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Emmy Award-winning actress Kirstie Alley’s candid and audacious memoir about her life and the men she has shared it with—for better and for worse. John Travolta. Parker Stevenson. Ted Danson. Maksim Chmerkovskiy. Kelsey Grammer. Patrick Swayze. Woody Allen. Woody Harrelson. And many others. . . . In three decades in Hollywood, Kirstie Alley has lived with, worked with, love Emmy Award-winning actress Kirstie Alley’s candid and audacious memoir about her life and the men she has shared it with—for better and for worse. John Travolta. Parker Stevenson. Ted Danson. Maksim Chmerkovskiy. Kelsey Grammer. Patrick Swayze. Woody Allen. Woody Harrelson. And many others. . . . In three decades in Hollywood, Kirstie Alley has lived with, worked with, loved, or lost all of these men, and in this revealing memoir, she peels back the layers (and sometimes the sheets) on her relationships with all of them. From the early days of her childhood in Wichita, Kansas, surrounded by her loving father, her inquisitive and doting grandfather, and a younger brother she fiercely protected when she wasn’t selling tickets to see him naked, Kirstie Alley’s life has been shaped and molded by men. “Men, men, glorious men!” gave her her first big break in Hollywood and her awardwinning role on Cheers, and through two marriages, a debilitating cocaine addiction, the death of her mother, roles in some of the biggest comedies of the last twenty years, and a surprising stint on Dancing with the Stars, men proved to be the inspiration for multitudes of the decisions and dramas in Kirstie Alley’s life. In this collection of linked essays that’s both hilarious and poignant in turns, Kirstie chronicles all the good, the bad, and the ugly men who have influenced and guided her. She demonstrates how men can be the air that women breathe or the source of all of their frustrations. But for better or worse, Kirstie shows that a life well lived is a life lived in the company of men, especially if they remember to put the lid down. The Art of Men (I Prefer Mine al Dente) is a hilarious excursion into love, joy, motherhood, loss, sex, and self-discovery from one of Hollywood’s most enduring stars.


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Emmy Award-winning actress Kirstie Alley’s candid and audacious memoir about her life and the men she has shared it with—for better and for worse. John Travolta. Parker Stevenson. Ted Danson. Maksim Chmerkovskiy. Kelsey Grammer. Patrick Swayze. Woody Allen. Woody Harrelson. And many others. . . . In three decades in Hollywood, Kirstie Alley has lived with, worked with, love Emmy Award-winning actress Kirstie Alley’s candid and audacious memoir about her life and the men she has shared it with—for better and for worse. John Travolta. Parker Stevenson. Ted Danson. Maksim Chmerkovskiy. Kelsey Grammer. Patrick Swayze. Woody Allen. Woody Harrelson. And many others. . . . In three decades in Hollywood, Kirstie Alley has lived with, worked with, loved, or lost all of these men, and in this revealing memoir, she peels back the layers (and sometimes the sheets) on her relationships with all of them. From the early days of her childhood in Wichita, Kansas, surrounded by her loving father, her inquisitive and doting grandfather, and a younger brother she fiercely protected when she wasn’t selling tickets to see him naked, Kirstie Alley’s life has been shaped and molded by men. “Men, men, glorious men!” gave her her first big break in Hollywood and her awardwinning role on Cheers, and through two marriages, a debilitating cocaine addiction, the death of her mother, roles in some of the biggest comedies of the last twenty years, and a surprising stint on Dancing with the Stars, men proved to be the inspiration for multitudes of the decisions and dramas in Kirstie Alley’s life. In this collection of linked essays that’s both hilarious and poignant in turns, Kirstie chronicles all the good, the bad, and the ugly men who have influenced and guided her. She demonstrates how men can be the air that women breathe or the source of all of their frustrations. But for better or worse, Kirstie shows that a life well lived is a life lived in the company of men, especially if they remember to put the lid down. The Art of Men (I Prefer Mine al Dente) is a hilarious excursion into love, joy, motherhood, loss, sex, and self-discovery from one of Hollywood’s most enduring stars.

