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Charles lives on the black planet, a place where plague machines terrorize citizens with swarms of locusts and rivers of blood, salesmen sell sleep in the form of brain implants, and God appears on the television every night to warn of the upcoming apocalypse. When Charles meets Leda, a woman who claims to have escaped from hell, he begins to suspect that the black planet Charles lives on the black planet, a place where plague machines terrorize citizens with swarms of locusts and rivers of blood, salesmen sell sleep in the form of brain implants, and God appears on the television every night to warn of the upcoming apocalypse. When Charles meets Leda, a woman who claims to have escaped from hell, he begins to suspect that the black planet is not at all what it appears to be. After Leda disappears, Charles sets out to find her with help from his stripper ex-girlfriend, the deadhead Jeanine. Along the way he will uncover the truth of the origins of the black planet, and discover the source of the mysterious voice that calls to Leda from the ocean waves.


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Charles lives on the black planet, a place where plague machines terrorize citizens with swarms of locusts and rivers of blood, salesmen sell sleep in the form of brain implants, and God appears on the television every night to warn of the upcoming apocalypse. When Charles meets Leda, a woman who claims to have escaped from hell, he begins to suspect that the black planet Charles lives on the black planet, a place where plague machines terrorize citizens with swarms of locusts and rivers of blood, salesmen sell sleep in the form of brain implants, and God appears on the television every night to warn of the upcoming apocalypse. When Charles meets Leda, a woman who claims to have escaped from hell, he begins to suspect that the black planet is not at all what it appears to be. After Leda disappears, Charles sets out to find her with help from his stripper ex-girlfriend, the deadhead Jeanine. Along the way he will uncover the truth of the origins of the black planet, and discover the source of the mysterious voice that calls to Leda from the ocean waves.

30 review for The Crooked God Machine

  1. 5 out of 5

    Shamus McCarty

    WOW! There’s some really raw talent here. This is good, it’s really raw, but the imagination at work here is fantastic. The one thing that bothered me a little, and I’m going to breeze through this because I don’t want you to focus on it, is it needs to be proof read about two more times. Not to dwell on this, but it also needs a professional editor to go through it and clean up some of the awkward sentences and imagery. It can get muddy at times. ***Slight spoilery ahead*** Ok, now to the stuff I WOW! There’s some really raw talent here. This is good, it’s really raw, but the imagination at work here is fantastic. The one thing that bothered me a little, and I’m going to breeze through this because I don’t want you to focus on it, is it needs to be proof read about two more times. Not to dwell on this, but it also needs a professional editor to go through it and clean up some of the awkward sentences and imagery. It can get muddy at times. ***Slight spoilery ahead*** Ok, now to the stuff I LOVED! Right off the bat, I got the feeling something was wrong. There’s a lot of crazy messed up things going on in this world, but that’s not what I’m talking about. I got the feeling that something was wrong on a deeper level. She never said it, or even hinted at it. The writing its self tells you. The voice of the story tells you things are probably not what they seem. There’s something going on. And that’s HARD to do! But Autumn executed it perfectly. Which brings me to the next thing. The story. I felt a connection to the characters. I felt like I understood who they were and why they were acting the way they did. I genuinely cared about them and liked them. As the story unfolds, and I was sitting here going “What the F is going on?” I didn’t give up on it, because I wanted to know what was happening next. And I wanted to get to the bottom of this WTF feeling I was having. It’s a difficult book to classify. If you held a gun to my head and said, “CLASSIFY OR DIE!” I would reply. “I don’t know! Maybe slipstream / bizarro with horror tendencies?” And then you would shoot me, because what does that even mean? Not recommended for Literature Nazis, but highly recommended for those who like a good brain raw-dogging.

