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Daredevil: Guardian Devil

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Daredevil's notion of faith is tested when a mysterious baby winds up on his doorstep. Following the death of his longtime lover, Daredevil must find the strength to continue.


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Daredevil's notion of faith is tested when a mysterious baby winds up on his doorstep. Following the death of his longtime lover, Daredevil must find the strength to continue.

30 review for Daredevil: Guardian Devil

  1. 5 out of 5

    Ben Brown

    Well, this was a pleasant surprise. I had precisely zero expectations for what to expect from “Guardian Devil,” based on the plot synopsis (Daredevil has to protect an infant from a weird organization that believes it will grow up to be the Antichrist)…but when I realized out that it also happened to be written by none other than Kevin Smith, the filmmaker behind “Clerks” and “Chasing Amy”? Well, let’s just say that I still feel like I’m falling down the rabbit hole a little bit with that one. But Well, this was a pleasant surprise. I had precisely zero expectations for what to expect from “Guardian Devil,” based on the plot synopsis (Daredevil has to protect an infant from a weird organization that believes it will grow up to be the Antichrist)…but when I realized out that it also happened to be written by none other than Kevin Smith, the filmmaker behind “Clerks” and “Chasing Amy”? Well, let’s just say that I still feel like I’m falling down the rabbit hole a little bit with that one. But really, I shouldn’t. Because “Guardian Devil” is good–really good. In fact, I think there’s an argument to be made that it tackles its themes of redemption, Catholic guilt, and nature vs. nurture in a richer, even more narratively gratifying manner than Frank Miller’s acclaimed “Born Again” did, a story that “Guardian Devil” actually feels very much like a direct sequel to. While I appreciated “Born Again” for its ambition, I ultimately was underwhelmed by the odd direction that Miller decided to take his story–too much of the arc ended up feeling aimless, even inconsequential. Not so with “Guardian Devil.” While Smith, like Miller, seeds several different plot threads across the first two or three issues, UNLIKE Miller, Smith actually takes care to ensure that everything here actually either a.) ties together satisfyingly into one singular narrative, or b.) directly enhances the broader themes. Not everything in “Guardian Devil” quite works–I’m still not sure, for example, why Doctor Strange’s presence was required, other than for an admittedly cool “Hey, it’s Doctor Strange!” moment–but on the whole, as a Daredevil tale, there’s quite a bit to like here. That it's from the mind of the guy behind “Mallrats” only makes it all the more impressive.

  2. 4 out of 5

    Jeff

    Docked a star because every freakin' character talks like Kevin Smith.

  3. 5 out of 5

    Anne

    If I had the choice I would go with three and a half stars, because it was pretty good, but I didn't get that 'wowza' feeling about it. Still, it's a very good story, and I would definitely recommend it.

  4. 4 out of 5

    Mike

    Re-read to fill in any details I need to know before diving into Parts of a Hole (David Mack's follow-on that was only published as a GN this year). Realise now that, aside from the adoration I had for Kevin Smith in his heyday, this isn't nearly as special a run of DD as I'd thought ten years ago. It was an interesting story but seemed like a big letdown with the "supervillain explains his nefarious plot in excruciating detail, just before getting his ass handed over by the hero". And the art? Q Re-read to fill in any details I need to know before diving into Parts of a Hole (David Mack's follow-on that was only published as a GN this year). Realise now that, aside from the adoration I had for Kevin Smith in his heyday, this isn't nearly as special a run of DD as I'd thought ten years ago. It was an interesting story but seemed like a big letdown with the "supervillain explains his nefarious plot in excruciating detail, just before getting his ass handed over by the hero". And the art? Queseda seems to be doing a great run as Executive Editor, but I'm not convinced on his artwork. He does fine with the scenery, and I *get* the artistically-exaggerated bodies, but my good god, the faces are just awful. A combination of horror movie fright and grade-school flat.

  5. 5 out of 5

    Kimberly

    Please keep Kevin Smith away from Daredevil. It was horrible. The way women were treated made me cringe, and the plot was boring and over-the-top. It didn't add anything to Daredevil's overall arc. Do not recommend.

