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Philosophy: A Discovery in Comics

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This illustrated primer on philosophy is a great way to be introduced to a complex topic. In her easily accessible style, Margreet de Heer visualizes the history of Western philosophy and makes it approachable for those with little knowledge of the subject. The book explains the thoughts of philosophers such as Socrates, Plato, Aristotle, Descartes, Spinoza, and Nietzsche, This illustrated primer on philosophy is a great way to be introduced to a complex topic. In her easily accessible style, Margreet de Heer visualizes the history of Western philosophy and makes it approachable for those with little knowledge of the subject. The book explains the thoughts of philosophers such as Socrates, Plato, Aristotle, Descartes, Spinoza, and Nietzsche, and ponders questions such as What is thinking? What is reality? Is there free will? and Why are these ideas still important? A perfect introduction to exploring philosophical concepts, this humorous yet substantive graphic account strips the subject of unnecessary complexity.


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This illustrated primer on philosophy is a great way to be introduced to a complex topic. In her easily accessible style, Margreet de Heer visualizes the history of Western philosophy and makes it approachable for those with little knowledge of the subject. The book explains the thoughts of philosophers such as Socrates, Plato, Aristotle, Descartes, Spinoza, and Nietzsche, This illustrated primer on philosophy is a great way to be introduced to a complex topic. In her easily accessible style, Margreet de Heer visualizes the history of Western philosophy and makes it approachable for those with little knowledge of the subject. The book explains the thoughts of philosophers such as Socrates, Plato, Aristotle, Descartes, Spinoza, and Nietzsche, and ponders questions such as What is thinking? What is reality? Is there free will? and Why are these ideas still important? A perfect introduction to exploring philosophical concepts, this humorous yet substantive graphic account strips the subject of unnecessary complexity.

30 review for Philosophy: A Discovery in Comics

  1. 4 out of 5

    Branden Rothenberg

    Who needs lecture halls? Read this comic book instead! One of the most unorthodox history lessons I have ever experienced, Philosophy a Discovery in Comics, takes a swing at teaching the essentials of deep thinking to a younger generation and hits a home run; this comic masterfully combines intricate concepts with illustrations to bring clarity to a topic that is underappreciated and misunderstood today. The success of this book stems from its ability to appeal to such a vast audience of all ages Who needs lecture halls? Read this comic book instead! One of the most unorthodox history lessons I have ever experienced, Philosophy a Discovery in Comics, takes a swing at teaching the essentials of deep thinking to a younger generation and hits a home run; this comic masterfully combines intricate concepts with illustrations to bring clarity to a topic that is underappreciated and misunderstood today. The success of this book stems from its ability to appeal to such a vast audience of all ages by offering a baseline comprehension of western philosophy through drawings that are simultaneously cute, comical, and helpful. Margreet de Heer structures her comic by having the reader travel in chronological order through the history of western philosophy. From Plato to Descartes the reader learns about western philosophies most important men, their beliefs, and their involvement or lack of involvement with the church. Following her summaries of key western philosophers Margreet puts herself in the spotlight through her modern day examples and applications of ancient philosophies. This method helps to establish a much needed connection to ancient philosophy. Overall, Philosophy a Discovery in Comics successfully achieves its goal of bringing mass appeal and understanding to deep thinking and western philosophy through effective illustrations and modern day applications of the subject. Margreet de Heer has forced a very difficult job onto herself. Philosophy is universally viewed as a very advanced subject; Margreet attacks this notion through a comic book that is insightful, easy to understand, and impressively informative. The overall superstar of the book that allows for such a vast audience is undoubtedly the illustrations; they literally cause the book to be what it is: a comic. The use of a comic book as the medium for a crash course on western philosophy causes the reader regardless of their age to enjoy learning lecture hall material. It is not difficult to imagine an aspiring student being required to write an excruciatingly long essay on the similarities and differences between eastern and western philosophy. Margreet presents ideas like this in her standard and easy to understand simplicity; a drawing of herself with a text bubble adding context to her drawing while the sketches themselves summarize what she says. As a comparison between the eastern and western philosophy, Margreet says the following: “Hmm, I think Eastern Philosophy is based on: unity whereas western philosophy is about: duality” (de Heer 26). A yin yang symbol and a plasma globe are drawn in as supplementary helpers to solidify her point. Both the symbol and globe are filled with tidbits of information to create a presentation not unlike a chart to summarize each philosophy type. Along with the illustrations, the writing style suggests a laid back vibe that is likely a polar opposite to the writing styles of college philosophy textbooks or the works of the visionaries themselves. The relaxedness of the book further improves its readability to all. Although comic books and philosophy was an unlikely pair, de Heer combined the two in such a way that both are built upon by each other. Starting with Socrates in the 5th century B.C. de Heer summarizes ancient philosophies and follows them with examples or applications of what was taught and how it translates to today. Margreet shows an example of a Socratic discussion when after a bad day at the supermarket she arrives home and reaches the following conclusion: “How do I balance my life” (de Heer 33)? Step by step Margreet walks through the processes that Socrates once conducted and shows what conclusions can be made through rational thought. Each aspect of Margreet’s Socratic discussion is narrated partially by a banner that introduces how far down the road she is along with colorful sketches that draw out her undergoing the process. The extent to how relatable the author is in these examples is so intense that it causes the reader to imagine applications of the philosophies in their own lives. I am certain a textbook could not achieve so much in pages overflowing with ridiculous difficulty. Travelling forwards in time over one thousand years the philosophy of Descartes has Margreet wondering how close our perceptions are to reality. Margreet asks herself while looking at a mirror with a cat peeking out from behind, “What is reality” (de Heer 87)? The next page reveals that behind the mirror the cat is a much more allergy friendly cardboard cutout, which causes things for Margreet to escalate quickly. By page 93 the author has hopped into a robot with microscopes for eyes, microphones where the nose and ears should be, and a big tongue where a more reserved mouth would be expected. As a modern day application of Descartes questioning of reality Margreet has used her creative side to show how isolated we are. Text lying by the not so humanoid robot tells us just how limited we are in all five senses. Margreet has truly done a service to mankind by mixing such childish silliness with philosophy. Philosophy a Discovery in Comics teaches rationality to all generations, who in this world of ever less rational events and people could really use it.

