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A program for parents and professionals on how to raise kids who love to read, featuring interviews with childhood development experts, advice from librarians, tips from authors and children's book publishers, and reading recommendations for kids from birth up to age five. Every parent wants to give his or her child a competitive advantage. In Born Reading, publishing insid A program for parents and professionals on how to raise kids who love to read, featuring interviews with childhood development experts, advice from librarians, tips from authors and children's book publishers, and reading recommendations for kids from birth up to age five. Every parent wants to give his or her child a competitive advantage. In Born Reading, publishing insider (and new dad) Jason Boog explains how that can be as simple as opening a book. Studies have shown that interactive reading—a method that creates dialogue as you read together—can raise a child's IQ by more than six points. In fact, interactive reading can have just as much of a determining factor on a child's IQ as vitamins and a healthy diet. But there's no book that takes the cutting-edge research on interactive reading and shows parents, teachers, and librarians how to apply it to their day-to-day lives with kids, until now. Born Reading provides step-by-step instructions on interactive reading and advice for developing your child's interest in books from the time they are born. Boog has done the research, talked with the leading experts in child development, and worked with them to compile the "Born Reading Essential Books" lists, offering specific titles tailored to the interests and passions of kids from birth to age five. But reading can take many forms—print books as well as ebooks and apps—and Born Reading also includes tips on how to use technology the right way to help (not hinder) your child's intellectual development. Parents will find advice on which educational apps best supplement their child's development, when to start introducing digital reading to their child, and how to use tech to help create the readers of tomorrow. Born Reading will show anyone who loves kids how to make sure the children they care about are building a powerful foundation in literacy from the beginning of life.


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A program for parents and professionals on how to raise kids who love to read, featuring interviews with childhood development experts, advice from librarians, tips from authors and children's book publishers, and reading recommendations for kids from birth up to age five. Every parent wants to give his or her child a competitive advantage. In Born Reading, publishing insid A program for parents and professionals on how to raise kids who love to read, featuring interviews with childhood development experts, advice from librarians, tips from authors and children's book publishers, and reading recommendations for kids from birth up to age five. Every parent wants to give his or her child a competitive advantage. In Born Reading, publishing insider (and new dad) Jason Boog explains how that can be as simple as opening a book. Studies have shown that interactive reading—a method that creates dialogue as you read together—can raise a child's IQ by more than six points. In fact, interactive reading can have just as much of a determining factor on a child's IQ as vitamins and a healthy diet. But there's no book that takes the cutting-edge research on interactive reading and shows parents, teachers, and librarians how to apply it to their day-to-day lives with kids, until now. Born Reading provides step-by-step instructions on interactive reading and advice for developing your child's interest in books from the time they are born. Boog has done the research, talked with the leading experts in child development, and worked with them to compile the "Born Reading Essential Books" lists, offering specific titles tailored to the interests and passions of kids from birth to age five. But reading can take many forms—print books as well as ebooks and apps—and Born Reading also includes tips on how to use technology the right way to help (not hinder) your child's intellectual development. Parents will find advice on which educational apps best supplement their child's development, when to start introducing digital reading to their child, and how to use tech to help create the readers of tomorrow. Born Reading will show anyone who loves kids how to make sure the children they care about are building a powerful foundation in literacy from the beginning of life.

30 review for Born Reading: Bringing Up Bookworms in a Digital Age -- From Picture Books to eBooks and Everything in Between

  1. 5 out of 5

    ジェイムズ・n. パウエル

    Once upon a long, long, long time. . . in a faraway land. . . a land faraway. . . where the kiss of the Princess floats down from the ramparts, and gives the Prince courage, the dragon to slay, where Arabian midnights and Black Forest bowers shine with genies and faeries and wizardly powers. . . where the sea blue is bluer than bluest cornflowers and deeper than church steeples. . . towers upon towers . . . where the littlest mermaid floats up in the night and breasts the dark waters, and sings Once upon a long, long, long time. . . in a faraway land. . . a land faraway. . . where the kiss of the Princess floats down from the ramparts, and gives the Prince courage, the dragon to slay, where Arabian midnights and Black Forest bowers shine with genies and faeries and wizardly powers. . . where the sea blue is bluer than bluest cornflowers and deeper than church steeples. . . towers upon towers . . . where the littlest mermaid floats up in the night and breasts the dark waters, and sings to the sailors, and unbraids blue tresses, entwined in sea grasses, where reef awaits ship prow, in palest moonlight . . . And so it was. . . each night . . . she rolled it out. . . her ocean of tales . . . like a vast silken sea. . . spreading it out . . . rolling it up . . . spreading it out . . . rolling it up . . . spreading it out . . . into the oceans of our dreams . . .