  2. 5 out of 5

    Adam Nicolai

    This is one cool frickin' book. I'd never heard of Autumn Christian before. I found Crooked God Machine when I saw on Goodreads that someone who enjoyed my novel, Alex, had given this a 5-star review. I read the sample just to check it out, and it was like black arms reached out from the mud, grabbed me by the ankles, and pulled me under. An Amazon reviewer mentioned Salvador Dali - I had the same thought. The writing is like the love child of Salvador Dali, David Lynch, and HR Giger. It's sinuou This is one cool frickin' book. I'd never heard of Autumn Christian before. I found Crooked God Machine when I saw on Goodreads that someone who enjoyed my novel, Alex, had given this a 5-star review. I read the sample just to check it out, and it was like black arms reached out from the mud, grabbed me by the ankles, and pulled me under. An Amazon reviewer mentioned Salvador Dali - I had the same thought. The writing is like the love child of Salvador Dali, David Lynch, and HR Giger. It's sinuous, cutting, insidious, unapologetic. The setting is a nightmare that won't end. If hell existed, this is what it would be like. All the elements of life that frighten us - losing the people we love, discovering there's nothing in life worth living - are here, but magnified and grotesque. From day one these people are battered with horrors. Most succumb. Some - somehow - survive. A rare few even learn to fight. Now, please, consider that this book is not for everyone. You have to have a deep love for the macabre. You have to enjoy true horror. Here's a good litmus test. Look at the following phrases. Hell shuttles Plague machines Black planet God on the television, screaming If you're intrigued, read the sample, then buy the book. If not, you won't enjoy this. Me, I enjoyed it. Deeply. I do have one caveat that it pains me to mention but I do feel has to be mentioned. There are quite a few typographical errors in this work. Missing periods and sentences that aren't capitalized are pretty common, as are misused or missing quotation marks. The worst offenders are sentence fragments, presumably the leftover products of bits of text that were moved around during revision. I don't mention these because they should make you doubt whether to buy the book - in fact, the fact that I kept reading despite them is actually a powerful testament to how much I enjoyed the book. But they occur with such frequency that at times they actually pulled me out of the flow and forced me to re-construct what the author was trying to say. I mention them because anything that interferes with a reader's ability to become completely absorbed by this book is a horrible shame. When they occurred in the last fifteen pages, I truly, actively hated them - but only because they were in my way. I also mention them so that you're warned going in. They're there, and they are well worth ignoring. Ms. Christian's voice is strong enough that the brittle pieces of typographical detritus that try to weigh it down will just crumble away if you let them. Thank you for a wonderful novel, Autumn Christian. I picked up A Gentle Hell and I'll be watching for more from you.

  3. 5 out of 5

    Ryan Clifton

    Insanely brutal dystopian nightmare that almost makes Orwell's world look like a paradise. The fact that Christian wrote this when she was only 19 is pretty fucking amazing.

  4. 5 out of 5

    Phillip Smith

    I have never read anything even close to the outright insanity that is in these pages. It's is a mean explosion of ideas, an epic quest to reconcile a lost faith, a dystopian novel that continuously rewrites the limits of the genre. But in all of the horror, there are moments of tenderness that strike like a hammer blow to the head. In a book this crazy, it's a pretty masterful balance. Autumn Christian's "The Crooked God Machine" is vivid, visceral, and relentless. Just read it and see for your I have never read anything even close to the outright insanity that is in these pages. It's is a mean explosion of ideas, an epic quest to reconcile a lost faith, a dystopian novel that continuously rewrites the limits of the genre. But in all of the horror, there are moments of tenderness that strike like a hammer blow to the head. In a book this crazy, it's a pretty masterful balance. Autumn Christian's "The Crooked God Machine" is vivid, visceral, and relentless. Just read it and see for yourself.

