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Twin monarchs Satyrus and Melitta have worked hard, seen much blood shed and many good friends die to secure their fertile kingdom on the Black Sea. But as the colossal conflict between Alexander the Great's former generals to inherit his empire rages from one end of the known world to the other, sitting on the sidelines is not an option. If their kingdom is to have a futu Twin monarchs Satyrus and Melitta have worked hard, seen much blood shed and many good friends die to secure their fertile kingdom on the Black Sea. But as the colossal conflict between Alexander the Great's former generals to inherit his empire rages from one end of the known world to the other, sitting on the sidelines is not an option. If their kingdom is to have a future, Satyrus and Melitta must join forces with one of the contenders, knowing that making the wrong choice could mean disaster. And with Ptolemy, Antigonus-One-Eye and his son Demetrius 'the Besieger', Lysimachus and Seleucus all massing their forces for one last battle, the stakes could not be higher. But with the wily Athenian schemer Stratokles, the courtesan-spy Phiale and Satyrus's lover, the power-hungry Briseis, daughter of the Tyrant of Syracuse, also determined to secure the spoils of victory for themselves, the twins find themselves caught in a deadly web of intrigue that could cost them everything.


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Twin monarchs Satyrus and Melitta have worked hard, seen much blood shed and many good friends die to secure their fertile kingdom on the Black Sea. But as the colossal conflict between Alexander the Great's former generals to inherit his empire rages from one end of the known world to the other, sitting on the sidelines is not an option. If their kingdom is to have a futu Twin monarchs Satyrus and Melitta have worked hard, seen much blood shed and many good friends die to secure their fertile kingdom on the Black Sea. But as the colossal conflict between Alexander the Great's former generals to inherit his empire rages from one end of the known world to the other, sitting on the sidelines is not an option. If their kingdom is to have a future, Satyrus and Melitta must join forces with one of the contenders, knowing that making the wrong choice could mean disaster. And with Ptolemy, Antigonus-One-Eye and his son Demetrius 'the Besieger', Lysimachus and Seleucus all massing their forces for one last battle, the stakes could not be higher. But with the wily Athenian schemer Stratokles, the courtesan-spy Phiale and Satyrus's lover, the power-hungry Briseis, daughter of the Tyrant of Syracuse, also determined to secure the spoils of victory for themselves, the twins find themselves caught in a deadly web of intrigue that could cost them everything.

30 review for Tyrant: Force of Kings

  1. 5 out of 5

    Carlos

    Luego de un tiempo muy, pero muy largo, he podido terminar esta saga de 6 libros que me gustó bastante. No es que me haya demorado tanto porque me aburría al leerlo, era simplemente porque no tenía tanto tiempo para leer y he estado ocupado con mis deberes. Me gustó el final, así como también el final de la mayoría de los personajes. Me gustó también el análisis que esta saga me hizo hacer acerca de todo lo detrás que hay de una guerra (o guerras); política negocios, familias, estatus, religión, Luego de un tiempo muy, pero muy largo, he podido terminar esta saga de 6 libros que me gustó bastante. No es que me haya demorado tanto porque me aburría al leerlo, era simplemente porque no tenía tanto tiempo para leer y he estado ocupado con mis deberes. Me gustó el final, así como también el final de la mayoría de los personajes. Me gustó también el análisis que esta saga me hizo hacer acerca de todo lo detrás que hay de una guerra (o guerras); política negocios, familias, estatus, religión, intereses personales. También quiero agregar que he aprendido mucho sobre palabras más técnicas como por ejemplo lo que se refiere al vocabulario griego relacionado a lo militar; lo que es un hoplita, partes de las armaduras, significado de los barcos, entre muchas otras cosas. Felicidades a Cameron por estos lindos personajes que ha creado y que se meten en la cabeza y al final del libro les tomas cariño y te da pena cuando el libro termina y sabes que los personajes ya no van más. Totalmente recomendado si están insertos en la novela histórica militar.

  2. 4 out of 5

    Finn

    A wonderfully gripping book (and series) set during a fascinating time period. Christian Cameron brings the Hellenistic Greek world to life with his assiduous attention to detail about warfare and daily life. Cameron achieves a great balance of action, adventure, description and lighthearted humour, making these books a joy to read.