  2. 5 out of 5

    Ian Pindar

    Philosophy: a discovery in comics I really enjoyed this book. It gives great illustrated overview of the historical development of Western Philosophy in a fun way. I particularly liked the way it linked religion and philosophy and how the author related it to her own friends and personal experience. It is not possible to cover all philosophers, but I was a bit disappointed that Bertrand Russell and Schrödinger did not feature. This is an ideal introductory book for anyone that is interested in Phi Philosophy: a discovery in comics I really enjoyed this book. It gives great illustrated overview of the historical development of Western Philosophy in a fun way. I particularly liked the way it linked religion and philosophy and how the author related it to her own friends and personal experience. It is not possible to cover all philosophers, but I was a bit disappointed that Bertrand Russell and Schrödinger did not feature. This is an ideal introductory book for anyone that is interested in Philosophy or a younger reader studying a related area. My daughter loved it; whom is studying ethics A level. A great read. The Writing IMP

  3. 5 out of 5

    Suzanne

    So I thought this book would interest my oldest in some philosophers she has yet to read. Instead, I got to listen to my eight year-old explain, rather cogently, Plato's cave at the dinner table. Any book that can explain basic philosophical concepts and theories to a curious elementary school student is a winner. If you've already read most of the big name philosophers, you don't need this book - but there's probably someone in your life who does.

  4. 4 out of 5

    Gentle

    This comic book covered an amazingly wide range of philosophical information. The book covers famous philosophers and their work, major events, and philosophy in general. The comic images were funny, well-drawn, and very relevant to the information being covered on each page. I enjoyed reading this book and think it would work well as an introduction to philosophy for young people or anyone who has never studied the subject.

  5. 4 out of 5

    Beatrice

    I read this book in Portuguese and in one sitting. I love its metafictional quality, the way the author defines philosophy according to the words of others and then applies it to the development of her comics. Very contemplative, carefully crafted, and thought provoking. Really glad that I read it, and I hope to look further into the philosophical concepts touched on in this.