30 review for The Art Of Men (I Prefer Mine Al Dente)

  1. 5 out of 5

    Alexandra

    I went into this book thinking I wouldn't want to finish it. However, it had me laughing within the first couple pages. And it kept getting better. It was very entertaining and a very quick read. I didn't know very much about Kirstie Alley before this. After reading this book, i actually like her a lot. She's not afraid to admit when she was wrong or stupid. She doesn't hold anything back. And she makes fun of herself. I really did enjoy this book. She mentions a lot of celebrities, but it doesn I went into this book thinking I wouldn't want to finish it. However, it had me laughing within the first couple pages. And it kept getting better. It was very entertaining and a very quick read. I didn't know very much about Kirstie Alley before this. After reading this book, i actually like her a lot. She's not afraid to admit when she was wrong or stupid. She doesn't hold anything back. And she makes fun of herself. I really did enjoy this book. She mentions a lot of celebrities, but it doesn't seem like she's name-dropping. It seems like it's all relevant. This was a very fun book to read and it had me laughing throughout.

  2. 5 out of 5

    Mom

    I loved the way this book feels like a conversation or many conversations with Kirstie Alley. It made it completely enjoyable and hard to put down. I love it that she shares her life in such a down-to-earth way, freely admitting that she has done things she shouldn't have and has many regrets. We all have done things in our lives that we would have done differently. The important thing is that we learn from our mistakes. This is what life is about: growing, changing, bettering ourselves. As I ha I loved the way this book feels like a conversation or many conversations with Kirstie Alley. It made it completely enjoyable and hard to put down. I love it that she shares her life in such a down-to-earth way, freely admitting that she has done things she shouldn't have and has many regrets. We all have done things in our lives that we would have done differently. The important thing is that we learn from our mistakes. This is what life is about: growing, changing, bettering ourselves. As I have read many biographies, I find it sad that so many actors and actresses have had such a struggle in life. When you find out these things, you can't help but wish them all the best and feel that they deserve our respect for the hard times they have gone through. I don't know what the answer is, but I wish there was a better formula to biographies. I have a very chronological mind and wish for things to be in timeline order, but most books are not written that way for whatever reason (memories, points they wish to make, etc.). I think for my next biography, I will keep a journal handy to jot notes so I can later refer to them when the years keep going back and forth in the story. This is just a pet peeve, not a complaint about the book. This book wouldn't appeal to all, but I can appreciate her sense of humor and the spirit of her writing.

  3. 4 out of 5

    Katie

    I had seen Kirstie Alley in a number of movies, moreso when I was younger obviously and had liked her, but when she appeared on Dancing with the Stars the first time around, I really fell in love with her sense of humor and relationship with Maks (her pro dancing partner). I then saw a review of her memoir in People, got super excited about it and requested it right away at the library. I wasn't really aware of all her rendevous' with famous gentlemen, other than the flirtations she had with Mak I had seen Kirstie Alley in a number of movies, moreso when I was younger obviously and had liked her, but when she appeared on Dancing with the Stars the first time around, I really fell in love with her sense of humor and relationship with Maks (her pro dancing partner). I then saw a review of her memoir in People, got super excited about it and requested it right away at the library. I wasn't really aware of all her rendevous' with famous gentlemen, other than the flirtations she had with Maks and maybe would have appreciated it a little more if I was fans of, or knew about, her old flames. This is a book that truly stands by it's title, with every chapter dealing with "The Art of Men" in some form or another. She doesn't just talk about romantic dealings either, which is nice. She discusses friends, her father, her son, friends who become loves, and loves who became friends. Kirstie (and this book) is definitely the type of girl you'd grab a bottle of wine with, sit down and chat for hours while getting super silly. The way she writes makes me want to be one of those friends she does it with, and that's a talent in itself.

  4. 4 out of 5

    Lynn

    I started the book mainly to skim the juicy details and see the pictures. I came away with the vision of a very self absorbed woman who thinks she is irrestible to any man that walks. She also actually believes she a size six. I recently saw an interview of her on the Dr Oz show. She is funny, but I just can't get over her insistance that she believes she is thin. The book was shallow, as I expected.

