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The China Study, with 850,000 copies sold, has been hailed as one of the most important health and nutrition books ever published. It revealed that the traditional Western diet has led to our modern health crisis and the widespread growth of obesity, diabetes, heart disease, and cancer. Based on the most comprehensive nutrition study ever conducted, the book reveals that a The China Study, with 850,000 copies sold, has been hailed as one of the most important health and nutrition books ever published. It revealed that the traditional Western diet has led to our modern health crisis and the widespread growth of obesity, diabetes, heart disease, and cancer. Based on the most comprehensive nutrition study ever conducted, the book reveals that a plant-based diet leads to optimal health with the power to halt or reverse many diseases. The China Study Cookbook takes these scientific findings and puts them to action. Written by LeAnne Campbell, daughter of The China Study author T. Colin Campbell, PhD, and mother of two hungry teenagers, The China Study Cookbook features delicious, easily prepared plant-based recipes with no added fat and minimal sugar and salt that promote optimal health. From her Breakfast Home-Fry Hash and Fabulous Sweet Potato Enchiladas to No-Bake Peanut Butter Bars and Cheese(less) Cake, all of LeAnne’s recipes follow three important principles: 1. Optimal nutrition is based on eating food rather than nutrient supplements 2. The closer that foods are to their native states—prepared with minimal cooking, salting, and processing—the greater the long-term health benefits of eating them 3. It is best to choose locally and organically grown produce whenever possible Filled with helpful tips on substitutions, keeping foods nutrient-rich, and transitioning to a plant-based diet, The China Study Cookbook shows how to transform individual health and the health of the entire family.


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The China Study, with 850,000 copies sold, has been hailed as one of the most important health and nutrition books ever published. It revealed that the traditional Western diet has led to our modern health crisis and the widespread growth of obesity, diabetes, heart disease, and cancer. Based on the most comprehensive nutrition study ever conducted, the book reveals that a The China Study, with 850,000 copies sold, has been hailed as one of the most important health and nutrition books ever published. It revealed that the traditional Western diet has led to our modern health crisis and the widespread growth of obesity, diabetes, heart disease, and cancer. Based on the most comprehensive nutrition study ever conducted, the book reveals that a plant-based diet leads to optimal health with the power to halt or reverse many diseases. The China Study Cookbook takes these scientific findings and puts them to action. Written by LeAnne Campbell, daughter of The China Study author T. Colin Campbell, PhD, and mother of two hungry teenagers, The China Study Cookbook features delicious, easily prepared plant-based recipes with no added fat and minimal sugar and salt that promote optimal health. From her Breakfast Home-Fry Hash and Fabulous Sweet Potato Enchiladas to No-Bake Peanut Butter Bars and Cheese(less) Cake, all of LeAnne’s recipes follow three important principles: 1. Optimal nutrition is based on eating food rather than nutrient supplements 2. The closer that foods are to their native states—prepared with minimal cooking, salting, and processing—the greater the long-term health benefits of eating them 3. It is best to choose locally and organically grown produce whenever possible Filled with helpful tips on substitutions, keeping foods nutrient-rich, and transitioning to a plant-based diet, The China Study Cookbook shows how to transform individual health and the health of the entire family.

30 review for The China Study Cookbook: The Official Companion to the China Study (Over 120 Whole Food, Plant-Based Recipes)

