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This book will meet the need of those completely ignorant of Spurgeon and his vast achievements, but will stir also the interest of all who value his unique ministry.


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This book will meet the need of those completely ignorant of Spurgeon and his vast achievements, but will stir also the interest of all who value his unique ministry.

30 review for Spurgeon: A New Biography

  1. 5 out of 5

    Thaddeus

    This is a great and inspiring biography of the Prince of Preachers - Charles Spurgeon! One cannot overemphasize the stature of this man of God - he seems to tower over so many in his devotion to the Lord, productivity in Gospel ministry and preaching, and personal piety and character. However, with all of this going for Spurgeon, he was at the same time - just a man like the rest of us - with his own unique flaws and failures. His health, depression & anxiety and other weaknesses riddled his life This is a great and inspiring biography of the Prince of Preachers - Charles Spurgeon! One cannot overemphasize the stature of this man of God - he seems to tower over so many in his devotion to the Lord, productivity in Gospel ministry and preaching, and personal piety and character. However, with all of this going for Spurgeon, he was at the same time - just a man like the rest of us - with his own unique flaws and failures. His health, depression & anxiety and other weaknesses riddled his life and made him not just a larger-than-life figure, but helped us see his humanity. Ultimately, there are no 'great men of God' only weak and pitiful sinners in the hands of a Great and amazingly gracious saviour! However, Spurgeon's life shows a unique blessing of God's grace and his story will continue to inspire many... Dallimore's biography is a welcomed entry to the many other Spurgeon biographies. It is well written and organized. It was definitely an enjoyable read for my wife and I together. However, I wish that Dallimore would have spent more time expanding on Spurgeon's weaknesses, struggles and humanity. At times he can seem too titanic, too perfect and too stellar of a saintly example in Dallimore's biography that one wonders if this is an idealized version of Spurgeon. However, Dallimore does touch a bit on Spurgeon's human side... but I found this aspect of this biography lacking for my own tastes. I'd have liked to read more about Spurgeon's personal life as well - his relationship with his wife and children especially. Perhaps there may be better, more thorough biographies of Spurgeon... but for what it's worth, Arnold Dallimore's biography is a well-worthwhile read! I'd highly recommend this book - especially to any Christian who hasn't read any biography of Spurgeon. His story and life lived totally to the glory of God and proclamation of His Word continues to inspire myself and many others!

  2. 5 out of 5

    Philip Mcduffie

    Dr. Stevenson was the president of the Weslyeyan Conference during the days of Spurgeon. He was allowed to privilege do be one of the speakers at Spurgeon's funeral. As he gazed at the coffin that the body of the great Charles Haddon Spurgeon rested in he said, "I venture to suggest to you in reference to our dear friend who has gone...he rendered a great service to his age, and to the coming age also, in that he upheld during so long a time the majesty of preaching. Men say that preaching is pl Dr. Stevenson was the president of the Weslyeyan Conference during the days of Spurgeon. He was allowed to privilege do be one of the speakers at Spurgeon's funeral. As he gazed at the coffin that the body of the great Charles Haddon Spurgeon rested in he said, "I venture to suggest to you in reference to our dear friend who has gone...he rendered a great service to his age, and to the coming age also, in that he upheld during so long a time the majesty of preaching. Men say that preaching is played out and that the pulpit is superfluous. The editor is to be the great minister of God in the future, and people are to get the Gospel from the newspapers...But with that coffin before us, none of us can doubt that the pulpit is the power in the world still--that still by the foolishness of preaching God is pleased to save men." Spurgeon's labor for Christ is fascinating. Dallimore does a wonderful job in presenting it.