  5. 4 out of 5

    Lisa

    I loved Kirstie Alley as Rebecca Howe on Cheers (and Look Who's Talking is a lot of fun too!) so I was looking forward to reading this - and it turned out to be exactly the type of celebrity memoir I love! Lots of name-dropping, forthright, and detailed (while still keeping private things private.) Growing up in Kansas, she talks openly about her Hollywood wealth, her clothes, her cars, her houses - which I actually found refreshing. Even before her Hollywood years, Kirstie starts by telling us a I loved Kirstie Alley as Rebecca Howe on Cheers (and Look Who's Talking is a lot of fun too!) so I was looking forward to reading this - and it turned out to be exactly the type of celebrity memoir I love! Lots of name-dropping, forthright, and detailed (while still keeping private things private.) Growing up in Kansas, she talks openly about her Hollywood wealth, her clothes, her cars, her houses - which I actually found refreshing. Even before her Hollywood years, Kirstie starts by telling us about her previous two marriages, her former drug use, and decision to join Scientology. Her career as an actress starts at Chapter 15 when she was hired by director Nicholas Meyer for a main role in Star Trek II. Kirstie's chosen to frame her memoir around the men she's loved (not all physically, but some.) This includes stories about: Tim Matheson, Patrick Swayze, Sidney Poitier, James Burrows, Ted Danson, Kelsey Grammer, George Wendt, John Ratzenberger, Woody Harrelson, John Travolta, Woody Allen, Maksim Chmerkovskiy, Jonathan Knight (from New Kids on the Block!), Burt Reynolds, Carl Reiner, and Prince. The photo section at the back of the book also included pictures of Tom Selleck, Mark Harmon, David Crosby, Patrick Dempsey, Gil Bellows, Craig Robinson, and Steve Guttenberg. I really wish this memoir had been released on audiobook. Four stars!

  6. 5 out of 5

    Forrest

    All you need to know about Ms. Alley's skill as a writer is in the title, where she first uses an art metaphor for men before suddenly switching to a food metaphor. The effect of this is nonsense. This book is riddled with poor writing. If there was a ghost writer present, they were either incompetent at their job, or chose to have so ghost-like a presence as to be unnoticeable. Alley capitalizes words unnecessarily, I guess to let the reader know that these words have emphasis or are being yell All you need to know about Ms. Alley's skill as a writer is in the title, where she first uses an art metaphor for men before suddenly switching to a food metaphor. The effect of this is nonsense. This book is riddled with poor writing. If there was a ghost writer present, they were either incompetent at their job, or chose to have so ghost-like a presence as to be unnoticeable. Alley capitalizes words unnecessarily, I guess to let the reader know that these words have emphasis or are being yelled, but they're also followed by about 50 exclamation points (that is a conservative estimate), which accomplish the same effect. I guess she thought, "if I want to get my point across here, I better turn the dial to 11!" Her metaphors/similes are terrible (see the title), and often offensive. At one point she writes, "Like a black man to the KKK, they were indistinguishable to me!" Does she think that's funny? Or, worse, witty? The dialogue she reconstructs here is wooden and, frankly, unrealistic, which is mind boggling, since this is, supposedly, a memoir, meaning the words she has people saying were actually uttered. If that's true, my response is "on what planet?" If you read this and say to yourself "yes! This is how people talk and interact in my life," then I feel sorry for you. Worse, Alley is a lazy writer. At one point, in writing about her Cheers co-stars, she says "Below, I will do my best to describe their amazing amazingness." I can't believe an editor didn't force a change there. Alley often makes up words when she feels like it, my personal favorite being "sparklery," which I guess is meant to imply something has the characteristics of a sparkler, but I don't quite understand why "sparkly," a real word, wouldn't have sufficed, since the main property of a sparkler is that it is sparkly. She also repeats herself. The opening to one (short) paragraph is something like "Maybe there is a grain of truth in that..." and then, less than two sentences later, in the same paragraph, she says "maybe there is some honesty to that." YES WE KNOW BECAUSE YOU SAID THE SAME THING IN THE TOPIC SENTENCE TO THIS PARAGRAPH. Look. I get it. Kirstie Alley is an actress. She's not Toni Morrison. I knew what I was getting when I picked this book up. My critiques are off point because she shouldn't be expected to write well. To which I say, she should still be able to write in a literate manner, because we are wasting paper and other publishing resources to put this book out into the world, and it should, therefore, have some value. Finally, perhaps all this wouldn't matter if the book itself were interesting; if the stories Alley had to tell were intriguing, or salacious, or profound. But they are not. Alley tries to spin tales of sex and desire and men that reflect the glamour of the life she's lived, but in trying so hard to be sexy, the end result is laughable and, often, off putting. If anything, this book is a testament to the fact that Alley managed to build a stunningly successful career portraying herself as a sex kitten when, in fact, she apparently is anything but sexy. If she had dug into this idea, explored the dichotomy between self and image, maybe this book could have been something. Instead, we got this piece of trash. Just terrible.