  6. 5 out of 5

    Riya Goja

    This review has been hidden because it contains spoilers. To view it, click here. Thoughts On A Person’s Existence Philosophy. The study of questioning how we think had never appealed to me. Not until I read Philosophy: A Discovery in Comics by Margreet de Heer. After reading this book, I have realized that there is a lot more to discover about the nature of my thoughts, rather than just finding myself distracted by them. Questions have formed in my mind about who I really am, and what my purpose in life is. Overall, this book helped sparked an interest in me to think about Thoughts On A Person’s Existence Philosophy. The study of questioning how we think had never appealed to me. Not until I read Philosophy: A Discovery in Comics by Margreet de Heer. After reading this book, I have realized that there is a lot more to discover about the nature of my thoughts, rather than just finding myself distracted by them. Questions have formed in my mind about who I really am, and what my purpose in life is. Overall, this book helped sparked an interest in me to think about the different ideologies western philosophers have had. After reading through this book, I believe that all of the different philosophies formed relate back to the same fundamental question of who a person really is. Throughout Heer’s book, the reader is able to explore and understand the different philosophies and mindsets that western philosophers have formed. The book begins with Heer introducing herself and her husband Yiri, who colored the book as Heer wrote it and sketched it out. She captures the reader’s attention by explaining what thinking is through her own words and experiences. Heer covers topics like what logical thinking is in comparison to abstract thinking, and provides the basis of the fundamentals of philosophy. After making the reader knowledgeable about the basics, she moves on to explain the foundation of western philosophy, in which she writes about the lives and ideas of Plato, Socrates, and Aristotle. Then she moves onto medieval philosophy, which relates to the lives of Augustine and Thomas Aquinas, and how they were influenced by western philosophy. Next, she explains the life stories of Erasmus, Descartes, and Spinoza, before switching back to her own ideas about what reality is. In the end of the book, Heer explains what her family’s philosophy is, and ends with questioning the reader about what they believed their philosophy were. From the start of the book till the end, Heer makes it clear that although everyone may have different philosophies, they all have the same commonality of questioning how much they actually know about themselves. Knowing yourself is a very important part of being able to form your own philosophy on life, but it is very perplexing to truly understand yourself. The more you try to understand who you are, the more you realize that it’s a baffling question to answer. When Heer was explaining in the book about how to approach the concept of understanding oneself, she said “[f]or a philosopher, it is much more important to know oneself than to know the works of others” (Heer 51). Evidently, this makes clear how the most important thing about understanding philosophy is to first know who you are, before formulating any ideas on what thinking or reality is. Once you gain a basic understanding of your own self, it will be easier to approach and comprehend philosophies, because they all stem from the basic question of who a person really is. This is also because of the fact that once you become comfortable in the process of questioning yourself and who you are, you automatically begin to form your own philosophy on life, which you can then find easy to compare to other philosophies. This whole process of knowing yourself helps you dive deeper into your own philosophy, and forces you to try and understand the philosophies of others as well in order to help add onto your own. Furthermore, when Heer gave another example of her life and ideas on philosophy towards the middle of the book, it helped in further proving the idea that all different philosophies stem from the same basis of knowing oneself before comprehending what our reality is. She recounted the story of when she went to the U.S. and planned on staying there. After two weeks of living in the U.S., she had the realization that her dream of getting a job and staying in the U.S. was not what she had actually wanted. Although she had thought she would finally accomplish her dream and enjoy the reality of it by coming into the U.S., she realized it was not what she had imagined life to be like. After explaining this short insight into her life, Heer begins to question herself and her way of thinking again by wondering “[i]s autonomy an illusion?” (Heer 67). She begins this process of questioning whether or not her autonomy is real after her friend tells her how her karma already has a preset path for her in life; however, she can change her path in life with her own free will. Heer’s questioning process about her life, and suspicions about illusions she may be in under her life clearly portrays how understanding oneself is the first and most important step for understanding philosophy. Without questioning the events that occurred in her own life, Heer wouldn’t have been able to make the connection of how her reality may be influenced by some kind of illusion. Her thoughts on this potential illusion in her life are now part of her own philosophy, but the first step was for her to try and understand herself. Finally, towards the end of the book, Heer introduces readers into a branch of philosophy known as modern philosophy, which relates to my belief in how all types of philosophies fall back to the same fundamental questioning of who a person actually is. Heer explains how modern philosophy is very practical and is not usually formed on ideas related to religion anymore. When she describes the practicality of modern philosophy, Heer makes a very important statement that “[p]hilosophy is about gaining wisdom and living your life accordingly” (Heer 97). This statement undoubtedly makes clear how all philosophies relate back to understanding and gaining more knowledge about the workings of your life. As you get more informed and are able to comprehend abstract ideas like who you really are, you begin to realize that you really do not know much about your true identity. Therefore, Heer’s statement also implies that although you may not fully understand who you are, whatever knowledge you do have can be used towards living your life with a new outlook. Overall, this book really helped me get a good overview on how to approach what philosophy is, even though I had no prior knowledge on what the study of philosophy actually is. Heer and her husband Yiri’s approach to teaching philosophy through the format of a comic book really appealed to me, because I think that it was much easier to get through some of the more difficult and abstract concepts due to the cartoons. Heer’s book also guided me in how I should approach philosophy, and made me realize that all philosophies begin to be formed by the philosophers questioning their own lives and who they really are. I would recommend this book to anyone who is very curious about the nature of what shapes a person’s decisions or who is a heavy thinker. Personally, I thoroughly enjoyed reading this book, and got through it in one sitting. It has changed my way of thinking and my approach to the philosophies of others, and has sparked my interest in understanding who I am.

