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The ChristianAs secret of a happy life guides readers to reply not on the shifting sands of emotions but on the constant and unshakable faithfulness of God.


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The ChristianAs secret of a happy life guides readers to reply not on the shifting sands of emotions but on the constant and unshakable faithfulness of God.

30 review for The Christian's Secret of a Happy Life

  1. 5 out of 5

    Ryan Hanry

    This book is absolutely amazing in every way. I am going to read and re-read this on a regular basis! I'm really enjoying this book!! I would recommend this well edited edition to all: https://www.amazon.com/Christians-Sec... This book is absolutely amazing in every way. I am going to read and re-read this on a regular basis! I'm really enjoying this book!! I would recommend this well edited edition to all: https://www.amazon.com/Christians-Sec...

  2. 4 out of 5

    Jessica

    This title really seems a bit trite for the magnitude of wisdom and mature Christian discipleship which it's pages contain. Plan to be enlightened (seeing biblical principles and scripture in a new way-even though the book was authored in 1875). Plan to be challenged (all our modern self focused-self absorbed Christianity is refuted bit by bit). After all this we see through a clearer glass, a more simple Christian life which does indeed bring happiness- or what I would refer to as true biblical This title really seems a bit trite for the magnitude of wisdom and mature Christian discipleship which it's pages contain. Plan to be enlightened (seeing biblical principles and scripture in a new way-even though the book was authored in 1875). Plan to be challenged (all our modern self focused-self absorbed Christianity is refuted bit by bit). After all this we see through a clearer glass, a more simple Christian life which does indeed bring happiness- or what I would refer to as true biblical joy. In the 1800's I imagine that the line was thinner between happiness and joy. Today's Christians are learning to discern that joy is a heart condition relating to contentment regardless of perfect circumstances and one's happiness usually is based upon a sense of comfort without trial. The later can never be sustained, but joy is eternal. I beleive the author's desire for the time was to help the reader discover truer 'joyful' happiness- really encompasseing both states in the best sense; before recent generations' quest for the quick fix, instant ease and satisfaction of desires became the current measure of one's happiness. The author's classic wisdom based on scripture and her ability to dissect personal motive from a Godly motivation makes this an especially refreshing and thought provoking read. Not guilt based but truth impartation does the convincing.

  3. 4 out of 5

    Holly

    This book is not for any but the true seeker of knowledge because the author's language is dated and difficult to follow. For me, it was a gem. The author answered many questions that I did not know I had about my spiritual life. Questions like "If I have truly turned my life over to Christ, why am I still so flawed?" and "How does one really "turn your burden over to him?" I know why it has been a Christian best seller for 150 years. I love her approach to Christianity. The chapters are really This book is not for any but the true seeker of knowledge because the author's language is dated and difficult to follow. For me, it was a gem. The author answered many questions that I did not know I had about my spiritual life. Questions like "If I have truly turned my life over to Christ, why am I still so flawed?" and "How does one really "turn your burden over to him?" I know why it has been a Christian best seller for 150 years. I love her approach to Christianity. The chapters are really short, about 3-4 pages and each day provided me with tons of food for thought.

  4. 4 out of 5

    Sue

    I have read this book a number of times. It is one of my favorite books. Miss Smith has a wonderful way of looking at the Christian life. She is able to look at real life and talk about how we as christians are to walk in it. This is not always easy, but I have found that her answers to common situations a christian faces are biblically sound and very practical and useful. I get new insight on how to continue in this life every time I read it. I would encourage any christian to read it and see h I have read this book a number of times. It is one of my favorite books. Miss Smith has a wonderful way of looking at the Christian life. She is able to look at real life and talk about how we as christians are to walk in it. This is not always easy, but I have found that her answers to common situations a christian faces are biblically sound and very practical and useful. I get new insight on how to continue in this life every time I read it. I would encourage any christian to read it and see how God uses it in their life.