  7. 4 out of 5

    Erica Hunt

    I have always loved Kirstie Alley and thought that she was one funny and sassy bitch. About a year ago while following her on twitter I saw that she was writing a book. Once it was up on Amazon I purchased the book on pre-order. Although my hubby read me a review of it and it was a horrible review but I said you know what I love her I am going to read it anyways (plus I bought it so might as well read it). Well lets be honest it wasn't a prize winning book here, but it sure as hell was funny. It I have always loved Kirstie Alley and thought that she was one funny and sassy bitch. About a year ago while following her on twitter I saw that she was writing a book. Once it was up on Amazon I purchased the book on pre-order. Although my hubby read me a review of it and it was a horrible review but I said you know what I love her I am going to read it anyways (plus I bought it so might as well read it). Well lets be honest it wasn't a prize winning book here, but it sure as hell was funny. It was a look into her life and all the men that have played a role in her life. I really had a lot of laugh out loud moments while reading. Just like she is on twitter and probably in real life, she is candid and straight forward and very funny. Yet, oddly my favorite aspect of the book is when she talks about her religion. To be fair I know nothing about scientology other than what I have seen on South Park and read in tabloids. I liked how she explained her relgion and gave an inside look into some of her fundamental beliefs. Although I know this is only one very small look into the relgion it was fascinating look into the relgion. I would say anyone who likes Alley should pick up this book, it is a quick and enjoyable read. Yet, because I know it wasn't the best written book ever for the general reader I will give it 3 out of 5 stars.

  8. 4 out of 5

    Beth Hatch

    This made me just feel really sad. Sad that she relishes her lack of innocence even as a young girl when it came to men. And she did some questionable things even to her brother! I found this book very disturbing and very sad and more so because she obviously still has some major issues with men, sex, drugs, and just human decency. "True, all that cocaine stuffed up my nose could have ruined my rep and put me in prison but I was willing to take that risk. I wasn't willing to be known as a tastel This made me just feel really sad. Sad that she relishes her lack of innocence even as a young girl when it came to men. And she did some questionable things even to her brother! I found this book very disturbing and very sad and more so because she obviously still has some major issues with men, sex, drugs, and just human decency. "True, all that cocaine stuffed up my nose could have ruined my rep and put me in prison but I was willing to take that risk. I wasn't willing to be known as a tasteless designer." "It was riveting to poke his weiner with a stick, and although I was only five I was bright enough to know that flesh touching flesh was taboo....it dawned on me: I was in full control of Henry's weiner!.... The power of sexual domination flooded through me." (Sad to think that's how she felt at age five) Enough said.

  9. 5 out of 5

    Shannon

    I like Kirstie Alley but she probably should have refrained from writing this book. It is fluff..at best.

  10. 4 out of 5

    Jacqabri

    Kirstie is very entertaining...and in a strange way is very down to earth. There was not a lot of details, but still an entertaining, light read.

  11. 4 out of 5

    Mo

    I love Kirstie Alley. I hate this book. Go figure. Bailed after 20 pages.

