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Dr. Brent Ridge and New York Times bestselling author Josh Kilmer-Purcell are not your average couple: The two Manhattanites left their big city lives behind, and found themselves living in bucolic Sharon Springs, New York, where they became "accidental goat farmers." But what began as a way to reconnect with their own style of modern country living soon exploded into a wi Dr. Brent Ridge and New York Times bestselling author Josh Kilmer-Purcell are not your average couple: The two Manhattanites left their big city lives behind, and found themselves living in bucolic Sharon Springs, New York, where they became "accidental goat farmers." But what began as a way to reconnect with their own style of modern country living soon exploded into a wildly successful brand, Beekman 1802, named after their historic home. Brent and Josh are now world-renowned for producing everything from magnificent handcrafted goat’s milk soaps to artisanal Blaak cheese, and now, with The Beekman 1802 Heirloom Dessert Cookbook, they’re bringing their special vintage-modern touch to classic, remarkable recipes bound to become family favorites year after year.The Beekman 1802 Heirloom Dessert Cookbook will show off the delicious and decadent recipes that the Beekman Boys have collected from across the generations of their family, from Brent’s grandmother’s Fourth of July Fruitcake to Josh’s mother’s Hot Chocolate Dumplings. Each recipe will be accompanied by a personal memory from the authors or a story about how that recipe came to be. With eco-conscious and vintage-oriented food production gaining traction as a major culinary trend, this beautiful package will reel in readers, whether they’re nostalgic for some classic Americana in their kitchen or just hankering for the perfect Blackberry Betty recipe.


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Dr. Brent Ridge and New York Times bestselling author Josh Kilmer-Purcell are not your average couple: The two Manhattanites left their big city lives behind, and found themselves living in bucolic Sharon Springs, New York, where they became "accidental goat farmers." But what began as a way to reconnect with their own style of modern country living soon exploded into a wi Dr. Brent Ridge and New York Times bestselling author Josh Kilmer-Purcell are not your average couple: The two Manhattanites left their big city lives behind, and found themselves living in bucolic Sharon Springs, New York, where they became "accidental goat farmers." But what began as a way to reconnect with their own style of modern country living soon exploded into a wildly successful brand, Beekman 1802, named after their historic home. Brent and Josh are now world-renowned for producing everything from magnificent handcrafted goat’s milk soaps to artisanal Blaak cheese, and now, with The Beekman 1802 Heirloom Dessert Cookbook, they’re bringing their special vintage-modern touch to classic, remarkable recipes bound to become family favorites year after year.The Beekman 1802 Heirloom Dessert Cookbook will show off the delicious and decadent recipes that the Beekman Boys have collected from across the generations of their family, from Brent’s grandmother’s Fourth of July Fruitcake to Josh’s mother’s Hot Chocolate Dumplings. Each recipe will be accompanied by a personal memory from the authors or a story about how that recipe came to be. With eco-conscious and vintage-oriented food production gaining traction as a major culinary trend, this beautiful package will reel in readers, whether they’re nostalgic for some classic Americana in their kitchen or just hankering for the perfect Blackberry Betty recipe.

30 review for The Beekman 1802 Heirloom Dessert Cookbook: 100 Delicious Heritage Recipes from the Farm and Garden

