free hit counter code In the Bazaar of Love: The Selected Poetry of Amir Khusrau - GoBooks - Download Free Book
Ads Banner
Hot Best Seller

In the Bazaar of Love: The Selected Poetry of Amir Khusrau

Availability: Ready to download

I vow to die that you might look my way. See how many have died like me in the bazaar of love. Amir Khusrau—poet, courtier, mystic, musician—straddled the worlds of politics and religion and helped forge a distinctive synthesis of Muslim and Hindu cultures. His poetry in Persian appealed equally to the Delhi sultans and to his Sufi sheikh, Nizamuddin Auliya. It was appreciate I vow to die that you might look my way. See how many have died like me in the bazaar of love. Amir Khusrau—poet, courtier, mystic, musician—straddled the worlds of politics and religion and helped forge a distinctive synthesis of Muslim and Hindu cultures. His poetry in Persian appealed equally to the Delhi sultans and to his Sufi sheikh, Nizamuddin Auliya. It was appreciated not only in India, where his Hindavi poetry has survived through a lively oral tradition, but also across a cosmopolitan Persianate world that stretched from Turkey to Bengal. Khusrau's poetry has thrived for centuries and continues to be read and recited to this day. But despite his vast literary output, there is a dearth of translations of his work. In the Bazaar of Love offers new translations of Khusrau's poems in Persian and Hindavi, many of which are being translated into English for the first time. Paul Losensky's translations of Khusrau's ghazals, including his mystical and romantic poems, comprise fresh renditions of old favourites while also bringing to light several little- known works. Sunil Sharma brings us many of Khusrau's short poems, including those belonging to the qawwali repertoire, as well as a mixed prose-and-verse narration 'The Romance of Duval Rani and Khizr Khan'. The first comprehensive selection of Amir Khusrau’s poetry, In the Bazaar of Love covers a wide range of genre and forms, evoking the magic of one of the best-loved poets of the Indian subcontinent. About the Author Paul Losensky is associate professor at Indiana University, Bloomington, where he teaches translation studies, and Persian language and literature. Sunil Sharma teaches Persian and Indian literatures at Boston University. He is the author of two books on Indo-Persian poetry.


Compare
Ads Banner

I vow to die that you might look my way. See how many have died like me in the bazaar of love. Amir Khusrau—poet, courtier, mystic, musician—straddled the worlds of politics and religion and helped forge a distinctive synthesis of Muslim and Hindu cultures. His poetry in Persian appealed equally to the Delhi sultans and to his Sufi sheikh, Nizamuddin Auliya. It was appreciate I vow to die that you might look my way. See how many have died like me in the bazaar of love. Amir Khusrau—poet, courtier, mystic, musician—straddled the worlds of politics and religion and helped forge a distinctive synthesis of Muslim and Hindu cultures. His poetry in Persian appealed equally to the Delhi sultans and to his Sufi sheikh, Nizamuddin Auliya. It was appreciated not only in India, where his Hindavi poetry has survived through a lively oral tradition, but also across a cosmopolitan Persianate world that stretched from Turkey to Bengal. Khusrau's poetry has thrived for centuries and continues to be read and recited to this day. But despite his vast literary output, there is a dearth of translations of his work. In the Bazaar of Love offers new translations of Khusrau's poems in Persian and Hindavi, many of which are being translated into English for the first time. Paul Losensky's translations of Khusrau's ghazals, including his mystical and romantic poems, comprise fresh renditions of old favourites while also bringing to light several little- known works. Sunil Sharma brings us many of Khusrau's short poems, including those belonging to the qawwali repertoire, as well as a mixed prose-and-verse narration 'The Romance of Duval Rani and Khizr Khan'. The first comprehensive selection of Amir Khusrau’s poetry, In the Bazaar of Love covers a wide range of genre and forms, evoking the magic of one of the best-loved poets of the Indian subcontinent. About the Author Paul Losensky is associate professor at Indiana University, Bloomington, where he teaches translation studies, and Persian language and literature. Sunil Sharma teaches Persian and Indian literatures at Boston University. He is the author of two books on Indo-Persian poetry.

