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Hollywood, 1996. When Monster Magazine reporter Clint Stockbern sets out to interview the legendary '50s horror movie director Landis Woodley, he uncovers a bizarre story of real-life horror. Flashback to Hollywood, 1957. Woodley is shooting his latest zombie movie, Cadaver, in a real morgue when he has a brainstorm that will help him pinch some pennies. But when zombie mak Hollywood, 1996. When Monster Magazine reporter Clint Stockbern sets out to interview the legendary '50s horror movie director Landis Woodley, he uncovers a bizarre story of real-life horror. Flashback to Hollywood, 1957. Woodley is shooting his latest zombie movie, Cadaver, in a real morgue when he has a brainstorm that will help him pinch some pennies. But when zombie make-up effects are replaced by real corpses, a deadly curse begins to take its toll on those foolish enough to become involved with the filming of the soon-to-be cult classic, Cadaver.


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Hollywood, 1996. When Monster Magazine reporter Clint Stockbern sets out to interview the legendary '50s horror movie director Landis Woodley, he uncovers a bizarre story of real-life horror. Flashback to Hollywood, 1957. Woodley is shooting his latest zombie movie, Cadaver, in a real morgue when he has a brainstorm that will help him pinch some pennies. But when zombie mak Hollywood, 1996. When Monster Magazine reporter Clint Stockbern sets out to interview the legendary '50s horror movie director Landis Woodley, he uncovers a bizarre story of real-life horror. Flashback to Hollywood, 1957. Woodley is shooting his latest zombie movie, Cadaver, in a real morgue when he has a brainstorm that will help him pinch some pennies. But when zombie make-up effects are replaced by real corpses, a deadly curse begins to take its toll on those foolish enough to become involved with the filming of the soon-to-be cult classic, Cadaver.

30 review for Horror Show

  1. 5 out of 5

    Melki

    "They paid to see the magic. They want to believe, Buzzy, they want to dream. And that's what we sell 'em . . . we sell 'em nightmares." What do you get when you combine a schlocky-horror film director, who's so desperate for a hit he uses real cadavers in his latest flick, with a Satanist who's determined to conjure The Big Guy himself? Pure, unadulterated fun, with a little bit of creepiness, my friends; that's what you get. Our story opens with a life-long horror fan living out his teen-boy f "They paid to see the magic. They want to believe, Buzzy, they want to dream. And that's what we sell 'em . . . we sell 'em nightmares." What do you get when you combine a schlocky-horror film director, who's so desperate for a hit he uses real cadavers in his latest flick, with a Satanist who's determined to conjure The Big Guy himself? Pure, unadulterated fun, with a little bit of creepiness, my friends; that's what you get. Our story opens with a life-long horror fan living out his teen-boy fantasy - getting to interview legendary horror filmmaker Landis Woodley for Monster Magazine. As Woodley tells his sad tale, we flash back to the late fifties, and the terrifying goings-on that changed so many lives. The fun and mayhem begins, and really never lets up. Yes, the author is indeed that Greg Kihn of Jeopardy and The Breakup Song fame, and if you think he doesn't know anything about horror, take another look at the Jeopardy video - https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=yAJNw.... (I'm glad I only invited 35 zombies to my wedding!) The horror in this book is fairly mild, as is the sex and violins violence. It reminds me of nothing so much as one of those old b&w movies to which it pays tribute. I wouldn't be surprised to see it filmed, and featured on this guy's show. Unless Elvira's still doing her thing. Then it should definitely be hosted by her. Is the book really worth five stars? No, probably not, but I enjoyed the heck out of it. I don't recall ever reading anything that brought back such great memories of Saturday nights in front of the TV when I ate up those campy old monster movies.

  2. 5 out of 5

    Rachel (TheShadesofOrange)