  2. 4 out of 5

    Eustacia Tan

    When I read the introduction, I thought this was going to be a stuffy book. I'm not sure why, since it talks about how he used his reading journey with his daughter, but I suppose the style of writing and the repeated use of the term "interactive reading" scared me a little. But, when I actually started reading this book, I was surprised by how easy to read it was. Oh, and if you're wondering why I'm reading this book when I'm neither a parent nor expecting (I'm not even married or attached!), it When I read the introduction, I thought this was going to be a stuffy book. I'm not sure why, since it talks about how he used his reading journey with his daughter, but I suppose the style of writing and the repeated use of the term "interactive reading" scared me a little. But, when I actually started reading this book, I was surprised by how easy to read it was. Oh, and if you're wondering why I'm reading this book when I'm neither a parent nor expecting (I'm not even married or attached!), it's because: a. I have a little brother who's 10 years younger than me, and I was hoping I could learn something that I can use while reading with him when I'm back in Singapore and b. I want to teach more kids English, and I do think that if I prepare myself, the students will come. Does Born Reading give me any useful information? I think so. This book basically promotes something called Interactive Reading, which basically, is reading to your child while asking questions. I do this with my bro, so yay! But for me, the real value of the book lies in its exploration on how to mix traditional print book with ebooks or apps. While a lot of the app recommendations are targetted for babies and toddlers (I only found a few websites my brother can use in the last chapter), there is a compelling story of how to raise up a reader in this technology age. I really enjoyed reading Jason Boog's story of how he turned an app into a full-on experience (you can do related activities too), and his very thorough recommendations on which apps to use, and for what. He also has something called a Reading Kit that may interest parents. Overall, I really like this book. There's a lot of sound advice, and I think it manages to tread the middle-line between an electronic-device ban and using an iPad as a babysitter. Disclaimer: I received a free copy of this book from the publisher via Goodreads in exchange for a free and honest review. This review was first posted at Inside the mind of a Bibliophile

  3. 4 out of 5

    Derrick Schneider

    It's tempting to ponder what readers will get out of this book, since the kind of person who picks it up is likely to be someone like me or my wife: a voracious reader who wants to make sure they pass on that love to their child. But then they'll discover that they're already doing most of the stuff in the book! But I've actually gotten some useful ideas out of it and some book titles we don't currently have, and I think it would be great for someone who wasn't a voracious reader but wanted their It's tempting to ponder what readers will get out of this book, since the kind of person who picks it up is likely to be someone like me or my wife: a voracious reader who wants to make sure they pass on that love to their child. But then they'll discover that they're already doing most of the stuff in the book! But I've actually gotten some useful ideas out of it and some book titles we don't currently have, and I think it would be great for someone who wasn't a voracious reader but wanted their kid to be. The author also navigates the world of ebooks and apps fairly well (though the penalty of long lead times for books: he uses the then-current AAP recommendations rather than the more informed guidelines of late 2013), though his app recommendations should be vetted. My major complaint with the book is that it provides thirdhand view of most of the research (excluding the original paper about interactive reading and AAP guidelines). In other words, Lisa Guernsey's _Screen Time_ is a summary of numerous primary sources. In this book, he talks to Lisa Guernsey for a summary of her book. Now, Lisa Guernsey is a great person to talk to on the subject of apps and so forth, but the far-removed view allows for numerous passages like this, when he's talking to Caroline Knorr (also a good person to talk to): "...There are studies that show that developing those aural skills is great for kids ..." What studies are those, I wonder? If they're in the small bibliography, that's not clear from the body of the book. I don't doubt that there are such studies, but you're now seeing at least two levels of filtering and interpretation.

  4. 5 out of 5

    Erika

    What a fantastic book! Booklists from baby to kindergarten, smart apps and fun interactive qays to read with all the research and reasoning to back it up. Perfect for bookworms hoping to raise some bookworms. Or at least people who read for pleasure 😍