  12. 4 out of 5

    Mediaman

    Entering this book with an open mind, I was quickly disgusted by the author's admission of childhood sexual play, drug use, sexual manipulation of almost every man she ever met and her blaming her mother or the men in her life for any of her problems! Add to that her pushing of her "religion" (which she makes sound like merely a wholesome anti-drug support community) which she turned to when she was high on cocaine and you'll very quickly conclude that this is one screwed-up woman. The book is a Entering this book with an open mind, I was quickly disgusted by the author's admission of childhood sexual play, drug use, sexual manipulation of almost every man she ever met and her blaming her mother or the men in her life for any of her problems! Add to that her pushing of her "religion" (which she makes sound like merely a wholesome anti-drug support community) which she turned to when she was high on cocaine and you'll very quickly conclude that this is one screwed-up woman. The book is a fascinating read, but only in the way reading the autobiography of a serial killer shocks you with what's on the pages, being somewhat entertained but disgusted when you're done. It makes you feel sick to think that this woman actually believes she is funny when talking about her childhood when she charged people money to see a little boy's private parts. She comes across as a complete psycho who should probably be arrested for some of the admissions in this book. Her Kansas family and friends should disown her for what she wrote. If you are looking for inside celebrity gossip you won't find much. She does slam a couple minor people, including throwing her defenseless ex-husband Parker under the bus, but the big names she mostly keeps to herself while bragging about bedding a major star who turns into a monster who almost chokes her to death. It all is supposed to be written in a style that is to "help" other women avoid the "traps" she fell into. But she actually set most of the traps herself--or knowingly forced her way into them. She should accept the blame for destroying so many people's lives, check herself into sex rehab (or jail!), deal with her weird grandpa-pleasing obsession and truly turn her life around with something like an honest faith in something greater than herself. If she thought this would make people appreciate her more, she was sorely mistaken. It ends up making her look despicable.

  13. 4 out of 5

    Amanda Alexandre

    One of the reasons Kirstie Alley became an actress was that she could make out with handsome men. That is the kind of blunt and unapologetical confession you get from this book. She confesses what no one else has the guts to do. So… moralists are not going to like it. There will be drugs. There will be a lot of flirting. And just inadequacy in general. If you can’t get past that, this memoir is not for you. According to narrow minded individuals, she is not a model of “human decency”. Also, she is One of the reasons Kirstie Alley became an actress was that she could make out with handsome men. That is the kind of blunt and unapologetical confession you get from this book. She confesses what no one else has the guts to do. So… moralists are not going to like it. There will be drugs. There will be a lot of flirting. And just inadequacy in general. If you can’t get past that, this memoir is not for you. According to narrow minded individuals, she is not a model of “human decency”. Also, she is not very modest. She knows she is attractive, and how that attractiveness affected her, although she is conscious of her humble beginning, likes animals, had drug addiction and confesses she screwed up a lot of things in her life. Fine by me. I prefer to read someone who made many mistakes and learned with them, than endure the moral arrogance of others who “did everything right”. She as mostly influenced by men, hence the funny title (Yes, I only read it for the title). As a pretty, funny, vivid, confident and borderline bitchy woman, the obvious outcome is that guys like her. Handsome guys. Talented guys. Even her assistant was incredibly handsome. We hear about her marriages… and platonic crushes with co-stars: men like Patrick Swayze, Woody Harrelson and John Travolta. She is incredibly honest about all of them. Sometimes I’d wonder: “Has she really said that?”or “Aren’t her friends going to be furious that she revealed so intimate details about their lives?”

  14. 5 out of 5

    Bessie

    I had a hard time enjoying this book. Its really sad how I started this book being a huge fan of alley and now after reading it she seems like a delusional wreck. It just rubbed me the wrong way. she basically describes in the book that every guy she has come in contact with in her life has wanted to run away and marry her even when she was already married. To her its like every guy that would say hi to her would become passionately in love with her. the entire book seems a bit narcissistic. She I had a hard time enjoying this book. Its really sad how I started this book being a huge fan of alley and now after reading it she seems like a delusional wreck. It just rubbed me the wrong way. she basically describes in the book that every guy she has come in contact with in her life has wanted to run away and marry her even when she was already married. To her its like every guy that would say hi to her would become passionately in love with her. the entire book seems a bit narcissistic. She went even as far as to say she had an emotional affair with Patrick Swayze. I found it to be a little convenient for her that she would come out with a story about this when he is not here anymore to comment...it screams LIES to me. After reading it I wonder if all of what she has written was in her head. It just seems like a cry for attention from an actress thats not really in the spot light anymore. Even if it is true which i doubt it is some things of your personal life should stay personal.