    3.5 Stars This was such a fun horror novel for horror movie buffs. There were so many wonderfully quoteable lines.

  3. 5 out of 5

    Tim

    Wow… this is one of those rare books that I have a list of complaints that I could make, but simply enjoyed it so much that I don’t care. Let me start off by getting this out of the way. The writing is adequate, but not great. The plot is uneven and some of the supernatural aspects seem tacked on. Also, the conclusion is a bit of a mess that left me with way more questions (and I don’t think that was the intention). Alright, now with all of those complaints, some of them fairly substantial, I sh Wow… this is one of those rare books that I have a list of complaints that I could make, but simply enjoyed it so much that I don’t care. Let me start off by getting this out of the way. The writing is adequate, but not great. The plot is uneven and some of the supernatural aspects seem tacked on. Also, the conclusion is a bit of a mess that left me with way more questions (and I don’t think that was the intention). Alright, now with all of those complaints, some of them fairly substantial, I should probably give this three stars max. Hell no. This is one of the most solidly entertaining horror novels I’ve read in some time… and as strange as this sounds, I actually would have probably liked the book more had all supernatural/actual horror moments been taken out. The book follows a film crew in 1957 trying to make a film called “Cadaver.” It’s a gimmicky horror movie, directed by a man who is an obvious combination of Ed Wood and William Castle (don’t know who they are? This is probably not the book for you…) . A good portion of the novel follows the trials of filming the movie, dealing with two stars (one of whom is essentially a later years drug addicted Bela Lugosi and the other is your standard young star who can’t act, but has perfect hair) and a special effects guy who has a tendency to get drunk and play some truly horrendous practical jokes. These sections are an absolute blast. Hell, I will go so far as to say this book could have been written specifically for me. It plays into my love of 50s cinema, and I truly love books and movies about making films (Burton’s Ed Wood is one of my top 10 favorite films). Reading about this film crew making their B-pictures… as far as I’m concerned, that could have been over 1000 pages and I wouldn’t have gotten bored. Now the whole demon possession and curse bit… eh, been there done that. Don’t get me wrong, it’s not bad, but I’ve seen these elements done better in plenty of books. The story really shines when Kihn ignores it and just focuses on the filmmaking. I really enjoyed this book, and am giving it a solid 4 stars, but with the note that unless you’re a big fan of 50s horror cinema and know who the classic stars of the genre are, it will probably not hold up as well for you as it did for me. Fun note: the author Greg Kihn is the same Greg Kihn of the Greg Kihn Band (Why yes I am trying to see how many times I can get away with writing Greg Kihn in a sentence… how did you know?). The urge to start this review saying “They don’t write ‘em like that anymore” was so strong. I managed to resist it just barely, but am still making a note of it here so you all know my sacrifice.

  4. 4 out of 5

    Bryce Wilson

    Could have been so much better. Story starts off well, with interesting points about the way film present sweeps film past under the rug and an intriguing plot about the origins of a cursed film. Unfortunately these only show up in the framing device, once that's done so is most of the fun. Once we go back to the past we also lose a lot of the fun and the book becomes a game of "Match the skeleton to the closet to the thinly veiled fictional character" which really isn't that hard for anyone wit Could have been so much better. Story starts off well, with interesting points about the way film present sweeps film past under the rug and an intriguing plot about the origins of a cursed film. Unfortunately these only show up in the framing device, once that's done so is most of the fun. Once we go back to the past we also lose a lot of the fun and the book becomes a game of "Match the skeleton to the closet to the thinly veiled fictional character" which really isn't that hard for anyone with more then a passing interest in classic horror, or anyone whose seen Ed Wood for that matter. The revelations aren't at really all that exciting and the whole thing has a feeling of been there done that. A great book remains to be written about this era, it's just not this one.

  5. 5 out of 5

    Craig

    More fun than a barrel full of fish shooting monkees in straight-jackets with Stratocasters. Crazy, man.

  6. 5 out of 5

    Robin Bonne

    4.5 If you enjoy old b-movies, this might be the book for you.

  7. 4 out of 5

    Tobin Elliott

    Definitely a better book than Shade of Pale. This one had more fun in it, which allows Kihn's sense of humour free reign. And it's a fun little plot, demons and ghosts, both real and reel, both real and imagined. Kihn's strength, I'm beginning to learn, isn't in building intriguing characters, but he's a capable writer, and he comes up with some interesting plots. Looking forward to the sequel to this one, Big Rock Beat: A Wacky Zany Romp. Definitely a better book than Shade of Pale. This one had more fun in it, which allows Kihn's sense of humour free reign. And it's a fun little plot, demons and ghosts, both real and reel, both real and imagined. Kihn's strength, I'm beginning to learn, isn't in building intriguing characters, but he's a capable writer, and he comes up with some interesting plots. Looking forward to the sequel to this one, Big Rock Beat: A Wacky Zany Romp.