  1. 4 out of 5

    Ivonne Rovira

    Although the Beekman 1802 farm is located in Upstate New York, The Beekman 1802 Heirloom Dessert Cookbook: 100 Delicious Heritage Recipes from the Farm and Garden contains what I would call a Brooklyn hipster take on traditional recipes. The difficulty of the recipes fall somewhere between your grandma’s from-scratch chocolate cake and Martha Stewart’s concoctions. In other words, if you’re looking for an icebox cake that starts with store-bought cookies or a recipe featuring Cool Whip or gelati Although the Beekman 1802 farm is located in Upstate New York, The Beekman 1802 Heirloom Dessert Cookbook: 100 Delicious Heritage Recipes from the Farm and Garden contains what I would call a Brooklyn hipster take on traditional recipes. The difficulty of the recipes fall somewhere between your grandma’s from-scratch chocolate cake and Martha Stewart’s concoctions. In other words, if you’re looking for an icebox cake that starts with store-bought cookies or a recipe featuring Cool Whip or gelatin, this cookbook is not for you. You want Sandra Lee or the Kraft recipe website. That said, authors Brent Ridge, Josh Kilmer-Purcell, and Sandy Gluck have included recipes — even the occasional easy one — that would please traditional cooks. And, even when you’re feeling lazy — and, in my case, that’s pretty often — an experienced cook can reverse engineer quite a few of these recipes to use Pillsbury pie crust, Keebler graham cracker crusts, boxed cake and pudding mixes, and other in-a-hurry staples and still come out with something pretty grand. And in other cases, you can leave out the lavender, cardamom, and other exotic ingredients you don’t want to buy for one lousy recipe and still get yummy results. And isn’t that good enough for a cookbook that cost $1.99? Just don’t substitute Cool Whip for real whipped cream, OK? We should always maintain some standards.

  2. 4 out of 5

    Cindy

    I had originally received a copy of this book through NetGalley back in 2013. It was such a beautiful cookbook that I wanted to have a print copy which I bought and forgot to post my review. This is a favorite of all my cookbooks. It has recipes divided by the seasons of the year which is different but I really like how it is done. There are many recipes that have now turned into "must make"! The pages have a spot to make your notes about recipes. At first, I thought I would hate to write in such I had originally received a copy of this book through NetGalley back in 2013. It was such a beautiful cookbook that I wanted to have a print copy which I bought and forgot to post my review. This is a favorite of all my cookbooks. It has recipes divided by the seasons of the year which is different but I really like how it is done. There are many recipes that have now turned into "must make"! The pages have a spot to make your notes about recipes. At first, I thought I would hate to write in such a lovely book but this is one to be loved and passed down through the generations. I treasure cookbooks with hand written notes about the recipes so why not write in it! The pictures in the cookbook are beautiful. It's truly something to drool over. If you collect cookbooks, this is one you'll definitely want to add to your collection. I highly recommend it! * I received an ARC from the publisher and NetGalley in exchange for an honest review.

  3. 5 out of 5

    Ted Morgan

    Where to begin? Photography by Paulette Tavormina defines the look and tone of this seasonal anthology of regional recipes that evoke fantasy cooking. The recipes, however, all seem doable; not a dry technical exploration of food preparation but something with flesher maps to add to those vital guides. Dr. Ridge and his co-authors invite and entice readers and cooks.

  4. 5 out of 5

    Jillyn

    Dr. Brent Ridge and Josh Kilmer-Purcell bring the best of their dessert recipes together in this cookbook, taking simple, comforting, and familiar dishes and giving them a modern, elegant twist. The duo is well known for making cheeses, soaps, and honey on their property of their historic home, and can be seen on the Cooking Channel. In this dessert cookbook, they bring the recipes from their family, and bring it to yours. ---- I absolutely loved this cookbook. Though admittedly unfamiliar with th Dr. Brent Ridge and Josh Kilmer-Purcell bring the best of their dessert recipes together in this cookbook, taking simple, comforting, and familiar dishes and giving them a modern, elegant twist. The duo is well known for making cheeses, soaps, and honey on their property of their historic home, and can be seen on the Cooking Channel. In this dessert cookbook, they bring the recipes from their family, and bring it to yours. ---- I absolutely loved this cookbook. Though admittedly unfamiliar with the brand, these recipes have made a fan of me. This book is a great tool for any home cook, and can help elevate your dishes into something stunning. The first thing that struck me in this cookbook is the photography. As my regular readers know, if a cookbook doesn't have pictures in it, I'm highly unlikely to even give it a second glance. That was definitely no problem here. Between the photographs of the food and the shots of the estate, this book is aesthetically pleasing from cover to cover. Another aspect of this book that I found a bit unique is that in lieu of listing recipes in order of course, this book is divided into the four seasons. I found this far more helpful. With fall just around the corner, I was able to flip to that section to find new inspiration for the upcoming weeks and harvests. And then of course, there's the recipes themselves. They sound (and when pictured, look) stunning. The instructions are easy to follow, and each recipe has room for additional notes, so that you can make your own adaptations or changes. Each recipe also includes a little back story of the dish, and why it is included in the book. This helped to give the cookbook that warm, hearth-y feeling of home. The desserts that popped out to me the most in this book were the orange-chocolate pots de creme, diablo food cake, lemon lavender squares, and concord grape pie. It should be noted that there are several basic but delicious recipes for things like the perfect pie crust, cookies, and yellow cake. If you enjoy cooking or baking, this is a great collection of recipes to own. The recipes are homey and delicious, and run the gamut from basic to complex in a way that is easy to follow and understand. Thank you to Netgalley and Rodale Books for my copy. This review can also be found on my blog, Bitches n Prose.