  7. 5 out of 5

    Courtney

    This quaint graphic novel covers some of the basic concepts of Western philosophy. Each general school of thought is introduced via brief biographies of key philosophers in the field. It moves chronologically so that the reader is able to get a feel for the development of major philosophical ideas. de Heer's personal thoughts on each subject round out the individual elements and help to tie them together. This is a well-executed graphic novel/primer, but it's important to note that the informati This quaint graphic novel covers some of the basic concepts of Western philosophy. Each general school of thought is introduced via brief biographies of key philosophers in the field. It moves chronologically so that the reader is able to get a feel for the development of major philosophical ideas. de Heer's personal thoughts on each subject round out the individual elements and help to tie them together. This is a well-executed graphic novel/primer, but it's important to note that the information is very, very basic and not necessarily intended for those with any sort of background in philosophy. I happen to have a bachelor's degree in philosophy, so this was way too introductory for my taste. I do wish, for the sake of those delving into philosophy for the first time, that this book had been a bit broader in depth and scope.

  8. 4 out of 5

    Kayla

    As a person who didn't know much about philosophy other than how to pronounce the word, this book was a great crash course introduction. The art work as the title suggest is that of a comic. I really enjoyed that the author, Margreet pulled out of the history to say, that she didn't know what direction the book would go in next and the way if was sort of like a conversation between her, her husband, and the reader, aw well as the philosophers themselves and her family and friends. While some peop As a person who didn't know much about philosophy other than how to pronounce the word, this book was a great crash course introduction. The art work as the title suggest is that of a comic. I really enjoyed that the author, Margreet pulled out of the history to say, that she didn't know what direction the book would go in next and the way if was sort of like a conversation between her, her husband, and the reader, aw well as the philosophers themselves and her family and friends. While some people may not think its and adequate in explaining philosophy and it's history or principles, it very much is worth reading for an introduction, especially for people like me. Overall it's worth the read as its a break from a traditional textbook collection of essays.

  9. 5 out of 5

    Kat

    Disclaimer: I received this book as part of a FirstReads Giveaway I thoroughly enjoyed this comic book. The art style is cute and fairly easy to read and follow, and it suits the tone of what is being said quite well. Another advantage is that most pages are distinct in message, so it is fairly easy to pick up or put down at any point. While too short to be a comprehensive history and summary of philosophy, it makes up for its brevity by being genuinely thought-provoking. If the book has an overa Disclaimer: I received this book as part of a FirstReads Giveaway I thoroughly enjoyed this comic book. The art style is cute and fairly easy to read and follow, and it suits the tone of what is being said quite well. Another advantage is that most pages are distinct in message, so it is fairly easy to pick up or put down at any point. While too short to be a comprehensive history and summary of philosophy, it makes up for its brevity by being genuinely thought-provoking. If the book has an overarching theme or idea, it is to push the reader to think about their own personal philosophy more deeply. Which of the philosophers covered do we agree with and why?

  10. 4 out of 5

    Slawka

    /I received a free copy from the First Reads/ I am generally quite enthusiastic when it comes to comics and graphic novels. But the idea of showing the most important philosophers and philosophical questions in a comics, mixed with personal opinions and experiences was more than good. I really find it brilliant and i would recommend it to anyone interested in philosophy - for those who knoww a lot it will be a relaxed evening with a funny and well drawn comic and for those who have no idea about /I received a free copy from the First Reads/ I am generally quite enthusiastic when it comes to comics and graphic novels. But the idea of showing the most important philosophers and philosophical questions in a comics, mixed with personal opinions and experiences was more than good. I really find it brilliant and i would recommend it to anyone interested in philosophy - for those who knoww a lot it will be a relaxed evening with a funny and well drawn comic and for those who have no idea about philosophy it will be a wonderful discovery.