  3. 4 out of 5

    Ashley Baker

    Such a good, encouraging book! ⭐️⭐️⭐️⭐️⭐️

  4. 5 out of 5

    Drake Hyman

    It is a peculiar experience when one reads a biography on an individual about whom he has come to know a great deal referentially. I had believed myself to be knowledgeable about the life, ministry and written works of Spurgeon and had thus conceived of a limited image of him as an influential 19th century preacher who wrote prolifically and inspired many a modern preacher. Upon picking up this book, I was so ignorant of the supernatural nature and abundance of his ministry that now I am left co It is a peculiar experience when one reads a biography on an individual about whom he has come to know a great deal referentially. I had believed myself to be knowledgeable about the life, ministry and written works of Spurgeon and had thus conceived of a limited image of him as an influential 19th century preacher who wrote prolifically and inspired many a modern preacher. Upon picking up this book, I was so ignorant of the supernatural nature and abundance of his ministry that now I am left convinced he may rightly contend for the title of the most significant minister in the whole of church history. Dallimore's Spurgeon is unyielding in his zeal for the work of Christ. I must admit I almost scoff in disbelief at the sheer volume of written material the man produced on top of his many other involvements. There appears in his life no wasted moment, no missed opportunity, no stone left unturned. Every minute of his life appears to have been spent doing the work of building up the kingdom of God, whether through the writing and distribution of sermons, the training of ministers, the ministry to the poor and orphans, administration of a church, or the many other roles Mr. Spurgeon held. Admittedly I found myself often jealous of Spurgeon--jealous of the purity of his life and character, his unyielding devotion to Christ and the abundant fruits of his ministry. I see in him the answer to Dwight L. Moody's famous quote: "The world has yet to see what God can do with a man fully consecrated to him." Certainly Spurgeon (if not also Moody himself) endeavored to be such a man, one whose devotion to God shook the world. I am grateful for the opportunity to read about such men, viewing their life and legacy as an example of the extent to which God can use a man devoted fully to him. If you are seeking to be renewed in your love for Christ, in your pursuit of holiness, dear Christian, look to Spurgeon. Few humans have so incarnated His glory on this earth.

  5. 4 out of 5

    Danno Romann

    Amazing.

  6. 5 out of 5

    Philip Brown

    Best secondary source I've read on Spurgeon. Outstanding! Highly recommended.

  7. 4 out of 5

    Bill

    Forgotten by the literati but not by Christians around the world, CH Spurgeon was the Billy Graham of Victorian England. It saddens me when I realize the utter disregard paid the man by historians and literary critics. I recently bought the Viking Victorian Reader and Spurgeon is nowhere to be found in that book. Yet during his lifetime, his sermons were carried in many of the major daily newspapers throughout the English speaking world, and his books and pamphlets sold in the hundreds of thousa Forgotten by the literati but not by Christians around the world, CH Spurgeon was the Billy Graham of Victorian England. It saddens me when I realize the utter disregard paid the man by historians and literary critics. I recently bought the Viking Victorian Reader and Spurgeon is nowhere to be found in that book. Yet during his lifetime, his sermons were carried in many of the major daily newspapers throughout the English speaking world, and his books and pamphlets sold in the hundreds of thousands of copies. He founded a "mega-church" in London, a seminary, an orphanage, and worked 7 days a week, taking almost nothing for himself. He was well acquainted with the needs of the urban poor, particularly women and children, and directed his church's efforts with an eye to helping lift people out of poverty. I was disappointed by Dallimore's biography, which is meant, I guess, to be inspirational, rather than insightful. Spurgeon's prose is wonderfully eloquent and passionate, almost Dickensian, yet reserved as befits a Victorian. I was hoping to glimpse something of the inner man. Spurgeon did write an autobiography. Maybe I can find the real Spurgeon there.

  8. 4 out of 5

    Megan Zaubi

    Unlike any other biography I've ever read -- I couldn't put it down! Dallimore writes in the very beginning that, although a plethora of biographies sprang into existence after the death of the famous preacher C.H. Spurgeon, he thought they lacked certain aspects so he wrote his own. He more than makes up for what the others lack, especially considering that it reads like fiction, it's that entertaining. He uses first and secondhand accounts to weave together an image of Spurgeon's life that is c Unlike any other biography I've ever read -- I couldn't put it down! Dallimore writes in the very beginning that, although a plethora of biographies sprang into existence after the death of the famous preacher C.H. Spurgeon, he thought they lacked certain aspects so he wrote his own. He more than makes up for what the others lack, especially considering that it reads like fiction, it's that entertaining. He uses first and secondhand accounts to weave together an image of Spurgeon's life that is complete and compelling, and which really shows what the man believed and how he 'put his money where his mouth was' for lack of a better term. By far the most interesting biography I've ever read.

  9. 5 out of 5

    Rebecca

    Basically, if Spurgeon was half as righteous or humble as Dallimore made him out to be, he would burn this book. All glory was given to Spurgeon and to his skill and impressive charisma was accredited every salvation under his time in the pulpit. Dallimore was clearly star-struck and enamored by this man and wrote with an ardent bias. I felt that God was robbed of glory and honour and that Spurgeon, were he alive, would nod in agreement.