  5. 4 out of 5

    Megan Kennedy

    Right off the bat: this book is not for everyone. If you can’t untie your mind and let in some seriously surreal dystopian horror wander in, you may not enjoy it. I implore you, for the good of your soul, to try, because this book is fucking fantastic. This debut novel from Autumn Christian is full of a thick, ancient darkness; Christian has a voice and a worldview unlike any author I’ve ever read, able to twist the most unexpected objects and symbols into a cohesive, unforgettable story. The bo Right off the bat: this book is not for everyone. If you can’t untie your mind and let in some seriously surreal dystopian horror wander in, you may not enjoy it. I implore you, for the good of your soul, to try, because this book is fucking fantastic. This debut novel from Autumn Christian is full of a thick, ancient darkness; Christian has a voice and a worldview unlike any author I’ve ever read, able to twist the most unexpected objects and symbols into a cohesive, unforgettable story. The book follows Charles, who lives on the Black Planet, where dead babies are fed to a swamp witch, plague machines roam across the land terrorizing the citizens with ice storms and locust swarms, and God himself is on TV in a black horned mask is on TV, nightly damning mankind and warning of the coming apocalypse. The emotional tone of the work is thick and heavy, and almost feels like a sludgy poison in your veins. And yet there is a lightness that shines through in the irrepressible hope of Charles, a hope that keeps drawing what little beauty is left in the world to him like moths to a flame, which only strengthens his hope and keeps him fighting to somehow undo the horrifying world he lives in. The imagery is unlike anything you’ll read: demented, blazingly imaginative, unsettling and unforgettable, far above par for any novel, let alone horror. Christian’s pacing has a deliciously crawling dread that builds to a somewhat abrupt ending, but it doesn’t leave the reader unsatisfied. It’s only that you, like its poor inhabitants, become completely trapped by the black planet by book’s end.

  6. 5 out of 5

    David Thirteen

    This book comes close to redefining dystopian. It presents a nightmare vision of a world dominated by a savage religion, where each day the new normal is worse than before. The most terrifying thing about the story is the way the characters accept each new indignity and brutality. And what really ratchets the horror up is how similar this bizarre place is to our own world. The book was a bleak yet rewarding experience. My only complaint was that often the narrative appears to be running in absen This book comes close to redefining dystopian. It presents a nightmare vision of a world dominated by a savage religion, where each day the new normal is worse than before. The most terrifying thing about the story is the way the characters accept each new indignity and brutality. And what really ratchets the horror up is how similar this bizarre place is to our own world. The book was a bleak yet rewarding experience. My only complaint was that often the narrative appears to be running in absence of any plot with one weird incident after another. It all comes around in the end, and ultimately the weird incidents were worth the time, so this is an extremely minor complaint. Definitely not like anything you’ve read before.

  7. 4 out of 5

    Pedro Proença

    This book is a bleak, sad story about a world ruled by a monstrous God and one man's journey to find his lost love. It's like a acid-infused, dreamlike, dystopic reading of the Old Testament. Charles lives in a world tormented by monsters and "plague machines" (machines that produce Bible-like plagues, like turning water into blood and sending locusts). One day, Charle's father leaves, and then is when things begin to fall apart. His mother and sister choose to have an invasive procedure that turne This book is a bleak, sad story about a world ruled by a monstrous God and one man's journey to find his lost love. It's like a acid-infused, dreamlike, dystopic reading of the Old Testament. Charles lives in a world tormented by monsters and "plague machines" (machines that produce Bible-like plagues, like turning water into blood and sending locusts). One day, Charle's father leaves, and then is when things begin to fall apart. His mother and sister choose to have an invasive procedure that turned them into drooling, mindless zombies. His best friend is a sociopathic prophet, and God is a mask-wearing men on television who speaks only of the damnation of mankind. I really liked this book, it exposes the dangers of living in a world ruled literally by the God from the Old Testament. The landscapes painted by author Autumn Christian are apocalyptc wastelands and rotten towns. This is beautifully written, the scenes pop out of the page. The ending blew my mind. I thought it was heading in a certain direction, and then it completely changed. Sensational book.