  11. 5 out of 5

    John

    Cute and simplistic, it does a good job providing a baseline understanding of what philosophy has aimed to do and why that is important. It provides the briefest of biographies and overviews of a lineage that goes from Socrates to Aquinas, covers the trio of early modern philosophers (Erasmus, Spinoza, and Descartes) active in the Netherlands, and summarizes the philosophies & philosophers that guide a few friends and families. A very quick read that intends to spark interest rather than satisfy Cute and simplistic, it does a good job providing a baseline understanding of what philosophy has aimed to do and why that is important. It provides the briefest of biographies and overviews of a lineage that goes from Socrates to Aquinas, covers the trio of early modern philosophers (Erasmus, Spinoza, and Descartes) active in the Netherlands, and summarizes the philosophies & philosophers that guide a few friends and families. A very quick read that intends to spark interest rather than satisfy it.

  12. 5 out of 5

    Stewart Tame

    Fun book, very reminiscent of Larry Gonick's Cartoon History of the Universe in some ways. Folks who think of philosophy as an intimidating subject will likely appreciate this stripped-down introduction to the topic. Heer helps demystify the whole thing, makes it almost user-friendly. This isn't intended to be an exhaustive history or anything. She covers the basics, gives examples of philosophy on a sort of everyday level, and encourages the curious to read further. I found this book thoroughly Fun book, very reminiscent of Larry Gonick's Cartoon History of the Universe in some ways. Folks who think of philosophy as an intimidating subject will likely appreciate this stripped-down introduction to the topic. Heer helps demystify the whole thing, makes it almost user-friendly. This isn't intended to be an exhaustive history or anything. She covers the basics, gives examples of philosophy on a sort of everyday level, and encourages the curious to read further. I found this book thoroughly enjoyable.

  13. 4 out of 5

    Ild Flue

    Hi! I love your work. I find it so well done, so amusing and cleaver, that I had to tell you thank you so much for such a good job! I work us a hands and crafts, and ethics teacher in a college. Since I found you I often see myself thinking about your drawings as the best explanation to many things I talk to my students. Hope you continue working for many years so we feel so lucky to have you drawing for making everyday life easier and better. Cheers,Menchu

  14. 4 out of 5

    Amanda Coppedge

    Thought-provoking intro to philosophy. Recommended for teens. If you want a more in-depth graphic novel look at philosophy, I highly recommend The More Than Complete Action Philosophers!. Thought-provoking intro to philosophy. Recommended for teens. If you want a more in-depth graphic novel look at philosophy, I highly recommend The More Than Complete Action Philosophers!.

  15. 4 out of 5

    Sowmya

    Not quite as impressive as the other one in Discovery in comics series - on Science. However, it is still a good attempt. It became too autobiographical at a few points, but I think this also qualifies as a good gift book for teenagers and provides a good overview on early and modern western philosophy

  16. 4 out of 5

    Vicki Cline

    My local library has a rather large collection of graphic novels, which I don't usually read, but this one looked interesting. She covers the history of philosophical thought, concentrating on a few philosophers from each era, and explains their thoughts using pictures (naturally) as well as words. It was really quite enjoyable as well as a fast read.

  17. 5 out of 5

    Kelsey Matthews

    I really enjoyed this. As someone who dropped Philosophy 101 because I could not for the life of me understand applied logic, I thought it was a well done 101 style text. Having it in graphic format was all the more helpful. I did pace myself, giving time to digest the information. Overall, a good introduction!

  18. 4 out of 5

    Rick

    While I didn't enjoy this volume as much as Science: A Discovery in Comics, it was still quite good. de Heer covers a lot of territory pretty quickly and handles it all pretty well. an excellent primer for studies of philosophy. While I didn't enjoy this volume as much as Science: A Discovery in Comics, it was still quite good. de Heer covers a lot of territory pretty quickly and handles it all pretty well. an excellent primer for studies of philosophy.

  19. 5 out of 5

    Ronny

    I really enjoyed this book for the fact that is was an easy read. I liked that it was in comic form and about philosophy something i just got into. It gave me insight on many western philosophers like plato.