  5. 4 out of 5

    Stephanie

    A beautiful collection of some classic desserts and some new favorites. It is a plus for me that it is organized by season to go along with the ingredients that will be in season at the time. There are many recipes that I wanted to try as soon as I opened the book; the dessert on the cover, pancake cake with maple cream frosting looks delicious! The lemon-lavender squares and chocolate rocky road pot stickers will recipes to definitely try out. There are some classic crowd-pleasers included also A beautiful collection of some classic desserts and some new favorites. It is a plus for me that it is organized by season to go along with the ingredients that will be in season at the time. There are many recipes that I wanted to try as soon as I opened the book; the dessert on the cover, pancake cake with maple cream frosting looks delicious! The lemon-lavender squares and chocolate rocky road pot stickers will recipes to definitely try out. There are some classic crowd-pleasers included also such as lemon meringue pie, blondies and even sugarplums! Each recipe included a section to take notes, which is great as well as a note section at the end of each season's recipes to add your own. A great cookbook addition for any dessert lover! This book was provided as a free ARC through NetGalley in exchange for an honest review.

  6. 4 out of 5

    Julie

    I agree with another reviewer that there are not enough photographs of the completed recipes. Alternatively, there were plenty of photos of ingredients & kitchen equipment. There were two recipes I chose to try. One was 'Poached Pears Stuffed with Goat Cheese' - the blue cheese & red wine really make this recipe! The other was 'Oatmeal Cream Pies with Ginger Cream' - oatmeal cookies sandwiched with a creamy filling & crystallized ginger! I may borrow this book again another time from my local Li I agree with another reviewer that there are not enough photographs of the completed recipes. Alternatively, there were plenty of photos of ingredients & kitchen equipment. There were two recipes I chose to try. One was 'Poached Pears Stuffed with Goat Cheese' - the blue cheese & red wine really make this recipe! The other was 'Oatmeal Cream Pies with Ginger Cream' - oatmeal cookies sandwiched with a creamy filling & crystallized ginger! I may borrow this book again another time from my local Library.

  7. 4 out of 5

    Mk

    There are over 50 photos that have little to do with the recipes. The hard covered book is difficult to cook from as the binding doesn't allow the pages to stay open. It is organized by seasons, but some of the recipes have nothing to do with the season - such as the no bake everything cookies. The first recipe I looked at called for store bought pound cake and store bought ice cream. The farm looks beautiful, and I'm sure this would be a nice reminder if you'd visited. What is a "lifestyle comp There are over 50 photos that have little to do with the recipes. The hard covered book is difficult to cook from as the binding doesn't allow the pages to stay open. It is organized by seasons, but some of the recipes have nothing to do with the season - such as the no bake everything cookies. The first recipe I looked at called for store bought pound cake and store bought ice cream. The farm looks beautiful, and I'm sure this would be a nice reminder if you'd visited. What is a "lifestyle company" anyway?