  5. 5 out of 5

    Jennifer Lohr

    I tend to shy away from Christian living books about being "happy". I believe God created me to be holy, not happy. Happiness is too contingent on emotions. Holiness, joy, contentment are the fruits of a Christ-centered life. Boy, am I glad I didnt let that keep me from reading this book!! Completely biblical and Christ honoring, Hannah W. Smith takes the teachings of Christ and applies them to every day life in practical and powerful way. I would recommend this book to anyone wanting to have a I tend to shy away from Christian living books about being "happy". I believe God created me to be holy, not happy. Happiness is too contingent on emotions. Holiness, joy, contentment are the fruits of a Christ-centered life. Boy, am I glad I didnt let that keep me from reading this book!! Completely biblical and Christ honoring, Hannah W. Smith takes the teachings of Christ and applies them to every day life in practical and powerful way. I would recommend this book to anyone wanting to have a closer, more meaningful wall with Christ.

  6. 5 out of 5

    Ron

    “Perfect obedience would be perfect happiness, if only we had perfect confidence in the power we were obeying.” Hannah Whitall Smith First published in 1874, Smith’s classic of Christian living pre-dates many subsequent Christian works. “It is a fatal mistake to make our emotions the test of our oneness with Christ. If I have joyous emotions, I may be deluded by thinking I have entered into Divine union when I have not; and if I have no emotions, I may grieve over my failure to enter, when really “Perfect obedience would be perfect happiness, if only we had perfect confidence in the power we were obeying.” Hannah Whitall Smith First published in 1874, Smith’s classic of Christian living pre-dates many subsequent Christian works. “It is a fatal mistake to make our emotions the test of our oneness with Christ. If I have joyous emotions, I may be deluded by thinking I have entered into Divine union when I have not; and if I have no emotions, I may grieve over my failure to enter, when really I have already entered. Character is the only real test. God is holy and those who are one with Him will be holy also.” Hannah Whitall Smith. Readers must understand that Smith defines happy differently than many of her contemporaries and many of us. If anything her life was far from easy or happy in the sense we use that word. Nevertheless this book has influenced Christians since. "In 1870 Hannah Whitall Smith wrote what has become a classic of joyous Christianity, The Christian's Secret of a Happy Life. The title barely hints at the depths of that perceptive book. It is no shallow "four easy steps to successful living." Studiously, the writer defines the shape of a full and abundant life hid in God. Then she carefully reveals the difficulties to this way and finally charts the results of a life abandoned to God. What is the Christian's secret to a happy life? It is best summed up by her chapter entitled "The Joy of Obedience." Joy comes through obedience to Christ, and joy results from obedience to Christ. Without obedience joy is hollow and artificial." Richard J. Foster, Celebration of Discipline “Many Christians love God’s will in the abstract, but carry great burdens in connection with it. [But] if the work is His, the responsibility is His, also, and we have no room left for worrying about the results.” Hannah Whitall Smith As Foster wrote, this is not a “four easy steps” book. In fact, it’s slow going for modern readers. Smith’s prose is clear and powerful, but her sentences are long and complex. It’s worth the effort. “Nearly everything in life comes to us through human instrumentalities, and most of our trials are the result of somebody’s failure, or ignorance, or carelessness, or sin. What is needed, then, is to see God in everything, and to receive everything directly from His hands … before we can know an abiding experience of entire abandonment and perfect trust. To the children of God, everything comes directly from their Father’s hand, no matter who or what may have been the apparent agents.” Hannah Whitall Smith

  7. 4 out of 5

    Leanda

    This book written so many years ago is still 'on the money' and relevant today. Throughout the ages there are clearly people who really have 'got it' and yet generally speaking, overall, we just don't seem to get it. It seems like we as a people are still drinking milk and have never, and, at times, it feels like, will never, get to the solid food. How do we - as a people, not as individuals - 'get it'? I guess at the end of the day that is not our responsibility. It is in fact God's. All that is This book written so many years ago is still 'on the money' and relevant today. Throughout the ages there are clearly people who really have 'got it' and yet generally speaking, overall, we just don't seem to get it. It seems like we as a people are still drinking milk and have never, and, at times, it feels like, will never, get to the solid food. How do we - as a people, not as individuals - 'get it'? I guess at the end of the day that is not our responsibility. It is in fact God's. All that is required of each one of us - as individuals and collectively - is to do our bit .. In faith we are to trust, listen and live, leaving the work and worry to God. That is not to say we do nothing but we do need to do less 'doing right' and more just 'living life'. Living out our relationships with one another, allowing God to work in them and through them. Living a life of love and joy that comes by living by faith and trust - true faith and trust ... at all times, not just in the good times or not just during the bad times, but during the good and the bad and all times in-between. The message Hannah Whitall Smith gives is live life in the knowledge of God rather than your circumstances or your feelings. Take the stress and worry out of life by putting your trust and life in God's hands.