  5. 4 out of 5

    Barb Middleton

    Jason Boog cites numerous studies that show interactive reading techniques as best practices for raising your child's intellect and curiosity. Interactive reading isn't just sitting down and reading with your child - even though that is important. Instead, parents need to ask the 5 W's (who, what, when, where, and why), dramatize reading, add music, and read to them every day. Words can give children a way to express emotions and feel control. His book will get children school-ready and he gives Jason Boog cites numerous studies that show interactive reading techniques as best practices for raising your child's intellect and curiosity. Interactive reading isn't just sitting down and reading with your child - even though that is important. Instead, parents need to ask the 5 W's (who, what, when, where, and why), dramatize reading, add music, and read to them every day. Words can give children a way to express emotions and feel control. His book will get children school-ready and he gives great tips or tricks for dealing with tantrums and handling electronic devices. Boog isn't an expert but he quotes enough of them and tosses in practicalness that leaves a little of everything for everyone. I even got a few lesson ideas. For me, the app suggestions were the most helpful. I am a librarian for an elementary school but we have a pre-kindergarten class. I'll try some apps for their age, as well as, buy some of his book suggestions for our school. The book does tie in with curriculum standards which some parents might like. He lists them for first grade and kindergarten. It was a nice way to conclude his book and show how all his techniques can lead to more success in reading at school. He's not an educator but he gets it. His stories of what he did with his daughter shows how he created a multimedia experience and turned her on to reading. I got a kick out of how they taught their daughter some sign language and she'd use it to communicate before she could speak. Although he doesn't use the educator lingo, what he identifies as techniques are using multiple learning styles such kinesthetic, audio, and visual, to create an interactive reading experience. He also has a section on nonfiction books which has become more important in school curriculums as a result of the implementation of Common Core standards. He did his research well and the text is easy to read. Most experts say that digital devices should be avoided until age 2 and that parents should sit down with the device and child; to not use it as a babysitter. Boog stresses not only cooperative play, but independent unstructured play that is "unplugged." Unstructured play allows kids to develop reasoning skills, problem-solve, and be creative. He also suggests keeping digital devices out of the bedroom so children are not using them in the middle of the night. Much of his practical or creative suggestions help keep this text from being dry. I like how he pretended his coffee mug needed help reading and he named it, "Coffee Man," getting his daughter to read a book to it. He talks about the importance of simple storytelling making it easy to do and not some complex deal. More importantly, he makes reading fun. Books help readers, young and old, process the world around them by articulating feelings, emotions, and issues they are dealing with in life. Many lists are available to readers in his book for apps, books, audiobooks, and more. His website is fantastic and if you don't have time to read it you can just blow through the short introduction that gives 15 guidelines and conversation starters to have with your kid. He even says to rip out the pages (gulp) and cut up the 15 sentences using them conveniently. Actually, I don't have a problem writing in books or cutting them up. My books that are most beat up, are the most loved. They are my "Velveteen Rabbit" books.

  6. 5 out of 5

    Kayla

    Lots of solid advice here! I was tempted when I started to think that there wasn't going to be much of anything for me to get out of this but I was pleasantly surprised by how much there really was for me to think about. His "Born Reading Playbook" is a great cheat sheet for parents who are wanting to make the most of reading time but aren't sure where to start, and I found myself using it as a mental checklist to make sure I was incorporating the various strategies into my reading with my daugh Lots of solid advice here! I was tempted when I started to think that there wasn't going to be much of anything for me to get out of this but I was pleasantly surprised by how much there really was for me to think about. His "Born Reading Playbook" is a great cheat sheet for parents who are wanting to make the most of reading time but aren't sure where to start, and I found myself using it as a mental checklist to make sure I was incorporating the various strategies into my reading with my daughter. If you're looking for advice for helping your kid love reading and develop thinking skills related to reading from birth through kindergarten, this is a great resource. I am torn in my feelings about what Boog has to say about technology use in this book. I am a pretty firm believer in no technology for young kids, with the exception of using it to communicate with extended family (my daughter loves video chats with my parents, siblings, and their kids and wouldn't interact with them more than a couple of times a year if it weren't for technology). But I do agree with him that parents need to stop thinking of phones, tablets, and computers as digital babysitters and start thinking of it as an interactive experience. I suppose it comes down to this: Families will allow what they will allow when it comes to technology. Different parents have differing levels of comfort with allowing their kids to use technology at a young age (or any age, really). But the best thing parents can do if they allow their child to use technology is sit and use it with them. Technology is not a babysitter! This book was published in 2014, and I imagine it could already use some updating. In fact, he was missing at least one piece of information (albeit a minor one in the context of his book overall) basically as soon as his book hit the shelves. This book was published in mid-July of 2014, about three months after the #WeNeedDiverseBooks hashtag started picking up steam on twitter. Now there is an entire nonprofit organization dedicated to promoting diversity in books for children. Boog briefly mentions the need to introduce children to diverse books, but because of the timeline, the resources available from the nonprofit are not included in his book. The other thing that could probably use some updating are his lists of apps. in the last 6 years, I'm sure some of the apps he mentioned are no longer in service, and even if that weren't true, there are certainly additional apps that warrant adding to the list. So, to summarize: Valuable for the information and examples about reading, and if you're a tech-loving family that doesn't see any problem with introducing tech to kids at an early age, his resources and advice on that topic are some of the best I've seen.