  10. 4 out of 5

    Kenneth Clayton

    Dallimore Arnold: Spurgeon: A New Biography (G)(247pgs) A great bio of spurgeon. Easy to read and always exciting. Spurgeon was used mightily by God and is an encouragement to many Christians today. Is my favorite bio to date

  11. 4 out of 5

    Eli

    Awesome biography of the prince of preachers.

  12. 4 out of 5

    Scott Guillory

    Absolutely wonderful look at the life of this precious saint! How he glorified God with his life and ministry. This bio is a great introduction for those who know little or nothing about Spurgeon.

  13. 5 out of 5

    Rod

    You'd be hard pressed to find a more inspiring bio. Excellent read.

  14. 5 out of 5

    Daniel Nelms

    This was a short bio on Spurgeon, less than 300 pages, although it was surprisingly well at presenting to you his life. It reads of the old fashioned type of biographies, in that rarely is a critical word spoken against Spurgeon, and he is made out to be nearly impeccable. Although, I would argue, there is a place for such biographies, as we all need heroes from time to time who seem larger than life. Spurgeon, indeed, was larger than life. He authored 140 books, revived a church from a hundred This was a short bio on Spurgeon, less than 300 pages, although it was surprisingly well at presenting to you his life. It reads of the old fashioned type of biographies, in that rarely is a critical word spoken against Spurgeon, and he is made out to be nearly impeccable. Although, I would argue, there is a place for such biographies, as we all need heroes from time to time who seem larger than life. Spurgeon, indeed, was larger than life. He authored 140 books, revived a church from a hundred to many thousands, directly or indirectly helped to start countless churches in London and beyond, created close to 66 institutions which included a popular Pastors College as well as an Orphanage and an Almshouse for widows. Each of his sermons were printed and sold each week, ending at the end of his life with over 2,000 sermons in print - which he edited every single one of them before publication himself. And you cannot forget the weekly publication of the "Sword and the Trowel." He even one time preached to a crowd of over 25,000 indoors - and keep in mind, there was so speakers/sound systems in those days. It was said that he slept for a day and two nights after that event. He most weeks hand wrote 500 letters a week, had an extensive library of 12,000 books and was known for his extraordinary intellectual abilities. His "Commenting and Commentaries," a book published from lectures he gave at his Pastors College, referenced, summarized and reviewed over 1,400 biblical commentaries - all read by him! All in all, it is said that at his death he preached to over 20 million in his lifetime, and over 250+million copies of his sermons were sold throughout the world and translated into dozens of languages. This was a fast read, one I couldn't put down. Dallimore's uber-conservatism shows in a whole chapter written essentially as an apology for Spurgeon's cigar and alcohol habits, which left me laughing as I read through it. He didn't mention the fact that Spurgeon felt no shame in even having his face on advertising for his favorite cigars, although these habits died down in life as he got more sickly. Regardless, he is a near mythical figure in evangelicalism and Christianity. There is much lore that I've heard over the years concerning Spurgeon, some of which was true, some that was exaggerated. Nevertheless, it goes to show his impact over 100 years later - we're still talking about the "Prince of Preachers" even today. One day I'll dive into a longer, thicker biography of the man, as it would be worth my time to do. Nevertheless, Dallimore's biography is a great introduction to the man. Three stars.