  1. 4 out of 5

    Jim

    In the foreword to the cookbook, T. Colin Campbell, author of The China Study (and the father of cookbook author LeAnne Campbell), acknowledges that for adults used to the typical American diet, switching to a plant-based, no-added-fat diet can be challenging. For those who have chosen to make the lifestyle change, however, The China Study Cookbook is an invaluable guide to preparing tasty, nutritious meals that fully meet the requirements of the diet espoused by the Campbells. Before introducing In the foreword to the cookbook, T. Colin Campbell, author of The China Study (and the father of cookbook author LeAnne Campbell), acknowledges that for adults used to the typical American diet, switching to a plant-based, no-added-fat diet can be challenging. For those who have chosen to make the lifestyle change, however, The China Study Cookbook is an invaluable guide to preparing tasty, nutritious meals that fully meet the requirements of the diet espoused by the Campbells. Before introducing the recipes, the book has some tips on food preparation, a Q&A topic about raising children on a plant-based diet, and describes the seven categories of plants (plus mushrooms) that will be used in the recipes. The recipes include a wide variety of dishes, including breads and muffins, breakfast dishes, appetizers and salads, soups, sandwiches, entrées, side dishes, and desserts. In general, ingredients include whole grain flours, non-dairy milk, no refined sugar, egg replacers, no added fats, unprocessed complex carbohydrates, and plant foods that are as close to their original state as possible. The primary sweetener that's used is Sucanat - a product that's essentially pure dried sugar cane juice. Non-dairy milk includes rice, soy, or almond milk. Egg replacers are made from ground flaxseed meal mixed with water. Vegetables are typically cooked by baking, steaming, or sautéing in vegetable broth. Recipes are designed to minimize the amounts of fat, sugar, and salt. All recipes are accompanied by full-page color photographs. At first, I thought that the lack of nutritional information (calories, fiber, fat, carbohydrates, protein, etc.) was an unfortunate omission, but the author explained that nutrient contents in different samples of the same food are highly variable and that it's more important for the consumer to focus on the overall wholesomeness of a dish than the nutrient numbers. It's an impressive cookbook. The recipes look surprisingly tasty, considering the radical differences from traditional cooking. The lack of meat is perhaps the biggest difference, but the recipes use high-protein meat substitutes such as tofu. The author encourages personal experimentation to get the taste you prefer. This morning, my wife and I tried one of the recipes, "Breakfast Home-Fry Hash," adjusting the recipe slightly, based on the ingredients we had on hand and our own tastes, and it was delicious. We're looking forward to trying more recipes from the book. At our age, I don't know if we're up to the challenge of going completely over to a plant-based diet, but if we were younger or had young children, we would be seriously considering it. A review copy of the book was provided by the publisher.

  2. 4 out of 5

    Kim Overstreet

    I have eaten a whole foods plant based diet for two years with spectacular results and have several other cookbooks of this type. This is tied with The Happy Herbivore as my favorite. I have prepared ten China Study recipes thus far and loved them all. The food is flavorful, not bland like with some healthy cookbooks I've tried. My husband, who is an omnivore, enjoyed them as well. Most can be prepared with minimal effort from inexpensive ingredients found in a regular grocery store. The book it I have eaten a whole foods plant based diet for two years with spectacular results and have several other cookbooks of this type. This is tied with The Happy Herbivore as my favorite. I have prepared ten China Study recipes thus far and loved them all. The food is flavorful, not bland like with some healthy cookbooks I've tried. My husband, who is an omnivore, enjoyed them as well. Most can be prepared with minimal effort from inexpensive ingredients found in a regular grocery store. The book itself is a nice size with photos for almost every recipe. A convenient index makes recipes easy to find by name or ingredient. I am purchasing a second copy to give as a gift - highly recommended!

  3. 5 out of 5

    Paula

    I LOVE this book! I grabbed it from the library, and now I am going to rush out and buy it! The recipes are simpler than the Forks over Knives cookbook that I have. They also have great photos, which I love. If you want great plant based recipes, this book is the best I have seen.

  4. 5 out of 5

    Dana

    I have lowered my rating from 4 stars to 3 after having tried more of these recipes. The recipes are plant-based and include little or no added fat and salt and minimal amounts of added sugars. I think one problem is the no added fats. Many foods are much better with added fats. I also do not like the replacement foods and fake foods that are suggested. Because the China Study Diet recommends no dairy, the recommend non-dairy milks - and if you purchase commercially made ones, almost all of them I have lowered my rating from 4 stars to 3 after having tried more of these recipes. The recipes are plant-based and include little or no added fat and salt and minimal amounts of added sugars. I think one problem is the no added fats. Many foods are much better with added fats. I also do not like the replacement foods and fake foods that are suggested. Because the China Study Diet recommends no dairy, the recommend non-dairy milks - and if you purchase commercially made ones, almost all of them have carrageenan, in them which is inflammatory and carcinogenic. Plus, most of them, with the exception of soy milk, which is controversial due to the hormonal effect, come in large containers and the recipes call for small amounts and then the rest of it goes bad because it is gross tasting and no one in my house will drink it as a drink. We have tried soy milks, almond milks, rice milks, hemp milk and coconut milks. I do like canned coconut milk in some recipes, but if it does not use the whole can then I have leftover coconut milk that often goes bad if I can't figure out what to do with the rest of it. Many of the recipes call for sucanant, which is raw sugar to replace refined sugar. I don't know if it is any healthier, but it does not taste the same and we don't like it. Other recipes call for agave, which some studies now say is no better than sugar. I prefer to use honey and maple syrup as sugar replacers when I can or else just use sugar. So, I do think that these recipes can be good for some people - especially those who currently follow the SAD diet and are unhealthy, but I am not thrilled with some of the ingredients in them.