  8. 4 out of 5

    Alyssa

    Read: February 2014 Where It Came From: eARC from publisher via NetGalley* Genre: Cookbook Rating: 3.75 Rocky Road Potstickers This charming dessert cookbook, written by two New Yorkers who left the city and moved upstate to run a farm/restaurant/I’m-not-really-sure-what in Sharon Springs, is sweet vintage eye candy. “Beekman 1802” is apparently the name of authors Josh Kilmer-Purcell and Brent Ridge’s farm, not a year or a family name, and the seasonality of life there is a big part of their offeri Read: February 2014 Where It Came From: eARC from publisher via NetGalley* Genre: Cookbook Rating: 3.75 Rocky Road Potstickers This charming dessert cookbook, written by two New Yorkers who left the city and moved upstate to run a farm/restaurant/I’m-not-really-sure-what in Sharon Springs, is sweet vintage eye candy. “Beekman 1802” is apparently the name of authors Josh Kilmer-Purcell and Brent Ridge’s farm, not a year or a family name, and the seasonality of life there is a big part of their offerings in this book. As they explain in their introduction, they believe an heirloom recipe is not simply one that has been passed down through generations, but one that has its own sort of mythological place in the imagination and family history. For me, an example would be the Watergate Salad of my grandmother’s that evokes so many memories of holidays spent around her big dining room table. As you read this, maybe you’re thinking of some similar types of treats that you associate with family, friends, and contentedness. This book seeks to gather heirloom desserts from the authors’ own memories, along with some new ones they’ve created, to pass on to readers and hopefully aid in creating more food-memories around the table to be passed down to future generations. Pretty neat. The recipes? Awesome. They run the gamut from the fairly simple, such as caramel apples, to deeper cuts of the dessert canon, like orange-chocolate pots de crème and buttermilk pie. This is probably not (or maybe very, depending on your point of view) a good book to read while hungry, because you may find yourself devouring all the Girl Scout cookies in the house as you imagine making and eating the things on these pages. I love the emphasis on the seasonality of food found here, which was something I never truly appreciated or understood until I spent some time in Japan, and have strived to keep in my life since. The book is divided into four sections, one for each season, with the heirloom dessert recipes arranged accordingly. For winter, some of the ones that caught my eye were the Vanilla Panna Cotta Surprise (spoiler alert: the surprise is lemon curd!), the more-modern-than-vintage Chocolate Rocky Road Potstickers, and the Winter Kabocha Squash Pie (my undying love for kabocha previously recorded). The Creamsicle Angel Food Cake and the Three-Citrus Crème Caramel from the spring section had me dreaming of warmer days and blooming daffodils, while the Sweet Green Tomato Handpies and Honey Ice Cream recipes made me long for the kinds of summer picnics one can indulge in when one does not live in the prohibitively hot low desert. Autumn has its share of goodies as well, with a Pancake Cake with Maple Cream Frosting riff on millefeuille and a Steamed Persimmon Pudding topping my list of must-tries. Yum, yum, and YUM. The photography in the book is sumptuous and rich, with a vintage, rural rusticity. Think barn weddings and Etsy, and you’ll have the proper aesthetic in mind. The many images are gorgeous and evocative of the slower rhythms of life with the ebb and flow of the seasons in the countryside. However. If you’ve read any of my other cookbook reviews, you know that I really like to have a photo of the finished product for each recipe included in the book. In many cookbooks this doesn’t happen, and as long as there are photos for most of the recipes, I can deal. It frustrates me a little, though, when there is space that could easily be used for a photo of a recipe and it is instead used for a photo of something else. For example, the facing page of their Lemon Meringue Pie recipe is indeed a full-page photo, not of pie, but of a stack of baking tins and lemons. Beautiful? Yes. But why not showcase the food we’re actually making? Being able to visualize something I’ve never cooked before is usually pretty helpful to me, and I think others probably feel the same. For example, that persimmon pudding I mentioned earlier—I’ve never made a British-style pudding in my life. Never used a pudding mold, never steamed a baked good, nothing. A picture of the hopeful result, and not one of artfully arranged copper molds, would certainly help my confidence going in. There are also full-spread photos of ingredients or things being prepared sprinkled throughout the book with no relation at all to the recipes preceding or following them! Again, very pretty to look at, but also a bit confusing. Sigh. I also think the writing could be stronger. I may be the only weirdo in the world who takes this into account when reviewing a cookbook, but there you have it—the quality of writing in anything I send to my neurons for processing is important to me. To be clear, it’s not bad by any means, but I just feel it could be boosted up a level. Occasional wonk and typos (my own included) make me sad. Or giggle. I guess it depends. At the end of the intro, the authors talk about how the secret ingredient of these recipes isn’t sugar, but rather “a magical dust that when liberally sprinkled has the power to enrapture us.” And I was like, magical dust? What is this magical dust? Love? MSG? Cocaine?!? Tell me!!! I get that they mean love…tradition…heirloominess…stuff like that. But the wording and follow-through on the metaphor just seemed very literal…I was amused. But what do I know? Maybe they really do have a magic dust to make food awesome at Beekman 1802! The header text for each recipe, like the introduction, is short and sweet, which I liked very much. A little bit about the background and inspiration, and then on to the recipes! The recipes themselves proceed in order, with steps unnumbered. On rare occasions there was a lack of clarity, such as in the Lemon Meringue Pie recipe, which has the step instructing you to put the filling in the pie shell missing. On the one hand, yeah, duh, you can figure it out, but on the other, if you’re taking the time to write a book about cooking, why not be thorough and clear? There were also some instances where I thought a little more information might’ve been helpful—what is a tube pan, for instance? Where can I find espresso powder? Can I substitute brewed espresso or strong coffee instead? Are Famous Chocolate Wafers a brand? Where would you recommend I find goat’s milk yogurt? How much vanilla extract could I use to sub in for a vanilla bean? I think the inclusion of things like that to provide options for home cooks could’ve been nice. Despite these concerns, I really enjoyed the book overall. When it comes down to it, cookbooks are about the quality of their recipes, and the food here sounds fantastic and looks delicious. Other neat little touches I enjoyed were the seasonal quotes in each section, the space to write notes for each recipe to help make it your own, and the place for writing in one of your own family’s heirloom recipes for each season. I also learned some cool stuff—did you know that sugarplums aren’t really plums rolled in sugar, but rather dried fruits and nuts rolled into balls? I didn’t. How about that German chocolate cake isn’t actually from Germany, but instead takes its name from a brand of chocolate? Who knew! If you’ve got a sweet tooth, or like vintage stuff, or fantasize about a simple life in a bucolic setting, this book is right up your alley. Desserts for all tastes can be found here, and damned if it doesn’t make me want to buy a farm and go live a pastoral life celebrating the farm-to-table movement (or at least turn on the Decemberists and sit in my backyard on a warm evening eating one of these vintage-inspired treats). *As ever, much as we are grateful for the copy, our review is uninfluenced by its source. Originally posted on Read This / Eat That

