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The Chemical Wedding of Christian Rosenkreutz, often looked upon as the third Rosicrucian manifesto, has an entirely different tone from the other Rosicrucian documents. Unlike the Rosicrucian manifestoes, which address the transformation of society, The Chemical Wedding is concerned with the inner transformation of the soul. It is a deeply interior work, one which asks th The Chemical Wedding of Christian Rosenkreutz, often looked upon as the third Rosicrucian manifesto, has an entirely different tone from the other Rosicrucian documents. Unlike the Rosicrucian manifestoes, which address the transformation of society, The Chemical Wedding is concerned with the inner transformation of the soul. It is a deeply interior work, one which asks the reader to step into its world of symbols and walk with Christian Rosenkreutz along his path of transformation. Despite its importance as a key text of the Western esoteric traditions, this is the first ever contemporary English translation of The Chemical Wedding, made especially for this edition by Joscelyn Godwin. Also included in this edition is an introduction and commentary by Adam McLean, which illuminates the transformative symbolism.


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The Chemical Wedding of Christian Rosenkreutz, often looked upon as the third Rosicrucian manifesto, has an entirely different tone from the other Rosicrucian documents. Unlike the Rosicrucian manifestoes, which address the transformation of society, The Chemical Wedding is concerned with the inner transformation of the soul. It is a deeply interior work, one which asks th The Chemical Wedding of Christian Rosenkreutz, often looked upon as the third Rosicrucian manifesto, has an entirely different tone from the other Rosicrucian documents. Unlike the Rosicrucian manifestoes, which address the transformation of society, The Chemical Wedding is concerned with the inner transformation of the soul. It is a deeply interior work, one which asks the reader to step into its world of symbols and walk with Christian Rosenkreutz along his path of transformation. Despite its importance as a key text of the Western esoteric traditions, this is the first ever contemporary English translation of The Chemical Wedding, made especially for this edition by Joscelyn Godwin. Also included in this edition is an introduction and commentary by Adam McLean, which illuminates the transformative symbolism.

30 review for The Chemical Wedding of Christian Rosenkreutz

  1. 5 out of 5

    Mary Overton

    Alchemical parables and allegories are horror stories with happy endings. They detail the terror and disgust of death … decay, dissolution, suffering … and linger over descriptions of living tissue reduced to foul waste. Then the alchemist distills any remaining liquid, burns the solid material to ash, recombines this into a paste, stuffs it into a human mold, cooks it some more, and - voila! - resurrection. The Chemical Wedding is a chemical allegory first published in 1616 as the third Rosicruc Alchemical parables and allegories are horror stories with happy endings. They detail the terror and disgust of death … decay, dissolution, suffering … and linger over descriptions of living tissue reduced to foul waste. Then the alchemist distills any remaining liquid, burns the solid material to ash, recombines this into a paste, stuffs it into a human mold, cooks it some more, and - voila! - resurrection. The Chemical Wedding is a chemical allegory first published in 1616 as the third Rosicrucian manifesto. Supposedly it was a lost manuscript "unearthed" from the tomb of its author, Christian Rosenkreutz, 120 years after his death. Fake manuscripts were all the rage in occult literature. This edition has a marvelous commentary by Adam McLean. For a taste of its horror, here is the creepiest of 7 creepy conundrums shared during an after-dinner game of riddles: “‘In my youth I loved a beautiful, virtuous girl from the bottom of my heart, and she loved me, but her kinsman would not give permission for us to marry. So she was married to another man, honest and upright, who kept her with modesty and affection until she came to childbed, and was so ill that everyone thought she had died. With great sorrow, they gave her a magnificent burial. Then I thought to myself: if this person could not be yours in life, at least you can embrace her in death and kiss her to your heart’s content. So I took my servant with me, and dug her up again by night. When I opened the coffin and took her in my arms, I felt her heart and discovered that it was still beating a little. As I warmed her it became stronger and stronger, until I could see that she was indeed still alive. Then I silently took her home with me and, after warming her frozen body with a bath of precious herbs, committed her to the care of my mother until she gave birth to a fine son, whom I cared for as lovingly as I had the mother. After two days, since she was greatly confused, I revealed to her all that had occurred, and asked her to live as my wife from now on. But she was greatly worried that it might give grief to her husband, who had treated her well and honorably. However, as such things will turn out, she now felt no less obligated to one as to the other. “‘After two months, being then obliged to travel elsewhere, I invited her husband as a guest and asked him among other things whether he would take back his dead wife, if she were to come home again. He affirmed it with tears and lamentations. Finally I brought his wife to him, together with her son, told him all that had happened, and asked him to give consent for my intended marriage. After a long argument he could not shake my claim, and so had to leave the wife with me. Then came the battle over the son…’ “The Virgin [hostess of the dinner party] here interrupted him and said: ‘I am surprised that you could thus increase the poor man’s misery.’ “‘What?’ he answered, ‘Was I not concerned about it?’ “Thereupon an argument arose among us, in which most of us were of the opinion that he had done right. But he said: ‘Not at all: I gave him back both wife and son! Now tell me, gentlemen, which was the greater: my integrity or this man’s happiness?’” pp. 54-55 https://www.maryoverton.work/clevers-...