  6. 4 out of 5

    Greg

    Weird. Apparently, I had read this about 10 years ago, but I don't remember reading it at all. I liked it more then they I did now, too. This is the eight-issue Kevin Smith written run of Daredevil. While I was reading it I was enjoying it, but then thinking about it more afterward I didn't like it as much. Read the spoiler if you'd like to know why. (view spoiler)[In the big boss battle / climax towards the end of the run the villain gives his grand explanation of how and why he destroyed Matt M Weird. Apparently, I had read this about 10 years ago, but I don't remember reading it at all. I liked it more then they I did now, too. This is the eight-issue Kevin Smith written run of Daredevil. While I was reading it I was enjoying it, but then thinking about it more afterward I didn't like it as much. Read the spoiler if you'd like to know why. (view spoiler)[In the big boss battle / climax towards the end of the run the villain gives his grand explanation of how and why he destroyed Matt Murdoch's life and Murdoch responds, you're nothing but a copycat, you've just done what Kingpin tried to do, you have no originality blah blah blah. In a way that is sort of what this whole story arc is. This is basically Kevin Smith imitating Frank Miller. And I get it. The Frank Miller Daredevil run was phenomenal (or so I thought at the time, and I haven't returned to it to test my childhood memory with a current day re-reading). It could be argued that Frank Miller made Daredevil as good as the series was. Before Miller Daredevil was sort of like most of the other Marvel characters at the time, but Miller wrecked DD and made him a broken / more complex character. These days this is commonplace, no one wants flat all good super-heroes. I imagine that if you are a fan of DD and you get a chance to write a story arc it's really difficult not to want to imitate Miller. Granted, I'm relying on 30 year old memories, but I don't feel like Smith brought much new to the story. Bullseye kills a woman DD loves. In Miller, it was Elektra, this time it's Karen Page. The story changes a bit when the villain (I'm sorry I'm forgetting his name), isn't able to pull off orchestrating Matt Murdoch's total ruin like Kingpin did in the wake of Elektra's death, but that was pretty much the whole attempt here. I don't know if Kevin Smith had more than 8 issues to work on if he would have gone through with making Murdoch alone and homeless. I enjoyed reading it, I just wasn't sure if the same story basically needed to be retold again, and I think Kevin Smith could have brought something more interesting to the table. (hide spoiler)]

  7. 4 out of 5

    Joseph

    Someone at Goodreads really needs to re-do the abstract above about this book. I think the last time I read Daredevil was during the Frank Miller period, when Elektra was a major character in the book and all that. I don't remember much about it, to be honest. It was just "cool" and "wow" and "destined to be a classic!" So I bought those issues, but may not have even read them. I dunno. So, there's a lot of water under the bridge from the early 80s to the late 90s, and Daredevil, as a character, m Someone at Goodreads really needs to re-do the abstract above about this book. I think the last time I read Daredevil was during the Frank Miller period, when Elektra was a major character in the book and all that. I don't remember much about it, to be honest. It was just "cool" and "wow" and "destined to be a classic!" So I bought those issues, but may not have even read them. I dunno. So, there's a lot of water under the bridge from the early 80s to the late 90s, and Daredevil, as a character, may as well be brand new to me. I know very little about him, his supporting cast, or what's happened to him in the past decade and a half. I came to this book with no preconceptions on, well, anything. I know who Kevin Smith "is" and I've read some of his DC work. I haven't seen his movies, and quite frankly, he comes across as a frat boy who's too cute by half most of the time. I would never have expected to read something as beautiful as this story. Smith delves into the intricacies of Daredevil's life, from his religious faith to his troubled relationships with women, and weaves a tale that is ultimately not about the bad guy of the day, but the moral core of Matt Murdock. Smith is very talky, and you'll definitely get your money's worth of text in this book. The villain's exposition-heavy detailing of why he committed his crime is priceless, a nice nod to the comics of the author's youth, but it never veers into cheesiness. One reviewer below hates the exposition, saying comics are a visual medium, but that's only half the story. They're also a written medium, with text just as important as the art. I thought Smith served up his story very well. Not familiar with Quesada as an artist, and it has a very late 90s/early 00s feel to it, when a fair number of artists were popular with a "cartoony" element to their work. I thought the art did justice to the tale very well, and Quesada never veers off into Todd Nauck territory, thankfully.

  8. 4 out of 5

    James DeSantis

    I'd give this a 3.5 because I did like the majority of it. First big plus for me is the art. I really dug the way everything flow, especially the mystical parts of it. The fights all looked great, and it was a darker take on Daredevil (if you can believe it) so it all jelled well together. Most of the dialog was pretty good. I liked the plot, and the idea of having Matt challenge his religious views was both interesting and entertaining to witness. The death of a certain major character was hear I'd give this a 3.5 because I did like the majority of it. First big plus for me is the art. I really dug the way everything flow, especially the mystical parts of it. The fights all looked great, and it was a darker take on Daredevil (if you can believe it) so it all jelled well together. Most of the dialog was pretty good. I liked the plot, and the idea of having Matt challenge his religious views was both interesting and entertaining to witness. The death of a certain major character was heartbreaking, and his flashbacks really made me enjoy the character of Matt even more. On the flipside the pacing and some dialog was off or way to longwinded. Like I would take FOREVER to read a page sometimes because it was bogged down by so much damn dialog, and sometimes it meant very little. Still, overall another solid book for Daredevil. Being that he's one of the best heroes of all time that's pretty great to have another writer so solid work. Still staying away from Diggle's work.