  5. 4 out of 5

    Tanya

    Having read ‘The China Study’ in the past, I knew this cookbook would be filled with pertinent information on the effects of a plant based diet, and many recipes to easily incorporate into everyday meals. I was not disappointed. The recipes are indeed fairly simple, if not down right easy. No odd ingredient lists, and the meals are suitable for family fare. I do tweak many of the recipes to suit a low carb lifestyle (I’m diabetic; this is a must), so it should be noted that plant based does not e Having read ‘The China Study’ in the past, I knew this cookbook would be filled with pertinent information on the effects of a plant based diet, and many recipes to easily incorporate into everyday meals. I was not disappointed. The recipes are indeed fairly simple, if not down right easy. No odd ingredient lists, and the meals are suitable for family fare. I do tweak many of the recipes to suit a low carb lifestyle (I’m diabetic; this is a must), so it should be noted that plant based does not equal low carb. One should be confident in the kitchen and/or willing to experiment in order to suit a lower carb intake, otherwise this book, while full of excellent health info, may prove otherwise a disappointment.

  6. 4 out of 5

    Stefania

    I am really happy with this cookbooks. A lot of interesting, easy to make and yummy recipes (like macaroni squash and black bean cauliflower burritos), and there are pictures for every recipes!! I prefer cooking books with pictures so I get more tempted to cook the recipes :)

  7. 5 out of 5

    Christopher

    In decades past The China Study revealed that eating a diet with no animal products may help one avoid many of the diseases of affluent countries. Its author T. Colin Campbell has a daughter, LeAnne Campbell who has cooked vegan for over twenty years now, following the discoveries of the team her father described, and she even brought up two boys with the diet. She shares her recipes in this "China Study Cookbook". I have been cooking from this book for several weeks now, covering most of the di In decades past The China Study revealed that eating a diet with no animal products may help one avoid many of the diseases of affluent countries. Its author T. Colin Campbell has a daughter, LeAnne Campbell who has cooked vegan for over twenty years now, following the discoveries of the team her father described, and she even brought up two boys with the diet. She shares her recipes in this "China Study Cookbook". I have been cooking from this book for several weeks now, covering most of the dishes, and my experience with the book has been a pleasant one. The book opens with a lengthy overview of what a China Study diet is and its benefits, followed by advice on how to get one’s kids to eat well. The recipes themselves, around 120 of them, cover salads, sandwiches, main dishes, and deserts. Campbell also describes how to make your own vegan mayonnaise, which can then accompany the sandwiches in the book. As none of the dishes call for very hot spices, and only one Indian masala dish really explodes with flavour, some readers may find the recipes a little bland. However, as someone with a very poor, meat-based diet up to buying this book, the fresh vegetables and make-your-own sauces (e.g. lemon, soy, and mustard) alone provided enjoyable new tastes. It is worth making clear that this book is based on the China Study diet, not on any other positions of how to eat healthy. Thus, many of the dishes use grains (usually whole-grain rice) and soy, in spite of contrary opinions that such ingredients are worth avoiding. Also, in a somewhat expected turn, since e.g. olive oil is vegan and well-regarded, Campbell recommends against adding oils to dishes (with the sole exception of tahina). While some might worry that a vegan diet is only for the wealthy, I found I actually saved money after sticking to this cookbook while at home, as before I had been spending so much money every day on fast food. You can work around some of the book’s more expensive ingredients if you want (nutritional yeast, Sucanat), and even when recipes call for fancy stuff, they often use so little of the product that it lasts you a long time. I am based in Romania and encountered this book in its Romanian translation Studiul china: carte de bucate. Readers outside the United States will find that the book is, as perhaps can only be expected, based on what’s available in American supermarkets. Thus there are recipes for some items (e.g. black-eyed peas) that can be hard to find in some countries. Furthermore, while several recipes use the maple syrup so popular in North America (and which can usually be found in the EU as well), the author doesn’t consider other syrups that might be cheaper in some markets. Downsides? The photos are not always helpful. Sometimes they don’t clearly depict how certain ingredients should turn out in the end. Also, this is a vegan cookbook that calls for whole-grain rice, yet one of the photos shows a treat smothered in ice cream, and the rice dishes look like they were made from white rice. The time given for how long it takes to prepare each recipe is also way too optimistic. My wife loves to cook and is proficient in the kitchen, and we divide up the tasks, but many of the recipes take twice as long as Campbell suggests. Still, there are relatively minor complaints, and I think many readers would enjoy using this cookbook. I know that I’m feeling a lot more energetic after eating this diet.