  2. 5 out of 5

    Jonathan Donihue

    At this point in my life, I am too ignorant to say anything worthwhile about this book. I believe that reading this, and the commentary that follows it, has brought me some inspiration and insight. I don't know, however, if it would be of value to anyone else. If you choose to read The Chemical Wedding of Christian Rosenkreutz, I advise you to do so with humility. Humility is a rare thing these days, but sometimes the best thing a person can do is just shut up and listen.

  3. 4 out of 5

    DeAnna Knippling

    One of the foundational texts of philosophical alchemy. I realize this is some deep and meaningful stuff. I appreciated reading it for the symbolism and images, which show up all across Western thought since then. But does the author have to brag about how humble he is...constantly? Gosh, golly, gee whiz! He's ever so magnficently humble, even as he nearly cackles with glee at his competition's downfall and punishment. I wanted to strangle Mr. Smug. Recommended if you're doing research on the subj One of the foundational texts of philosophical alchemy. I realize this is some deep and meaningful stuff. I appreciated reading it for the symbolism and images, which show up all across Western thought since then. But does the author have to brag about how humble he is...constantly? Gosh, golly, gee whiz! He's ever so magnficently humble, even as he nearly cackles with glee at his competition's downfall and punishment. I wanted to strangle Mr. Smug. Recommended if you're doing research on the subject. Just prepare to roll your eyes at some of the commentary.

  4. 5 out of 5

    Jim

    The Chemical Wedding of Christian Rosenkreutz is a mysterious manifesto of unknown authorship that surfaced in early 1600's Europe. It has its roots in esoteric Christianity and alchemy, and helped found the Rosicrucian movement. My review is.... HUH? Let me summarize: some 17th century author tripping on hallucinogens got philosophical one night and wrote a book. He wrote about some mentally ill old guy who gets invited to a magic castle. While there he gets into a whole bunch of trouble cause he The Chemical Wedding of Christian Rosenkreutz is a mysterious manifesto of unknown authorship that surfaced in early 1600's Europe. It has its roots in esoteric Christianity and alchemy, and helped found the Rosicrucian movement. My review is.... HUH? Let me summarize: some 17th century author tripping on hallucinogens got philosophical one night and wrote a book. He wrote about some mentally ill old guy who gets invited to a magic castle. While there he gets into a whole bunch of trouble cause he keeps sneaking around and getting into stuff he shouldn't. Yet, he's deemed to be more worthy than the other freaks there and takes a boat to a big tower and witnesses some bird getting killed. The end. OK look, I picked up this book because so many reviews talk about its intricate complexity and great worth on a personal level. Maybe it is that for some people. Good for them. But for commoners such as myself it is absolute and utter nonsense. Generally speaking I love a good historical and esoteric spin on life and spirituality. I wanted to like this book. I love stuff like this. But this didn't work for me, at all. It was overly metaphorical to the point of gibberish. It was contrived and phony feeling 7 times over. It's just plain old WEIRD. There, I said it. WEIRD.