  15. 4 out of 5

    Daisey

    I've always thought Kirstie Alley was a good actress - I have enjoyed the films and tv shows she has done. It wasn't until I watched her shows Fat Actress and Kirsties Big Fat Life that I really understood how funny she is. Kind of crazy and spacey but, funny. I started following her on Twitter - she tweets a lot! I watched her on DWTS and just loved her and Maks and their relationship on that show - we all know it takes a special person to get along with Maks! I enjoyed this book - I had heard I've always thought Kirstie Alley was a good actress - I have enjoyed the films and tv shows she has done. It wasn't until I watched her shows Fat Actress and Kirsties Big Fat Life that I really understood how funny she is. Kind of crazy and spacey but, funny. I started following her on Twitter - she tweets a lot! I watched her on DWTS and just loved her and Maks and their relationship on that show - we all know it takes a special person to get along with Maks! I enjoyed this book - I had heard reveiws that it was funny but, I did not find it all that funny although there are some funny moments in Kirstie's tales of her life. Mostly it is about Kirstie's life and the men that influenced her. It's not all pretty, not really glamorous and yes, she does skim over things a bit but, this is not a autobiography so much as it is just talking about the men that made differences in her life. She lays it all out there without being too graphic, she takes responsibility for her choices and she makes no excuses for her mistakes.

  16. 5 out of 5

    Beth

    I've always been a fan of Kirstie Alley since she was on Cheers and Veronica's Closet. Love her sassy and saucy attitude. I rarely pick up any celebrity's memoir but I couldn't resist picking her book up when I saw her book cover. Reading her book was almost like having a conversation with an old girlfriend, catching up on news. She was not afraid to admit her mistakes and shortcomings when it came to her relationships. There were a couple of laugh out loud pages, some of them got big snorts out I've always been a fan of Kirstie Alley since she was on Cheers and Veronica's Closet. Love her sassy and saucy attitude. I rarely pick up any celebrity's memoir but I couldn't resist picking her book up when I saw her book cover. Reading her book was almost like having a conversation with an old girlfriend, catching up on news. She was not afraid to admit her mistakes and shortcomings when it came to her relationships. There were a couple of laugh out loud pages, some of them got big snorts out of me. She lost me towards the end. It was mostly prattle and I found it was time to close the book for good. She talked quite a bit about her son, True, but very little about her daughter, Lillie. That made me wonder why. Overall, it was an entertaining read.

  17. 4 out of 5

    Kim

    I love Kirstie Alley and as such, really wanted to love this book - but it's very stream-of-consciousness and just as she'd get to a subject I was interested in (like her experiences filming Star Trek) that section would be over. I wish she had not chosen to define her book in terms of her experiences with various men - it limited the scope and make it more soap-y and less real. It was interesting to read her thoughts about Scientology (though I wanted more of that and less of the other stuff) a I love Kirstie Alley and as such, really wanted to love this book - but it's very stream-of-consciousness and just as she'd get to a subject I was interested in (like her experiences filming Star Trek) that section would be over. I wish she had not chosen to define her book in terms of her experiences with various men - it limited the scope and make it more soap-y and less real. It was interesting to read her thoughts about Scientology (though I wanted more of that and less of the other stuff) and she definitely tells some cringe-worthy stories, but overall she could have used greater guidance in editing, in my opinion.

  18. 5 out of 5

    Kathy

    I am a sucker for celebrity gossip (as evident by the US Weekly and People magazines strewn about my house). This book fed into my curiosity a little bit, but some stories definitely merely skimmed over the details.... Also, I cannot believe her editor let her get away with saying "could care less" SO many times. That really bothered me! Was the editor not an English major?! Will I read her other book? I couldn't care less! ;)

  19. 5 out of 5

    Lori

    I like Kirstie Alley. I really do. But this book...meh. I like her writing style, very conversational but the subject matter was sort of interesting but then not and her justification for some of the things she's done struck me as very self-serving. And I found it very difficult to get past her using the phrase "could care less". Shouldn't there be someone that catches that kind of thing BEFORE publication?

  20. 4 out of 5

    Barbara Adde

    I hadn't expected to enjoy this as much as I did. Fun stories of her wild days, told from the perspective of her 60's. She came across as very real, very funny, honest and someone I'd like. Thanks for a good read, Kirstie.

  21. 5 out of 5

    Kim

    I knew this woman would have stories. I also know this woman is batshit insane. That's fine - both of those qualities make for a quick, entertaining read and the used book sale price of $2 was well worth it.

  22. 5 out of 5

    Dy-an

    Dancing with Patrick Swayze is bad enough but I'm pretty sure I put dibs on Jonathan Knight in 1990.