  20. 5 out of 5

    Jesse Richards

    A good introduction but very basic. She could have left out the biographies, and expanded the excellent end section where she asks people their own personal philosophies and we see modern philosophers like George Carlin.

  21. 4 out of 5

    PJ Wallachia

    I really enjoyed this book as a survey of western philosophy, but I do wish that she had spent more time exploring non-European ideas. Kudos to her for pointing out this bias in the book, and a superb overview in such a short time (117 pages).

  22. 5 out of 5

    Emma Moulton

    I won this book through first reads. I'm so pleased I did. It's an amazing book. It makes you think of things you wouldn't really think of. If you're thinking about getting the book, do!

  23. 4 out of 5

    Jane

    good historic view of philosophy.

  24. 5 out of 5

    Arlie

    Loved it - cute, entertaining, and really quite informative. A comic primer on philosophy told with insight and humour.

  25. 4 out of 5

    Jon Nakapalau

    Great introduction to philosophy!

  26. 4 out of 5

    Lia Mancino

    The graphic novel, Philosophy a Discovery in Comics, by Margreet de Heer, is about how we think, who we think we are, and how western philosophy came about. The author’s main topic of this book is what are our own personal philosophies. Everyone has their own personal philosophies that shape their decisions and ways they view life.“Well… Margaret's [narrator/author] philosophy is: there are more things in heaven and earth, Horatio, than are dreamt of in your philosophy or: there is always more(d The graphic novel, Philosophy a Discovery in Comics, by Margreet de Heer, is about how we think, who we think we are, and how western philosophy came about. The author’s main topic of this book is what are our own personal philosophies. Everyone has their own personal philosophies that shape their decisions and ways they view life.“Well… Margaret's [narrator/author] philosophy is: there are more things in heaven and earth, Horatio, than are dreamt of in your philosophy or: there is always more(de Heer, 114)!” From the author giving one of her own personal philosophies I felt like it helped me think about what my own philosophies are. Conclusions the author draws in is having the reader question, throughout the book, what are their own philosophies are. After, learning about how philosophy started and came about throughout different time periods. My overall response to this book was becoming more interested in how animals don’t understand humor, how philosophy was studied and started, how thoughts come about, and how to organize our thoughts. “Now that I’m thirty-six [author/narrator], I have formulated the following model: the brain consists of a load of containers of impressions, emotion, and memories… consciousness zips through it's an electrical current... The connections that are made are our thoughts… I think… I distinguish between three kinds of thought… observations perceptions, connections associations, conclusions. For example, the sun is out. Sun = warmth. I’ll wear shorts today! All these connections/thoughts take place more or less simultaneously, on different levels, consciously and subconsciously… and as current visits a container, it alters it a bit (8 and 9).” Throughout the whole book the author is always giving examples of how she thinks, to help the readers figure out how we personally think and also how we can organize our thoughts. This book would be good for someone who is interested in philosophy but doesn't want to read a large book about it. Also, the cartoons make the book a lot more interesting and interactive. A weakness of this book is that some pages were difficult to read because there was too much text on a single page. Making me unsure about where I was supposed to start reading on a page. I would recommend this book to anyone who is interested in how our own thoughts change as we get older because this book not only has a lot of information on that topic but it gives you the information in a very creative way. “What is thinking anyway? Nine years old: thinking = an ever ever-expanding series of thoughts (though → → → thought thought thought → → → → → → thought thought thought thought thought thought → → → → → → thought thought thought thought thought thought) Eighteen years old: (raging hormones and general confusion) thinking = a wild sea of conscious and subconscious thoughts. Twenty-seven years old: (when I got the hang of meditation) thinking = a veil between us and our true consciousness. (7)” Something that is also interesting about this book is that the author is able to relate to most of her audience because most people fall under the age ranges above making them feel a connection to the author. Something I thought was really neat about this book was that the author drew herself and her husband into the book and she was the one giving the information. Making it seem like she was giving us a lesson similar to a teacher would. The author the was on almost every page gives the new information on each page. A strength of this book is that it’s a quick read and the book has a lot of information, so after reading this book the reader has a fairly decent knowledge on philosophy. The author’s writing style was humorous and from this, I felt like the author was always grabbing my attention by relating to me personally. This book challenges me to question who I think I am and how I can manage my own thoughts better. An interesting question this book left me with is what are my own philosophies because everyone has their own personal philosophies that shape their decisions and ways they view life.