  5. 4 out of 5

    Ben

    Much has been made of the fact that Andreae wrote this book when young, as a 'prank' or literary 'hoax'. This may well be the case (although I suspect his admission was more inspired by a desire to protect himself during the turbulent days of counter-reformation warfare in Europe through which he lived). Whatever the books original background may have been, it inspired a surge of spiritual, political and alchemical writing in the seventeenth century, and eventually the modern Rosicrucian pseudo- Much has been made of the fact that Andreae wrote this book when young, as a 'prank' or literary 'hoax'. This may well be the case (although I suspect his admission was more inspired by a desire to protect himself during the turbulent days of counter-reformation warfare in Europe through which he lived). Whatever the books original background may have been, it inspired a surge of spiritual, political and alchemical writing in the seventeenth century, and eventually the modern Rosicrucian pseudo-religion. If one disregards its history and legacy, I believe it still stands its ground as a startlingly odd , subtly unsettling and strangely inspiring piece of writing. It is full of peculiar imagery which weaves its way into the subconscious. Even if Andreae intended it to be a pastiche of the Alchemical literature of his day, he produced something which transcends parody and which occasionally shines with genuine poetic value.

  6. 4 out of 5

    Krystina

    This is, by far, the oddest book I’ve read all year. Originally published 400+ years ago, the translator bills this as the first work of science fiction, because it’s a tangle of allegories on secret alchemist procedures. Every character is the representation of a substance/element and the trials and interactions between the characters is their chemical relationship. The version I read has footnotes, which were somewhat helpful in understanding what was going on — although it was interesting how This is, by far, the oddest book I’ve read all year. Originally published 400+ years ago, the translator bills this as the first work of science fiction, because it’s a tangle of allegories on secret alchemist procedures. Every character is the representation of a substance/element and the trials and interactions between the characters is their chemical relationship. The version I read has footnotes, which were somewhat helpful in understanding what was going on — although it was interesting how often the translator admitted to not knowing what certain scenes meant. This reads like a bizarre fairy tale, full of riddles, and set in a Wonderland universe. Expect the entire wedding party to get beheaded, for Venus to be sleeping in the castle basement, for a mischievous Cupid to poke his nose in everywhere, and for an old man to be forced to work his way through continuous odd tasks like painting a giant bird blue and then slaughtering it for its royal blood.

  7. 5 out of 5

    Mark

    And absurd and self-aware tale that lets the allegory get so plump and shambling that it reveals itself as parody. Presumably the humor was there all along, but Crowley draws it out with style and annotation, and the illustrations nail it down with the subtlety of a political cartoon.

  8. 5 out of 5

    Alex Sarll

    For some reason I find myself tempted to review this with nothing more than "So I hear you're a Rosicrucian now, Father". Which would probably make about as much sense as any other approach. Much lke Gawain and the Green Knight, it's impossible to read this keystone of 17th century oddness without suspecting one is missing the key to a code, but more so than Gawain, here many suggestions have been made, and defended as doggedly as only academics, conspiracy theorists and occultists can defend th For some reason I find myself tempted to review this with nothing more than "So I hear you're a Rosicrucian now, Father". Which would probably make about as much sense as any other approach. Much lke Gawain and the Green Knight, it's impossible to read this keystone of 17th century oddness without suspecting one is missing the key to a code, but more so than Gawain, here many suggestions have been made, and defended as doggedly as only academics, conspiracy theorists and occultists can defend the unprovable. Alchemical, religious and political symbolism seem to be the favourites; I reckon, if I set my mind to it, I could fill out glimpses I got of it as a kink thing. John Crowley's gloss in his rather beautiful edition is that it's a) a deliberate spoof of hermetic fantasies, even as it went on to inspire plenty itself, and b) one of the first science fiction novels. He may be deliberately trolling, but he's certainly no more wrong than anyone else.