  23. 5 out of 5

    Cindy Brown

    Great piece of celebrity trashy biography. Loved It.

  24. 5 out of 5

    Michelle

    I have previously read Kirstie’s other book and I should have learned my lesson from that. I thought the idea of this book would be good, with each chapter dedicated to the different men in her life. The first chapter is excellent, with a hilarious story about the disabled “man” who wanted to meet her on the set of one of the Look Who’s Talking movies. And the stories about her first husband, her second husbands and all her affairs in between - due to the nature of this book, it’s not told chron I have previously read Kirstie’s other book and I should have learned my lesson from that. I thought the idea of this book would be good, with each chapter dedicated to the different men in her life. The first chapter is excellent, with a hilarious story about the disabled “man” who wanted to meet her on the set of one of the Look Who’s Talking movies. And the stories about her first husband, her second husbands and all her affairs in between - due to the nature of this book, it’s not told chronologically, so you will end up confused as to which man she is currently married to/dating. I skipped the chapter about Scientology as that doesn’t interest me, but the further I got into the book, the less I found myself reading, and the more I found myself skimming/skipping. I think her stories about adoption and pregnancies were probably the last I read straight through. As I’ve never watched Cheers, that chapter didn’t interest me much, and ultimately, the chapters dedicated to Patrick Swayze and John Travolta just didn’t ring true. Even though the little me always thought John and Kirstie had great chemistry together during Look Who’s Talking. But it’s the whole point that Kelly Preston had to point out that Kirstie was flirting with her husband and they then became “best” friends? I skimmed the end of this book and it won’t be taking up valuable shelf space in my room. I would only recommend this if you’re her biggest fan (Remy) or you’ve read her other book. Otherwise - give it a miss.

  25. 4 out of 5

    Lynne M

    Considering that Kirstie Alley is known for her comedic roles, I thought this book would be, well... funny. But it wasn't. The writing is terrible, her metaphors are awful, and it's one long stream of consciousness rant. I know she isn't a professional writer, but she doesn't make herself come off as likeable or relatable in the least. Instead, she sounds sadly delusional. It's amazing that every man she has ever come across has wanted to run away with her! Some of the stories she tells about he Considering that Kirstie Alley is known for her comedic roles, I thought this book would be, well... funny. But it wasn't. The writing is terrible, her metaphors are awful, and it's one long stream of consciousness rant. I know she isn't a professional writer, but she doesn't make herself come off as likeable or relatable in the least. Instead, she sounds sadly delusional. It's amazing that every man she has ever come across has wanted to run away with her! Some of the stories she tells about her childhood are (sorry I cannot think of a fancier word) downright disgusting. If you are a fan, I'd recommend not reading this book. You might not be a fan of hers afterwards.

  26. 5 out of 5

    Bethan

    Having a chapter all about Woody Allen called “The Art of Not Being a Cunt” is laughable.

  27. 4 out of 5

    Gary Myers

    It's probably not fair of me to rate this, since I read so little of it, but I wasn't interested in her sexual affairs so it was the book for me.