  7. 5 out of 5

    Madison

    This review has been hidden because it contains spoilers. To view it, click here. I love to read. I want to instill that love with my children. I found the research and experiences interesting and loved the example books and apps for each age. I found the ending about the connections to the common core reassuring. Do these simple techniques and your kid will succeed. Techniques: 1. Read together 2. Ask lots of questions 3. Share details 4. Dramatize the story 5. Help your child identify with the character 6. Compliment your child as you read 7. Discuss personal opinions 8. Follow I love to read. I want to instill that love with my children. I found the research and experiences interesting and loved the example books and apps for each age. I found the ending about the connections to the common core reassuring. Do these simple techniques and your kid will succeed. Techniques: 1. Read together 2. Ask lots of questions 3. Share details 4. Dramatize the story 5. Help your child identify with the character 6. Compliment your child as you read 7. Discuss personal opinions 8. Follow the things your child loves 9. Stop and talk about what happened 10. Guess what happens next 11. Continue to conversation later 12. Scaffold 13. Explore the world and other cultures 14. Compare to personal experiences 15. Have your child retell the story

  8. 4 out of 5

    Julia

    I'm glad I picked this up because while it didn't offer a lot of earth-shattering advice it did encourage me to think more about how I'm going to actively incorporate reading in my child's life using a variety of different methods. It also forced me to think about things like screen time and how much I'm going to be okay with. The book recommendations included were a nice touch and Boog makes a point to say these are titles he and his daughter liked and there's a large amount of other titles out I'm glad I picked this up because while it didn't offer a lot of earth-shattering advice it did encourage me to think more about how I'm going to actively incorporate reading in my child's life using a variety of different methods. It also forced me to think about things like screen time and how much I'm going to be okay with. The book recommendations included were a nice touch and Boog makes a point to say these are titles he and his daughter liked and there's a large amount of other titles out there that the children's librarian at your local library can help expose you to ;)

  9. 5 out of 5

    Len Edgerly

    Fantastic resource for parents, grandparents et al This book is a goldmine of ideas, research, personal experience, and wisdom about how to introduce babies and children to the joys of reading in the fast-evolving digital age. Boog makes the story personal and entertaining by weaving in the reading experiences of his daughter, Olive. You'll never read a book to a child the same after reading Born Reading. You will be asking questions, playing games, and tapping the imagination in ways that will t Fantastic resource for parents, grandparents et al This book is a goldmine of ideas, research, personal experience, and wisdom about how to introduce babies and children to the joys of reading in the fast-evolving digital age. Boog makes the story personal and entertaining by weaving in the reading experiences of his daughter, Olive. You'll never read a book to a child the same after reading Born Reading. You will be asking questions, playing games, and tapping the imagination in ways that will transform you both.

  10. 5 out of 5

    Jessica

    Probably one of the best kid-raising books I've read so far. 100% recommended for every new and soon-to-be-new parent.

  11. 4 out of 5

    Ashley

    I read this from a librarian perspective to understand what parents are experiencing with raising kids in today's media-saturated world, and finding more opportunities where libraries can help parents. Boog created a playbook and guide that walks a reader through the first four to five years of a child's life and what literary milestones to be looking to hit during those years. The text is very easy to read, and peppered with anecdotes of the author's experience with his own daughter that provid I read this from a librarian perspective to understand what parents are experiencing with raising kids in today's media-saturated world, and finding more opportunities where libraries can help parents. Boog created a playbook and guide that walks a reader through the first four to five years of a child's life and what literary milestones to be looking to hit during those years. The text is very easy to read, and peppered with anecdotes of the author's experience with his own daughter that provide a good example of how to put his theory into practice. The years are further broken down into traditional reading practices that then transition into how to incorporate e-books, apps, and games to enrich a child's learning experience. The end of each chapter includes recommendations for age appropriate books (often discussed earlier in the chapter), apps, and even games based of the year. The real message that was reiterated every couple of pages is that parents need to read with their child and participate when kids are using technology. Boog shows how there isn't a firm consensus on when to introduce your kids to technology, especially when kids see their parents using it and want in. Generally, it appears that two years old is generally the earliest to allow your kids to have major interaction, and once again, to be with the kid while they do it so that technology isn't a babysitter. Once that door is open, there are so many cool storytelling and educational apps available that seem promising for helping kids become comfortable with technology well before starting school. The last quarter of the book is concerned with school readiness, standardized tests, and preparing kids for digital citizenship in terms of social media, etc. I can see where some parents would find the advice connecting the Born Reading playbook techniques to actual Common Core standards most useful. Overall, Boog's advice is solid, and I have some ideas for him: encouraging parents to take their child to storytime can help parents see early literacy techniques brought to life, and that when it comes to access to educational materials, books, and games, the public library can also help. While it's a nice idea to collect a library full of Project Gutenberg children's stories when your middle grade child is looking for e-books, the library makes it easier and contains more material than meets the eye.