  8. 4 out of 5

    Rodney

    After some reflection, I will do my best here to sum up my thoughts. I cannot reference or run any parallels to the old testament, as I have not read it. However, I thoroughly enjoyed the book. Autumn Christian has further cemented herself into my consciousness as a favorite author. There was a lot going on in the story, yet it never felt overwhelming. The main character constantly struggled to save those around him, through a very harsh reality. Being in love only seemed to add to his pain. He After some reflection, I will do my best here to sum up my thoughts. I cannot reference or run any parallels to the old testament, as I have not read it. However, I thoroughly enjoyed the book. Autumn Christian has further cemented herself into my consciousness as a favorite author. There was a lot going on in the story, yet it never felt overwhelming. The main character constantly struggled to save those around him, through a very harsh reality. Being in love only seemed to add to his pain. He showed a huge amount of strength and determination. The book's take on religion sat well with me. There were many examples of a herd mentality dominating nearly all of the population, reflecting much of what still exists today. My only negative here is that the kindle edition I read was certainly in need of some more editing.

  9. 4 out of 5

    Mattzog

    This book is unburdened by plot or character. It reads like the stream of consciousness ramblings of someone who is supremely and unreasonably confident that they will be a great author. I must admit I couldn't get past 20%; I had to give up. I don't like to give up on a book, but I found Crooked God Machine intensely displeasurable. The good? Lemme try at least... The descriptions were creative, sorta... They were wordy at least. But in the service of nothing. Crooked God Machine seems like a wri This book is unburdened by plot or character. It reads like the stream of consciousness ramblings of someone who is supremely and unreasonably confident that they will be a great author. I must admit I couldn't get past 20%; I had to give up. I don't like to give up on a book, but I found Crooked God Machine intensely displeasurable. The good? Lemme try at least... The descriptions were creative, sorta... They were wordy at least. But in the service of nothing. Crooked God Machine seems like a writer's early attempt at a novel that should've been thrown away, not published. Well, at least in the first fifth that's what it seemed like to me. And there was a good quote: "The world doesn't need your head, only your body. It never wanted your head." The description misrepresents the book in my opinion.

  10. 5 out of 5

    Lully Kellogg

    I've been following the work of Autumn Christian since she was posting short stories on deviantART about The Sims and broken ballerinas. Her work has captured me in a way no ore author has ever been capable of doing. The Crooked God Machine is pure Christian literature, uncomfortably real, pure spiritual darkness that you discover within yourself. Granted there are some errors in grammar (or words missing entirely or repeated, I'm guessing they were just editing errors), it can be a little awkwa I've been following the work of Autumn Christian since she was posting short stories on deviantART about The Sims and broken ballerinas. Her work has captured me in a way no ore author has ever been capable of doing. The Crooked God Machine is pure Christian literature, uncomfortably real, pure spiritual darkness that you discover within yourself. Granted there are some errors in grammar (or words missing entirely or repeated, I'm guessing they were just editing errors), it can be a little awkward trying to read, but I'm telling you, no amount of minor errors are worth not reading this book. You definitely take something from this. The Crooked God Machine is an experience.

  11. 5 out of 5

    Hagai Palevsky

    I thought some things were untouchable, unable to be harmed, even after all this time. But nothing is. Not here. Not in this world.