  8. 4 out of 5

    Dianna

    This cookbook was written to be a companion to The China Study by T. Colin Campbell. LeAnne Campbell, the author of this cookbook, is his daughter. Dr. Campbell really sums up this book in his forward: "I am prejudiced and I might as well say so up front. The author of this book is my daughter, LeAnne Campbell Disla. But prejudiced or not, I know her style of cooking, her recipes (I’ve tried many), her commitment to good nutrition and, as a very busy professional, her ability to prepare quick nu This cookbook was written to be a companion to The China Study by T. Colin Campbell. LeAnne Campbell, the author of this cookbook, is his daughter. Dr. Campbell really sums up this book in his forward: "I am prejudiced and I might as well say so up front. The author of this book is my daughter, LeAnne Campbell Disla. But prejudiced or not, I know her style of cooking, her recipes (I’ve tried many), her commitment to good nutrition and, as a very busy professional, her ability to prepare quick nutritious meals." I can judge whether I'm going to like a cookbook in the first thirty seconds or so of flipping through it. It's been a long time since I've browsed a cookbook and wanted to try several recipes—but that's what happened with this one. Plant-based/vegan cookbooks tend to be a little out there: ingredients are hard to find; recipes just sound weird; too much judgmental commentary; mile-long ingredient list. But this one is just right. Most of the recipes are something I would eat, and very few call for ingredients I don't already have on hand or couldn't get at my grocery store. What's more, many of them are very quick and simple to prepare. (Caveat: I have not actually tried any of these recipes yet. But I will soon!) I like that the author doesn't pay attention to minute details, like what kind of tortillas you buy (or admonish you to make your own). Things like this tend to derail me when I'm trying something new, and I appreciate that she doesn't make a big deal of it. The one weak point of this book is the photography. I love that there are photographs for almost every recipe, but they are blurry and out of focus.

  9. 4 out of 5

    Susan

    I'm a big fan of Dr. Campbell and his work and I bought this book just knowing I would love it, but I was summarily disappointed. I tried several of the recipes. Some of them were good, but not great (Sweet Potato Enchiladas, Tasty Tostados, Zucchinni Crabless Cakes, Southwestern Calzones, Tomato and Avocado Pasta Salad) others were edible, but nothing I'd want to try again (Dominican Chapea, Carrot Bake, Twice Baked Southwest Potatoes, Tomato Pesto Sandwich). None of them really wowed me. What s I'm a big fan of Dr. Campbell and his work and I bought this book just knowing I would love it, but I was summarily disappointed. I tried several of the recipes. Some of them were good, but not great (Sweet Potato Enchiladas, Tasty Tostados, Zucchinni Crabless Cakes, Southwestern Calzones, Tomato and Avocado Pasta Salad) others were edible, but nothing I'd want to try again (Dominican Chapea, Carrot Bake, Twice Baked Southwest Potatoes, Tomato Pesto Sandwich). None of them really wowed me. What surprised me most was after eating these recipes for a couple of weeks, I actually gained weight. A significant amount of weight. I wasn't over eating. The recipes didn't taste good enough for me to want to eat more than I needed to feel satisfied. There is no caloric or nutritional data included with the recipes, so I started calculating the calorie content of some of the recipes and was shocked to find out the calorie content was so high. Much higher than I normally eat at a meal. I quit eating out of this book and the weight is starting to drop back off again. I still love Dr. Campbell, and it pains me to have to give his cookbook a bad review, but this book just didn't work for me. I'll stick to cookbooks that list the nutritional data with their recipes from now on so I have a better idea of what I'm putting in my body.