  15. 4 out of 5

    Caleb Morell

    Favorite quotes: "A man who has really within him the inspiration of the Holy Ghost calling him to preach, cannot help it, - he must preach. As fire within the bones, so will that influence be until it blazes forth. Friends may check him, foes criticise him, despisers sneer at him, the man is indomitable; he must preach if he has the call of Heaven. All earth might forsake him; but he would preach to the barren mountain-tops. If he has the call of Heaven, if he had no congregation, he would preac Favorite quotes: "A man who has really within him the inspiration of the Holy Ghost calling him to preach, cannot help it, - he must preach. As fire within the bones, so will that influence be until it blazes forth. Friends may check him, foes criticise him, despisers sneer at him, the man is indomitable; he must preach if he has the call of Heaven. All earth might forsake him; but he would preach to the barren mountain-tops. If he has the call of Heaven, if he had no congregation, he would preach to the rippling waterfalls, and let the brooks hear his voice. He could not be silent. He would become a voice crying in the wilderness, "Prepare ye the way of the Lord." I no more believe it possible to stop ministers than to stop the stars of heaven. I think it no more possible to make a man cease from preaching, if he is really called, than to stay some mighty cataract, by seeking, in an infant's cup, to catch the rushing torrent. The man has been moved of Heaven, who shall stop him? He has been touched of God, who shall impede him... And when a man does speak as the Spirit gives him utterance, he will feel a holy joy, akin to that of Heaven; and when it is over, he wishes to be at his work again, he longs to be once more preaching" (p. 30). On walking to preach in villages as a young man: "I walked along quietly, lifting up my soul to God, and it seemed to me I could surely tell a few poor cottagers of the sweetness and love of Jesus, for I felt them in my own soul" (33). "My quiet meditation during the walk helped me to digest what I had read... I thought my reading over again while on my legs, and thus worked it into my very soul, and I can bear testimony that I never learned so much, or learned it so thoroughly, as when I used to tell out, simply and earnestly, what I had first received into my own mind and heart." (35). Before assuming the pastorate of Metropolitan, Spurgeon urged the congregation to pray: "One thing is due... namely, that in private as well as in public, they must all wrestle in prayer... that I may be sustained in the great work" (47). "The fact is, that Mrs Spurgeon's aid and sympathy were invaluable in the moulding of her husband's character and life, so that he never could have been what he was without her" (p. 54) "During the 1880s a group of American ministers visited England, prompted especially by a desire to hear some of the celebrated preachers of that land. On a Sunday morning they attended the City Temple where Dr. Joseph Parker was the pastor. Some two thousand people filled the building, and Parker's forceful personality dominated the service. His voice was commanding, his language descriptive, his imagination lively, and his manner animated. The sermon was scriptural, the congregation hung upon his words, and the Americans came away saying, "What a wonderful preacher is Joseph Parker!" In the evening they went to hear Spurgeon at the Metropolitan Tabernacle. The building was much larger than the City Temple, and the congregation was much more than twice the size. Spurgeon's voice was much more expressive and moving and his oratory noticeably superior. But they soon forgot all about the great building, the immense congregation, and the magnificent voice. They even overlooked their intention to compare the various features of the two preachers, and when the service was over they found themselves saying, "What a wonderful Savior is Jesus Christ!"" (p. 220)

  16. 4 out of 5

    Jacob Vander Ploeg

    Though I would not say this is the greatest literary work, it does not matter! The content and reading of the life of Spurgeon is so amazing it would hardly matter if a child wrote it so long as the historical facts are there. If you want to be convicted about your obedience and devotion to God pick this one up, and you will see the Lord can use you for much greater things, if you are willing to give your entire life and work over to Him. Maybe that's not what everyone desires in reading a book, Though I would not say this is the greatest literary work, it does not matter! The content and reading of the life of Spurgeon is so amazing it would hardly matter if a child wrote it so long as the historical facts are there. If you want to be convicted about your obedience and devotion to God pick this one up, and you will see the Lord can use you for much greater things, if you are willing to give your entire life and work over to Him. Maybe that's not what everyone desires in reading a book, but if it spurs me on to seeking God in a fuller sense, I cannot help but say it is an excellent read in that like Spurgeon's life and sermons it does not focus us on the author or the literary quality (even if they are good) but on Jesus Christ, and to further that I think this quote from the book enhances what I have just said: "During the 1880s a group of American ministers visited England, prompted especially by a desire to hear some of the celebrated preachers of that land. On a Sunday morning they attended the City Temple where Dr. Joseph Parker was the pastor. Some two thousand people filled the building, and Parker's forceful personality dominated the service. His voice was commanding, his language descriptive, his imagination lively, and his manner animated. The sermon was scriptural, the congregation hung upon his words, and the Americans came away saying, "What a wonderful preacher is Joseph Parker!" In the evening they went to hear Spurgeon at the Metropolitan Tabernacle. The building was much larger than the City Temple, and the congregation was much more than twice the size. Spurgeon's voice was much more expressive and moving and his oratory noticeably superior. But they soon forgot all about the great building, the immense congregation, and the magnificent voice. They even overlooked their intention to compare the various features of the two preachers, and when the service was over they found themselves saying, "What a wonderful Savior is Jesus Christ!"" Be amazed at Jesus Christ and the amazing work he did through Spurgeon and his ministry, and take courage, this same Jesus Christ is just as alive today as he was then, he is more than able to do it again!