  12. 5 out of 5

    Scott

    A dark and surreal tale about the Black Planet, The Crooked God machine tells the story of Charles who is born into an insane world run by a God who communicates to people via television. It is a world populated by plague machines, prophets and hell shuttles. A planet where life makes no sense and people willingly undergo lobotomy type procedures in order to cope with that fact. And yet there is Charles who just wants to understand life, and to find someone to love and to love him in return. The A dark and surreal tale about the Black Planet, The Crooked God machine tells the story of Charles who is born into an insane world run by a God who communicates to people via television. It is a world populated by plague machines, prophets and hell shuttles. A planet where life makes no sense and people willingly undergo lobotomy type procedures in order to cope with that fact. And yet there is Charles who just wants to understand life, and to find someone to love and to love him in return. The author Autumn Christian has one of the most unique voices I have ever encountered. To me it is all parts poetic, surreal, bleak, and beautiful. She has told a nightmarish story here, one that mirrors the old testament of the Bible in many ways. One that translates it into a modern vision. That repurposes, reimagines, rewords, and yet still has at its core the central confusion of the Bible, and of life itself. Why is God so full of anger? Why is life so confusing? What is love and why is it so fleeting? And why do humans destroy themselves? Charles is a rebel at heart. A boy that grows into a man who has watched all those he loves give up, or run off in desperation and fear. The people around him all seem to be under the spell of this angry and jealous God. But he senses that there must be something more to life, that things are just not right. This story is really his search, his attempt to find the scattered pieces of reality and attempt to put them back together. Sometimes I read something so powerful and so original that it shifts something within me, within my thinking and how I view the world. Philip K Dick was one who did this time and again for me. Now I can add Autumn Christian to that list.

  13. 5 out of 5

    Jay Knioum

    I'm exiting this book with a paradoxical feeling of exhiliration, given the absolute, open-wound, smothered-in-black-tar darkness of the world it presents. Because it's the story threading its way through this ashen world that is so blazing hot and full of life, and the core message of humanity against the worst of all possible truths that I find liberating. Even beautiful. Yes, the book does need a good proofreading, but that honestly doesn't matter. Rather, it is a testament to this author's a I'm exiting this book with a paradoxical feeling of exhiliration, given the absolute, open-wound, smothered-in-black-tar darkness of the world it presents. Because it's the story threading its way through this ashen world that is so blazing hot and full of life, and the core message of humanity against the worst of all possible truths that I find liberating. Even beautiful. Yes, the book does need a good proofreading, but that honestly doesn't matter. Rather, it is a testament to this author's ability to tell one hell of a story that the errors just kind of become part of the jarring, surreal narrative after a while. Am I making excuses? Probably, I'm not dwelling on this stuff. As other reviewers have pointed out, this one isn't for everyone. It's not easily classified. It certainly has a lot to say, and you'll wade in bile and blood and savage sorrow on every page. But for all that, it's a magnificent book.

  14. 5 out of 5

    Hatchet Mouth

    A surrealist romp through the Old Testament that constructs a new mythology. The Crooked God Machine is at once a sermon and a cautionary tale about accepting religious propaganda without question. To lift a quote from a Marilyn Manson tune, 'God is in the tv' and He is angry. All young Charles ever wanted was to be loved. Instead, he has a taxidermy-obsessed father, a mother who has surrendered all independant thought to a euphoric brain implant stimulated by the television and a host of girlfri A surrealist romp through the Old Testament that constructs a new mythology. The Crooked God Machine is at once a sermon and a cautionary tale about accepting religious propaganda without question. To lift a quote from a Marilyn Manson tune, 'God is in the tv' and He is angry. All young Charles ever wanted was to be loved. Instead, he has a taxidermy-obsessed father, a mother who has surrendered all independant thought to a euphoric brain implant stimulated by the television and a host of girlfriends who are each tragic figures in their own right, doomed to fall away from Charles as he is unable to save them from the hell shuttles, Jolene the swamp hag and divine sentries wearing animal masks. Autumn Christian's first novel begins with an absurdist flavor, but finds its plot a hundred pages in as it thunders along to its explosive ending.

  15. 4 out of 5

    Corey Conley

    I wanted to like this book. I really did. However, I found the metaphors and odd descriptions more of a distraction than anything. They kept taking me out of the story. I also feel that the entire book was dark for dark's sake. A roller-coaster needs balance. It needs to have ups and downs, twists and turns, fast and slow. Too much scare, and one's body can't handle it. Too much slow, and you're bored to death. This story stayed dark, depressed, and full of despair so much that it took away any I wanted to like this book. I really did. However, I found the metaphors and odd descriptions more of a distraction than anything. They kept taking me out of the story. I also feel that the entire book was dark for dark's sake. A roller-coaster needs balance. It needs to have ups and downs, twists and turns, fast and slow. Too much scare, and one's body can't handle it. Too much slow, and you're bored to death. This story stayed dark, depressed, and full of despair so much that it took away any impact it should've had on me. There was no attempt at balance or a chance to smile. When it ended, I literally said, "Well, of course that's how it would go. Why wouldn't it?" Meh.