  9. 4 out of 5

    Dawn Ferchak

    Before I get into the real meat (err, dough?) of this review, here are three facts that I think you should know before you continue: 1. I don’t bake. I can cook like hell on wheels, but baking is another beast entirely, and, as far as I am concerned, it has very big teeth. 2. I used to live near Sharon Springs (where the authors have their gorgeous farm), but I’ve never had the pleasure of meeting the Beekman boys. 3. Seriously, I don’t bake. Given that, you might wonder why in the world I de Before I get into the real meat (err, dough?) of this review, here are three facts that I think you should know before you continue: 1. I don’t bake. I can cook like hell on wheels, but baking is another beast entirely, and, as far as I am concerned, it has very big teeth. 2. I used to live near Sharon Springs (where the authors have their gorgeous farm), but I’ve never had the pleasure of meeting the Beekman boys. 3. Seriously, I don’t bake. Given that, you might wonder why in the world I decided to review a baking cookbook. Well, I’ve always wanted to bake; I was just always bad at it. Also, the book is beautiful, and the cake on the front made me crave sugar like a kid holding her first bag of Halloween candy. (Seriously, if you are one of those people who don’t cook but love to read and collect cookbooks, just buy it. Don’t even bother to read the rest of the review —it’s that pretty.) So, I took the plunge. AND HOLY SHIT, I BAKED! AND IT WAS DELICIOUS! There were a lot of recipes to choose from, and I am positive that I will be using this book to make a whole lot more of them. But I decided to start with Sticky Toffee Buns because Sticky Toffee Pudding is one of my favorite desserts in the world. I won’t lie; I was a little intimidated at first, since this recipe required me to make my own dough. From scratch. Like, the kind you mix, then leave alone, then punch for a while, leave it alone again, then break out the rolling pin, spread the mixture, slice the rolls, and leave it alone for a third time before putting it in the oven and, if you’re me, praying. OMG IT WORKED!!! It was Delicious. Like cinnamon rolls, but 100x better because the brown sugar and butter you put in the baking pan becomes gorgeous and indeed very sticky toffee on top of the fluffy, sweet, beautiful rolls. I want to eat them all the time, and, now, thanks to this book, I can. Plus, it’s beautiful. It has great recipes that even a baking failure like me can follow to delicious success. And there are places to make notes on both the recipes and your own family favorites.