  9. 4 out of 5

    Shannon Appelcline

    In the years since its publication, Kevin Smith's eight-issue contribution to Daredevil have been lost in the shadow of the Bendis and Brubaker runs that immediately followed it. In retrospective ... it's a little hard to know what to think of this story. Every one remembers it, of course, because it's the story about Bullseye and Karen Page. And, oh, Karen is treated badly in this story. I don't mean what happens, but instead how she's depicted, and I get the impression that was a follow-up to y In the years since its publication, Kevin Smith's eight-issue contribution to Daredevil have been lost in the shadow of the Bendis and Brubaker runs that immediately followed it. In retrospective ... it's a little hard to know what to think of this story. Every one remembers it, of course, because it's the story about Bullseye and Karen Page. And, oh, Karen is treated badly in this story. I don't mean what happens, but instead how she's depicted, and I get the impression that was a follow-up to years of treating her badly. But the story itself, it's a lot more than that. It's a complex plot with lots of twists and turns. To a certain extent, I feel like it's too clever for its own good. And to a certain extent, I don't feel like it earns out the place that it demands in Daredevil lore. There's pure silliness at the start, and a really out-of-place villain at the end, and in between, well ... you remember issue #5. I gave it a 4-star rating, but this is a volume where I really could see that you might love it or hate it, and that's not just about the events within, but also the path that leads us there. PS: Don't use those cursive fonts, and especially don't use them in white print on black paper, and especially don't use them for some of the most critical parts of the comics!

  10. 4 out of 5

    Nicholas

    Not a bad intro to the Daredevil character. While Kevin Smith definitely overwrote this arc (a disturbing trend in the last three volumes of Marvel works I've tried out), the plot ended up pretty solid and there are some pretty nice dialogue gems to be found within this volume. Matt Murdock has lost his faith. He's been through a rough patch lately and the normally devout Catholic has been handed enough curveballs to leave him feeling pretty bitter with the man upstairs. The love of his life has Not a bad intro to the Daredevil character. While Kevin Smith definitely overwrote this arc (a disturbing trend in the last three volumes of Marvel works I've tried out), the plot ended up pretty solid and there are some pretty nice dialogue gems to be found within this volume. Matt Murdock has lost his faith. He's been through a rough patch lately and the normally devout Catholic has been handed enough curveballs to leave him feeling pretty bitter with the man upstairs. The love of his life has left him and the tights gig is beginning to feel a more and more like spitting in the wind. In short Matt's in the middle of a huge crisis of conscience and identity when into his lap is thrust a small child. Who, or what, the child is becomes the focus of a bit of an obsession for Murdock. What's clear is that the child is at the center of a struggle between factions of light and dark that have him questioning his beliefs and his role as the child's guardian as his life unravels further and further. There are strong thematic tones of dark and light, layered double entendres and a seamless blending of the mystic and scientific that gave this run a complexity I wasn't really expecting. Parts of it gave me that old X-Files feeling as Murdock attempts to define which elements of his life are the result of supernatural forces and which are caused by the more mundane and manipulative. Ultimately the resolution took some of the wind out of the sails. It wasn't a terrible explanation, but it falls a bit short of the epic it promises to be in the very beginning. The story has huge consequences for the DD universe though with several characters meeting their soap opera "ends" within the arc. That last Avengers story and a variety of other aborted reads had me doubting my goal of powering through most of the Marvel Universe since the 2000s, but this one has restored some hope in the endeavor. I like Daredevil. He's like Batman. He and Bruce would get along just fine. They're bitter as @*!#. I also kind of like how he stays kind of exclusively in Hell's Kitchen. I hadn't really noticed before that Daredevil maintains a super low profile in all the major crossover events. I kind of respect the reasoning and like that he's gotten such little exposure and he's fine with it.