  16. 5 out of 5

    Luke Knight

    This is the only work by Autumn Christian that I've read, but if it is indicative of her other work it's a crime that this author is not a household name among fans of literary-leaning horror and science fiction. While several of Christian's influences are put on flagrant display (the all-knowing television celebrities of "Do Androids Dream of Electric Sleep?," the mythical authoritarian tyrant of "1984," etc.) the real meat of this work is the author's singularly unique voice and fresh approach This is the only work by Autumn Christian that I've read, but if it is indicative of her other work it's a crime that this author is not a household name among fans of literary-leaning horror and science fiction. While several of Christian's influences are put on flagrant display (the all-knowing television celebrities of "Do Androids Dream of Electric Sleep?," the mythical authoritarian tyrant of "1984," etc.) the real meat of this work is the author's singularly unique voice and fresh approach. This is 10% worship of classic dystopian tales and 90% something mind-rendingly psychedelic, heart-crushingly despair filled, and, most importantly, utterly fresh. It's impossible to imply the feel, tone, and even plot of this thing in a short review, as the real magic here is in Christian's fascinating world building, doom-ridden atmosphere, and enchanting command of language. The author has so perfected her alien approach to storytelling that she's managed to convey a mind-bending narrative in an utterly alien world riddled with strange, sometimes non-sensical metaphor without ever confusing the reader or letting her work fall into the bloated and pretentious world of willfully obtuse, intentionally difficult faux-artistry. The first few pages are an utter whirlwind, but once you settle in it's refreshingly easy to fall into Christian's groove and hold on for the ride. Now, at this point you may be wondering why I've only given this novel 3 stars with such a glowing review. The answer has nothing to do with the writing, and everything to do with editing: the soft cover version of this thing is an utter mess. Missing words, obtuse punctuation, spelling and capitalization errors, etc abound. This was so prevalent that at first I thought it was an intentional stylistic device; however, as the mistakes piled up and offered nothing but confusion and reading difficulty to the story, I began to wonder if the wrong draft got sent to the printer (*note: I think this is likely as my fiancee read the e-book version and didn't notice any of these issues). Despite the shoddy copy editing, this novel is nothing short of a masterpiece. If you enjoy the darker side of science fiction and the psychedelic side of horror, this is a must-read.

  17. 4 out of 5

    Craig DiLouie

    Autumn Christian's existential-dystopian nightmare CROOKED GOD MACHINE is unflinching in its dark portrayal of a planet oppressed by an insane God. It’s as if David Lynch said no fiction could outweird ERASHERHEAD, and Christian said, hold my beer. The result is something bizarro, something horror, something philosophical and religious. When I started reading it, I snagged on the weird elements and wondered whether my willing suspension of disbelief was up for the investment, but the story keeps Autumn Christian's existential-dystopian nightmare CROOKED GOD MACHINE is unflinching in its dark portrayal of a planet oppressed by an insane God. It’s as if David Lynch said no fiction could outweird ERASHERHEAD, and Christian said, hold my beer. The result is something bizarro, something horror, something philosophical and religious. When I started reading it, I snagged on the weird elements and wondered whether my willing suspension of disbelief was up for the investment, but the story keeps turning up the weird volume until by the end it goes well beyond 11, and it wasn’t long before I was thoroughly hooked on this bleak drug. So here’s the story. Charles is a good man hoping to love and be loved in a world ruled by a God intent on punishing his subjects and soon ending it. Monsters roam the woods, vast machines wreak Biblical havoc in scheduled plagues, Hell shuttles round up people to send below based on quotas, and God screams from the TV all day when a show isn’t on promoting implants that keep the body active while the brain passes into a decade-long sleep. As the world slowly ends all around him, Charles sets out to resist and finally confront God based on secret knowledge that this was all not what was intended by the original creators. The story is titillating in its uncompromising weirdness and destruction of sanity, but it’s pretty bleak, though a counterpoint to nihilism is expressed as hope even if it’s undeserved. While Christian’s world is clearly insane and seemingly random, there’s a strange internal logic to the story that ties it together and infuses it with meaning. The result is a dark and titillating read that’s strangely fun. My only big criticism is the story would benefit from editing, as there are numerous typos, missing words, etc. that might distract some readers. If you think you might dig a strong fusion of bizarro and horror, check it out.