  8. 5 out of 5

    Beckynovacek

    this is in my list of top 10 books. i'll always have a copy or two on my bookshelves.

  9. 4 out of 5

    Thomas Kinsfather

    This book started off good, then died after a few chapters. Finishing it was long and excruciating. I don't recommend it.

  10. 4 out of 5

    Joy

    I read this some years before and was not all that impressed, but this reading earned the book a top rating. There was so much wisdom. The book was definitely clear on the difference in salvation and discipleship. The secret is rest in God's provision and discipline in daily living. It was clear what God has done for us and what we need to do to obey Him. "He disciplines and trains by inward exercises and outward providences." "What are the chief characteristics of a little child, and how does it I read this some years before and was not all that impressed, but this reading earned the book a top rating. There was so much wisdom. The book was definitely clear on the difference in salvation and discipleship. The secret is rest in God's provision and discipline in daily living. It was clear what God has done for us and what we need to do to obey Him. "He disciplines and trains by inward exercises and outward providences." "What are the chief characteristics of a little child, and how does it live? It lives by faith, and its chief characteristic is freedom from care. It's life is one long trust from year's end to year's end... It lives in the present moment and receives its life unquestioningly as it comes to it day by day from its father's hands... Children do not need to carry about in their own pockets the money for their support." "Now, the truth is, that this life is not to be lived in the emotions at all, but in the will; and therefore, if only the will is kept steadfastly abiding in its center, God's will, the varing states of emotion do not in the least disturb or affect the reality of the life... I cannot control my emotions, but I can control my will." "...sweetness under provocation; calmness in the midst of turmoil and bustle; a yielding to the wishes of others, and an insensibility to slights and affronts; abssence of worry or anxiety; deliverance from care and fear, -- all these, and many other similar graces, are usually found to be the natural outward development of that inward life which is hid with Christ in God."

  11. 5 out of 5

    Amber

    This book is overly simplistic. If you are looking for easy answers to complex issues, even if they are near impossible to accomplish, then you will love this book. I was looking for encouragement in this text, but I instead spent too much time discussing with my husband the logical roadblocks contained within its pages. Which led me to ask, "who is this woman, and why am I reading her book?" After reading a brief biography, I realized this woman must have doubted her own propositions as much as This book is overly simplistic. If you are looking for easy answers to complex issues, even if they are near impossible to accomplish, then you will love this book. I was looking for encouragement in this text, but I instead spent too much time discussing with my husband the logical roadblocks contained within its pages. Which led me to ask, "who is this woman, and why am I reading her book?" After reading a brief biography, I realized this woman must have doubted her own propositions as much as I do. The basic premise of the book is okay: let go of your ego and submit your will to God. But the application requires one to completely ignore the depths of the human condition. The issues I have with this book are all theological, so not worth discussing. If you are not the type to over-think things, then this book would likely be a great encouragement. I can see why it is still popular after all these years.

  12. 5 out of 5

    John

    I can see why this is regarded as a classic by some, because some of the chapters and content is quite good - although the rest is not so. The book is a bit floaty some times, using way to much adjectives and words to describe the menaing or the nature of more simple concepts and thus fail to properly explain things. This combined with the type of language used, it simply was mostly boring to read - especially in the way I read it - out of curiosity. It may be that If you read one chapter a day I can see why this is regarded as a classic by some, because some of the chapters and content is quite good - although the rest is not so. The book is a bit floaty some times, using way to much adjectives and words to describe the menaing or the nature of more simple concepts and thus fail to properly explain things. This combined with the type of language used, it simply was mostly boring to read - especially in the way I read it - out of curiosity. It may be that If you read one chapter a day and really tried to get into the text that you would catch more of the book than I did. I also think this is a more situation dependent book, merely aimed at housewives in the end of the 19th century (although the goal seems to be to attract a wider audience) - to whom this book may have a greater impact than a single nerdish guy in the 21th century.