  17. 5 out of 5

    Anson Cassel Mills

    Arnold Dallimore (1911-1998), a Baptist clergyman who pastored three Ontario churches, also wrote biographies of Whitefield, Wesley, and Edward Irving. Like those biographies, this one of Spurgeon was intended to be both inspirational and historically accurate. The difficulties of simultaneously attempting to promote the faith while providing a “warts-and-all” biography are obvious, but Dallimore handles the challenge well. Dallimore, the Baptist pastor, emphasizes a Spurgeon who was a whirlwind Arnold Dallimore (1911-1998), a Baptist clergyman who pastored three Ontario churches, also wrote biographies of Whitefield, Wesley, and Edward Irving. Like those biographies, this one of Spurgeon was intended to be both inspirational and historically accurate. The difficulties of simultaneously attempting to promote the faith while providing a “warts-and-all” biography are obvious, but Dallimore handles the challenge well. Dallimore, the Baptist pastor, emphasizes a Spurgeon who was a whirlwind of pastoral commitments and a hearty Calvinist who supervised a magnificent range of church-oriented social service activities. (To an agnostic he once retorted, “The God who answereth by Orphanages, Let Him Be God.”) No wonder that after spending nearly forty years in the pulpit, Spurgeon died before he was sixty. Dallimore also properly stresses Spurgeon’s principled withdrawal from the Baptist Union, with all the hurtful criticism that that decision engendered, as well as its prophetic anticipation of religious decline in the twentieth century. Yet it is also heartening to read of Spurgeon’s warm relationship with those other evangelical giants of the late nineteenth century, D. L. Moody and Hudson Taylor, none of whom crossed their “t’s” the same way. I would have preferred a bit more on Spurgeon’s theology, the historic setting in which his ministry developed, and the contrast between his periods of deep depression and his reputation as a “bubbling fountain of humor.” Nevertheless, for the modern general reader, this life of Charles Haddon Spurgeon is perhaps the best introduction to the greatest of all nineteenth-century evangelical preachers.

  18. 5 out of 5

    Cade Patterson

    Back when men were men and mutton chops were in style, Spurgeon was the Lion of the evangelical movement. This is an excellent sympathetic biography of a man with a single-minded devotion to proclaim the Word of God and see souls won to Christ. Easy to read, funny at times, and surprisingly engaging, Dallimore tells the story of the life of Spurgeon, beginning to end. He grew up in a greenhouse environment for the preacher he was to become, and was uniquely gifted to preach powerfully and clearl Back when men were men and mutton chops were in style, Spurgeon was the Lion of the evangelical movement. This is an excellent sympathetic biography of a man with a single-minded devotion to proclaim the Word of God and see souls won to Christ. Easy to read, funny at times, and surprisingly engaging, Dallimore tells the story of the life of Spurgeon, beginning to end. He grew up in a greenhouse environment for the preacher he was to become, and was uniquely gifted to preach powerfully and clearly. He endured incredible pain of physical ailments and vilification from the press and his heretical colleagues, all the while building up the church at the Met. Tabernacle and working like a madman to show Christ’s love to London. I wish I’d seen some of Spurgeon’s humanity, as this seems to be a canonization of sorts, but all the same I feel rightly impressed by this biography. An excellent read, even if you’re not inclined (or compelled) to read about 19th century English Baptist pastors.

  19. 5 out of 5

    Cedar Lea

    At first, I found Spurgeon a little hard to relate to. He seemed like such an extraordinary person from the time he was a young child until he entered the ministry at age 17 and was able to follow God in an exceptional way. It was amazing, though, to read the immense impact his ministry had on London and regions beyond. It wasn't until closer to the end of the book that I started enjoying the book more. It explained more of what some of Spurgeon's flaws were, his health struggles, and the critic At first, I found Spurgeon a little hard to relate to. He seemed like such an extraordinary person from the time he was a young child until he entered the ministry at age 17 and was able to follow God in an exceptional way. It was amazing, though, to read the immense impact his ministry had on London and regions beyond. It wasn't until closer to the end of the book that I started enjoying the book more. It explained more of what some of Spurgeon's flaws were, his health struggles, and the criticism he received over opposing the 'New Theology', which was the accepting of evolution in the church. I found that his insight into the effects that evolution would have on the church really struck a chord with me and helped me understand church history in a new way. In the end, this book was informative, and I feel that it was enriching to me to have read it.