  10. 4 out of 5

    Sue

    I expected to find more recipes reflecting the early 19th century, instead I found more mid centuy recipes. Despite this, I still loved this cookbook. Beautiful photos, delicious sounding desserts and recipes that will be reasonably easy to follow. I love the format of the book (seasons, with room for your own notes). I'm looking forward to baking my way through this book in the years to come.

  11. 5 out of 5

    Angie

    Admittedly, I haven't made very many of the recipes in this book (yet). The pictures and the description are very inspiring and for aspiring to! Last week, I baked a new favorite cookie to add to my repertoire -- the sour cream cutout cookie. It's sort of an old-fashioned tea cake-type cookie with a wonderful taste of nutmeg. Simply delicious!

  12. 4 out of 5

    Daylee

    This cookbook has one of my biggest pet peeves, artistic photos of ingredients or equipment instead of pictures of the actual dessert being cooked. Plus the recipes themselves are a bit overly complicated compared the actual heirloom recipes they're based on. And the several I tried were not worth that extra effort.

  13. 5 out of 5

    ReadWithE

    Wow. Sooooo many tempting recipes! Will update review once I've tried some!

  14. 5 out of 5

    Anavon

    I loved spending the year cooking my way through this wonderful book and I plan to refer back to if often.

  15. 5 out of 5

    DelAnne Frazee

    Title: The Beekman 1802 Heirloom Dessert Cookbook 100 Delicious Heritage Recipes from the Farm and Garden Author: Josh Kilmer-Purcell, Brent Ridge, Sandy Gluck Publisher: Rodale Books Published: 9-10-2013 Pages: 276 ISBN: 978-1-60961-573-4 E-Book ISBN: 978-1-60961-574-1 This cookbook is filled to overflowing with the same type of recipes many of us have written in notebooks and on recipe cards that read Aunt Mae's this or Grandmas' that. Recipes that are tried and true and passed down through the gener Title: The Beekman 1802 Heirloom Dessert Cookbook 100 Delicious Heritage Recipes from the Farm and Garden Author: Josh Kilmer-Purcell, Brent Ridge, Sandy Gluck Publisher: Rodale Books Published: 9-10-2013 Pages: 276 ISBN: 978-1-60961-573-4 E-Book ISBN: 978-1-60961-574-1 This cookbook is filled to overflowing with the same type of recipes many of us have written in notebooks and on recipe cards that read Aunt Mae's this or Grandmas' that. Recipes that are tried and true and passed down through the generations because the are loved and asked for by all. It is aptly named because this cookbook will become an heirloom to be passed on through the family from generation to generation. Devided into the seasons the recipes are broken down seasonal ingredients, but will evoke memories of your own family get togethers. In Winter I found a recipe for Snow Cream, something I remember my grandmother making when we visited Michigan in the winter and a Double Ginger Cake that Great-Aunt Edith would make for me every year that I could not get her to share. When I made it I was 10 again sitting in her kitchen waiting in anticipation for the cake to cool so I might have a piece. The only difference was she used orange juice instead of lemon, but I found lemon was quite tasty too. My family is always pleased when I review a cookbook because they get to try so many different dishes, but they all agreed this is one we needed to be sure and place an order for quick delivery. Each of remembers at least one of the recipes with a fondness from our childhood and family reunions. Many of those who made them originally are gone now, but with The Beckman 1802 Heirloom Dessert Cookbook they come alive once more for us through the memories these dessert bring to mind. With easy to follow instructions and little bits of wisdom that comes included with each recipe you will soon be adding this special cookbook to your collection of favorites. With a place to make your personal notes on each recipe and even a place to enter your favorite recipe for each season this is a cookbook to be cherished, loved and passed on as a family heirloom. Be sure to check it out soon you will not want to miss another day without trying some of these wonderful recipes. You will find everything from a basic pie dough recipe to Carmel Apples to Sweet Green Tomato Hand Pies, their are recipes to appeal to everyone. The pictures are absolutely stunning and bring that extra quality that makes you want to take the dessert right off the page and indulge.