  13. 5 out of 5

    Rachel Woodward

    This book is such an encouragement, treating common spiritual difficulties practically. The tone is like a good friend, compassionate yet for your own good is not afraid to tell you what you're doing wrong. I especially appreciated the chapters addressing the unfortunate tendency for people to use their feelings/emotions to gauge how they are doing spiritually or even to know what they believe. Smith does a great job clearing this up, and even uses the analogy of a mother-child relationship to d This book is such an encouragement, treating common spiritual difficulties practically. The tone is like a good friend, compassionate yet for your own good is not afraid to tell you what you're doing wrong. I especially appreciated the chapters addressing the unfortunate tendency for people to use their feelings/emotions to gauge how they are doing spiritually or even to know what they believe. Smith does a great job clearing this up, and even uses the analogy of a mother-child relationship to describe the will-emotion relationship. Don't be turned off by the title. This is no cheap & easy 3-steps to perfect happiness. It is a classic for good reason.

  14. 4 out of 5

    Maureen

    I have just completed this precious book for the fifth time and found it to be life-transforming once again. It contains such simple yet deeply profound Truth while also containing many excellent practical helps. I know I shall reread this book throughout my life and should also be understood in the context of the author's own highly challenging life and times (especially for women); it truly is one of my top five must reads for any Christian who truly wants to live a victorious, fulfilled and h I have just completed this precious book for the fifth time and found it to be life-transforming once again. It contains such simple yet deeply profound Truth while also containing many excellent practical helps. I know I shall reread this book throughout my life and should also be understood in the context of the author's own highly challenging life and times (especially for women); it truly is one of my top five must reads for any Christian who truly wants to live a victorious, fulfilled and happy life! The language is rather unusual at first but don't let this stop you from reading all the way through!

  15. 5 out of 5

    Stephanie Blake

    Absolutely one of my favorites. She tackles the hard spiritual questions.From the very beginning of that Christian classic, my thoughts were molded by her teaching. Although this book is still in print and for sale, you can also read it online. I especially recommend the first chapter: God’s Side and Man’s Side. To paraphrase the author, God’s part is to do all the work, your part and my part is to trust Him.

  16. 5 out of 5

    Deborah

    This is one of those read-every-year books. Depending on where you're at in your life, you will always take away something new and different from it after you've read it. Written in the late 1800's, sometimes the prose is a little complicated, but sticking with it, one will glean much from the book.

  17. 5 out of 5

    Lisa Anne Morrow

    This was one of the best books I have ever read, besides the Bible! I could read it over and over again. It was first published in 1870. God used Hannah Whitall Smith to impart such wisdom through this book.

  18. 5 out of 5

    Noreen

    The Christian's Secret of a Happy Life was originally published in 1883. That is impressive that it is still in print and having a good impact on so many people's lives. I enjoyed her insight and analogies.

  19. 4 out of 5

    Chris

    This book is a classic! It reminds me of C. S. Lewis' "Mere Christianity" and challenges the reader to trust in God and to discover the true secrets to happiness. I LOVE THIS BOOK!!

  20. 5 out of 5

    Audrey

    This book is not presented in a ten easy steps-type format, thank goodness. After a while that gets pretty tiring. This book is based directly from scripture and was written by a Quaker.

  21. 4 out of 5

    Rebecca

    It took me a long time to be ready to read this book, and it was a bit difficult due to some archaic language, but this is a classic and well worth reading.

  22. 5 out of 5

    Jonathan

    This is In my All-Time Top Ten list for practical theology (would like a better term for this). If you're looking for peace and purpose read this, I don't think you'll be disappointed.