30 review for In the Bazaar of Love: The Selected Poetry of Amir Khusrau

  1. 5 out of 5

    Hafsa | حفصہ

    The BookBum Club: May theme - Around The World – Read a book by an author who's from a different country. 3.5 stars The influence of Khusrau on poetry, spirituality and music in modern day Pakistan is most evident for me through his name often taken in music or a musical rendition of his ghazals. This book’s introduction provides insight into the master’s life and literary endeavors but at the same time it is very opinionated and I say this as someone who has heard stories and accounts otherwise t The BookBum Club: May theme - Around The World – Read a book by an author who's from a different country. 3.5 stars The influence of Khusrau on poetry, spirituality and music in modern day Pakistan is most evident for me through his name often taken in music or a musical rendition of his ghazals. This book’s introduction provides insight into the master’s life and literary endeavors but at the same time it is very opinionated and I say this as someone who has heard stories and accounts otherwise throughout my life. Nevertheless, my knowledge increased and that is always a good thing. I appreciate this book because it makes Khusrau’s poetry available to people who can’t speak Persian/Hindavi aka people like me and acknowledges his contributions to a myriad of fields. However, I wouldn’t dare say that it’s the perfect translation of his work since from the first poem there is a palpable awkwardness which breaks the fluency of the poetry and ravani, as Khusrau himself emphasised is the most prized thing when it comes to poems. The very familiar over-exaggerated my love kills me kind of feel which is part and parcel of South Asian romantic poetry is so profoundly explored in Khusrau's work that I couldn't help but roll my eyes at various instances when the emotions just became overwhelming and unrelatable (if that's a word). Perhaps, a better translation of the ghazals and I would've been swooning. In terms of themes in the ghazal portion, I felt like variety was very much lacking in the translator’s selections of the thousands of poems that Khusaru has written. Basically, the first portion of this book just needed a better translator. Now coming to the second portion which essentially redeemed this book for me, called "Other Poems", translated by Sharma instead of Losensky was a treat to read. It had a lot of variety in terms of both Khusrau's writing and the themes explored in the poetry. Some were devotional, others humorous and my favourite were perhaps the narrative poems, especially Duval Rani-Khizr Khan's love story. E.g. "He Visits My Town Once A Year": He visits my town once a year. He fills my mouth with kisses and nectar. I spend all my money on him. Who, girl, your man? No, a mango. A few poems like the above gave my bitter sarcastic self life! Overall, I enjoyed the second half of the book much more than I would've imagined when I was reading the first half, would recommend this to anyone who wants to explore poetry of a South Asian literary giant. However, beware, this is so not the best translation of his work.

  2. 5 out of 5

    Edita

    You are the meaning behind every form. * You drive my ruined heart and soul insane. […] Love, how did you come to work on a nobody like me? Is no one else left in this ruined world? * Not having dreamt bitter dreams a single night, how can they know the taste of aching absence? The times suffer a drought of faithfulness and storms well up in the eyes: When will the stars decree this omen of rain? * At night I bewail the insomnia of absence. This is my cordial song. * Yearning for you, no trace of me remains. You are the meaning behind every form. * You drive my ruined heart and soul insane. […] Love, how did you come to work on a nobody like me? Is no one else left in this ruined world? * Not having dreamt bitter dreams a single night, how can they know the taste of aching absence? The times suffer a drought of faithfulness and storms well up in the eyes: When will the stars decree this omen of rain? * At night I bewail the insomnia of absence. This is my cordial song. * Yearning for you, no trace of me remains. * Today the breeze picked up the smell of my heart and spleen. Careful, be sure it’s not allowed to blow his way. * When evening falls, my heart catches fire in solitude.

  3. 5 out of 5

    Aseem Kaul

    A disappointing read - Losensky's diction is tone-deaf and stilted, hovering awkwardly between the archaic and the contemporary; his grasp of the poem's meaning is frequently superficial; and his willful neglect of form (you can barely tell these poems are ghazals in the original) is hard to excuse. That these poems still retain some power is a testament to Khusrau, his subtle genius barely discernible beneath the turgid translation. The man deserves a better translator.

  4. 4 out of 5

    Garima Gupta

    The only reason to thank the translators is that they made these masterpieces of ghazals available to a non-Persian speaking person like me.... It takes a bit of effort (wine makes it easier) to get over the awkwardness of English, to express emotions that just refuse to flow musically in that language. But once you get past that the emotions are divine!