  16. 4 out of 5

    Lizzie Andrews

    I absolutely love this dessert cookbook! With unique recipes like Rocky Road Pot Stickers, Ricotta Blintzes and Strawberry Shortcake with Balsamic Syrup they feature classic recipes with a whole new twist. I had tried the three recipes mentioned for a family get together and they were loved by everyone. Not one person had anything bad to say. The recipes were easy to follow and clearly written, made with easy to find ingredients. I really hate when I have to go to five different stores to find t I absolutely love this dessert cookbook! With unique recipes like Rocky Road Pot Stickers, Ricotta Blintzes and Strawberry Shortcake with Balsamic Syrup they feature classic recipes with a whole new twist. I had tried the three recipes mentioned for a family get together and they were loved by everyone. Not one person had anything bad to say. The recipes were easy to follow and clearly written, made with easy to find ingredients. I really hate when I have to go to five different stores to find the ingredients for a recipe and thankfully I don't have to with this book. I will be using this cookbook over and over again. As a matter of fact I will be making the banana cake with cream cheese frosting tonight!

  17. 4 out of 5

    Laura

    This just wasn't for me. I picked it up because I love to bake and thought there would be some cool dessert recipes in here. There are a few (the chocolate soup is very creative, though pretty modern). But there were too many photos (which I rarely say) - though there isn't one for each recipe. I felt like there was too much focus on the lifestyle-brand and not enough on the history of the food. There are much better dessert cookbooks out there, especially if you're looking for vintage recipes or This just wasn't for me. I picked it up because I love to bake and thought there would be some cool dessert recipes in here. There are a few (the chocolate soup is very creative, though pretty modern). But there were too many photos (which I rarely say) - though there isn't one for each recipe. I felt like there was too much focus on the lifestyle-brand and not enough on the history of the food. There are much better dessert cookbooks out there, especially if you're looking for vintage recipes or those that have stood the test of time. This is a beautiful book, and if you visited one of their festivals, it would be a great souvenir. While I wouldn't keep this in my kitchen, it did make me want to check out their farm.

  18. 4 out of 5

    Rachel

    I had watched reality TV show on “The Beekman 1802”, which I really enjoyed. Two of the authors Josh and Brent are a gay couple from Manhattan that decided to move out to the country, buy a historic house and raise goats and an organic garden. Josh is the cook and Brent is the manager. So when I found out they wrote a cookbook, I snatched it up at the library. They were trying to focus on classic desserts handed down from generation to generation, but also included some new ones as well. I would I had watched reality TV show on “The Beekman 1802”, which I really enjoyed. Two of the authors Josh and Brent are a gay couple from Manhattan that decided to move out to the country, buy a historic house and raise goats and an organic garden. Josh is the cook and Brent is the manager. So when I found out they wrote a cookbook, I snatched it up at the library. They were trying to focus on classic desserts handed down from generation to generation, but also included some new ones as well. I would try out the Malted Milk Chocolate Cake, the Sugarplums, Lemon-Toasted Poppy Seed Cake, Lemon Lavender Squares, and the Baked Stone Fruits with Cannoli Cream.

  19. 5 out of 5

    Jen (Feffer)

    I have to admit to being duped, a little, by The Beekman 1802 Heirloom Dessert Cookbook. Some of you may have seen my Facebook post, excitedly exclaiming about getting to review a cookbook full of recipes from the early 19th century. Um…whoops? All I can say is, even proficient readers miss things in their excitement sometimes because, HELLO, the info is RIGHT THERE in the synopsis! That said, the book is beautiful. ...Read more of this review at fefferbooks.com. I have to admit to being duped, a little, by The Beekman 1802 Heirloom Dessert Cookbook. Some of you may have seen my Facebook post, excitedly exclaiming about getting to review a cookbook full of recipes from the early 19th century. Um…whoops? All I can say is, even proficient readers miss things in their excitement sometimes because, HELLO, the info is RIGHT THERE in the synopsis! That said, the book is beautiful. ...Read more of this review at fefferbooks.com.

