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This is the dramatic, exciting, authoritative story of the experiences of African Americans from the time they left Africa to their continued struggle for equality at the end of the twentieth century. Since its original publication in 1947, From Slavery to Freedom has stood as the definitive his-tory of African Americans. Coauthors John Hope Franklin and Alfred A. Moss, Jr. This is the dramatic, exciting, authoritative story of the experiences of African Americans from the time they left Africa to their continued struggle for equality at the end of the twentieth century. Since its original publication in 1947, From Slavery to Freedom has stood as the definitive his-tory of African Americans. Coauthors John Hope Franklin and Alfred A. Moss, Jr., give us a vividly detailed account of the journey of African Americans from their origins in the civilizations of Africa, through their years of slavery in the New World, to the successful struggle for freedom and its aftermath in the West Indies, Latin America, and the United States. This eighth edition has been revised to include expanded coverage of Africa; additional material in every chapter on the history and current situation of African Americans in the United States; new charts, maps, and black-and-white illustrations; and a third four-page color insert. The authors incorporate recent scholarship to examine slavery, the Civil War, Reconstruction, and the period between World War I and World War II (including the Harlem Renaissance). From Slavery to Freedom describes the rise of slavery, the interaction of European and African cultures in the New World, and the emergence of a distinct culture and way of life among slaves and free blacks. The authors examine the role of blacks in the nation's wars, the rise of an articulate, restless free black community by the end of the eighteenth century, and the growing resistance to slavery among an expanding segment of the black population. The book deals in considerable detail with the period after slavery, including the arduous struggle for first-class citizenship that has extended into the twentieth century. Many developments in recent African American history are examined, including demographic change; educational efforts; literary and cultural changes; problems in housing, health, juvenile matters, and poverty; the expansion of the black middle class; and the persistence of discrimination in the administration of justice. All who are interested in African Americans' continuing quest for equality will find a wealth of information based on the recent findings of many scholars. Professors Franklin and Moss have captured the tragedies and triumphs, the hurts and joys, the failures and successes, of blacks in a lively and readable volume that remains the most authoritative and comprehensive book of its kind.


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This is the dramatic, exciting, authoritative story of the experiences of African Americans from the time they left Africa to their continued struggle for equality at the end of the twentieth century. Since its original publication in 1947, From Slavery to Freedom has stood as the definitive his-tory of African Americans. Coauthors John Hope Franklin and Alfred A. Moss, Jr. This is the dramatic, exciting, authoritative story of the experiences of African Americans from the time they left Africa to their continued struggle for equality at the end of the twentieth century. Since its original publication in 1947, From Slavery to Freedom has stood as the definitive his-tory of African Americans. Coauthors John Hope Franklin and Alfred A. Moss, Jr., give us a vividly detailed account of the journey of African Americans from their origins in the civilizations of Africa, through their years of slavery in the New World, to the successful struggle for freedom and its aftermath in the West Indies, Latin America, and the United States. This eighth edition has been revised to include expanded coverage of Africa; additional material in every chapter on the history and current situation of African Americans in the United States; new charts, maps, and black-and-white illustrations; and a third four-page color insert. The authors incorporate recent scholarship to examine slavery, the Civil War, Reconstruction, and the period between World War I and World War II (including the Harlem Renaissance). From Slavery to Freedom describes the rise of slavery, the interaction of European and African cultures in the New World, and the emergence of a distinct culture and way of life among slaves and free blacks. The authors examine the role of blacks in the nation's wars, the rise of an articulate, restless free black community by the end of the eighteenth century, and the growing resistance to slavery among an expanding segment of the black population. The book deals in considerable detail with the period after slavery, including the arduous struggle for first-class citizenship that has extended into the twentieth century. Many developments in recent African American history are examined, including demographic change; educational efforts; literary and cultural changes; problems in housing, health, juvenile matters, and poverty; the expansion of the black middle class; and the persistence of discrimination in the administration of justice. All who are interested in African Americans' continuing quest for equality will find a wealth of information based on the recent findings of many scholars. Professors Franklin and Moss have captured the tragedies and triumphs, the hurts and joys, the failures and successes, of blacks in a lively and readable volume that remains the most authoritative and comprehensive book of its kind.