  12. 4 out of 5

    Stephie

    I love the Born Reading playbook and the easy way this breaks it down on how to encourage your child to interact with books (and ebooks and apps) better. In just a few days of implementing a few of the first strategies, I've already seen a marked language boost in my son. I took half a star away because a lot of the book seemed to just be a story of "oh, my kid is so smart, look what she did" though, I really don't feel like Mr. Boog meant to do this. I also took another star away because it felt I love the Born Reading playbook and the easy way this breaks it down on how to encourage your child to interact with books (and ebooks and apps) better. In just a few days of implementing a few of the first strategies, I've already seen a marked language boost in my son. I took half a star away because a lot of the book seemed to just be a story of "oh, my kid is so smart, look what she did" though, I really don't feel like Mr. Boog meant to do this. I also took another star away because it felt like all of the quotes from people he sought said the same thing: read as much as possible and ask questions. I suppose that's not his fault though. I may update this review at a later time and just give him the missing star, if nothing else, to hopefully boost this book so more parents seek it out for their babes.

  13. 4 out of 5

    Sarah

    Starting off citing research supporting significant IQ benefits to specific styles of reading with kids is strong and convincing to keep me hooked. Loved the fact that this book didn't outright dismiss screens but talked about HOW to use them as a form of media and evaluate the educational value of different apps with specific recommendations. This gets a little repetitive as each chapter sorted by age could probably be summarized "be animated, excited, and genuinely work with your child's inter Starting off citing research supporting significant IQ benefits to specific styles of reading with kids is strong and convincing to keep me hooked. Loved the fact that this book didn't outright dismiss screens but talked about HOW to use them as a form of media and evaluate the educational value of different apps with specific recommendations. This gets a little repetitive as each chapter sorted by age could probably be summarized "be animated, excited, and genuinely work with your child's interests", but the specific ideas on ways to do that were very helpful.

  14. 4 out of 5

    Amy

    Great and easy read about effective methods of reading with children. Highly recommend to any parents. As a librarian, I definitely was familiar with many points, but it served as a good reminder of techniques that I can share with parents. It helped as a refresher. I like that there are app and tech recommendations, and although those might change over time, the focus of the book is really on the methods that we can use when reading with children, which will always be applicable no matter what Great and easy read about effective methods of reading with children. Highly recommend to any parents. As a librarian, I definitely was familiar with many points, but it served as a good reminder of techniques that I can share with parents. It helped as a refresher. I like that there are app and tech recommendations, and although those might change over time, the focus of the book is really on the methods that we can use when reading with children, which will always be applicable no matter what the text or app looks like.

  15. 5 out of 5

    Davina

    I wish I had infinity copies of this book to hand out to new parents in the library where I work. Boog's writing style is so engaging and accessible and his message so valuable that I think this should be a standard text for anyone involved in early literacy, parents, educators and librarians alike.

  16. 5 out of 5

    Kimberly Patton

    I got through most of this before I had to turn it back in to the library. Very good resource for those wanting to teach their kids about reading right away. It has tons of techniques to focus on with early learners and the book is geared for beginner parents. I am looking forward to using his book guides in the future.

  17. 4 out of 5

    Lisa Petronio

    This is my second time reading this book. Each time, I read the chapters that pertain to the girls’ ages. This is fantastic for the under 6 crowd, offering suggestions for interactive reading, appropriate digital tools and recommended books for each year from birth through Kindergarten. As an avid readers, I enjoyed this perspective on how to share my love for reading with my children.

  18. 5 out of 5

    Megan Close Zavala

    This was an accessible read that got extremely repetitive by the end. Perhaps that was the point, but it took some of the fun out of an otherwise informative and enjoyable read. Learning more about the Common Core standards was scary, but I now have a ton of new book recommendations for my little reader!