  9. 4 out of 5

    Kelly Kuwabara

    Five stars for Theo's fantastic illustrations alone. Each drawing rewards any extra attention the viewer pays, with layers of meaning and witty details. The narrator's character as a man who is simultaneously vain and earnest; simultaneously childish and heroic; simultaneously ridiculous and touching, couldn't be more exactly or more entertainingly conveyed than by the representations here. The text is a wild ride for someone like me who knew nothing about alchemy or Rosicrucians, but John Crowl Five stars for Theo's fantastic illustrations alone. Each drawing rewards any extra attention the viewer pays, with layers of meaning and witty details. The narrator's character as a man who is simultaneously vain and earnest; simultaneously childish and heroic; simultaneously ridiculous and touching, couldn't be more exactly or more entertainingly conveyed than by the representations here. The text is a wild ride for someone like me who knew nothing about alchemy or Rosicrucians, but John Crowley's notes prove to be an enchanting and reassuring guide through this wacky allegorical tale of blood, ashes, death and resurrection, royal authority, transparent jelly-ish bodies, green souls, and baroque scientific-magical processes. He struck an appealing balance between scholarly interest and careful artistic interpretation that made the fascinating and modern-relevant components of a potentially obscure story shine through.

  10. 5 out of 5

    ambyr

    It's hard for me to rate this. As a primary source, a glimpse into the lives and fascinations of the seventeenth century, it's worth reading. And the author's humor still works for at least this modern-day reader; I giggled throughout at the protagonist's mastery of the humblebrag. It's a shaggy dog story, it's an allegory, it's a hoax, it's a joke, and it's certainly a swift and fun read--but what it's not, by modern standards, is a novel. And that's okay, but it makes it awfully hard to rank i It's hard for me to rate this. As a primary source, a glimpse into the lives and fascinations of the seventeenth century, it's worth reading. And the author's humor still works for at least this modern-day reader; I giggled throughout at the protagonist's mastery of the humblebrag. It's a shaggy dog story, it's an allegory, it's a hoax, it's a joke, and it's certainly a swift and fun read--but what it's not, by modern standards, is a novel. And that's okay, but it makes it awfully hard to rank it on the same star rating system as everything else I read.

  11. 5 out of 5

    Rachel (Kalanadi)

    I didn't know what this was at all until I cracked open the beautiful hardcover book, and started reading Crowley's introduction. It's his annotated edition of a 1616 little alchemical tale, of a man (Christian Rosencreutz) invited to a strange royal wedding, and the trials and rewards as he goes through all the tests... and the rebirth of the king and the queen. I don't know what to make of this at all! Crowley's annotations were very helpful, to point out the symbolism and context. But even the I didn't know what this was at all until I cracked open the beautiful hardcover book, and started reading Crowley's introduction. It's his annotated edition of a 1616 little alchemical tale, of a man (Christian Rosencreutz) invited to a strange royal wedding, and the trials and rewards as he goes through all the tests... and the rebirth of the king and the queen. I don't know what to make of this at all! Crowley's annotations were very helpful, to point out the symbolism and context. But even then, the story is just so strange! It's easy to see why it puzzles and intrigues people who want to interpret and reinterpret and create very convoluted explanations for everything, and read it all as allegorical. Sometimes it contradicts itself, or goes very odd, and no one knows if there are actual errors or if it was intentional. And then the ending! Is there an eighth day? (As Crowley argues.) Is the ending really missing, or did Andreae actually write it that way? Superficially, The Chemical Wedding is pretty fantastic. A great weird story to spend an evening on. And anyone who wants to try to explain it is in for some fun. I'm not sure I'm convinced by Crowley's argument that this is very early science fiction (pre-dating Somnium, which I haven't read). He's saying that alchemy was the science of Andreae's day, and points out a few of the grand-scale and completely geeky elements that would be alchemy's version of sci fi nerdery. I get the gist of this, I think, but on the whole it didn't feel like science fiction, but rather overwhelmingly like a fantastical fable. (Note about this edition: I backed Small Beer Press's Kickstarter and got the absolutely gorgeous hardcover edition. It's really stunning on the outside, but I also thought all the little details inside were perfect. Theo Fadel's illustrations were spot on. The annotations, page numbers, and quotes are in red. I just think the page layout and typography is a joy to look at!)