  23. 5 out of 5

    Deborah

    This book is written in old English and can be difficult to follow, but I found it quite helpful. It is considered a Christian classic.

  24. 4 out of 5

    Amy

    I'm so glad I finally got around to reading this Christian classic! I wish I had read a hard copy instead of audiobook so I could've underlined and taken notes. It was strikingly relevant to Christian living today which I wasn't expecting from something written in 1875. I was geared up for Victorian pietism. Instead I often found myself thinking, "This would be so excellent for modern christians! That was just what people call 'X' today in different language!" She addresses such current trends i I'm so glad I finally got around to reading this Christian classic! I wish I had read a hard copy instead of audiobook so I could've underlined and taken notes. It was strikingly relevant to Christian living today which I wasn't expecting from something written in 1875. I was geared up for Victorian pietism. Instead I often found myself thinking, "This would be so excellent for modern christians! That was just what people call 'X' today in different language!" She addresses such current trends in Christian discourse as shame, doubt, freedom in Christ, etc., demonstrating this book to be a true classic, relevant in every time. I thought the stronger vocabulary of her time a refreshing take on the same issues of faith we face today. One thing that particularly stood out for me was how her style, born of her time, of calling the believer to a stronger Christian walk and higher calling in Christ was so much more encouraging and inspiring than many modern Christian women's books. Sometimes it's actually more encouraging to be called further up and farther in than to be merely comforted by an empathetic point of view. There were a few points I'd have to take issue with, particularly with what I think was a Quaker perspective on the gift of the Spirit. However, many points that perhaps would rub one the wrong way or you might take issue with at first glance actually turn out to be just the places you need to be challenged. It would make a great book-study selection. A very worthwhile read! A small taste of her chapter on doubt: "Would it be no self-denial to turn resolutely from them [your doubts, or any pet sin, for that matter] and hear no word they have to say? If you do not know, try it and see. "Have you never tasted the luxury of indulging in hard thoughts against those who have, as you think, injured you? Have you never known what a positive fascination it is to brood over their unkindnesses and to pry into their mailice, and to imagine all sorts of wrong and uncomfortable things about them? It has made you wretched, of course, but it has been a fascinating sort of wretchedness that you could not easily give up. "Just like this is the luxury of doubting. Things have gone wrong with you in your experience...your case has seemed different from others. What more natural than to conclude that, for some reason, God has forsaken you, and does not love you, and is indifferent to your welfare? How irresistible is the conviction that you are too wicked for Him to care for or too difficult for Him to manage?.....The deliverence from this must be by the same means as the deliverence from any other sin. It is to be found in Christ, and in Him only."

  25. 5 out of 5

    Lindsay Bowley

    The title of this book is misleading in its simplicity. It is not a book about being happy; it is so much more. Written by a Quaker woman in the 1800’s, this book dives into the deep joy that came come (even when not felt with emotions) upon the realization that a Christian can cease striving, that God loves them like a kind Father loves a child, and that the victorious Christian live has already been obtained through the redemptive blood of Jesus Christ. If you are a close friend of mine, and we The title of this book is misleading in its simplicity. It is not a book about being happy; it is so much more. Written by a Quaker woman in the 1800’s, this book dives into the deep joy that came come (even when not felt with emotions) upon the realization that a Christian can cease striving, that God loves them like a kind Father loves a child, and that the victorious Christian live has already been obtained through the redemptive blood of Jesus Christ. If you are a close friend of mine, and we have had discussions in the past few years about never feeling enough or living in guilt, this is a wonderful book to read. A couple in their 80’s recommended it to me originally, and I plan to revisit it often. Looking for an audio version now so that I can listen to it for a second read...