  18. 5 out of 5

    Richard

    Crooked God Machine is surreal, disturbing, and utterly engrossing. The first half of the book reads like a series of fever dreams that are connected only by the ongoing appearance of the same characters, but it eventually comes together as a single story arc that ends in a way I didn't expect, but really should have given the entire rest of the book that came before it. It leans heavily into the surreal, dystopian horror angle in the beginning before adding more and more scifi elements up until Crooked God Machine is surreal, disturbing, and utterly engrossing. The first half of the book reads like a series of fever dreams that are connected only by the ongoing appearance of the same characters, but it eventually comes together as a single story arc that ends in a way I didn't expect, but really should have given the entire rest of the book that came before it. It leans heavily into the surreal, dystopian horror angle in the beginning before adding more and more scifi elements up until the end, but all of the concepts mesh well together and are brought to life with vivid description. The ebook version of this is, according to the author's note, a second edition with some further editing added to clean it up. It also added a short story in the end that appears to take place in the same universe as the book itself. It's an interesting short and the brief snapshot we see of universe filled with custom tailored, corporate run worlds (some of which have gone horribly wrong) is quite interesting. Overall, this was quite the experience!

  19. 5 out of 5

    Joel

    Warren Ellis sent me. Those of you who know--that sentence is enough. Yet, it isn't enough. This book is brutal and beautiful. Horrifying and majestic. All in equal measure. It's angry and hateful. Its hopeful and yearning. David Lynch on mescaline couldn't come close to some of the ideas and images rendered here. It's a fever dream that never breaks. God is real and must be killed. God doesn't care if you live or die and you have to reconcile that. This book demands attentions and will claw your e Warren Ellis sent me. Those of you who know--that sentence is enough. Yet, it isn't enough. This book is brutal and beautiful. Horrifying and majestic. All in equal measure. It's angry and hateful. Its hopeful and yearning. David Lynch on mescaline couldn't come close to some of the ideas and images rendered here. It's a fever dream that never breaks. God is real and must be killed. God doesn't care if you live or die and you have to reconcile that. This book demands attentions and will claw your eyes out because of it. It's a facehugger. What this book is trying to say won't hit you until the megaton of import punctures your chest and leaves you screaming to go and infect another person. Read this damned work. You'll be blessed for it.

  20. 4 out of 5

    Jerzy Baranowski

    Good but flawed I bought it after recommendation on Warren Ellis’ Twitter This might be a spoiler. I see this book as very similar to ‘I have no mouth but I must scream’. Many reviews talk about overwhelming gore but I cannot say that this is a case. While reading it, you can see possible directions where it can go and still be good and it goes that way, so no dumb twists. However, even the second edition is still lacking of a good editor. Note from author can actually explain lot of shortcomings. Good but flawed I bought it after recommendation on Warren Ellis’ Twitter This might be a spoiler. I see this book as very similar to ‘I have no mouth but I must scream’. Many reviews talk about overwhelming gore but I cannot say that this is a case. While reading it, you can see possible directions where it can go and still be good and it goes that way, so no dumb twists. However, even the second edition is still lacking of a good editor. Note from author can actually explain lot of shortcomings. I recommend reading amazon kindle sample before buying the book. Style is in this case everything and either you like it or not.