30 review for From Slavery to Freedom: A History of African Americans

  1. 4 out of 5

    Warner

    Amust read history on black people

  2. 5 out of 5

    Douglas

    Text book for my African American History up to 1877 class. Very readable & enlightening. Text book for my African American History up to 1877 class. Very readable & enlightening.

  3. 4 out of 5

    Thomas Rush

    When one encounters John Hope Franklin, now in video form on old TV shows or youtube, the first thing one is struck by is his natural dignity. He had such an easy-going personality, that he was able to easily make you like him right away. There was a benevolent quality about him, a naturally giving kind of spirit. In addition to his calm, kind and peaceful air, one is immediately struck by his intelligence. He's a man that can tell you something that happened 70 years ago with the clarity of as When one encounters John Hope Franklin, now in video form on old TV shows or youtube, the first thing one is struck by is his natural dignity. He had such an easy-going personality, that he was able to easily make you like him right away. There was a benevolent quality about him, a naturally giving kind of spirit. In addition to his calm, kind and peaceful air, one is immediately struck by his intelligence. He's a man that can tell you something that happened 70 years ago with the clarity of as if it happened 5 minutes ago. All of this brings us to this book, the magnum opus of his career. In taking us through the more than 350 years of African-American History, he rarely leaves a stone unturned. The conciseness and clarity of his writing makes it easy to read as well. This book is in the top-rank of survey Histories of Black America, and Professor Hope-Franklin holds his own with any other Historian who has ever written. You will be hard-pressed to find a better History of Africa-America than this. This is a classic book, comprehensive in scope and an excellent piece of scholarship written at the highest level of its craft. I cannot say enough positive things about this work. An outstanding contribution. I read Hope-Franklin's work no more than 2 pages at a sitting. This is the only way I could digest this mountain of information, to “eat this elephant-of-a-book-of 505 pages only one spoonful at a time.” It takes Job-like patience to do it this way. This is not the kind of book I could do marathon reading with, breezing through 30 to 50 pages at a sitting. If I had done that, I would have gotten bored and bogged down. I also looked up all words in this book in a dictionary that were unfamiliar to me, and copied them down into a notebook. Though I pride myself on having a very comprehensive reading vocabulary, Hope-Franklin's verbiage had me looking up and writing down quite a number of words. I am glad that I read the book slowly and to have also looked up all necessary vocabulary words, absorbing much more information doing it this way than any other way. It took me quite some time to read the book, but I am profoundly blessed to have done it my way. I can only hope the level of my reading is reflected in this review.

  4. 4 out of 5

    Vince Carter

    Even with all the attendant publicity of how transforming an experience it was for our president to achieve his office, this famed account is remarkable. Daunting in its range certainly, yet the readable way in which so many stories of heroism and horror, inspiration and contribution are told makes it so worth the experience.

  5. 4 out of 5

    Ann

    John Hope Franklin was a most amazing man. I requested this book at the library after learning of his connection to Nashville's Fisk University and after his recent death. This reference / text book is full of a great deal of information - very impressive. I was able to skim through it, though didn't read it cover to cover.