  8. 5 out of 5

    Thee_ron_clark

    I read this book a number of years back while I was in the military. A driver of mine gave it to me due to my love of a Clockwork Orange and the book's title connection to that film and book. This story has a number of twists and turns throughout. It mainly revolves around a film gone wrong, an ancient evil, a body, and a yearly sacrifice. Perhaps it doesn't fall into that particular order. I felt the book had a number of interesting plot twists and I definitely enjoyed the dark ending.

  9. 4 out of 5

    Patrick

    Plan 10 From Outer Space. Found this at the library and checked it out on a whim. Stephen King, Greg is not but I had fun with the book. Sure there are some plot holes big enough to drive a truck through but as a fan of B- horror flicks and schlock tv horror shows it was easy to overlook the flaws in favor of the fun.

  10. 4 out of 5

    Mandyhello

    I was so about to give this 5 stars.. and then the ending was so abrupt that I thought pages fell out and I spent $8 to buy the Kindle edition to make sure.. That was the real ending..

  11. 5 out of 5

    Silver Screen Videos

    Although many horror fans have fond memories of Ed Wood and his brethren of the 1950's who cranked out one cheesy fright flick after another, one thing you could count on was that their movies simply weren't very scary. Greg Kihn remedies that shortcoming by adding some seriously dangerous demonic forces to the usual B-movie shlock in his highly clever and genuinely spooky novel, Horror Show, a book that's equal parts loving homage and genuine horror. The main character in Horror Show is Landis W Although many horror fans have fond memories of Ed Wood and his brethren of the 1950's who cranked out one cheesy fright flick after another, one thing you could count on was that their movies simply weren't very scary. Greg Kihn remedies that shortcoming by adding some seriously dangerous demonic forces to the usual B-movie shlock in his highly clever and genuinely spooky novel, Horror Show, a book that's equal parts loving homage and genuine horror. The main character in Horror Show is Landis Woodley, a fictionalized Ed Wood with more talent and business sense but a considerably harder edge. Along with his special effects guru, Buzzy Haller, he has been able to make surprisingly profitable and popular horror films on virtually no money, thanks to some creative financing, but that’s about to dry up if his current film isn’t a success. The bulk of Horror Show takes place in 1957, as Woodley and Haller try to finish their latest work. Among all the ersatz horror of Woodley’s films, some genuine supernatural forces wind up getting involved in the latest production, thanks to a satanic ritual gone awry that unleashes a powerful demon. Author Greg Kihn is a veteran rock musician, and he is clearly in touch with the Hollywood scene. His description of the workings of film production, even at the lowest level, as was practiced by Woodley, is quite detailed, and readers will be able to see for themselves how shlock like Ed Wood’s films came together. In addition, Kihn populates his story with thinly fictionalized versions of Wood regulars like Bela Lugosi and Vampira, and even Wood’s crossdressing makes an appearance in the person of Woodley’s favorite screenwriter. Kihn doesn’t turn his portrayals into jokes; instead, the characters have well-rounded personalities. While Horror Show is quite effective as an homage, it’s also a very good horror novel. Obviously, the supernatural aspects of the movie require a considerable suspension of disbelief, but when the demon comes out, there are three or four very effective set pieces, and author Kihn manages to tie his two separate storylines together quite effectively. In addition to the supernatural terrors, readers also get to experience some extremely grisly goings on when Woodley and Haller decide to shoot scenes of their latest film, Cadaver, in the Los Angeles City Morgue, with some of the residents as props. While most of Horror Show takes place in 1957, Kihn bookends his story with an introduction and conclusion set in 1996 (when the book was written). In these sections, a young reporter for a Famous Monsters type magazine tries to interview the elderly and reclusive Woodley, only to get an invitation to return, in the book’s final segment, to see something really scary. Unlike some novels of this sort, the framing device isn’t a mere gimmick but manages to wrap up the novel quite cleverly. Horror Show is, first and foremost, a book that fans of the 50’s-era horror films will love, with a chance to see some of their “icons” come to life in ways both very realistic and totally bizarre. And it’s also a very creepy horror novel, one that doles out its frights selectively and quite effectively. The melding of shlock moviemaking and the supernatural into one work here is quite original and easily one of the best horror novels I’ve read in quite a while. Unlike the B-movies portrayed in Horror Show, this novel is grade A, all the way.