  11. 5 out of 5

    47Time

    Longwided... so very longwinded... Even the author himself makes fun of it in the last leg of the story. This is one of the slowest reads I've encountered in comics. I'm not a fan of the amount of text, but the story succeeds in raising Daredevil above the status of masked vigilante. His secret identity, his faith, his family, his confidence - all will be put to the test. It was almost worth it to read through the whole thing, if only to experience how not to write a comic. The ending was more e Longwided... so very longwinded... Even the author himself makes fun of it in the last leg of the story. This is one of the slowest reads I've encountered in comics. I'm not a fan of the amount of text, but the story succeeds in raising Daredevil above the status of masked vigilante. His secret identity, his faith, his family, his confidence - all will be put to the test. It was almost worth it to read through the whole thing, if only to experience how not to write a comic. The ending was more enjoyable than the ride. It's a low point in Matthew Murdock's life after his girlfriend Karen Page leaves him. He tries to occupy himself with work and the life of a vigilante. The latter brings him face to face with a teenager who is wanted by some bad men for her baby which she claims resulted from an immaculate conception. Matt is left confused when she gives him the baby whom she calls a savior and leaves. Many characters will be involved with either protecting or trying to kill it. Matt himself opts for the latter more than once. The reason for this uncharacteristic hatred is revealed only at the very end. (view spoiler)[A man named Nicholas Macabes also approches Matt regarding the baby, but calls it a devil in disguise that will destroy the world. He wants it killed before that happens. Matt is confused, but surprises even himself when he hurls the baby off a building. Thankfully, Black Widow is around to save it after Matt asked her to babysit. She holds onto the baby until Matt figures things out. Matt's personal and professional lives are hit hard - Karen returns to him, but has AIDS, his work colleague Foggy Nelson is accused of a murder. Matt is too distracted by all this and gets captured by Baal. He escapes and again considers killing the baby, but resorts to bringing it to a church instead. Matt visits Doctor Strange for answers. He discovers he has been under the influence of a drug that directed his thoughts toward killing the baby. Bullseye kidnaps the baby after a fight with Daredevil that ends with several nuns and Karen dead. Matt's next target is Macabes. He instead meets Mysterio who was behind all the events of the past weeks. Matt hits him with not only fists, but also truths that destroy Mysterio's confidence and self esteem. The latter kills himself while Matt leaves with the baby. (hide spoiler)]

  12. 4 out of 5

    Aaron

    Daredevil is given a baby by an unknown girl who disappears, leaving Matt Murdock with a crisis of faith when two different agents claim the baby is both a savior and the antichrist. Black Widow lends a hand as Matt struggles with the return of Karen Page, his relationships with the women in his life, his own Catholic upbringing, and his very senses. I've been jumping around the Daredevil timeline quite a bit since I realized that he's my favorite Marvel hero. I've scoured a few lists in search o Daredevil is given a baby by an unknown girl who disappears, leaving Matt Murdock with a crisis of faith when two different agents claim the baby is both a savior and the antichrist. Black Widow lends a hand as Matt struggles with the return of Karen Page, his relationships with the women in his life, his own Catholic upbringing, and his very senses. I've been jumping around the Daredevil timeline quite a bit since I realized that he's my favorite Marvel hero. I've scoured a few lists in search of the most well known and highest quality individual stories, and I think I have those pretty well covered, so now I'm coming back to the recent past with the beginning of Volume 2. This volume contains some well-regarded stories and the entire runs by Bendis and Brubaker are supposed to be excellent. However, I like starting from the beginning, and I do like Kevin Smith's film work, so this was as good a place as any to kick it off. While the return of Karen Page, Matt's interactions with Black Widow, and his internal conflict were well done, I found some elements of the plot to be more than a little hard to digest. (view spoiler)[Namely, the fact that Kingpin (who spills Matt's secrets) and Bullseye (who kills Karen Page) are the real agents of evil in this story, yet they're barely seen and Matt doesn't go after them immediately after what they did. It also appears that Smith was trying to make Mysterio - the hidden villain who creates the whole illusion surrounding the baby - a force to be reckoned with, but that effort was mostly unsuccessful. (hide spoiler)] While I do like reading the inner narrative of characters, the sheer volume of words on certain pages was a little much. I'm also not a huge fan of Quesada's almost cartoonish versions of the characters in this story. Ultimately, the revelations and conclusion didn't match up to the initial few issues.