  6. 5 out of 5

    Mark Bowles

    A. Overview 1. Moss comes on board to offer a younger perspective for the 40th anniversary of Franklin’s work. This book attempts to “bring together the essential facts in the history of the American Negro from his ancient African beginnings down tot he present time. (Xi)” This history is the story of “the strivings of the nameless millions who have sought adjustment in a new and sometimes hostile world.” B. Land of their fathers 1. In the last 1/3 of the 20th century blacks have written fondly of A. Overview 1. Moss comes on board to offer a younger perspective for the 40th anniversary of Franklin’s work. This book attempts to “bring together the essential facts in the history of the American Negro from his ancient African beginnings down tot he present time. (Xi)” This history is the story of “the strivings of the nameless millions who have sought adjustment in a new and sometimes hostile world.” B. Land of their fathers 1. In the last 1/3 of the 20th century blacks have written fondly of their African heritage, and the land of their fathers. We learn of these lands though travelers accounts and oral history. This chapter looks at the main African political units including Ghana, Mali, Songhay, and some other lesser states. C. The African way of life 1. It is hard to generalize about an African way of life on a continent so large. This chapter focuses on West Africa because the bulk of the slaves came from this area. 2. Politics: All areas had a basic desire to form a government to help solve the needs of the community. 3. Economics: An agricultural people. The land belonged not to individuals but to the collective community. The “master of the ground” administered the soil and led the religion. There was sophisticated artisanry in the tribes (basketry, textile weaving, pottery, woodworking, and metallurgy. 4. Society: The family was the basis of social organization. The eldest male led the family, yet families were linked through the mother. Matrilineal lineage. Polygamy existed everywhere yet was not a universal practice. 5. Religion: Ancestor worship. The spirit of the forefathers had unlimited power over their lives. 6. Arts: Carvings, wood, stone, and ivory sculptures. Almost all tribes expressed their artistic aesthetics. Music is one example of this. 7. Lack of written language is partly explained by the heterogeneous language. There were so many regional dialects that no written language was ever adopted. 8. Transplantation of African culture: How much was brought over to America? As Africans from different tribes lived together in America there was an interaction among different African cultures. In places like the Sea Islands much of the African culture remained in place. Thus, African culture was brought over in the boat and was modified in America D. The slave trade and the New World E. Colonial slavery 1. Virginia and Maryland: Began with 20 slaves in 1619 at Jamestown. They were listed as indentured servants. As the Virginians required more labor they made the blacks status into “perpetual servitude.” Slavery came to Maryland in 1634. 2. Carolina and Georgia; the Middle colonies; Colonial New England F. That all men may be free 1. By the middle 18th, slavery was an integral part of the economy. The Declaration of Independence remained silent on the issue of slavery. Blacks were not permitted to enlist to fight for independence. But, when men were needed G. Washington began to allow all indentured servants and slaves fight. Eventually a black regiment was set up. There was a fight after the war to manumit the slaves. The antislavery movement was so strongly resisted in the South that the movement died. G. The turn of the 19th century 1. Trouble in the Caribbean. 1807 US and England outlaw the slave trade. II. A. The effort to attain peace 1. Reconstruction and the nation: This period is not just Southern history. It is an integral part of national history. This was a crisis that demanded action. The central problem was how to move the nation towards greater economic and political democracy. 2. Conflicting policies: Lincoln, Presidential Reconstruction, Congressional Reconstruction 3. Relief and rehabilitation: Relief was led by agencies like the Freedman’s Bureau, church, Northern teachers. 4. Economic adjustment: Black Codes initially made blacks return to work for the Southern planters. “Perhaps the greatest failure of Reconstruction was economic. (216)” 5. Blacks in politics: Constitutional conventions, blacks in public office. “At no time was there Negro rule anywhere in the South. (221)” B. Losing the peace 1. Republicans and Democrats struggle for domination. This struggle shaped Reconstruction and led to the final defeat by both in attaining peace between he races. 