  10. 5 out of 5

    Nicole

    This cookbook focuses on plant-based whole food recipes. After reading it I decided to move it to my to-buy list because many of the flair and ingredient combinations are right in my personal flavor-palate. As with the gluten-free cookbooks I own, I am not an adherent to the lifestyle but just an enthusiastic cook (and eater) who finds some of the recipes and techniques interesting. Will I convert to using flax seeds and water as an egg substitute in baked goods permanently? Probably not! Will I This cookbook focuses on plant-based whole food recipes. After reading it I decided to move it to my to-buy list because many of the flair and ingredient combinations are right in my personal flavor-palate. As with the gluten-free cookbooks I own, I am not an adherent to the lifestyle but just an enthusiastic cook (and eater) who finds some of the recipes and techniques interesting. Will I convert to using flax seeds and water as an egg substitute in baked goods permanently? Probably not! Will I give recipes that call for such substitutions (or for xanthan gum or non-dairy "milks") a try? Sure!

  11. 4 out of 5

    Susan

    Planning on either buying this book, or rechecking it out from the library. Quiet a few more recipes I would like to try. I like the substitutes she has for various things such as eggs, oils, etc. I'm on the path of eating healthy!

  12. 4 out of 5

    Chris

    So far this has been the best cookbook I've found focusing on a no added oil, low salt, plant-based diet. I've enjoyed nearly all the recipes I've tried. The corn and avocado pasta salad was even a hit when I brought it to a work event.

  13. 5 out of 5

    Stacey Adams

    I like cookbooks that aren't too specific on crazy ingredients and using a bunch of weird kitchen gadgets....so I love this cookbook. Being a plant based eater isn't always easy and finding new recipes can be a challenge. Using staples you probably have in your pantry or fridge you can create a myriad of tasty recipes following with this book in your possession. It gives helpful substitutions to use to make food that is similar to your "meat eating" favorites. And not all the recipes use tofu to I like cookbooks that aren't too specific on crazy ingredients and using a bunch of weird kitchen gadgets....so I love this cookbook. Being a plant based eater isn't always easy and finding new recipes can be a challenge. Using staples you probably have in your pantry or fridge you can create a myriad of tasty recipes following with this book in your possession. It gives helpful substitutions to use to make food that is similar to your "meat eating" favorites. And not all the recipes use tofu to do that. Besides giving recipes that are plant based it also uses "better sweeteners" and whole grains (no white flour or refined sugar in these recipes). A lot of the recipes look easy, one or two steps not a lot of prep or a ton of pans to get the job done....less dishes to wash....I'm all for that. The recipes are appetizing as well as good for your health. Vegetables don't have to be boring it's not so scary to try using them in different ways when you have a guide showing you the way. From breakfast through dinner and desserts all areas are covered. I especially like the sauces which open the door for many new options to spice up basic sandwiches or salads. Golden Garden Mayonnaise, Chipotle Sauce, Aioli Sauce, Hummus, Golden "Cheese" Sauce, Salsa, Lemon Tahini Dressing, Asian Ginger Dressing, Tomato Coconut Sauce, Vegetarian "Oyster" Sauce......what a wonderful list....I can't wait to try them all. This is the book to have if you're new to eating plant based or if you've been plant based for a while. Maybe it will even convert people, entice them to try eating plant based just by reading the recipes....I can see that happening. The pictures are beautiful, the descriptions tempting, the layout easy to follow....nothing complicated. No reason not to eat plant based with a cookbook this enticing.