  27. 5 out of 5

    Silas

    This was a reasonably good introduction to some philosophical ideas. It takes a lot of the "great man" approach, with biographies of several philosophers, starting at Socrates (and thus missing some of my personal favorites), and going through Plato and Aristotle, then jumping to a few Christian thinkers, and then abandons the idea upon reaching modern philosophers (thus missing most of my other favorites, as well) in favor of looking at some of the author's family members. The comic format did This was a reasonably good introduction to some philosophical ideas. It takes a lot of the "great man" approach, with biographies of several philosophers, starting at Socrates (and thus missing some of my personal favorites), and going through Plato and Aristotle, then jumping to a few Christian thinkers, and then abandons the idea upon reaching modern philosophers (thus missing most of my other favorites, as well) in favor of looking at some of the author's family members. The comic format did make things really pretty approachable, and I liked when the author addressed philosophical ideas a bit more than when she talked about philosophers's lives (though that was still somewhat interesting). I do think that making some of those biographies a bit briefer in order to add a few more modern philosophers would have been a bit better, but that's not how this went, and I think the author's history studying theology probably emphasized Christian philosophers more than I cared for, but overall, this is fairly good, though I also kind of wish there were more content.

  28. 4 out of 5

    Dylan Smart

    In my opinion, this book was the most fun I've ever had while learning about modern, and ancient philosophy. From the pictures, to the use of words, "Philosophy: A Discovery in Comics" Is guaranteed to keep you interested through every lesson. I really enjoy how the author is able to create pictures and cartoons that can easily explain the topic to anyone. It has the ability to teach the reader, and has the same ability to keep them entertained while doing it. Overall, this was possibly my favorit In my opinion, this book was the most fun I've ever had while learning about modern, and ancient philosophy. From the pictures, to the use of words, "Philosophy: A Discovery in Comics" Is guaranteed to keep you interested through every lesson. I really enjoy how the author is able to create pictures and cartoons that can easily explain the topic to anyone. It has the ability to teach the reader, and has the same ability to keep them entertained while doing it. Overall, this was possibly my favorite Philosophy book I've read so far!

  29. 5 out of 5

    Edward Sullivan

    The focus of this graphic introduction to philosophers and philosophical concepts is exclusively on western philosophy. de Heer inroduces the thoughts of philosophers such as Socrates, Plato, Aristotle, Descartes, Spinoza, and Nietzsche, and ponders questions such as What is thinking? What is reality? Is there free will? and Why are these ideas still important? Compared to de Heers other books like this on religion and science, this one falls short in scope and thoroughness. Originally published The focus of this graphic introduction to philosophers and philosophical concepts is exclusively on western philosophy. de Heer inroduces the thoughts of philosophers such as Socrates, Plato, Aristotle, Descartes, Spinoza, and Nietzsche, and ponders questions such as What is thinking? What is reality? Is there free will? and Why are these ideas still important? Compared to de Heers other books like this on religion and science, this one falls short in scope and thoroughness. Originally published in the Netherlands.

  30. 5 out of 5

    Noah Schwartzlow

    Philosophy: A Discovery in Comics, This book is very entertaining. If you prefer a laid back book to sit and enjoy without breaking your back. I highly recommend this book. However it isn't the book I would say challenges the reader. I enjoyed this book because it had very precise topics. Meaning, it wouldn't jump. It did have subcategories in the "chapters" that branched into history of the Philosophers. I enjoyed reading the book and highly recommend it. This book explains what philosophy is, w Philosophy: A Discovery in Comics, This book is very entertaining. If you prefer a laid back book to sit and enjoy without breaking your back. I highly recommend this book. However it isn't the book I would say challenges the reader. I enjoyed this book because it had very precise topics. Meaning, it wouldn't jump. It did have subcategories in the "chapters" that branched into history of the Philosophers. I enjoyed reading the book and highly recommend it. This book explains what philosophy is, what types of philosophy there are, the life of famed philosophers, and the personal views of the author and her husband. The book was very informal. I thought her approach to teaching it was interesting. Instead of a novel a comic. Why not? Some negatives about the book: It was quiet short because of the nature of a comic. The husband seemed to blend in weirdly. She talked about his philosophy among the great professors. Which I didn't feel was appropriate.

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