2. Reconstruction ended gradually as restraints were slowly relaxed. 3. Disenfranchisement movements: The Democrats returned to power in the South and sought ways to reduce the power of blacks. When the Populist revolt failed (in which the black and white farmers joined together) total disenfranchisement occurred.. 4. White supremacy triumphs: This occurred because whites were fighting each other. This gave the black voter the balance of power. Thus, the vote was taken away to remove this power from blacks. Plessy v. Ferguson. C. Philanthropy and self-help 1. The only area in which blacks could improve their status was in education. Education became the great preoccupation of blacks. Northern philanthropers aid this quest. 2. Booker T. Washington: His ascendance was one of the most significant episodes in race relations after 1877. Great proponent of vocational education. Conflict with Du Bois. 3. Economic struggles: Difficulty in purchasing farmlands. Blacks were unaware of modern agricultural methods. B.T. Washington wanted to stimulate black business somehow. 4. It was more important for blacks to maintain a separate social and cultural existence than it was for them to do it economically. This was done through fraternal organizations. One of the results was a growing number of black intellectuals. By the end of the century blacks realized that the brunt of the burden of black development would have to be carried by blacks themselves. D. Race and the nation 1. The new imperialistic strivings of America. Blacks and their involvement in the Spanish American War. The Spaniards called them “Smoked Yankees.” Americans did not unanimously favor the arming of blacks. 2. Spain secedes their West Indies holdings and Puerto Rico. Also Cuba. 3. Urban problems. Employment difficulties. Violence against blacks. 4. Blacks organize to try to end these problems. Du Bois and the Niagara Movement. NAACP forms E. In pursuit of democracy 1. World War I. 20,000 blacks fought. Many went to the recruiting stations but were not accepted. Black regiments. There was general disregard for the safety of the black regiments like the 92nd. They had the highest casualty rates. But generally the blacks in combat were very enthusiastic. 2. At home blacks were also enthusiastic about the war. They purchased tremendous amounts of war bonds. Migration of hundreds of blacks to Northern industrial cities. The fundamental cause of the migration was economic. 3. The black press supported the war enthusiastically also. F. Democracy escapes 1. The black soldiers returned initially to jubilation, but this did not last long. KKK and violence, race riots. Blacks were being discriminated against at the workplace and they generally believed that “democracy had escaped them.” 2. Protest rise: NAACP fights for an anti-lynching law. Marcus Garvey appeals for race pride. G. The Harlem Renaissance 1. Socioeconomic problems in black literature: Literature, poetry, skilled dramatic actors, light comedy with Vaudeville. Jazz Age. H. The New Deal 1. Depression: Black cabinet. I. Two worlds of race 1. Tremendous interest in education in the 20th century. This interest did not decline since Reconstruction. Founding of black colleges. 2. There was a distinctly separate black world within America. Thus they developed institutions of their own to establish their own identity. But blacks did participate in the affairs of the larger community. J. Fighting for the 4 freedoms 1. Blacks go to World War II. Discrimination existed but the had the greatest opportunity in this war than any previous one. 2. On the home front they benefited from the war with new job opportunities. But there were race riots 3. Much interest was given to the role that the UN might play in ending discrimination in America. K. The Postwar years 1. The main adjustment for the American people at this time was the adjustment to the new position of the black. 2. The most dramatic facts of life for postwar blacks was their increasing urbanization. Whites moved out and took the better jobs with them as new industrial parks opened outside the city. The black ghetto formed. This is one of the major factors that led to the deterioration of the black family 3. Poets and writers in postwar years. Blacks in TV (Cosby, Gumbal). L. The Black Revolution 1. The main stimulus to direct black action was the opposition by whites to their cause. 2. Bus boycotts, sit-ins, freedom marches. 3. Civil Rights acts were the “illusion of fulfillment.” Blacks did not register to vote. Only 58% were registered in 1976. M. New Forms of Activism 1. Reagan years: Unemployment concerns 2. Jesse Jackson’s political career 3. The war in Vietnam and war protests. Fights against Apartheid