  14. 5 out of 5

    Stephanie

    I was pleased to receive a copy of The China Study Cookbook from BenBella Books and NetGalley in exchange for my honest review. The author, LeAnne Campbell, PhD, is the daughter of a co-author of the original 2004 book The China Study (he wrote the foreword for this revised edition). Both the book and the related information from the documentary Forks Over Knives have contributed to the ongoing interest in the health benefits of eating a plant-based diet. That way of eating is my personal prefer I was pleased to receive a copy of The China Study Cookbook from BenBella Books and NetGalley in exchange for my honest review. The author, LeAnne Campbell, PhD, is the daughter of a co-author of the original 2004 book The China Study (he wrote the foreword for this revised edition). Both the book and the related information from the documentary Forks Over Knives have contributed to the ongoing interest in the health benefits of eating a plant-based diet. That way of eating is my personal preference, so I was looking forward to some new recipes. I somehow assumed the author’s doctorate was in something related to nutrition, but it is in education. Specifically, she has 30 years of experience in “designing and directing education initiatives, specifically leadership programs, professional development workshops, conferences and curriculum development workshops.” Neither good nor bad in terms of her qualifications to write a cookbook, just information. The book is arranged in chapters focusing on different menu areas, such as entrees, breakfasts, etc. There are a ton of beautiful pictures of food, and many good recipes. I think it is a good choice for people moving into eating a plant-based diet, as there are lots of relatively simple dishes, including things like spaghetti and fajitas which may already be things people like, but maybe they haven’t done them without meat. It’s a great cookbook. My main — in fact ONLY — criticism is that I HATE cookbooks that don’t include nutritional information for the recipes. That wouldn’t have been difficult to include, and for me it would have bumped this up to at least 4 stars, maybe 5…without it, I give it 3 stars.

  15. 4 out of 5

    Lori Kresse

    I like the idea of the book but the only two recipes that I made were difficult and not great. The vegan lasagna took almost two hours to prepare! That is NOT including cooking time for the lasagna, just making the "cheese" layer--a mixture of beans and greens and spices and cashews that was heavy and odd tasting and could not fit in my food processor so I had to do multiple batches. And I am a seasoned cook who prepares lunch and dinner from scratch nearly every day. The mushroom layer was real I like the idea of the book but the only two recipes that I made were difficult and not great. The vegan lasagna took almost two hours to prepare! That is NOT including cooking time for the lasagna, just making the "cheese" layer--a mixture of beans and greens and spices and cashews that was heavy and odd tasting and could not fit in my food processor so I had to do multiple batches. And I am a seasoned cook who prepares lunch and dinner from scratch nearly every day. The mushroom layer was really good, though it took almost 25 minutes for the water to cook from the pan as requested in the recipe. No times are given in the recipe as to how long this should take, so that was frustrating and made it very difficult to plan ahead. I made the vegan brownies (with black beans, almond flour, cocoa and sweet potatoes). The batter smelled delicious and didn't taste that bad, but the brownies were gross. Gummy, dry and wet at the same time, if there could be such a thing, and grainy. I might have liked them if I hadn't had any real chocolate desserts in a year or so, but even that is questionable. Makes me leery about trying other recipes. They seem less like recipes from actual talented chefs and more like food hacks from people who don't like to cook that much but want to eat in more healthy ways.

  16. 5 out of 5

    Tracyesine

    I am enjoying this collection of easy, mostly healthful recipes. It's so interesting to see how our understanding of "whole food" (and, generally, healthful) cooking changes over time. As a latecomer to the whole food philosophy, it is not my understanding that maple syrup is a "whole food"; it's a concentrated sweetener, and it's a lot more expensive than regular sugar without having a significant benefit. For this reason, the dessert section is almost useless to me. Still, the recipes are easi I am enjoying this collection of easy, mostly healthful recipes. It's so interesting to see how our understanding of "whole food" (and, generally, healthful) cooking changes over time. As a latecomer to the whole food philosophy, it is not my understanding that maple syrup is a "whole food"; it's a concentrated sweetener, and it's a lot more expensive than regular sugar without having a significant benefit. For this reason, the dessert section is almost useless to me. Still, the recipes are easier and more appealing than those of the purer whole food giant, Joel Fuhrman. If you like this book, I also recommend the Happy Herbivore line of cookbooks, which I like even better. Like the China Study, it is only partially "whole food" (generally, oil free, but not necessarily sugar free), and yet, no preference is given to more expensive sugars.