  19. 4 out of 5

    Amanda - Cover2CoverMom

    I really appreciate Jason’s passion for childhood literacy, as it is something near and dear to my own heart. Jason does a great job of talking about the importance of interactive reading with young children. I do feel like Jason was a tad heavy with his personal narratives about his daughter… Overall in comparison with some of the other books on childhood literacy, this was not my favorite.

  20. 5 out of 5

    Sara

    Well written and broken into age groups. I feel like I will reference this again later because we haven't reached 2 years old yet. Great book recommendations too.

  21. 4 out of 5

    Trish

    This book has lots of helpful resources. I liked that the author included digital media for reading and learning. I found lots of new books to read.

  22. 4 out of 5

    Maria

    The book was okay but truly became a bore. I felt he repeated the same concepts a million ways.

  23. 4 out of 5

    Bookworm

    An enjoyable book about reading Jason Boog was raised a reader. So when his daughter Olive was born he wanted to instill the same love of books as he was, while balancing new technologies like smartphones and tablets.   The book is divided year by year (mostly) of age and cognitive-stage appropriate books for the littlest readers. From reading books to babies even though they won't understand the content to balancing out how a toddler can use a smartphone to enhance the learning experience of a bo An enjoyable book about reading Jason Boog was raised a reader. So when his daughter Olive was born he wanted to instill the same love of books as he was, while balancing new technologies like smartphones and tablets.   The book is divided year by year (mostly) of age and cognitive-stage appropriate books for the littlest readers. From reading books to babies even though they won't understand the content to balancing out how a toddler can use a smartphone to enhance the learning experience of a book, the author provides a break down as to how a parent can utilize reading and technology together.   The author comes across as a little anti-smartphone/tech (which I personally can understand), but there might be some who dislike it. However, I thought he did a really great job in showing how difficult it can be to just not hand over his phone to his child to keep her happy while trying to figure out what apps to download and how he could best use them to help Olive when she was very interested in a particular subject.   And I thought he did a really good job in showing how various resources and books can be used: from allowing a baby to chew on the book (as a way of exploring the world) to keeping books readily available to learning how the library works and the various baby/child activities there, I found it fascinating to read how there is a lot more than just plopping down and reading a book.   That said, I do somewhat understand that some people might feel this book isn't for them--it's aimed towards parents who read and have the time/energy to invest in a long-term practice of reading and book interaction. There also might be people who dislike the lack of heavily scientific citation or evidence. Personally I liked that a lot as books of this time tend to be a little to dry and academic for my tastes.   The author seems to want to make this as more of a guide and a "how-to" rather than a book to support his assertions. It's also probably a lot easier for a parent with a young child to read than reading some big huge dense scientific book when all he or she wants to know is how to read with the child.   I don't have children, but I think this would be a GREAT read for parents, teachers, caregivers, teacher's aides, librarians, or anyone who needs to interact with children. There are also book recommendations for each age, (1-4 and beyond kindergarten), so hopefully this will give some ideas.A good purchase for anyone in the above categories, but someone who doesn't have children may benefit more from just borrowing this from the library instead.

  24. 5 out of 5

    Miriam Downey

    Read my full review here: http://mimi-cyberlibrarian.blogspot.c... Recently I observed a strange thing. Only one grandson did any recreational reading on his own. The others read when they were forced to read or when a parent read to them. How is this possible when their grandmother reads voraciously? Additionally, I noted my toddler grandson knew how to swipe my iPhone to get to the games. So, when I noticed that a librarian I greatly admire, Betsy Bird of the New York Public Library, had writt Read my full review here: http://mimi-cyberlibrarian.blogspot.c... Recently I observed a strange thing. Only one grandson did any recreational reading on his own. The others read when they were forced to read or when a parent read to them. How is this possible when their grandmother reads voraciously? Additionally, I noted my toddler grandson knew how to swipe my iPhone to get to the games. So, when I noticed that a librarian I greatly admire, Betsy Bird of the New York Public Library, had written the forward to the new book Born Reading by Jason Boog, I decided that I ought to look into Boog's ideas about how to create lifelong readers. The biggest strength of Born Reading is the way Boog takes 15 key concepts, which he calls The Born Reading Playbook, and expands them in each chapter to create parents who know how to interact with their children and children who love to read. He has done the research, talked with the leading experts in child development, and also has created lists of great books and educational apps that will best supplement a child's development. He teaches parents to read "interactively" with their children in a way that makes reading part of the daily life experience. Two of the things that really attracted me to Born Reading were Boog's research regarding digital media and young children and his observations about interactive reading. As a children's librarian, I am very tuned in to the concept of interactive reading, but I have only observed the consequences of the digital age on my grandchildren, since media has changed dramatically since I retired ten years ago. I valued Boog's opinions on the use of digital media. Besides all that, Boog has a remarkable website filled with great information for parents on reading with lists of suggested books, websites, and media choices. I have used it on the educational book blog I produce for the online school Free World U. You can find it.here Several caveats: Boog is not a librarian, a children's literature expert, nor an educator. He is a writer and a father. The Publisher's Weekly reviewer calls Boog "A know it all rather than an educator or peer" but his material is valuable none the less. A perfect gift for young parents.