  12. 5 out of 5

    Danielle Klassen

    I feel like I should have a shelf in my collection for books wherein I got overzealous and was ready to five star them at the beginning and found myself losing stars along the way. And yet I still end up giving them a nod towards reading them anyway. This book fits in that category for certain! For one: Kihn (whose name you might be familiar with if you are a music fan) is a good writer and the characters he draws up are interesting and all fairly complex, even if they aren't likeable. I give pro I feel like I should have a shelf in my collection for books wherein I got overzealous and was ready to five star them at the beginning and found myself losing stars along the way. And yet I still end up giving them a nod towards reading them anyway. This book fits in that category for certain! For one: Kihn (whose name you might be familiar with if you are a music fan) is a good writer and the characters he draws up are interesting and all fairly complex, even if they aren't likeable. I give props for that because this is far from a boring book and with a cast this large, it would be in the hands of a much less interesting or skilled writer. Also, this man knows his stuff when it comes to horror, particularly that iconic decade that gave us so much in the way of creature features - The 50s. The setting is absolutely perfect and worth reading for that alone. If you are a fan of those days, please do yourself a favor and read it for the nostalgia buzz alone because this will hit all those happy buttons. And now we have to go into why I gave it only three stars with all that heaping praise. I stand by the fact that I think this was a great idea and I loved the nod towards the icons of the genre being represented here. What I have more difficulty with is that they are mostly, if not completely, unlikeable in a way that is difficult to get past. This is not always a deal breaker for me, especially given that some of my absolute favorite characters of all time are complete bastards and I love them all the more for it. What I do have a harder time with is that Kihn doesn't always give them much to balance the acidity or the cruelty of their characters. He does showcase that they can be more than just a one trick pony sometimes and I think that sometimes this is meant to be more funny than horrifying but it was harder to tell. I think if he showed the more human sides of these characters more, it would have been easier to swallow and would have given more punch when they were assholes. It's entirely possible that this was a kind of statement on Hollywood and the lack of humanity in its greed and the climb to get ahead and while that certainly comes across, it's still not always enjoyable to read. And the other star that found its way to the floor was on account of that tonal issue that came from the characters. I think this book was aiming to be funny sometimes but without the foil to make up for the more callous behavior, it sometimes just felt more awkward. There are times when it shines through and I really enjoyed that part of the book. There's one part where a character is trying to persuade another one to do something by promising to do something nice for him and upon getting what he wants, immediately forgets about it as this guy moves on to make other parts of his plan happen. It's an asshole move but it's still funny because he's not trying to be an asshole so much as it's what he does and little moments like this are actually a lot of fun to read about. Its when characters end up doing things that feel a little too far in the trying camp that I found I was no longer on board and having far less fun than I wanted to be. Still! Long review is long and all to tell you that this book has some minor tonal issues, some parts that I didn't care for and some characters that I wasn't on board for but it is a nostalgia bomb and a fitting tribute to the horror of yesteryear. If you love 1950s horror and a look at the sleezy underside of Hollywood glamour, give it a read anyway.

  13. 5 out of 5

    Warren Fournier

    Very Enjoyable Celebration of Exploitation Cinema Greg Kihn's musical output features many familiar elements of new wave, disco, and classic rock, and his hits are the kinds of tunes that get stuck in your head for weeks. Not so much with this, his first horror novel. "Horror Show" is a very loving tribute to the early days of 50s and 60s exploitation cinema, with obvious references to Ed Wood and his work, as well as to that director's relationship with Bela Lugosi, here represented by the ficti Very Enjoyable Celebration of Exploitation Cinema Greg Kihn's musical output features many familiar elements of new wave, disco, and classic rock, and his hits are the kinds of tunes that get stuck in your head for weeks. Not so much with this, his first horror novel. "Horror Show" is a very loving tribute to the early days of 50s and 60s exploitation cinema, with obvious references to Ed Wood and his work, as well as to that director's relationship with Bela Lugosi, here represented by the fictional heroin-addicted fallen star Jonathan Luboff. I love the subject matter, and I enjoyed Mr. Kihn's portrayal of a determined group of misfits with great passion for film and the macabre trying to make a splash despite their meager budgets and lack of Hollywood social cred. Everyone in this little film crew is loaded with talent, but burdened by mental illness, addiction, or some other idiosyncrasies that prejudices 50s society against them. The group is very loyal to each other despite being constantly on each other's nerves, and their inner genius emerges with each picture they make as they constantly push the envelope despite dwindling resources. This in itself would have made for a great novel in itself, but then a side plot about a snake demon gets thrown in, which does little to advance the plot, and is almost forgotten by the end of the book. Characters are introduced as pivotal, but turn out to be undeveloped or unimportant to the overall story. The pacing is a bit off as well. Though I was never bored, 80 percent of the novel is just humorous banter between the main characters, and so the darker elements, when they appear, seem to come out of nowhere. The last 10 pages contain the classic horror denouement, but there is so much lighthearted foolishness beforehand that there is no crescendo of tension and the conclusion feels rushed. Therefore, the whole novel feels somewhat lopsided. And I can't say that it was scary in the slightest. So unlike some of Mr. Kihn's pop songs, there is nothing here that will stick with you. But despite all this, I really enjoyed the experience. Just like the Z-grade movies the novel celebrates, you can pick this story apart all you want, but in the end, you can't help but admit that it was a fun little ride for those restless late nights.