  17. 4 out of 5

    Jessica

    I’ll be honest. I’ve been a vegetarian for 9 years and I’d never heard of the China Study. This was not the cookbook I thought I was getting. I’ve become accustomed to being able to judge cookbooks be their cover. I thought this would be vegetarian Chinese recipes. However, when I got over the initial disappointment about this cookbook being full of stir fries, I realized I still really liked the simplicity and short ingredient list of the recipes. There’s a pumpkin gnocchi that is just flour and I’ll be honest. I’ve been a vegetarian for 9 years and I’d never heard of the China Study. This was not the cookbook I thought I was getting. I’ve become accustomed to being able to judge cookbooks be their cover. I thought this would be vegetarian Chinese recipes. However, when I got over the initial disappointment about this cookbook being full of stir fries, I realized I still really liked the simplicity and short ingredient list of the recipes. There’s a pumpkin gnocchi that is just flour and canned pumpkin purée. There’s faux ice cream that’s just overripe frozen bananas and flavor. The wheel isn’t exactly reinvented here, but I can definitely appreciate the simplicity when I’m trying to work more home cooked meals into my life.

  18. 4 out of 5

    Jamie

    First off, if you aren't aware of what The China Study is, don't be fooled like I was. There's nothing Chinese about this cookbook, it's all ordinary, same-old-same-old vegetarian/vegan recipes. Nothing new or interesting, but it's got all the basics. Honestly, almost all the stars were deducted for the truly disgusting photographs. I don't know how their photographer managed to do it, but by taking every picture in super close-up they've made sure that not a single recipe looks edible. I couldn' First off, if you aren't aware of what The China Study is, don't be fooled like I was. There's nothing Chinese about this cookbook, it's all ordinary, same-old-same-old vegetarian/vegan recipes. Nothing new or interesting, but it's got all the basics. Honestly, almost all the stars were deducted for the truly disgusting photographs. I don't know how their photographer managed to do it, but by taking every picture in super close-up they've made sure that not a single recipe looks edible. I couldn't even pay attention to the recipes themselves, the pictures unsettled my stomach so much.

  19. 5 out of 5

    Tina

    Recipes that looked good: Pg. 85 Black-eyed Pea Salad Pg. 107 Lettuce Wraps Pg. 123 Dominican Chapea - tried it and it was good. I don't usually like soups. Pg. 177 Fabulous Sweet Potato Enchiladas Pg. 189 Macaroni Squash Pg. 219 Caribbean Moro - basically a simplified rice version of the Dominican Chapea Pg. 221 Carrot Bake Pg. 245 Amazingly Delicious Date Fruit Pit There were pictures of most of the meals, which is a must for me.

  20. 4 out of 5

    Wisteria

    This, to me, is the very best vegan cookbook! Being Colin Campbell's daughter, she has vast knowledge of the vegan world. Our favorite recipe is "Mom's Polenta." This recipe is delicious! It is simple to make, yet, filled with flavor and keeps you full for a long time. My daughter and I often use this, especially in winter, because it is filling and warm and...delicious! If you are thinking about going Vegan, this is THE "China Study" cookbook to follow! Highly recommended!

  21. 5 out of 5

    Jason

    Useful and nutritious meals that are affordable and not necessarily meat-based. For the majority of us (humans), meat is a luxury that is needed but not always available. By the numbers there are more people that could use these recipes than will ever try a 5-star dinner.

  22. 5 out of 5

    Connie Goedert

    I've been eating WFPB for several years but needed to get out of a recipe rut. This book was just what I needed. I love the spicy flavors and even got my husband to like collards. Thank you LeAnne

  23. 5 out of 5

    Synthia

    The easiest recipes I have seen in a cookbook but in a good way. I often find cookbooks overwhelming with their 16 ingredients and small pinches of things I may only use twice a year. Looking forward to using some of these recipes in the near future.

  24. 4 out of 5

    Janet Johnson

    love the info great book

  25. 4 out of 5

    Jennifer

    I love this book and I love that everything is super clean. “Not all vegan recipes are healthy” but at least you know you can’t trust everything in this book!

  26. 5 out of 5

    Leslie Hanshew

    The documentary, Food Choices, and The China Study, by Colin Campbell changed my life! Great recipes in this book to be sure.

  27. 4 out of 5

    Lisa

    China Study As I've been reading the China Study book it's nice to be able to apply to cooking. LeAnne knows her stuff and makes it easy to follow along

  28. 4 out of 5

    Penny Fleckenstein

    Informative and explanatory.

  29. 5 out of 5

    Angie Carter

    Great soups!

  30. 4 out of 5

    Cathy

    Great recipes for a vegetarian. I am not one, but was interested in looking at them.

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