  25. 5 out of 5

    Becky

    This was a fast read geared towards parents who want to impart their love of reading to their children and help balance digital and physical media. Boog did a nice job taking a non-alarmist approach to the vast array of digital resources available for children and focused instead on how to use these to augment traditional reading resources. It is rare that I've seen that approach. Each chapter is dedicated to an age range and offers suggestions on traditional books and digital media that might be This was a fast read geared towards parents who want to impart their love of reading to their children and help balance digital and physical media. Boog did a nice job taking a non-alarmist approach to the vast array of digital resources available for children and focused instead on how to use these to augment traditional reading resources. It is rare that I've seen that approach. Each chapter is dedicated to an age range and offers suggestions on traditional books and digital media that might be enjoyed and appropriate. I noted down a number of suggestions that I was unaware of to explore with my children, including non-fiction selections, which are weaker in our household. Boog also offers a "Born Reading Playbook", basically a re-writing of dialogic reading techniques, which I've seen before, but am happy to be reminded of to use in our day-to-day reading. The biggest weakness in the book was that Boog seemed to have unlimited time to devote to his (only?) child and many of his suggestions revolved around "Do X with your child", "Make sure you talk them through app Y and are present and help them focus". As a parent of three young children who frequently plops them in front of the ipad/books/tv to get the laundry/dishes/sweeping done, I had to laugh at this. While I think the intention is laudible, I would have enjoyed reading a section on how to encourage independent use (including focus where appropriate) in children. All-in-all, I enjoyed this and would recommend to other parents and people interested in childrens' media/teaching to peruse -- there's no need to read cover-to-cover; a skimming of sections of interest is worth your while. I'll be following Boog's website at website for further suggestions. "The goal is for somebody to make the story happen in their head when they are given the book," Mouly summarized.

  26. 5 out of 5

    Marleah

    Lots of parenting books claim that parents SHOULD do this and SHOULD do that. Jason Boog's book presents recommendations from pediatricians, teachers, and librarians but also presents his own experiences raising his daughter, Olive, and makes no claims that this is the ONLY way to raise a child. He encourages parents to find a balance that works for them, especially in regards to books versus apps, and that no one format is better than another -- instead, it is how parents use them. Boog presents Lots of parenting books claim that parents SHOULD do this and SHOULD do that. Jason Boog's book presents recommendations from pediatricians, teachers, and librarians but also presents his own experiences raising his daughter, Olive, and makes no claims that this is the ONLY way to raise a child. He encourages parents to find a balance that works for them, especially in regards to books versus apps, and that no one format is better than another -- instead, it is how parents use them. Boog presents his 15 tips to help your child develop their reading right in his introduction. That "playbook" provides the framework for the rest of the book, which follows a timeline from before birth to kindergarten and beyond. Each chapter provides age-appropriate book and app recommendations, as well as feedback as to how Olive (and Boog himself) responded to those tools. Like pretty much anyone raising a child in this highly-technological world, I question how much time my daughter should spend with a portable screen in her hands. I also question whether some apps are better than others, just as some books may be better than others. Boog has great suggestions and ideas, as well as encouragement that a balance can be reached. For parents who are looking for new ideas to work with their children and improve (or create) good reading habits, this book gives many tips and tricks, experiences, and title recommendations of both books and apps. If parents are born readers themselves, there may be little new information, but there is plenty of reassurance to be found.