  7. 5 out of 5

    N.W. Martin

    I'm giving Franklin's landmark text 3 stars. Why? Simply because he is a known revisionist and social historian who emphasizes his opinion instead of reporting objective analysis. Don't get me wrong, the social movement in history was a landmark time for history, at least in my opinion, but the problem here is that Franklin adheres to a Liberal revisionist doctrine (via his sources) without critiquing both sides of the spectrum. Tis why we see - in later chapters - his aggressive opinion on Reag I'm giving Franklin's landmark text 3 stars. Why? Simply because he is a known revisionist and social historian who emphasizes his opinion instead of reporting objective analysis. Don't get me wrong, the social movement in history was a landmark time for history, at least in my opinion, but the problem here is that Franklin adheres to a Liberal revisionist doctrine (via his sources) without critiquing both sides of the spectrum. Tis why we see - in later chapters - his aggressive opinion on Reagan, Bush, Nixon, Eisenhower, and anyone on the Republican ticket. His worst analysis from my perspective is his handling of the Carter Administration. Although Carter's 8 AA appointments (in foreign policy) was an important moment for blacks, his foreign policy proved to be very weak. This leads me to question whether or not Carter's appointments were smart or just meant to raise his administration's PR. Franklin practically glorified Carter's "attempts" to stem the rising inflation in America while giving African American's their much needed rights. I find that approach shrewd, but not overly realistic. We get that Carter punched his ticket to the White House as a Populist, but Franklin's inability to acknowledge all the problems facing the counterculture movements (the Vietnam Quagmire debts) and society as a whole in the 70s proves to be his downfall in this regard. Carter's apathetic nature or lack of knowledge on Economics, led to rising inflation by the time Reagan took office, not due to Nixon's ill management. This is an important book for African American studies, especially for Historians, but I can't say I agree with his aggressive, and often times ironically abusive critiques of the white community (in later generations of course). Since the 80s, America has seen a great increase in the stature of African Americans. We can see as much with the rise in popularity of Tupac, Biggie, Eazy E, 50-Cent and all the contemporary artists. In fact, Black artists seem to own a monopoly on the market today with artists like Jay-Z, Beyonce, Kanye West etc, etc. Also, the rise of Jesse Jackson in the 80s really proves the changing landscape of the traditional American Social and Political Stratification. And it wasn't just Great Society, Fair Deal, and Liberal advocates who paved the way. Moderates had a huge say on many issues and proved that they supported American Freedom, not just racial justice. Finalmente, Franklin's prose is engaging and beautifully written. It's just his overall analysis, especially his analysis on later years, proves to be weak, hurt, self-conscious and biased. I would definitely read his book with an accompanying "Regular" history book to compare and contrast. Overall 3.4/5

  8. 4 out of 5

    Edward Bryant

    I believe this is one of the best single volume surveys of Black History in America. Dr. Franklin is a sharp chronicler and writes in a tone that is scientific enough, but also with some passion and the patience of a true historian. I first used the book in an African American History course in college and since purchased the most updated versions for family bookshelf.

  9. 4 out of 5

    Mac

    One of the best historians I've read in a while. He tells the story of the African American in America better than anyone I've read so far. Franklin's research is top notch. I recommend this book to anyone interested in America as we know it today.

  10. 5 out of 5

    Chelsea

    A very good, and very accessible, survey of black history in the US. I really recommend this for beginners (like me) in understanding black American history.

  11. 4 out of 5

    Monise

    Going to re-read this great book, which provides an in-depth account of African American history, since I will be designing curriculum to use for homeschooling in the Fall.

  12. 5 out of 5

    Dee's Reading Zone

    Thank you Dr. Waller for introducing me to this THOUGHT-PROVOKING JEWEL IN UNDERGRADUATE SCHOOL CIRCA 1984!