  5. 4 out of 5

    Azhar

    Amir khusro good, translation bad When i first checked the goodreads page and saw so many people talking about how a bad translation this was, i first laughed and shrugged it off thinking normies can't even appreciate simple art, But after reading it myself, omg, i agree. Effin horrible translation, Most of poems and ghazals don't even rhyme a little or have any rhythm (in the original language, it's all about rhythm) It's like the only English translation available tho, so sed lyf ig, Beggars can't Amir khusro good, translation bad When i first checked the goodreads page and saw so many people talking about how a bad translation this was, i first laughed and shrugged it off thinking normies can't even appreciate simple art, But after reading it myself, omg, i agree. Effin horrible translation, Most of poems and ghazals don't even rhyme a little or have any rhythm (in the original language, it's all about rhythm) It's like the only English translation available tho, so sed lyf ig, Beggars can't be choosers, i hope more translations come out, Indians would've translated it a lot of times already but amir khusro (and most other muslim poets of those times) wrote in Persian (Farsi) so idk if my Persian bros are gonna do it or not, Maybe oneday new translations and editions would come out, who knows, But for now, it was kinda nice too, I especially liked the stories near the ending, Wish it included the whole poems of farhad and sherin too, sed lyf. Noice book tho 👌🏼 -------------------------- I vow to die that you might look my way. See how many have died like me in the bazaar of love, uwu           

  6. 5 out of 5

    Anukool

    Exquisite Amir Khusro poetry, although I could sense that some of the feel was lost in translation at places

  7. 4 out of 5

    Anirudh Acharya

    Horrible translation

  8. 4 out of 5

    Jibran

    Poetry is difficult to translate but translations between languages that share no common cultural roots is even more difficult, more so when the originals follow a highly formal set of rules and metrical systems that are simply impossible to translate without taking liberties with the original, in which case the final product looks more like a rendition or an adaption than a translation. The problem with this edition is that a rather literal and flat translation has been attempted that does not Poetry is difficult to translate but translations between languages that share no common cultural roots is even more difficult, more so when the originals follow a highly formal set of rules and metrical systems that are simply impossible to translate without taking liberties with the original, in which case the final product looks more like a rendition or an adaption than a translation. The problem with this edition is that a rather literal and flat translation has been attempted that does not capture the beauty of the originals. I still prefer the old school translators like A.J. Arberry and R.A. Nicholson who changed the formal and independent distiches of a ghazal to better convey the thought in a series of rhymed quatrains. Another option is to do a free-style translation that makes it clear that each distich or couplet is unrelated to those that come before and after it.

  9. 5 out of 5

    Alisia Barringer

    Some very interesting Sufi poetry, love poems essentially but spiritual as well... I like the personality of these poems, they are eccentric, strange, but seem very personal, with a kind of intimacy, they come from a real place... not lofty but really focused on details of ordinary life, poignant, and often very sad... Brilliant stuff. Precursor of Rumi and other great Persian sufi poets...

  10. 5 out of 5

    Animesh Mitra

    Masterpiece. Must read, if you want to understand the pluralistic, multi-ethnic, multi-religious, multilingual culture of Indian subcontinent.

  11. 4 out of 5

    Aarushi Pandit

  12. 5 out of 5

    Shahjehan Saleem

  13. 4 out of 5

    Margaret Devadason

  14. 4 out of 5

    Diego

  15. 5 out of 5

    Tulika I. Bahadur

  16. 4 out of 5

    Saadia Peerzada

  17. 4 out of 5

    Sorodindu Rudra

  18. 4 out of 5

    Robin Asati

  19. 5 out of 5

    Shivani Panchmatia

  20. 4 out of 5

    Nina

  21. 5 out of 5

    Sankarshan

  22. 4 out of 5

    Samara Iqbal

  23. 5 out of 5

    Ayushi

  24. 5 out of 5

    Vipul Meshram

  25. 5 out of 5

    Akshay Bhoan

  26. 4 out of 5

    Charishma

  27. 5 out of 5

    Aakanksha Shahi

  28. 5 out of 5

    Shashank Sharma

  29. 5 out of 5

    Vince Chawla

  30. 4 out of 5

    Hira Naaz

Add a review

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Loading...
We use cookies to give you the best online experience. By using our website you agree to our use of cookies in accordance with our cookie policy.