  20. 4 out of 5

    waterbaby786

    Netgalley gave me this Arc and im simply thrilled to peices after reading it. This is one of those lovely dessert books you enjoying curling up with a hot cup of coffee while looking forward to cooking up the divine wrm and comforting recipes inside. The photography is beautiful taking you on a journey to the inviting countryside with its delicious lemoncurdto its freah berry icecreams of the summer. These recipe are ones you will treasure. I really love the empty spaces given here and there for y Netgalley gave me this Arc and im simply thrilled to peices after reading it. This is one of those lovely dessert books you enjoying curling up with a hot cup of coffee while looking forward to cooking up the divine wrm and comforting recipes inside. The photography is beautiful taking you on a journey to the inviting countryside with its delicious lemoncurdto its freah berry icecreams of the summer. These recipe are ones you will treasure. I really love the empty spaces given here and there for you to add your tidbits and things to remember valuing this book like a real heirloom book

  21. 5 out of 5

    Kasey Cocoa

    Styled like the older cookbooks I used to flip through as a child while my grandmother flittered around the kitchen, this cookbook brings those cherished recipes to our homes with easy to follow steps. Sure to please and bring tasty results, or even strike up conversation from the coffee-table. About the only thing I didn't like was the lack of photos showing what each recipe should look like. I enjoyed looking through this. A great addition to the kitchen library.

  22. 5 out of 5

    Deni

    I think it's ridiculous for a book printed on paper like this to include sections of blank lines for jotting notes. It just seems lazy, like they had to fill space before a deadline. Why not include more photos? Or more descriptions of the food? The photos are beautiful but my enthusiasm waned after finding that a lot of them are made with harder-to-find ingredients. Sometimes the beauty and clarity of recipes with rare ingredients will be enough to keep me fired up but not this time.

  23. 4 out of 5

    Teresa

    Very, very designed dessert cookbook full of well-edited recipes for quick desserts like chocolate cake, strudel, and other comfort desserts. Sprinkled amongst the recipes you probably already have (like a yellow cake recipe) are some delicious sounding unexpected options like the rocky road turnovers in wonton wrappers. For the most part, the recipes use ingredients that are easy to find and don't require any special know how so there's certainly something for everyone's baking skills.

  24. 4 out of 5

    Ashley

    This cookbook has really great recipes that do not get too complicated or require super special ingredients. It highlights desserts for all four seasons with a made from scratch approach. There are things I have always wanted to make in here and gave me new ideas for the future. Really great cookbook that is very pretty too!

  25. 4 out of 5

    Sandy Hall

    I loved everything about this cookbook! The pictures make me want to lick the screen and I'm trying to narrow down the list of options for our Thanksgiving dessert table - is 10 recipes too much for two people?

  26. 4 out of 5

    Rose

    The authors selected recipes by season with ingredients appropriate to each. Almost every recipe sounds incredibly delicious and the pictures are glossy, beautifully posed and make you wish you could taste them.

  27. 4 out of 5

    Sylvia Johnson

    Not what I expected. Nostalgic photos of old silver flatware, porcelain, and food set the mood but the recipes are updates of desserts from not that long ago. Some recipes I had made before and I will try about six of the ones presented.

  28. 5 out of 5

    Kathryn

    I've not seen or heard of the Fabulous Beekman Boys before. I'm not sure if there TV show is still on Planet Green TV. This dessert cookbook is yummy. The photography is homey and makes everything look delicious and the recipes are easy to follow and are desserts I'd like to try.

  29. 4 out of 5

    Megan

    Commits the cardinal sin of cookbooks in that there are a bunch of photos of uninteresting crap instead of the food. Picture of cow...check, picture of towels...check, picture of spoons...check...ad nauseam, ad infinitum.

  30. 4 out of 5

    Mary Schildman

    Home Many of these recipes were much like my great grandmother's dishes. This book brought back some many memories. Thank you for that. I'm going to buy the hard back version of this book and gift to my niece.

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