  14. 5 out of 5

    Baker St Shelves

    An excellent book that celebrates filmmaking in the 50’s! If you’re familiar with real life director Ed Wood and his terrible yet entertaining movies, then you’ll greatly appreciate this as the characters really are fictional parallels to Ed Wood’s life and associates. Now this is a clear horror book, but the horror is very slow building, but that’s okay because I was still interested in the plot and the characters. Even if it wasn’t a horror book, I would still love this due to the fact it give An excellent book that celebrates filmmaking in the 50’s! If you’re familiar with real life director Ed Wood and his terrible yet entertaining movies, then you’ll greatly appreciate this as the characters really are fictional parallels to Ed Wood’s life and associates. Now this is a clear horror book, but the horror is very slow building, but that’s okay because I was still interested in the plot and the characters. Even if it wasn’t a horror book, I would still love this due to the fact it gives you a glimpse on what filmmaking was back then if you had a small budget and only less than a week to film it. Showing that even though there are much better films out there, you kinda have to admire the B movies then and now for being able to pull this off under pressure. Great book if you love classic horror movies!

  15. 4 out of 5

    Hugo

    Off to a good start, though the Ed Wood homages are a little on-the-nose (thinly veiled analogues to Ed himself, as well as Vampira and Criswell, abound) and the midnight movie tone is well set, both in the present day section as well as the lengthy flashback sequence which forms most of the narrative. Once the action resumes in the present, however, it all falls apart: the demonic possession and curse stories comes to nothing, plot twists actually confound the story rather than resolving it, an Off to a good start, though the Ed Wood homages are a little on-the-nose (thinly veiled analogues to Ed himself, as well as Vampira and Criswell, abound) and the midnight movie tone is well set, both in the present day section as well as the lengthy flashback sequence which forms most of the narrative. Once the action resumes in the present, however, it all falls apart: the demonic possession and curse stories comes to nothing, plot twists actually confound the story rather than resolving it, and the ending comes out of nowhere and means nothing. And it's never explained why there is a robot dog on the cover.

  16. 5 out of 5

    Jackie Lantern

    Nice story along the way I guess, it’s a must for horror film buffs. There’s a lot of parallels between this story and the movie Ed Wood in terms of characters you’ve definitely seen before. The ending was lame, frustrating and unsatisfactory. The main character got the chance to be a stand up guy and ... didn’t, lol. His love interest from days of yore had the chance all along to do a stand up thing when she had figured it out long long ago, and never did until the very end. The finale chapter Nice story along the way I guess, it’s a must for horror film buffs. There’s a lot of parallels between this story and the movie Ed Wood in terms of characters you’ve definitely seen before. The ending was lame, frustrating and unsatisfactory. The main character got the chance to be a stand up guy and ... didn’t, lol. His love interest from days of yore had the chance all along to do a stand up thing when she had figured it out long long ago, and never did until the very end. The finale chapter and epilogue just felt lazy and terrible. The majority of the story was enjoyable though! So if you can live with that because you’re a general horror fan, I’d say go for it!

  17. 4 out of 5

    Ron

    I've had this on my TBR shelf since '96 and finally got around to it. The writing itself is surprisingly good, especially for a debut novel. I liked the homage to classic and '50s schlock horror. While some of the characters are vivid and well drawn, there really is no one to hang your hat on. The book starts and ends with Clint, the closest thing we have to a protagonist, but I can't say I cared about anyone in between. That's not to say that novels (especially horror) must have relatable chara I've had this on my TBR shelf since '96 and finally got around to it. The writing itself is surprisingly good, especially for a debut novel. I liked the homage to classic and '50s schlock horror. While some of the characters are vivid and well drawn, there really is no one to hang your hat on. The book starts and ends with Clint, the closest thing we have to a protagonist, but I can't say I cared about anyone in between. That's not to say that novels (especially horror) must have relatable characters, but a character I care about keeps me reading.