  13. 5 out of 5

    Kiki Unhinged

    Required reading for Ethnic History class

  14. 4 out of 5

    Rizky Hutapea

    One of the most complete historical description for black American history

  15. 5 out of 5

    Phi Beta Kappa Authors

    John Hope Franklin ΦBK, Fisk University, 1953 Author From the publisher: This is the dramatic, exciting, authoritative story of the experiences of African Americans from the time they left Africa to their continued struggle for equality at the end of the twentieth century. Since its original publication in 1947, From Slavery to Freedom has stood as the definitive his-tory of African Americans. Coauthors John Hope Franklin and Alfred A. Moss, Jr., give us a vividly detailed account of the journey of John Hope Franklin ΦBK, Fisk University, 1953 Author From the publisher: This is the dramatic, exciting, authoritative story of the experiences of African Americans from the time they left Africa to their continued struggle for equality at the end of the twentieth century. Since its original publication in 1947, From Slavery to Freedom has stood as the definitive his-tory of African Americans. Coauthors John Hope Franklin and Alfred A. Moss, Jr., give us a vividly detailed account of the journey of African Americans from their origins in the civilizations of Africa, through their years of slavery in the New World, to the successful struggle for freedom and its aftermath in the West Indies, Latin America, and the United States. This eighth edition has been revised to include expanded coverage of Africa; additional material in every chapter on the history and current situation of African Americans in the United States; new charts, maps, and black-and-white illustrations; and a third four-page color insert. The authors incorporate recent scholarship to examine slavery, the Civil War, Reconstruction, and the period between World War I and World War II (including the Harlem Renaissance). From Slavery to Freedom describes the rise of slavery, the interaction of European and African cultures in the New World, and the emergence of a distinct culture and way of life among slaves and free blacks. The authors examine the role of blacks in the nation's wars, the rise of an articulate, restless free black community by the end of the eighteenth century, and the growing resistance to slavery among an expanding segment of the black population. The book deals in considerable detail with the period after slavery, including the arduous struggle for first-class citizenship that has extended into the twentieth century. Many developments in recent African American history are examined, including demographic change; educational efforts; literary and cultural changes; problems in housing, health, juvenile matters, and poverty; the expansion of the black middle class; and the persistence of discrimination in the administration of justice. All who are interested in African Americans' continuing quest for equality will find a wealth of information based on the recent findings of many scholars. Professors Franklin and Moss have captured the tragedies and triumphs, the hurts and joys, the failures and successes, of blacks in a lively and readable volume that remains the most authoritative and comprehensive book of its kind.

  16. 5 out of 5

    Josh Brown

    The singular commitment to cataloguing and analyzing the history of black people in the United States that this volume exhibits provides a perspective on American history that is invaluable for understanding our present day circumstances - both for understanding contemporary issues that are “about race” as well as the ones that seem not to be.

  17. 4 out of 5

    Amanda

    Chock full of really good information. I am not an expert in African American History so I can't speak to the integrity there, but I did find this to be a great resource to guide a class. I wouldn't expect to be able to teach solely from this, I have yet to find a textbook that doesn't need supplemental materials, but this is a great start.

  18. 5 out of 5

    Brad Neece

    Not an easy read but an informatively fulfilling one. It’s a comprehensive account of the African American experience from the slavery era through the post civil rights era.

  19. 5 out of 5

    Angelika Fuller

    It's quite comprehensive, up until the '60s.

  20. 4 out of 5

    Frederick

    "We face ... a moral crisis as a country and as a people. It cannot be met by repressive police action. It cannot be left to increased demonstrations in the streets. It cannot be quieted by token moves or talk. It is time to act in the Congress, in your state and local legislative body and, above all, in all our daily lives." (p. 632) These words were spoken by the 35th President of the United States, 57 years ago! Sadly, they are as relevant today as they were then. Dr. Franklin's history of th "We face ... a moral crisis as a country and as a people. It cannot be met by repressive police action. It cannot be left to increased demonstrations in the streets. It cannot be quieted by token moves or talk. It is time to act in the Congress, in your state and local legislative body and, above all, in all our daily lives." (p. 632) These words were spoken by the 35th President of the United States, 57 years ago! Sadly, they are as relevant today as they were then. Dr. Franklin's history of the Black experience in the Americas is the definitive work on the subject. Nine editions of this book have been printed. I purchased the 3rd edition 50 years ago and reread it this year in an effort to better understand the current Black Lives Matter movement. If you want to know what is meant by the term systemic racism, read this book. If you want to think more deeply about the case being made for reparations, read this book. If you want to "feel" what Black Americans may be feeling about the current state of their status in this country, read this book. 56 years ago, the Republican nominee for President, who had only recently voted against the Civil Rights Act of 1964, persistently referenced the civil rights demonstrations that were taking place as "crime in the streets." (p. 637) Sound familiar?