  13. 5 out of 5

    William Thomas

    The problem with Kevin Smith writing comic books is that he writes the character the way he believes they should act, without regard to the personality that has been built up over 30 years. It feels, cartoonish and out of character, not only for Murdock, but for all of the supporting characters in the book. Like Smith is trying to bring back a Golden Age feel to the dialogue and monologue while writing modern story lines. It just doesn't work on any level. It makes the book sputter and start and The problem with Kevin Smith writing comic books is that he writes the character the way he believes they should act, without regard to the personality that has been built up over 30 years. It feels, cartoonish and out of character, not only for Murdock, but for all of the supporting characters in the book. Like Smith is trying to bring back a Golden Age feel to the dialogue and monologue while writing modern story lines. It just doesn't work on any level. It makes the book sputter and start and go in fits and bursts. There are some moments of genius. There are some moments where you're wading through a garbage dump. Kevin Smith isn't going to revolutionize any book he's writing. So he shouldn't try. Just write solid stories and cut down on the dialogue and open up more monologue. This isn't one of your movies, Kevin, it's not about the amount of dialogue you can cram into each scene. This is bigger than your movies. Its deeper, it has a rich history, and you're not doing it the justice it deserves. You're just skating by. Its just ok. Its no great shakes. And when it comes to these characters, like Daredevil and Punisher, you have to write it solid. Everything. Not just a good story line with cheesy and campy dialogue. Not a crap story with Tarantino dialogue. It should all come together like a symphony. This book, although adequate, just doesn't. I liked it much bettter when I read it the first time through 14 years ago in single issues. But then again, that's when i had a love affair with Kevin Smith and didn't know assholes from elbows.

  14. 5 out of 5

    Fate's Lady

    Ugh, where to even start with this, from the bad writing to the awful, awful art, to the nauseating sexism inherent in both, I just had a bad taste in my mouth from very nearly the beginning. Eventually I couldn't take it anymore, and put it down. And as far as the plot goes? I didn't even care enough about ANY of it to flip through to the end to see how it turns out.

  15. 5 out of 5

    Ian

    Rating: 6.5/10 The principal reason why I’m not the biggest fan of graphic novels is because when I finish a good one, I find it impossible not to wonder how much better a novelisation by one of my favourite authors would be. That’s very much how I feel about this Daredevil story, Guardian Devil. The plot, with it’s many surprising twists and shocks, is genuinely gripping. However, I feel that it is wasted on the visual medium of comic book artwork. There’s no doubt that well written prose would Rating: 6.5/10 The principal reason why I’m not the biggest fan of graphic novels is because when I finish a good one, I find it impossible not to wonder how much better a novelisation by one of my favourite authors would be. That’s very much how I feel about this Daredevil story, Guardian Devil. The plot, with it’s many surprising twists and shocks, is genuinely gripping. However, I feel that it is wasted on the visual medium of comic book artwork. There’s no doubt that well written prose would greatly enhance Kevin Smith’s narrative; Guardian Devil has all the ingredients to make an excellent novel. For people who have no interest in graphic novels, I would recommend the audio drama adaptation produced by GraphicAudio . The full voice cast really brings all the characters to life, and enhances the emotional impact of the story. FULL REVIEW PENDING!!! (SOMEDAY) Subscribe to my author Newsletter Vist my Official Website and Blog Follow me on social media: Facebook | Last.fm | Pinterest | Tumblr | Twitter

  16. 5 out of 5

    Brendan

    4 Kevin Smith is one of my favourite entertainers and seeing his name attached to Daredevil was enough incentive for me to jump on board. The storyline is long and interesting, I honestly had this at 4.5 until I noticed it bugged me a little with the overall arc. The book is full of cameos and to be quite honest, a very dark twist. I enjoyed the book and I only found some of the overall arc slightly off-putting. I wasn't a giant fan of the Foggy moments, they just felt forced and canon fodder. Wh 4 Kevin Smith is one of my favourite entertainers and seeing his name attached to Daredevil was enough incentive for me to jump on board. The storyline is long and interesting, I honestly had this at 4.5 until I noticed it bugged me a little with the overall arc. The book is full of cameos and to be quite honest, a very dark twist. I enjoyed the book and I only found some of the overall arc slightly off-putting. I wasn't a giant fan of the Foggy moments, they just felt forced and canon fodder. Why the 4? I can see why people will have this higher. It's a solid book with the vast Marvel universe for everyone to enjoy. My issue is the constant interactions and in line with my thoughts on the MCU, it's convenient that the heroes who could solve this in minutes are no where to be seen. Kevin Smith writes a solid storyline and has a lot of fun, but for me it wasn't the Daredevil event I had expected. Maybe I built this up to much.