  18. 5 out of 5

    Daniel

    An excellent book. It reads like the best kind of 1957s horror schlock, and at the same time the writing has a sense of modern dread underlying it. Some people will not get it, it's very subtle or, they will only get the 50s feel of it a monster movie if you will and will miss out on the sinister aspect underlying it. Even so, I thought it was a real good story, that stays with you after the book is over.

  19. 5 out of 5

    Shawn MacDonald

    I really wanted to like this book, but I just couldn't get into it. Kihn is a good writer, it wasn't that it was poorly written, I just didn't find myself wanting to pick up the book and read, it felt a little too much like work. I've got another book of his on my TO READ list, but I think I'll pick it up later. I need to read something that I can't put down, just to get me back in rhythm.

  20. 4 out of 5

    Justin Robinson

    The concept of this one, that Ed Wood accidentally makes a cursed movie, is excellent and right in my wheelhouse. The execution, sadly, was lackluster. The characters never came alive, mainly being interesting for determining who they were. The prose, aside from a few nice turns of phrase, is largely uninspired. I wanted to love this one, and it just did not deliver.

  21. 4 out of 5

    Jen Quinn

    Campy, funny, visceral, scary

  22. 5 out of 5

    Larry

    Yes, THAT Greg Kihn.

  23. 4 out of 5

    Liz Harkness

    I was hoping it would be scary. I wasn't scared. :(

  24. 5 out of 5

    Doug

    I really liked this book!

  25. 5 out of 5

    RazoDrn10

    but, what incredible writing!

  26. 4 out of 5

    Nafis Fuad

    Pure entertainment!

  27. 5 out of 5

    Nicole Wright

    this was super fun if you like classic horror

  28. 4 out of 5

    Frank

    Horror Show, Greg Kihn's first novel, is an exercise in a horror movie-based horror story writing. The story is a quick read, but with twists and turns that keep providing interesting points. The characters are a bit two-dimensional; the threat, not too bad; and the conclusion, satisfactory. This is a good book for getting a feel for Greg Kihn's ability in writing decent horror stories.

  29. 5 out of 5

    Beth

    I seem to recall reading a while back that musician Greg Kihn had written a few horror novels, but I had never read one until this one. It was actually pretty good. It concerns a director of B-grade (and sometimes Z-grade) horror films during the '50s and '60s and a controversial movie he directed called Cadaver. A young journalist for a monster magazine tracks him down and gets the scoop. There is also a side story concerning a satanist and a demon. I got a little way into it and was thinking h I seem to recall reading a while back that musician Greg Kihn had written a few horror novels, but I had never read one until this one. It was actually pretty good. It concerns a director of B-grade (and sometimes Z-grade) horror films during the '50s and '60s and a controversial movie he directed called Cadaver. A young journalist for a monster magazine tracks him down and gets the scoop. There is also a side story concerning a satanist and a demon. I got a little way into it and was thinking how clichéd it was but then I decided to approach it like the director's B- and Z-grade horror movies. I went with the camp and the schlock and ended up enjoying it as a light summer read.

  30. 5 out of 5

    Jim

    Greg Khin's "Horror Show" is a fun ride! I could NOT put it down. There is a mischievous sense of humor within this well crafter horror story that makes it even more enjoyable. The tale itself centers around a 1950s B-horror director and one of his more infamous films, but doesn't take the direct route to it, and keeps you on your toes and guessing all the way to the end. Brilliant sub plots and a great cast of characters keep this book moving at the perfect pace. I was a fan of his music, and n Greg Khin's "Horror Show" is a fun ride! I could NOT put it down. There is a mischievous sense of humor within this well crafter horror story that makes it even more enjoyable. The tale itself centers around a 1950s B-horror director and one of his more infamous films, but doesn't take the direct route to it, and keeps you on your toes and guessing all the way to the end. Brilliant sub plots and a great cast of characters keep this book moving at the perfect pace. I was a fan of his music, and now am looking forward to reading more of his novels. Definitely worth your time.

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