  12. 4 out of 5

    Travis

    I stumbled across this book in the sci-fi/fantasy section of a different library from my usual one. I had heard the term "chemical wedding" used in reference to alchemy, and may even have heard reference to the original work at some point. It seemed like it might be interesting as a more approachable, slightly modernized version of document contemporary with alchemy as an actual science; and I think alchemy is neat. The book proved to be disappointing. As John Crowley writes in his introduction, I stumbled across this book in the sci-fi/fantasy section of a different library from my usual one. I had heard the term "chemical wedding" used in reference to alchemy, and may even have heard reference to the original work at some point. It seemed like it might be interesting as a more approachable, slightly modernized version of document contemporary with alchemy as an actual science; and I think alchemy is neat. The book proved to be disappointing. As John Crowley writes in his introduction, the purported original author of this work, Johannn Andreae, claimed to have written it as a joke, and that seems about right for how it reads. It was either entirely a lark, or else it was a commentary on contemporary issues, the import of which is now lost. Either way the result is a bunch of allegory and obtuse mystification which evokes alchemical traditions, but doesn't seem to provide any true insight into the practice. The modern additions to this work are also underwhelming: Crowley's introduction is decent, but his notes throughout the book vary between actual useful information, like the explanation of cyphers, and something amounting to him saying "ooh, this part will be really important later," again and again; the illustrations by Theo Fadel are in the style of caricature (with weird bobble heads and over-emphasized features) that I generally find unattractive, and while the style plays into Andreae's assertion that the work is a joke, it really undercuts Crowley's argument that it should be taken seriously as an early work of science fiction.

  13. 5 out of 5

    loudermilk

    (in rich voice-over-voice) debbie loves carrie, but simon wants to kill them both. julien joined the order of the double-jointed crucifix, and now they want his feet. peter owes julien haff (sic) a million dollars, and carrie knows where it's hidden. simon wants julien to take carrie to mexico, but why ?! who did peter talk to at the racetrack ? why are the order of the d j c staying up late tonight..... and what's all the banging about ?! where did debbie get those thumb screws ? we'll find out, (in rich voice-over-voice) debbie loves carrie, but simon wants to kill them both. julien joined the order of the double-jointed crucifix, and now they want his feet. peter owes julien haff (sic) a million dollars, and carrie knows where it's hidden. simon wants julien to take carrie to mexico, but why ?! who did peter talk to at the racetrack ? why are the order of the d j c staying up late tonight..... and what's all the banging about ?! where did debbie get those thumb screws ? we'll find out, right after this.

  14. 4 out of 5

    Greg

    This is a nice translation of one of the three foundation texts of Rosicrucianism. It includes a very helpful commentary on some of the symbolism of the allegory. Recommended reading for people interested in Rosicrucianism.