  17. 4 out of 5

    Ana

    3.5 stars

  18. 5 out of 5

    Daniel

    Wow! All this anticipation for the Netflix series has motivated me to investigate one of the Marvel characters I don't know so much about, and I started with the onset of Volume Two in 1998. A friend has informed me that this Kevin Smith-penned storyline in Daredevil apparently saved Marvel from bankruptcy, because it signaled the end of an era of mediocrity for the company, and I can see very much how true that is. As with all of the comics Smith has dabbled in (see his legendary Green Arrow ru Wow! All this anticipation for the Netflix series has motivated me to investigate one of the Marvel characters I don't know so much about, and I started with the onset of Volume Two in 1998. A friend has informed me that this Kevin Smith-penned storyline in Daredevil apparently saved Marvel from bankruptcy, because it signaled the end of an era of mediocrity for the company, and I can see very much how true that is. As with all of the comics Smith has dabbled in (see his legendary Green Arrow run, or Batman: The Widening Gyre), he manages to get these scripts to rise above the talkiness which is so endemic to Smith's work and make these stories into truly impressive character sketches. In this Daredevil volume, Matt's life is turned upside down and the status-quo changes Smith throws his way impact both Murdock and his friends and family. The final two issues, when the mysterious villain is revealed, are phenomenal and offer an extremely tragic and memorable portrayal of a generally second- or third-tier Marvel villain. There's also some great interaction with Spider-Man in the final issue of Smith's run, which serves as a coda to the story proper, and his portrayal of Peter in those pages is as nuanced as his portrayal of Matt in the preceding 7 issues - which surely foreshadowed Smith's own brief run on Spider-Man. Killer read, highly recommend!

  19. 4 out of 5

    Stabbing

    I read this back in 1998 when it was originally published and had pretty much put it out of my head in the meantime. Now that I've reread it I remembered why I forgot it in the first place. This is the Kevin Smith run on daredevil, and it does have some decently written parts... And then there is the rest of it. It just the way it's written is very... smug? That might be the best word for it. Pop culture references abound and it has a ton of easter egg references to fanboyish things in it. There I read this back in 1998 when it was originally published and had pretty much put it out of my head in the meantime. Now that I've reread it I remembered why I forgot it in the first place. This is the Kevin Smith run on daredevil, and it does have some decently written parts... And then there is the rest of it. It just the way it's written is very... smug? That might be the best word for it. Pop culture references abound and it has a ton of easter egg references to fanboyish things in it. There's even a parody of that scene from Batman the Animated series where all the villains are sitting around talking about how they almost got'em. But the worst part is when the villain is revealed and there is this endless narrative of him explaining how very clever he is... Sigh. Oh, and the goodreads synopsis is wrong. It should be this one [Taken from Amazon listing]: Collects Daredevil (1998) #1-8. A scared teenager on the run. An infant child some say is humanity's savior. A former lover whose life is now hobbled by a terrible secret. A law partner accused of a horrible crime. A city being overcome by an inscrutable menace. They need a guardian. Someone to protect them. Someone with faith in them. They need Daredevil.

  20. 4 out of 5

    Brian Hodges

    This was my first foray into the world of Daredevil, so I can't adequately comment on how it perpetuates the overall story and legend. All I know is that it started out strong and cool with some totally badass storytelling and illustrations but petered out in the last two issues. I don't want to give away the ending for any who haven't read it, but in the issue that is supposed to be the big climax, there is LO-O-O-T of talking talking talking, exposition, exposition, exposition. Come on Kevin, This was my first foray into the world of Daredevil, so I can't adequately comment on how it perpetuates the overall story and legend. All I know is that it started out strong and cool with some totally badass storytelling and illustrations but petered out in the last two issues. I don't want to give away the ending for any who haven't read it, but in the issue that is supposed to be the big climax, there is LO-O-O-T of talking talking talking, exposition, exposition, exposition. Come on Kevin, this is a VISUAL medium. Show don't tell! I also felt that there was a tad too much self-congratulatory writing in this one, almost as if Smith wasn't so much trying to tell a story as show off how much he knew about the Daredevil legend. Perhaps longtime followers of the comic thought that was pretty cool. Me, not knowing anything about it, just kind of went, "Okay whatever." All that said, the first 6 issues in the volume ARE pretty kick ass with some good action, intrigue, character development and even some comic-book style soul-searching (a la "Preacher"). Worth a look if you like the character or the medium.

  21. 5 out of 5

    Jdetrick

    It's saying something that I believe this may be the best Kevin Smith written comic I've read, and it's still horribly overwritten. Many pages the words nearly crowd the artwork right out of the book. I'm also not a huge fan of Quesada's style, which is much too exaggerated and cartoony for me. There's an interesting story here, featuring a favorite villain of mine, but it's not told to best effect.

  22. 4 out of 5

    Kurt

    The art is intricate and bold, the religious themes bring out an underexplored aspect of a character who wears devil horns, and the story is amazing. The big fight with Bullseye is one of the true turning points of Matt Murdock's life, and you owe it to yourself to read this if you want to appreciate any Daredevil story that has been written since these issues.