  20. 5 out of 5

    Brenda

    A very well laid out book of Spurgeon’s life, from start to finish. I’ve read widely about Spurgeon, but never a biography that followed the timeline of his life. Very helpful to get the entire picture, and even a sense of his humor. One chapter was dedicated to Susannah, his wife, which will be helpful to any who have not read any biographies about her. Though the chapter on Spurgeon’s wife was not new information for me, I still enjoyed it. Dallimore’s writing is very pleasant, and Spurgeon’s A very well laid out book of Spurgeon’s life, from start to finish. I’ve read widely about Spurgeon, but never a biography that followed the timeline of his life. Very helpful to get the entire picture, and even a sense of his humor. One chapter was dedicated to Susannah, his wife, which will be helpful to any who have not read any biographies about her. Though the chapter on Spurgeon’s wife was not new information for me, I still enjoyed it. Dallimore’s writing is very pleasant, and Spurgeon’s life and ministry depicted here will bless all readers. A five star book that will always have a home on my bookshelf.

  21. 5 out of 5

    Nikolas S.

    I wasn't aware of Charles Spurgeon before reading this book. I was pleasantly surprised by the talents of the author. Arnold A. Dallimore has created a very engaging biography. I found Spurgeon's personality so moving that I ended up finishing the book quickly. It's pretty obvious Arnold Dallimore has great affection for Spurgeon's life and faith which might be off putting to some. I found that my own affection for Spurgeon bubbled after reading this book. I highly recommend it for christian and I wasn't aware of Charles Spurgeon before reading this book. I was pleasantly surprised by the talents of the author. Arnold A. Dallimore has created a very engaging biography. I found Spurgeon's personality so moving that I ended up finishing the book quickly. It's pretty obvious Arnold Dallimore has great affection for Spurgeon's life and faith which might be off putting to some. I found that my own affection for Spurgeon bubbled after reading this book. I highly recommend it for christian and non christian biography readers.

  22. 5 out of 5

    Troy Solava

    Great bio! It reads fast but is packed full of stories, quotes, and information. Dallimore revelas Spurgeon’s convictions, personality, weaknesses, and highlights. I’d recommend this bio. Makes me thankful for Spurgeon’s legacy. And makes me desire to be a gospel-centered, spirit-filled preacher like him.

  23. 4 out of 5

    Dennis Thurman

    Dallimore is one of the finest biographers in Christendom! I think of another of his works that has blessed me greatly, “A Heart Set Free: The Life of Charles Wesley.” This work concerning the Prince of Preachers is concise and colorful. Dallimore captures the essence of this servant of God and makes you feel as though you truly know the man and his ministry.

  24. 4 out of 5

    Gebriell

    I listened to this on audio.. Christian biography is one of the most soul stirring genres, and Spurgeon is a good man to mark out and follow in his example. I feel acquainted with the man Spurgeon now through Arnold dallimore, and am grateful I had the opportunity to listen to this book.

  25. 4 out of 5

    DeWayne Wright

    This book gives you understanding of who Spurgeon was and a highlight of his work of the gospel. I walked away after reading this book to examine my own faith and walk in Christ. Thank you Lord for Charles Spurgeon.

  26. 4 out of 5

    Logan Maloney

    Super well written biography about one of the greatest preachers of all time! The author made me want to sit in so badly in one of his sermons and see in real time Spurgeon’s influence spread as quickly as it did!

  27. 4 out of 5

    Clay M.

    This was my first exposure to the details of Spurgeon's life and ministry. I thoroughly enjoyed the way in which it was written. This book is a great introduction and overview for anyone looking to start reading Spurgeon. My major takeaway from the book was Spurgeon's life and devotion to prayer.

  28. 4 out of 5

    Danielw

    Very good biography on the "Prince of Preachers". Not as thorough as some of the other Spurgeon biographies (there are quite a few) but it tells you of a man who truly lived for Christ. The story of his ministries and his whole hearted following of Jesus also raises some conviction, because lets face it, very few live that way these days. Thats something the best Christian biographies do, make you face yourself, and its something so few pastors and ministers do nowadays. People are more concerne Very good biography on the "Prince of Preachers". Not as thorough as some of the other Spurgeon biographies (there are quite a few) but it tells you of a man who truly lived for Christ. The story of his ministries and his whole hearted following of Jesus also raises some conviction, because lets face it, very few live that way these days. Thats something the best Christian biographies do, make you face yourself, and its something so few pastors and ministers do nowadays. People are more concerned with the business of church or hurting feelings that the true Gospel rarely gets preached. This is a breath of fresh air to the lungs though. Great read.

  29. 4 out of 5

    Doug Payne

    A vey good and short biography.

  30. 5 out of 5

    Cody Cunningham

    Excellent. I've always been aware of how gifted Spurgeon was, but I was struck by his intense humility. Makes me want to read everything Spurgeon wrote.

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