  3. 5 out of 5

    Liviu

    a page turner and good ending to the series covering precisely what the blurb tells us; mostly Satyrus in this book, with little from Melita the last years of the main successors war (between the siege of Rhodes and the battle of Ipsos) and the double quest of Satyrus to insure the safety (insofar as possible) of his kingdom in these tumultuous years and to get back Miriam (hostage of Demetrios as the book starts) and convince her to eventually marry/stay with him in Tanais despite the religious a page turner and good ending to the series covering precisely what the blurb tells us; mostly Satyrus in this book, with little from Melita the last years of the main successors war (between the siege of Rhodes and the battle of Ipsos) and the double quest of Satyrus to insure the safety (insofar as possible) of his kingdom in these tumultuous years and to get back Miriam (hostage of Demetrios as the book starts) and convince her to eventually marry/stay with him in Tanais despite the religious and status differences (she is Jewish and her brother, now the head of their rich merchant family, is firmly opposed to her marrying a non-believer despite his friendship with Satyrus, while Satyrus is definitely Greek in his beliefs and even like his father Kineas, is beloved by some of the gods with all the attendant benefits and risks...) so unlikely alliances, new friends and enemies, the return of characters from earlier books and a definite conclusion, while the usual battles, fights, ambushes, desperate escapes, politics, intrigues and assassinations abound, all culminating obviously in the decisive Ipsos at the end overall, Tyrant Force of Kings is a very good book which delivers an appropriate ending to the saga, though it has a bit the feeling of "seen that already" and lacks the more emotional and dramatic moments of the 2nd and 3rd books about Satyrus and Melita which remain my favorites from the tetralogy

  4. 4 out of 5

    Clemens Schoonderwoert

    This fascinating and gripping book is the 6th and probably the final volume of the wonderful Tyrant series. Sadly I miss the historical details from the Historical and Author's notes within this book, but still I'm happy that this book contains, just like its predecessors, a well documented glossary and great maps of the most important parts, the likes of great places and countries which are important to this part of the Ancient world, and not to forget there's a map of the Battle of Ipsus of 301 This fascinating and gripping book is the 6th and probably the final volume of the wonderful Tyrant series. Sadly I miss the historical details from the Historical and Author's notes within this book, but still I'm happy that this book contains, just like its predecessors, a well documented glossary and great maps of the most important parts, the likes of great places and countries which are important to this part of the Ancient world, and not to forget there's a map of the Battle of Ipsus of 301 BC. The historical details has been worked out in a most fantastic fashion within this story, and thus making this book such a very compelling tale to read, with in their midst our main characters, the twins Satyrus and Melitta. Superb storytelling makes this book such a sensational read, simply because the author has the ability to keep you spellbound throughout with this thrilling Ancient Greek historical adventure story. What I sadly miss is a time/year direction in which to place this terrific tale, but at the same time I would like to say that it does not degrade the story itself in any way, and so in my humble opinion the main part of this book has moved on towards the year 301 BC, with at it's ultimate height the final conclusion, which is the famous Battle of Ipsus in that same year of 301 BC. The story itself is about the control of the Empire, Alexander the Great's legacy of course, and over that control will be fought between two factions, on the one hand the Macedonians under the leadership of Lysimachos, Seleucus and Cassander, and on the other hand the Antigonids under the leadership of Antigonus One-Eye and his son Demetrius. What will follow is a most wonderful description and thus telling about the conflicts, scheming and treachery between these two factions, which will eventually lead to the ultimate Battle of Ipsus where all will be decided in a hard fought bloody way. Highly recommended, for this has been a superb series, and thus in my opinion therefore this book is "A Tremendous Fitting End"!

  5. 5 out of 5

    Chris Wray

    This was a fine end to a series that I have enjoyed. The centre piece of the book is the battle of Ipsus, which is vividly recreated. The confusion, tension, terror and sheer scale of a successor battlefield are depicted very memorably. It is also appropriate that this battle, which conclusively confirmed that Alexander's empire would not be reunited under a single ruler, concludes the series and secures the future of Satryus and Melitta's little Euxine kingdom. I have enjoyed the plotting, intr This was a fine end to a series that I have enjoyed. The centre piece of the book is the battle of Ipsus, which is vividly recreated. The confusion, tension, terror and sheer scale of a successor battlefield are depicted very memorably. It is also appropriate that this battle, which conclusively confirmed that Alexander's empire would not be reunited under a single ruler, concludes the series and secures the future of Satryus and Melitta's little Euxine kingdom. I have enjoyed the plotting, intrigue and politics that surrounded the interactions of the Diadochi, and how Kineas and then Satyrus have navigated it successfully. I appreciated the dual description of them given in this book, that Kineas was a mercenary with the heart of a king and Satyrus was a king with the heart of a mercenary. They were two very well developed and memorable characters. The ending was also quite poignant, and hit exactly the right note: "It might have lasted forever, this paradise. In fact, they had less than thirty years. But they used them well." If the third and fourth books had been stronger then this would have been a great series, but it's still worth your time if you are into historical fiction. I look forward to reading more from Christian Cameron.