  27. 4 out of 5

    Mike

    As a librarian and a parent, I was obviously already sold on the idea of encouraging reading. This book is really quite good, and suggests a lot of activities for very young children to help prepare them for reading, focusing on the earliest stages. My child is already in fourth grade and this book is more for new parents or those with kids 5 & under, so I didn't find much that I could actually use. Despite the prominent mention of 'the best apps...' on the cover, I was relieved to see that the As a librarian and a parent, I was obviously already sold on the idea of encouraging reading. This book is really quite good, and suggests a lot of activities for very young children to help prepare them for reading, focusing on the earliest stages. My child is already in fourth grade and this book is more for new parents or those with kids 5 & under, so I didn't find much that I could actually use. Despite the prominent mention of 'the best apps...' on the cover, I was relieved to see that the authors spent a good amount of space suggesting alternatives to devices and screen time for kids under five, who in my opinion (and the opinion a many, many developmental psychologists and educators) should not be exposed to much of that media. They do give some suggestions for using tablets, TVs, and the rest though, if you are OK with that. If I knew anyone who was expecting, I might be tempted to get them a copy of this book, as it is a sort of handbook you could use along with one those other common child-rearing handbooks (e.g. the "What to expect..." series). The suggestions for activities for crawlers and toddlers was especially good, I thought. There are also a lot of suggested 'best books' and they give a reasonable mix of classics and more recent stuff. *Full disclosure, I did win a free copy of this book through the Goodreads 'first reads' program, though I was under no obligation to review it in return.*

  28. 4 out of 5

    Penny

    The introductory chapter really is a great summary of the most important info. in the book - if you continue on, each chapter has good book suggestions and I also liked the short 5 point "Storytelling Lessons", and suggestions for quality apps for kids. This can be a wonderful guide for new parents, and parents who don't really know where to start. As a public librarian, I will be sharing the interactive reading message with as many parents as I can, and promoting the book. Unfortunately, I beli The introductory chapter really is a great summary of the most important info. in the book - if you continue on, each chapter has good book suggestions and I also liked the short 5 point "Storytelling Lessons", and suggestions for quality apps for kids. This can be a wonderful guide for new parents, and parents who don't really know where to start. As a public librarian, I will be sharing the interactive reading message with as many parents as I can, and promoting the book. Unfortunately, I believe most parents who might pick up and read this book are the ones who don't really need it - they are already book lovers and consumers and are passing that on to their children. They are already concerned about how much screen time their kids are getting. The average parent who is not much of a reader him or herself, but wants to help their child become one, is likely to find some of this a tad pretentious and unrelatable - thus off-putting. Most will not relate to listening to Brahms as Dad works at home, then googling photos of the composer with a 2 year old. C'mon, now! Bottom line, I liked it a lot, but don't think it's going to reach the audience who really needs to read it.

  29. 5 out of 5

    Danni Green

    Although I'm not a parent, I found this book really interesting because it covers a lot of issues relating to reading development that I hadn't given a lot of consideration before. I really appreciated the anecdotes illustrating the author's own child's progression through different stages of readership and how that related to her development in other ways. The attention to technological advancements such as audiobooks, apps, and "screen time" was very informative; these were things my parents n Although I'm not a parent, I found this book really interesting because it covers a lot of issues relating to reading development that I hadn't given a lot of consideration before. I really appreciated the anecdotes illustrating the author's own child's progression through different stages of readership and how that related to her development in other ways. The attention to technological advancements such as audiobooks, apps, and "screen time" was very informative; these were things my parents never had to consider when I was a child. The one weakness I noticed in this book was that some sections seemed out of place in relation to the chapters in which they were included -- for instance, a section on books for older readers was included in the chapter on reading with your child in their first year of life, when it seemed like that would be more appropriate for the chapter on "kindergarten and beyond". Overall, I definitely feel like this book would be very useful to parents or to other adults interested in learning more about useful strategies for raising children who read. I would be really interested to hear whether actual parents feel similarly.

  30. 5 out of 5

    Dana

    So, this is actually, a totally awesome book for parents and educators of young children to own. I am an assistant youth librarian, mother of 3 and teacher, and while I love checking out books from the library, this is a book that I highly recommend purchasing so that you can refer to it over time. The book covers reading from birth to age 5 and gives tips on good books and apps to share with your children along with how you should be sharing things with them and the developmental reasons why in So, this is actually, a totally awesome book for parents and educators of young children to own. I am an assistant youth librarian, mother of 3 and teacher, and while I love checking out books from the library, this is a book that I highly recommend purchasing so that you can refer to it over time. The book covers reading from birth to age 5 and gives tips on good books and apps to share with your children along with how you should be sharing things with them and the developmental reasons why in order to further their mental growth and development. It is filled with fabulous "Storytelling Lessons" and "Born Reading Playbook" tips along with conversation starters. I highly recommend this book to parents, children's librarians and teachers of infants and young children. I received this book free to review from Netgalley.

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