  15. 5 out of 5

    Greer

    Weird stuff. Post-modernism has trained me to be suspicious, so when I first picked up this book I suspected it was actually meta-meta-fiction, a completely fictive pastiche of old alchemical allegories written by a contemporary writer. Then I fact-checked the existence of Andreae on Wikipedia, and realized that yeah, this is actually a real Reformation-era text. Well, damn. Fortunately, my suspicion that this book is just out to mess with people turned out to not be misplaced. Andreae, the man Weird stuff. Post-modernism has trained me to be suspicious, so when I first picked up this book I suspected it was actually meta-meta-fiction, a completely fictive pastiche of old alchemical allegories written by a contemporary writer. Then I fact-checked the existence of Andreae on Wikipedia, and realized that yeah, this is actually a real Reformation-era text. Well, damn. Fortunately, my suspicion that this book is just out to mess with people turned out to not be misplaced. Andreae, the man from the 1600's who said he wrote it, eventually admitted it was just a big joke--though a lot of people refused to believe him. And therein lies the whole strange appeal of the CW: just when you think it's a joke, it suddenly flips and sounds like it means something again, and vice-versa. Crowley definitely delights in deepening the CW's mystique. His notes are anti-commentary as often as they're clear--one of his most common refrains is "This part is definitely allegorical for something, but I have no idea what that something is." So, yep. If you find unsolvable allegories frustrating do *not* read this book. It might be about alchemy, or the Gospels, or the Reformation, or it might be a parody of all of that. Or none of those things. It doesn't resolve and it only gets weirder. On the other hand: there's alchemy, riddles, weird mystic shit, lots of flirting, lots of snark, and a math puzzle, so as far as old books go, this is pretty great! It's much more readable than anything you ever find in a serious old Christian Allegory like the Romance of the Rose or Dante's Paradiso. Just treat it like, as Crowley likes to say, the first sci-fi novel. (Also, the illustrations are really funny.)

  16. 5 out of 5

    Kenzie

    I came to this book with high expectations: John Crowley fan? Check. Alchemy nerd? Check. What I hadn't bargained on was Crowley's apparent agnosticism about the whole thing, and I feel so silly for not having expected that. His nuanced way of exploring magic is of the things I love about him! But, The Chemical Wedding has such a reputation as a formative esoteric text that I actually thought he would tell us what it means and what it means for his writing. Once I let go of my original expectati I came to this book with high expectations: John Crowley fan? Check. Alchemy nerd? Check. What I hadn't bargained on was Crowley's apparent agnosticism about the whole thing, and I feel so silly for not having expected that. His nuanced way of exploring magic is of the things I love about him! But, The Chemical Wedding has such a reputation as a formative esoteric text that I actually thought he would tell us what it means and what it means for his writing. Once I let go of my original expectations, I enjoyed an inside look at how Crowley reads this piece of early sci-fi/fantasy through a historical as well as literary lens. His historical reading fits so well with his thoughts on how magic and time are related, as in the Aegypt Cycle, and the more I sat with it all, I realized my expectations were met after all, in the lovely disorienting way that seems to happen with Crowley's works. Most of all, I enjoyed his thoughts on the question of the eighth day.

  17. 4 out of 5

    Jeff Raymond

    A very old story, considered by some to be the “first science fiction book,” this was Kickstarted some time ago and I just got around to reading it. The story itself? Kind of compelling, but does feel its age. What is great are the footnotes throughout giving some solid historical context to the text and the probable thinking that went into the storytelling. The documentation is ultimately what makes this worth the time, and if you can get your hands on this specific version of the story, you sh A very old story, considered by some to be the “first science fiction book,” this was Kickstarted some time ago and I just got around to reading it. The story itself? Kind of compelling, but does feel its age. What is great are the footnotes throughout giving some solid historical context to the text and the probable thinking that went into the storytelling. The documentation is ultimately what makes this worth the time, and if you can get your hands on this specific version of the story, you should absolutely do it.