  6. 5 out of 5

    Clay Kallam

    I stumbled into this six-book series by way of one of my favorite recent fantasy series, the Traitor Son Cycle by Miles Cameron. I noticed that, for some unknown reason, Cameron also wrote under the name of Christian Cameron, and had a series set in the time of Alexander the Great. As one who knows way too much about that Hellenistic time period, and one who loved Cameron’s previous work, I was all in from the moment I started volume one, Tyrant. And as this is a connected series that really need I stumbled into this six-book series by way of one of my favorite recent fantasy series, the Traitor Son Cycle by Miles Cameron. I noticed that, for some unknown reason, Cameron also wrote under the name of Christian Cameron, and had a series set in the time of Alexander the Great. As one who knows way too much about that Hellenistic time period, and one who loved Cameron’s previous work, I was all in from the moment I started volume one, Tyrant. And as this is a connected series that really needs to be read in order to be appreciated, this review is of all six books considered as a whole, rather than a review of each book (though parenthetical notes will be appended for each). The story covers about 30 years of ancient history, ending in 301 BCE at the Battle of Ipsos. Now if you already know who won the Battle of Ipsos, you will be a little too far ahead of the game, for much of the suspense of the series (which includes other historical events) will be lost – and you will also be surprised by some revisions Cameron makes in order to tell the story the way he wants to. But the basic premise is this: Cameron inserts fictional, high-ranking characters into the complicated weave of Hellenistic history, and has them participate in events both major and minor. For the most part, this works extremely well, as Cameron’s grasp of the minutiae of Hellenistic life and his gritty sense of the bloody, painful and horrific cost of ancient warfare is superb. He is also an excellent writer, so the story moves along at a brisk pace, flagging only momentarily in the later volumes. There are issues, of course. Like Star Trek, Kineas and Satyrus, the two main protagonists, are in the front lines way too often to be believed, especially in the later books, and their interactions with the major historical figures seem unnecessary, as if the editors insisted that somehow Kineas and Alexander are in contact, and so are Satyrus and various Hellenistic leaders. Cameron, though, is perfectly willing to kill off major characters, and in sudden and unexpected ways, which adds a tremendous amount of tension to battle scenes and assassination attempts (unlike Star Trek). There’s also some magical realism thrown in, but any attempt to explain the plot would require much more patience than any reader of this review is likely to have. But in short, Kineas, Satyrus and his woefully underutilized twin sister Melitta (why wasn’t she more prominent in the narrative?), all represent what we now consider Southern Russia, at the north of what we call the Black Sea. In those times, it was the place where the steppe nomads and expanding population of farmers and colonizers crossed paths, and it became a crucial part of the Hellenistic game of thrones given its ability to produce grain that the Mediterranean cities desperately needed to feed their people. So Cameron tosses these characters, their soldiers and their grain into the Hellenistic mix, and in the end, comes up with a wonderful series that I enjoyed from start to finish. Then again, I love excellent historical fiction, and this is my favorite period, so I’m hardly unbiased. But I will say this: If you have even a passing interest in the world of Alexander the Great after his death, the Tyrant series is for you. I just wish there were more than six volumes. * * * * * Though just above those five asterisks I wrote that I wish there were more than six volumes, at the same time, I have to admit the formula was wearing a bit thin -- especially as Melitta, the twin sister, was relegated to a very minor supporting role. There were too many battle scenes that seemed similar, too many grievous wounds and painful days, and too much artificial tension between Satyrus and his lady love. That said, there could have been more stories here, though tweaks would have had to have been made. My other comment on this series, and too many others to mention, is that after thousands of pages of blood and struggle, little time is spent savoring the triumph of survival. At the end of a long, brutal set piece in "Tyrant: Destroyer of Kings," for example, there were only a few words spent on enjoying the good times, and at the end of this six-book series, with plenty of betrayal and battle, there were six pages set aside for celebration. It would have been nice to spend some time with these characters when they were under imminent threat of death and disaster, especially after getting to know them so well. But that said, it was still a great ride.