  26. 4 out of 5

    Mary

    Sin and repent. Sin and repent. Sin and repent. Did Jesus sacrifice himself on the cross to give us eternal life in the future and leave us under the power of Satan in our present lives, repeatedly subject to his lies and deception and suffering the consequences of sin? The Hannah Whitall Smith book Christian’s Secret of a Happy Life reminds Christians we have the power to live free from sin. She points out that Christ removed the curse, power, and love of sin from us and gave us the power to li Sin and repent. Sin and repent. Sin and repent. Did Jesus sacrifice himself on the cross to give us eternal life in the future and leave us under the power of Satan in our present lives, repeatedly subject to his lies and deception and suffering the consequences of sin? The Hannah Whitall Smith book Christian’s Secret of a Happy Life reminds Christians we have the power to live free from sin. She points out that Christ removed the curse, power, and love of sin from us and gave us the power to live delivered from the dominion of sin, if only we open our eyes and minds to understand the greatness of His power. How do we receive this power? By faith. By faith, we accept the gift of salvation through the death of Jesus on the cross and deliverance from sin. The author directs us to the book of Romans chapters 6 and 7 as Scriptural evidence: The death He died, He died to sin once for all; but the life He lives, He lives to God. In the same way, count yourselves dead to sin but alive to God in Christ Jesus. (Romans 6:10-11). She urges us, through faith, to tap into the power of the freedom from sin provided to believers through the death and resurrection of Jesus. The author challenges believers to acknowledge the full power of being “buried with him through baptism into death in order that, just as Christ was raised from the dead through the glory of the Father, we too may live a new life” (Romans 6:4). The reality: those baptized into Jesus are baptized into His death and resurrection, enabling Christians to walk in a newness of life. Jesus provides a new life free from the bondage of Satan. Christians can walk into this new realm of life by simply believing. Trust God and allow Him to do the work of deliverance. According to Whitall Smith, if we desire to walk in this new life, we must completely abandon ourselves to God. We are to abandon our feelings, weaknesses, temptations, temperaments, our inward affairs to Him. We are to abandon things to Him that worry us or may bring us into bondage and darkness. Concerned about the difficulties Satan may cause you to encounter as you enter this new life? The author has you covered. The book encompasses how to handle obstacles concerning consecration, faith, Godly guidance, failure, doubts, temptation, and submission of your will. Don’t you know that you yourselves are God’s temple and that God’s Spirit dwells in your midst? (1 Corinithians 3:16) The author says God provides a soul-union with even the weakest and most failing believer. Yet, unless the believer knows and lives in the power of this connectivity to God, it is as though it does not exist. Hannah Whitall Smith’s book Christian’s Secret of a Happy Life offers believers or those seeking a better way to live their lives an excellent guide to the passageway to peaceful and joyful living. inspiredbooksguide.com

  27. 4 out of 5

    Hannah

    I was thrilled when Ben found an old copy of this at a bookseller's in Boston. I'd long heard about it, and having a hardback, thick-paged, decades-old version seemed to give it even more weight. It's interesting to read this as a reflection of its time, with its answer to any doubts or troubles in life simply being, "believe more." It seems that now, the conversation in Christian and theological circles has turned, viewing doubt as not necessarily a bad thing. I find myself feeling in between: I was thrilled when Ben found an old copy of this at a bookseller's in Boston. I'd long heard about it, and having a hardback, thick-paged, decades-old version seemed to give it even more weight. It's interesting to read this as a reflection of its time, with its answer to any doubts or troubles in life simply being, "believe more." It seems that now, the conversation in Christian and theological circles has turned, viewing doubt as not necessarily a bad thing. I find myself feeling in between: Smith's route is the simpler and clearer cut, and as such has a satisfying feeling of finality about it, but I can't help feeling the slightest bit skeptical. If the recipe to happiness is buying in and then firmly believing in the buying in without allowing for any doubts or any thoughts to the contrary, then of course it will seem like the right choice. Perhaps I'm beginning from a place of doubt already. I do think that there are some practical things in here, and some original thoughts that will stay with me - about trusting God, about dealing with guilt and temptation. Smith certainly has an appealing manner that sways me strongly at some times, reminding me of an old-time preacher, which - I suppose - was exactly what she was. I think what slightly dampens that for me is perhaps my own history with such folks, or it could be called critical readership. I keep thinking about what she is doing behind the scenes, about how she is coaching - or manipulating - me as a reader to feel a certain way, rather than blithely floating through without a second thought. Perhaps that was a good thing in the sense that it made reading this book more of an exercise in examining my own thinking and theology than a daily ingestion of words of wisdom, and that those things that I found to be valuable were valuable indeed.