  28. 5 out of 5

    Natalie S

    Kirstie Alley may be that famous “Fat Actress” but at heart she’s just a boy-crazy, 16 year old school girl. The former star of Cheers and the Look Who’s Talking franchise has tackled her weight issues in her previous book, How to Lose Your Ass & Regain Your Life. Her current one, The Art Of Men (I Prefer Mine al Dente) is a different beast altogether and centres solely on her fascination with the male species. The book is classed as an autobiography but Alley also sees it as a humorous self-help Kirstie Alley may be that famous “Fat Actress” but at heart she’s just a boy-crazy, 16 year old school girl. The former star of Cheers and the Look Who’s Talking franchise has tackled her weight issues in her previous book, How to Lose Your Ass & Regain Your Life. Her current one, The Art Of Men (I Prefer Mine al Dente) is a different beast altogether and centres solely on her fascination with the male species. The book is classed as an autobiography but Alley also sees it as a humorous self-help manual. It’s sold as being about celebrating the good ones, warning about the bad and shaming the outright ugly men she’s encountered in her 62 years on earth and who ultimately, helped shape her. It’s an interesting formula considering that most people have their fair share of anecdotes about complex, beautiful, troublesome, gentle and horrible men (and women) they’ve known. But few have had the opportunity, fame or foresight to commit this to paper and the fact is this format really doesn’t work. Alley’s strength is that she is frank and conversational but the lack of narrative thread can make for rambling and disjointed reading. At times the proceedings seem closer to a journal or series of blog posts or it could just be something she remembered in a therapy session or ten. Alley’s life does seem like a smorgasbord of diva stardom where she picks and chooses men like some people change clothes. It seems that Alley is trying to present this as an honest, no-holds barred tale but some parts of her life are glossed over (i.e. her “fat” period, the breakdown of her second marriage and her daughter (granted it’s a book about men but she gets around two sentences). Some claims are simply outrageous- like saying she took enough cocaine to kill several people, while others feel exaggerated (like the bad dream being compared to a “Satanic coven”). There are lots of people that admire Alley’s work but whether they will feel the same way after reading this book is another story. She always did seem likeable but here she presents herself as a home wrecker or chronic flirt that falls for men at the drop of a hat. She sensationally claims she had an emotional affair with Patrick Swayze (tacky as he’s passed away) and that she had her own real-life encounter with a Christian Grey-like character. She’s also been married twice and did consider ending the last one much earlier in order to run off and get hitched to John Travolta. The fact is that Alley is as vivacious and enthusiastic in her story as she is her acting. But the second half of the book (i.e. after becoming a Hollywood film star) is just a series of rendezvous about would-be husbands, old flames and flirtations with her leading men (although this is with the exception of the men she gushes and fawns over i.e. directors like José Quintero and Woody Allen and geniuses like Prince and Sidney Poitier). This autobiography could be a fun and hilarious romp but it actually grows rather repetitive and tiresome. Alley’s biggest pitfall is how shallow and self-absorbed she seems. She describes outfits worn 25 years ago in pain-staking detail and constantly reminds the reader how fit she was in her size two jeans. This is at odds with the self-deprecating humour found elsewhere and at her worst Alley comes across as simply crazy or delusional. There is also a chapter about Alley’s Scientology beliefs where she reverts to preaching about the faith. Some fans may appreciate this insight into her character, but the descriptions about her family i.e. her father, grandfather and son are more honest and candid, because they lack the pretension and obvious name-dropping that mar the other chapters. The Art Of Men (I Prefer Mine al Dente) is like the book equivalent of a rare steak. There are some readers that will find it half-baked and undercooked while others will enjoy the taste of an irreverent woman who speaks her mind through a puff piece. It’s an autobiography that won’t win any grand prizes in literature but it should sell copies thanks to Alley’s fame. Even so, I was left occasionally thinking she should have retained a little more mystery about her kooky, celebrity-filled life. Originally published on 3 February 2013 at the following website: http://www.theaureview.com/sydney/boo... Visit The Au Review’s homepage at: http://www.theaureview.com/

  29. 5 out of 5

    Marie

    what the fuck is this bullshit

  30. 4 out of 5

    Laurel-Rain

    In Kirstie Alley's newest memoir, "The Art of Men (I Prefer Mine al Dente)," she fills the reader in on her relationships with the men in her life, and sets each of these stories within the context of her life growing up, as well as during her journey as an actress. She fills us in on her first love, as well as the "crushes" she had along the way. Her friendships with men, as distinguished from her lovers, sometimes bordered on more, but for various reasons, did not morph into lover mode. Like he In Kirstie Alley's newest memoir, "The Art of Men (I Prefer Mine al Dente)," she fills the reader in on her relationships with the men in her life, and sets each of these stories within the context of her life growing up, as well as during her journey as an actress. She fills us in on her first love, as well as the "crushes" she had along the way. Her friendships with men, as distinguished from her lovers, sometimes bordered on more, but for various reasons, did not morph into lover mode. Like her relationship with John Travolta. At some point, the two of them decided that their friendship was more important than taking the relationship further. As a result, they have been good friends for many years. To sum up some of Ms. Alley's "rules" for love, she tells us about the lines she won't cross and how that has worked out for her. She doesn't spend much time talking about her famously notorious weight battles, but her frank and sometimes bawdy "voice" in this book is a reminder of her very human side, as well as her comic genius. The book was entertaining and felt like a conversation between friends. I didn't learn a lot that I hadn't already read about, but I liked what I did learn. I give this one four stars.

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