  7. 4 out of 5

    Juan Carlos

    Tirano es parte de una serie del estadounidense Christian Cameron quien es escritor de novelas históricas como es el caso de esta; nos habla sobre el acomodo de un mundo que resiente el vacío generado por la muerte de Alejandro Magno, la competencia entre sus generales por dominar el inmenso imperio heredado; a pesar de que es mi género favorito esta en particular me dio mucha flojera, demasiados términos de unidades militares, de distancia, artículos, unidades de medida y demás en ..... griego Tirano es parte de una serie del estadounidense Christian Cameron quien es escritor de novelas históricas como es el caso de esta; nos habla sobre el acomodo de un mundo que resiente el vacío generado por la muerte de Alejandro Magno, la competencia entre sus generales por dominar el inmenso imperio heredado; a pesar de que es mi género favorito esta en particular me dio mucha flojera, demasiados términos de unidades militares, de distancia, artículos, unidades de medida y demás en ..... griego antiguo; para mi gusto se pasa de riguroso y hace que comiences a tratar de identificar de que está hablando y eso pierde el hilo de la historia llevándose el sabor hacia el glosario o búsqueda en Google. También pudiera ser que debe ser leída con mas calma y tiempo del que le dediqué, sin embargo eso hace que le de un muy personal 6/10 esperando de cualquier manera que si la leen pongan sus comentarios en mi pagina de Facebook Leer te Vuelve Sexy

  8. 4 out of 5

    Richard

    Stunning series of books An absolutely wonderful journey through the ancient Hellenic world. The author captures the culture, the religion, the battles on land and sea quite magnificently but most importantly I have come love Kineas, Srayanka, Philokles, Leon, Diodorus, Anaxagoras, Theron, Stratokles, Satyrus, Melitta and too many more to mention almost as if they were firm friends or family.

  9. 4 out of 5

    Alejandro Garzón

    Último libro de una serie que me encantó y me atrapó. Una serie excelente para los amantes de la novela histórica. Éste no es el mejor libro de los 6, pero es bueno. Me parece que si bien desarrolló bien a batalla de Ipsos, el combate Sátiro-Demetrio decepcionó. También siento que le faltó dar un mejor cierre a algunos personajes como Melita, Anaxágoras, Apolodoro y Estratocles

  10. 5 out of 5

    Jose Carlos

    Tras leer toda la saga, debo confesar que el último libro me ha decepcionado un poco. Te lleva al climax durante 6 obras y al llegar al mismo, al menos en mi opinión personal, este no tiene la envergadura épica que merecía. Flojo final para una gran saga, igualmente recomendable de leer.

  11. 4 out of 5

    Mac Whiting

    Exhilarating and Powerfully Entertaining Characters you love or love to hate, non-stop action, and an amazing time in history all make this entire series impossible to put down. Thank you, Mr. Cameron for taking me to this time and place with these people. I enjoyed the trip.

  12. 4 out of 5

    PaleHorsemen

    I wished I could give it more but all this Satyrus and Miriam stuff really irritated me :(

  13. 4 out of 5

    Ernesto López

    Cameron nos debe un par de libros con esta saga. Te hace sentir que estabas allí, en una “falange”, en primera línea.

  14. 5 out of 5

    MirkoHauer

    excellent ending to a Great saga.

  15. 4 out of 5

    Bill

    The Diadochi meet in battle to settle the spoils of Alexander's empire. Reluctantly Satyrus and Melitta find it necessary to participate in order to secure their kingdom.