  18. 4 out of 5

    AL

    The first translation of this story I’ve ever read is the John Crowley version which seems good and thoroughly researched, yet when looking through the Adam McLean edition, I see that McLean is a more authoritative scholar of alchemy and other esoteric studies, and his intro and commentary are proof enough for me of his knowledge of the Great Work, as he points out the many flawed translations that are manipulated to fit the narrative of the translator’s agendas. Luckily, McLean is here to inform The first translation of this story I’ve ever read is the John Crowley version which seems good and thoroughly researched, yet when looking through the Adam McLean edition, I see that McLean is a more authoritative scholar of alchemy and other esoteric studies, and his intro and commentary are proof enough for me of his knowledge of the Great Work, as he points out the many flawed translations that are manipulated to fit the narrative of the translator’s agendas. Luckily, McLean is here to inform readers of the true secrets within the allegory.

  19. 5 out of 5

    Chris Marcatili

    A very bizarre tale of an old man who gets caught up in a metafictional tale of alchemy. It's Alice in Wonderland level bizarre, so if you're looking for story arch and character development, this isn't the book for you. If you're looking for something that evokes mystery and suggests layers of meaning, ripe for analysis, then you might enjoy this book. The John Crowley edition is beautifully designed with illustrations.

  20. 5 out of 5

    Loren

    I took "in a new version by John Crowley" to mean it would be a novel by John Crowley based on The Chemical Wedding. I loved Aegypt and the books that followed it and wanted more like that: beautiful meditations on the occult full of deep, rounded characters struggling to make sense of life and time and death. Instead, this is a straight translation of Andreae's hoaxy novel with some annotations by Crowley. Not enough Crowley for my taste.

  21. 5 out of 5

    Alexander McLeese

    One of the early writings (originally published in 1616) to come from the Rosicrucian's which i'm sure wont peak the interest of many but what will is that this books is clearly where the inspiration, ideas and characters came from for the first Harry Potter book as the similarities are unquestionable.

  22. 4 out of 5

    VexenReplica

    3.5/5, rounded up. A very odd and unusual story. If you can get an annotated copy of the story, I would highly recommend it, as it does get rather confusing and I definitely missed a lot of references.

  23. 4 out of 5

    Derek Fenner

    A gorgeous two-color edition and new translation/edition on the 400th anniversary of this seminal esoteric novel! Lots of good Rose-cross alchemy imagery.

  24. 5 out of 5

    Angelica Archangelica

    I did not finish it. It was amusing and strange. I was more intrigued by the historical context of the writing than the writing itself.

  25. 5 out of 5

    Brian Choate

    Not the exact version I got. Need to look for some commentaries on it now.

  26. 4 out of 5

    Mark Singer

    I had no expectations when I started this, and will have to think about it as I know little about alchemy. The editor claims it is one of the first science-fiction novels. This requires a re-read.

  27. 4 out of 5

    Noah Talon

    If you've gotten your letter, read the book.

  28. 5 out of 5

    Michael

    When I heard that John Crowley had started a Kickstarter campaign to publish a new edition of The Chemical Wedding I about peed myself. I love Crowley, I've had an interest in alchemy for decades, and the book itself is just beautiful. The story itself is not superb, but Crowley's commentary is fascinating.

  29. 5 out of 5

    Ralph Palm

    Meh....

  30. 5 out of 5

    Jim

    not sure i enjoyed this as much as i could/should/would have on another day... i love anything Crowley writes so i found this in my library and decided to read it... alas, not quite Crowley's book, as any investigating prior to acquisition would have told me... personally, the book calls for a hardback edition, a paperback diminishes the effort applied to bring the story to readers... a better executed version would have done the tome more justice... the artwork in the book is wonderful, kinda r not sure i enjoyed this as much as i could/should/would have on another day... i love anything Crowley writes so i found this in my library and decided to read it... alas, not quite Crowley's book, as any investigating prior to acquisition would have told me... personally, the book calls for a hardback edition, a paperback diminishes the effort applied to bring the story to readers... a better executed version would have done the tome more justice... the artwork in the book is wonderful, kinda reminds me of something you would see in a book about trolls or elves or something else noticeably magical... so, great in spite of aesthetic issues and my dwindling caffeine reserves, maybe...

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