  23. 5 out of 5

    Koen

    Since Marvel's Daredevil on Netflix I've become a huuuge fan of DD.. Even noticed I was reading the lines in Charlie's voice, and even the other actors' voices. Now, seeing the story here it was well brought and written.. The only thing I actually didn't like was the artwork :/ But still: me happy! 3*

  24. 4 out of 5

    Katy

    artless, misogynistic, needlessly self-referential. i only read this because people i trusted said it is worthwhile back story for what comes later but i probably should have skipped Smith's offering and gone straight to the Bendis stuff.

  25. 4 out of 5

    guanaeps

    What starts out as a heavy-handed and confusing story with out-of-character moments by Matt Murdock, soon reveals itself to be a pretty good Daredevil book, after a few issues. Joe Quesada draws the entire arc, proving his ability as a story teller. I guess it was just the style of the times, but there's so much information on every page; Quesada makes it all very digestible. Kevin Smith writes an interesting story that starts off weird, before taking a few course correcting twists, all while del What starts out as a heavy-handed and confusing story with out-of-character moments by Matt Murdock, soon reveals itself to be a pretty good Daredevil book, after a few issues. Joe Quesada draws the entire arc, proving his ability as a story teller. I guess it was just the style of the times, but there's so much information on every page; Quesada makes it all very digestible. Kevin Smith writes an interesting story that starts off weird, before taking a few course correcting twists, all while delving more into Daredevil's history and finishing itself off in a touching fashion. This was a hugely influential series when it was released in 98-99, so it's nice to see that it still (mostly) holds up.

  26. 4 out of 5

    Edward Davies

    I'd heard a lot about the Kevin Smith run, but didn't realise it was so wordy, which is a good thing. It really felt like value for money and was quite enjoyable even though it was a little silly and unlikely at times.

  27. 5 out of 5

    Eric

    I'm a Daredevil fan and this does not disappoint. Kevin Smith likes his Biblical imagery. A lot goes on and the artwork is fantastic thanks to Joe Quesada. Great coloring.

  28. 4 out of 5

    logankstewart

    My friend Adam highly recommended the entire series run of Daredevil, Volume 2. From my understanding, Volume 1 had run stagnant after thirty-four years and 380 comics. Marvel decided to reboot the Man without Fear and start afresh. Anon, Kevin Smith was hired to write the first story arc for the new series, Guardian Devil, beginning in 1998. Volume 2 ran for 119 issues, and concluded with a 13-issue mini-run titled Shadowlands. I'll be the first to say that my knowledge of Daredevil is very limi My friend Adam highly recommended the entire series run of Daredevil, Volume 2. From my understanding, Volume 1 had run stagnant after thirty-four years and 380 comics. Marvel decided to reboot the Man without Fear and start afresh. Anon, Kevin Smith was hired to write the first story arc for the new series, Guardian Devil, beginning in 1998. Volume 2 ran for 119 issues, and concluded with a 13-issue mini-run titled Shadowlands. I'll be the first to say that my knowledge of Daredevil is very limited. Having read comics for most of my life, I've always considered the hero as a lesser compatriot of Marvel's bigger names: Spider-Man, Wolverine, Hulk, the Fantastic Four, the Avengers, and not to mention practically all of the X-Men. Daredevil just wasn't that interesting to me. Yet, on Adam's considerable recommendation (ending when he brought the entire run over to my house in a heavy, white box), I found myself with 131 comics to read. Matt Murdock is an attorney by day and a red-leather-tights-wearing superhero by night. He's blind. He's intelligent. He struggles with his faith. After a freak accident as a teenager, where he saved the life of a pedestrian from an oncoming truck laden with nuclear waste (it's always nuclear something) and lost his eyesight, his remaining senses were all heightened to uncanny levels. The main plot of Guardian Devil revolves around an infant showing up in Murdock's law office. The mother drops the child off, claiming he's the Christ returned. Later, a mysterious man appears and tells Matt that the child is in fact the antichrist incarnate. Already conflicted, Murdock gets involved in a fight that spans from heaven to hell. Another important element to this arc was Murdock's relationship with his on-again, off-again flame Karen Page. Up front Adam told me the series started off kind of boring. He was right. The first eight issues held me captivated enough to press on, but suffered from some weak text and poor illustrations. Don't get me wrong. The art was just fine, but I was turned off by the peculiar choices Joe Quesada made, especially when it came to eyes. Every time I looked at a person's eyes I was turned off. They looked almost childish. This just didn't work with the tone of the story Smith was telling (and I'm already not much of a Smith fan). Nevertheless, I press onward. So far Daredevil still sits in the shadows of my mind, but I'm anxious to see if he rises to prominence. If I'm judging based on Guardian Devil, I'd say no. But, for the life of me, I'll read this series if only to see what Adam's talking about.