  28. 5 out of 5

    Connie Adams

    This book, " The Christians Secret Of A Happy Life" by Hannah Whiteall Smith, has had a profound effect upon my life. I read it first time in the 50's from a very worn copy given to me by one of the elders, who was a founder and charter member of the church I was attending, knowing I was seeking to better know God and walk in happiness. It made an impression on my mind & heart but as I grew older I visited it many times finding as I matured as a woman and spiritually, it had deeper meaning. I re This book, " The Christians Secret Of A Happy Life" by Hannah Whiteall Smith, has had a profound effect upon my life. I read it first time in the 50's from a very worn copy given to me by one of the elders, who was a founder and charter member of the church I was attending, knowing I was seeking to better know God and walk in happiness. It made an impression on my mind & heart but as I grew older I visited it many times finding as I matured as a woman and spiritually, it had deeper meaning. I reluctantly loaned it to a couple with whom I became friends in the 80's for they asked if they could borrow it. I felt fairly sure they would care for it realizing it was a old & dear to me, and return it. They were in the Air Force and moved a time or two but we kept contact and visited anad spent time together. They expressed their sorrow that the book had gotten misplaced and could not be found. Of course, I didn't want to make them feel worse for I knew it was genuine remorse so I didn't let them know how disappointed I was. In 2001, I received a package in the mail from them (no it wasn't my old copy) it was a brand new hardback copy. We are still friends and in contact many times thru the years. They bring up this subject at times expressing how badly they regretted this incident. I tell them, "Don't worry Be Happy".

  29. 4 out of 5

    Jo

    I had a weird feeling about the way the author was treating sanctification while I was reading this book, but I wasn’t sure enough to slap a label on it. After finishing it and doing a bit of research, it turns out there is a label – she’s promoting a Wesleyan doctrine of complete sanctification. Essentially, this doctrine teaches that you need to have a second spiritual experience in which you surrender yourself to God, and he will do the work of sanctification for you (“Let go and let God”), t I had a weird feeling about the way the author was treating sanctification while I was reading this book, but I wasn’t sure enough to slap a label on it. After finishing it and doing a bit of research, it turns out there is a label – she’s promoting a Wesleyan doctrine of complete sanctification. Essentially, this doctrine teaches that you need to have a second spiritual experience in which you surrender yourself to God, and he will do the work of sanctification for you (“Let go and let God”), thus enabling you to achieve perfection. Given that this viewpoint clashes with the reality of most Christian’s experiences (not to mention the biblical testimony of Christian growth), it’s no wonder that Smith recommends treating doubts in the way she does – essentially she tells readers to squeeze their eyes shut and tell themselves that their doubts aren’t true until the doubts go away. Reason doesn’t and shouldn’t enter into it. I didn’t care for this much while reading it, and care for it even less in retrospect.

  30. 4 out of 5

    Chris

    Except for the 1870's language, this was a great teaching...one I will refer to as needed I am sure. Divided into sections, I want to secure here some of the standout statements... the first section is called "The Life" - "In the divine order, God's working depends upon our cooperation" "From beginning to end, God is the giver and we are the receivers." "Faith is the next thing after surrender." "Difficulties" - "Cease to consider your emotions, they are only servants" "Doubts and discouragements Except for the 1870's language, this was a great teaching...one I will refer to as needed I am sure. Divided into sections, I want to secure here some of the standout statements... the first section is called "The Life" - "In the divine order, God's working depends upon our cooperation" "From beginning to end, God is the giver and we are the receivers." "Faith is the next thing after surrender." "Difficulties" - "Cease to consider your emotions, they are only servants" "Doubts and discouragements are all from the evil source and are always untrue. A direct and emphatic denial is the only way to meet them." "Results" - "Growing in grace" "it is the unhindered, wondrous, boundless love of God, poured out upon us in an infinite variety of ways, without stint or measure, not according to our deserving, but according to Hi measureless heart of love..." Be blessed by these few tidbits because there is SO MUCH MORE!

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