  21. 5 out of 5

    Derek Shouba

    Kind of boring. A bit like a series of encyclopedia articles. But one can imagine how exciting it must have been to read this African-American history of America when it was first published.

  22. 5 out of 5

    Howard Franklin

    Meticulously researched by Franklin and Moss, this highly readable book begins by presenting a broad view of early African empires, Ghana, Mali, and Songhay, dating back to before the Middle Ages. In fascinating detail, the reader is presented with societies that were remarkably sophisticated, with a sharp focus on their political, economic, and social systems, as well as art and music. After this foundation is carefully laid, the authors then sweep forward to The Slave Trade and the New World, f Meticulously researched by Franklin and Moss, this highly readable book begins by presenting a broad view of early African empires, Ghana, Mali, and Songhay, dating back to before the Middle Ages. In fascinating detail, the reader is presented with societies that were remarkably sophisticated, with a sharp focus on their political, economic, and social systems, as well as art and music. After this foundation is carefully laid, the authors then sweep forward to The Slave Trade and the New World, followed by Colonial Slavery, thus providing a vivid portrait of the roots of racism and the problem that has haunted America ever since their development. No detail is spared in depicting the tragic irony involved as the founders of the colonies, and thereafter the United States, idealized freedom and democracy, while simultaneously permitting the abominable institution of slavery to exist and flourish. Building upon this base, eras are then explored, depicting the role of Blacks from the New Republic to Manifest Destiny, to Slavery and Intersectional Strife, to the Civil War, then followed by Reconstruction and Economic Adjustment. And adding to a well-rounded narrative that incorporates opposite viewpoints, from white supremacy to abolitionist philosophy, along with governing political, economic, social, and religious factors, the authors further spice their comprehensive story-line with Eyewitness Accounts from a cross-section of individuals who lived during the various times. In the last third of this monumental work, the authors offer a vivid picture of the enormity of African Americans’ struggle to survive and become full citizens, from the latter part of the 1860s through the turn of the century and World War I, then continuing from the 1920s through the Great Depression and World War II, and further from the post war through the Civil Rights Movement of the 1960s to the turn of the Twenty-first century. Each era is explored thoroughly from a political, economic, social, and religious perspective, with chapters also devoted to cultural revolutions such as The Harlem Renaissance. I began by recommending From Slavery to Freedom to those who seek to fully understand the long, tragic history of racism. I feel compelled to add that everyone would benefit from reading it. For while those of us living today are not to blame for slavery and the racism underlying it, I would argue that we are responsible for eliminating the cancer of racism in our country and in our world, and working steadfastly as individuals and through our political, social, economic, and cultural institutions to create a just society for all members.

  23. 4 out of 5

    Luis Quiros

    The work of a man who understood that history, without our stories was a deception that needed to be exposed. His mission as a historian was not to simply compile historical events but to bring forth the history of the people who lived through those historical events and to give a voice to their experiences.

  24. 4 out of 5

    Doug Weiser

    I finally finished reading this book. I was prepared for it not to be a page turner, but I did not know it was a 636 page college level text book when I ordered it. Still, I feel it was a very enlightening read. I would recommend this book to anyone interested in the history of the US.

  25. 5 out of 5

    Quisha Turner

    I'm going to read it again. I learned a lot. History is amazing. Somethings that I read really upset me but I learned the truth. It's not pretty. It's rooted in history deep deep rooted evil..it's all black and white.

  26. 5 out of 5

    John Legge

    It's a history book, testbook like, but full of interesting stuff. Learning experience.

  27. 5 out of 5

    Sweetgrass

    My introduction to the the study of Africana started here.

  28. 5 out of 5

    Zefyr

    Read part of this a few years back and then had to get it back to the library - need to get back to it, and worth re-reading the part I already read.

  29. 4 out of 5

    Hawkins

    Read sections I needed for a paper. The version I have is older but I also have other material more recently published that provide greater detail about African American suffrage.

  30. 4 out of 5

    Cheryl

    Without doubt, this is the standard!

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