  29. 4 out of 5

    Kevin Mann

    I expected way too much from this. So many myths had developed about this seminal work, starting with the legendary names involved, for years, i had a hard time eventually sitting down to read it. Some things have a place in time and become very imtidating to just enjoy. Finally, i decided it was time to buy and read "the ultimate DD arc"....as many have labelled this... I think reading it all at once years later was much better for me than reading it in sections as it was released with all the I expected way too much from this. So many myths had developed about this seminal work, starting with the legendary names involved, for years, i had a hard time eventually sitting down to read it. Some things have a place in time and become very imtidating to just enjoy. Finally, i decided it was time to buy and read "the ultimate DD arc"....as many have labelled this... I think reading it all at once years later was much better for me than reading it in sections as it was released with all the hype, originally,---- as I never would have made it thru to the end back then..... there are a few parts that are inspired genius and a lot of other parts that do make you feel it is regurgitated recycled crap from other more talented creator's leftovers and you ask "why am i reading this???" There is a lot to be frustrated about as a reader here. It is horribly contrived and over-written. Some of the dialogue and narration is LOL silly, can't tell of it is tongue in cheek or deliberate as a goof by kev on his audience....Hey, kevin, every hear the expression "less is more?" .....at some point the over explaining narrative of every plot movement is just beyond over the top, it is annoying as hell. It smacks of either goofing on your audience to "tweak" with them and create some "in" gag kevin can laugh at with his 5 friends, or genuinely believing your audience is so stoooooopid, you must over-emphasize every plot point ad nauseum. This book really needed to be reduced by about two chapters. The final chapter was totally silly, it reminded me of the last 10 minutes of alfred hitchcock's "psycho" movie where the psychiatrist explains to the audience about what they have just seen and why it is not normal behavior. Kev wanting spider-man to show up and help DD out by putting everything in perspective for both DD and also us, the readers, was beyond lame....it needed to end right before that, and would have been more powerful as a piece and i would not be so harsh on it as a work if it had...perhaps an editor was needed? ...I agree with the complaints that kevin smith's style has too many starts and stops and anytime the pace seems just right, it abruptly loses it's steam, sometimes for entire chapters at a time! A lot of the inside movie "digs" , mainly in telling the villian's backstory narrative were forced as well...hahaaha, kev! Overall, I like Q's art. It seemed way better at the time, 10 years ago, but overall i am ok with it and it holds up well overall. The cartoonish exagerated elements of the artwork do not bother me. But i still prefer miller...as we all pretty much do for DD......

  30. 5 out of 5

    Amanja

    First of all, [email protected]!$ you Kevin smith. Zero stars. This is easily the worst run of daredevil, or dare I say any marvel, I've ever read. I cannot find any redeeming factors. Kevin Smith is overly wordy for an over the top, complicated plot that turns out to be written off as the fault of all of the women in murdock's life for damaging his judgement through the trauma of not doing enough women's work or some misogynistic b.s. All of the female characters are treated poorly and either abused and killed First of all, [email protected]!$ you Kevin smith. Zero stars. This is easily the worst run of daredevil, or dare I say any marvel, I've ever read. I cannot find any redeeming factors. Kevin Smith is overly wordy for an over the top, complicated plot that turns out to be written off as the fault of all of the women in murdock's life for damaging his judgement through the trauma of not doing enough women's work or some misogynistic b.s. All of the female characters are treated poorly and either abused and killed off or diminished into harpies with ticking baby clocks. The end sums up with a not at all subtle blaming of every woman daredevil has chosen to be with as well as his mother for every death in the story. Karen and natasha deserve better than this abuse. The male characters don't fair much better in the the two leads are painted as horrible womanizers incapable of being faithful only to expect forgiveness when the inevitably do their partners wrong. They are incompetent and cruel. In addition to Smith's long winded prose is his insufferable habit of referencing his own works and life. This narcissism caused me many eye rolls and brought me immediately out of the story that already felt more like fan fiction than canon. Not only is Smith's story, characters, plot, and pacing all wrong but the art leaves much to be desired as well. The men are drawn in a weird cartoon distortion while the woman are drawn as big lips teetering on a pair of breasts. Most of the art is taken over by gigantic speech bubbles attempting to hold Smith's wordiness so I suppose it doesn't matter much anyway. On top of all that each issue had at least one lettering mistake that led to confusion. It seems that every hand that touched this arc dropped the ball entirely. I honestly only finished reading it so that I could write an honest zero star review. Please don't waste your time on this lazy, self serving, sexist garbage fire.

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