  16. 5 out of 5

    Robin Carter

    Review I makes no bones about the fact that I’m a Christian Cameron fan, his books top my annual must read list every year, and are often competing for my book of the year award. This latest book Force of Kings is no different, although its a bitter sweet experience, the final book in a series going back to 2008 and the debut book in this series, a series that has helped give me a deeper love of ancient Greek culture, respect for that culture and respect for the author as one of the smartest most Review I makes no bones about the fact that I’m a Christian Cameron fan, his books top my annual must read list every year, and are often competing for my book of the year award. This latest book Force of Kings is no different, although its a bitter sweet experience, the final book in a series going back to 2008 and the debut book in this series, a series that has helped give me a deeper love of ancient Greek culture, respect for that culture and respect for the author as one of the smartest most driven, nicest guys i know. None of that tells you about force of Kings, as ever i hate to and wont give away the plot of a book in a review. What i will cover is: the totally immerse history, so well researched and written the reader is sucked back in time to live, breath fight and die hand in hand with Satyrus and his friends and enemies. My favorite underlying part of all Christians books is that there is no real good guy/ bad guy dynamic, he paints the shades of grey, weaving reality into the plot but without losing the wonder of the age. The history is romantic and idealised, at times poetic, but that comes across as the authors love of the location and the period. None of it corrupts the plot, the woven intricacies of Stratokles, the machinations of “the doctor”, the self assured megalomania of Demetrius ‘the Besieger’ and the quiet self assured nature of Satyrus, always searching to be a better man, and running headlong into any fire going to do the right thing. I love the way the author plays out his script, and at the same time makes the reader explore their own inner self, own decisions and the reasons behind them. I’m always left with some form of self examination afterwards, both myself and going back over decisions by characters, should they have made that choice, would i have made that choice. For me its the sign of a great book that challenges you to reread, to explore deeper and more thoroughly the plot and the people. A book that educates while it entertains. This is the second book this year from this prolific author (great king already out and been an outstanding read) The Long Sword the second William Gold book is out in November 2014 and there are 3 more Tom Swan books due out also. this is in my top 5 for this year, and will be competing for the top spot come the end of the year. A writer who makes you love history the way he loves it, seen through his eyes, and sharing his experiences. (visit his web site and you will see how intimately he will share the privations and wonders of Ancient Greece, and his commitment to learning the martial skills.) Highly recommended (Parm)

  17. 5 out of 5

    David Miles

    “But they were also careful to tell their sons and daughters that in war there was blood and torment, fire and loss, many losers and few victors.” Excerpt From: Cameron, Christian. “Tyrant: Force of Kings.” Orion Publishing Group, 2014-08-28T00:00:00+00:00. iBooks. This material may be protected by copyright.

  18. 4 out of 5

    Steve

    Great ending to a very entertaining series. Cameron brings the major historic characters together for the final battle royal. I believe Cameron's writing improves though the series and the last several novels are very polished and provide an even more entertaining and delightful narrative. In this final chapter, as was through out the entire series, the interaction between various peoples of the period, makes this series highly engaging and entertaining for any fan of historical fiction of hellen Great ending to a very entertaining series. Cameron brings the major historic characters together for the final battle royal. I believe Cameron's writing improves though the series and the last several novels are very polished and provide an even more entertaining and delightful narrative. In this final chapter, as was through out the entire series, the interaction between various peoples of the period, makes this series highly engaging and entertaining for any fan of historical fiction of hellenistic period.

  19. 5 out of 5

    Jeff Frane

    This is apparently the final book in the Tyrant series and it's a terrific way to conclude. Other reviews have noted that Cameron's writing has improved tremendously since the series began (with a couple of really weak entrants in the early years). Tons of intrigue, double-dealing and back-stabbing with a slate of characters I found nearly impossible to track. I finally quit trying and let the story whisk me along. I look forward to whatever Cameron has in the wings.

  20. 4 out of 5

    John Warren

    sad to see this series end. love the last of the tyrant series books in my opinion the best of the 6 but they all rate so high for me its kinda hard to rate one above the other. loved all the characters and its sad to see them leave. hopefully he will continue with the long war series with a couple more books.

  21. 4 out of 5

    David Dudek

    The Last Book in the Tyrant Series The whole Tyrant series was phenomenal from beginning to end. I thoroughly enjoyed reading these books and I would recommend them to anyone interested in this particular genre, as well as any other Christian Cameron book.

  22. 4 out of 5

    David Newell

    Another fantastic installment, I can't think of much to say other than Christian Cameron remain one of my all time favourite authors, and I'm utterly in love with the period and these books. may it never end

  23. 4 out of 5

    Normand Kosztko

    "Well written adventure novel

  24. 5 out of 5

    Dave

  25. 5 out of 5

    Nicholas Berndt

  26. 5 out of 5

    Tom

  27. 5 out of 5

    A. T. Schilling

  28. 4 out of 5

    david townend

  29. 5 out of 5

    kaz1030

  30. 5 out of 5

    Angelinux

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