  21. 4 out of 5

    Clarence

    Based on the recommendation of another writer's newsletter I read this I got around to reading this. I'm no fan of horror cause I don't do recreational fear but this book was compelling in a wild ride through both existential dread and mundane human emptiness type way. It be weird to call this book fun while the contents of this book sit in my head like an alien monolith but it was something I really ended up enjoying the journey on. Its not for everyone but If it is for you, you will enjoy it li Based on the recommendation of another writer's newsletter I read this I got around to reading this. I'm no fan of horror cause I don't do recreational fear but this book was compelling in a wild ride through both existential dread and mundane human emptiness type way. It be weird to call this book fun while the contents of this book sit in my head like an alien monolith but it was something I really ended up enjoying the journey on. Its not for everyone but If it is for you, you will enjoy it like nothing else.

  22. 4 out of 5

    Ryan Reed

    This book was fantastic. It was dark, riveting and terrifying. Definately not for the faint of heart. It unearths base and primordial fears. It puts you into horrifying situations without hope. It was quite an experience. I would give it 4 stars (my rating for books that I would suggest to others to read) if not for the graphic content. So, if graphic content does not bother you, consider this book recommended.

  23. 5 out of 5

    Matt

    A surrealistic nightmare of scenes, as if Dali and Dante had a lovechild. A dystopian landscape where God in his black mask rules with hell shuttles and machines that spew out all means of plagues. All the loss that surrounds Charles is heart-rending and disturbing all at the same time. It was an interesting, strange book that I think having a copy-editor going through it would not take anything away and would actually make some of the imagery even more disquieting by providing clarity.

  24. 4 out of 5

    tatum

    i cant remember how i found this on amazon, but i bought and read it in one sitting for whatever reason! really effective brash gore and despair, very bleak, oily, bloody. unique mish mash of swampy folk body horror and HR Giger, fahrenheit 451 scifi. some things i got bored by, some things i had to take in stride (I will be thinking about the flame thrower graduation for weeks) but all and all a neat read

  25. 4 out of 5

    Austin Archinal

    This book was definitely engaging. Autumn Christian demonstrates a singular control over horrifying, visceral descriptions of a nightmarish world and the situation of characters within that world. It's an extremely unsettling story. Overall, the narrative describes an abandoned, bleak reflection of our past, present, and future with prose so affecting that I was uncomfortable for the entire read.

  26. 4 out of 5

    Shane Carley

    It's an interesting book that has a lot to say, although do think it beats the reader over the head a bit. Very stylized prose that gives the story a uniquely surreal feeling, although it does start to feel like a little much after a while. I respect the difficulty of self-publishing, so I can forgive a few scattered missteps, but I have to say the number of typos and mistakes is REALLY disappointing for what is allegedly a "revised edition." It is incredibly distracting.

  27. 4 out of 5

    Eric Gaddis

    Horrific beyond what I expected. Autumn Christian has constructed something terrible, definitely in the best way. parts of this book are from everyone's lives. It is the blackened fears from dark moments at night, huddled under the covers hiding from monsters, praying to God to protect you.

  28. 5 out of 5

    Al

    Tremendous story of hope and despair and fighting and striving against the darkness of a mad world Highly recommended - the author builds a world of oppression and fear and grief and casts a group of characters adrift in that world - can hope survive? Read and see!

  29. 5 out of 5

    Daniel

    Holy hell. This was a book that reaches out with dripping, clawed hands, grabs your head, and refuses to let you look away. Compelling and beautifully written book about so much that is ugly. It could have benefited from another copy edit, but it’s honestly so compelling you barely notice.

  30. 4 out of 5

    Steve Fenton

    A chaotic dystopian society forced to bend before an angry God contrasts with characters with gritty Orwellian honesty. There are no heroes in this book, just flawed broken people at the mercy of the merciless monsters and machines that would drag them to hell. I couldn't put it down.

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