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It's the hot topic of the moment. Christians, the church and the Bible seem to be out of step with modern attitudes towards homosexuality. And there is growing hostility towards those who hold a different view. So is God homophobic? And what do we say, and how do we relate to to both Christians and non Christians who experience same-sex attraction. In this short, simple boo It's the hot topic of the moment. Christians, the church and the Bible seem to be out of step with modern attitudes towards homosexuality. And there is growing hostility towards those who hold a different view. So is God homophobic? And what do we say, and how do we relate to to both Christians and non Christians who experience same-sex attraction. In this short, simple book, Sam Allberry wants to help confused Christians understand what God has said about these questions in the scriptures, and offers a positive and liberating way forward through the debate.


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It's the hot topic of the moment. Christians, the church and the Bible seem to be out of step with modern attitudes towards homosexuality. And there is growing hostility towards those who hold a different view. So is God homophobic? And what do we say, and how do we relate to to both Christians and non Christians who experience same-sex attraction. In this short, simple boo It's the hot topic of the moment. Christians, the church and the Bible seem to be out of step with modern attitudes towards homosexuality. And there is growing hostility towards those who hold a different view. So is God homophobic? And what do we say, and how do we relate to to both Christians and non Christians who experience same-sex attraction. In this short, simple book, Sam Allberry wants to help confused Christians understand what God has said about these questions in the scriptures, and offers a positive and liberating way forward through the debate.

30 review for Is God anti-gay?

  1. 4 out of 5

    Ruby Granger

    An interesting biblical perspective on homosexuality. I picked this up as extra reading for my Ethics A Level and would definitely recommend it for those doing the OCR Religious Studies A Level course. It offers an alternate perspective on Christian homosexuality which may be useful for essays. It is a quick, informative read but also somewhat upsetting at times.

  2. 5 out of 5

    Aaron Downs

    Sam Allberry’s Is God anti-gay? is a pamphlet dealing with Christians and modern attitudes towards homosexuality. Allberry, an associate pastor of St. Mary’s Church in Maidenhead, UK, is a believer who has battled same sex attraction from his teens years until now. Allberry believes that open conversation on how to deal with same sex attraction is both necessary and healthy. Allberry begins by distinguishing between “being gay” and having “same sex attraction.” He posits that “being gay” means Sam Allberry’s Is God anti-gay? is a pamphlet dealing with Christians and modern attitudes towards homosexuality. Allberry, an associate pastor of St. Mary’s Church in Maidenhead, UK, is a believer who has battled same sex attraction from his teens years until now. Allberry believes that open conversation on how to deal with same sex attraction is both necessary and healthy. Allberry begins by distinguishing between “being gay” and having “same sex attraction.” He posits that “being gay” means finding identity in a sexual orientation while “same sex attraction” means having desires that do not define identity. I believe that Allberry makes a necessary distinction here, because a believer who struggles with same sex attraction doesn’t need to find his or her identity in sexual desire, but in Christ. This identity factor is of utmost importance, because someone who identifies as “being gay” cannot reconcile that identity from a biblical worldview. After establishing identity, Allberry establishes the purpose of sex and marriage. Sex and marriage have purposes of reproduction, pleasure, and mirroring the image of Christ and the church. Allberry explains that Adam and Eve were “made of the same stuff” as in being human, but “made of different stuff” as in being physically different. This differences allows for a reflection of the image of God, reproduction, and pleasure. Allberry continues to address biblical directives against homosexuality. He explains that the Bible is abundantly clear in its stance against homosexuality. Although many believers seeking to justify homosexuality from a biblical standpoint by claiming that Jesus never talked about homosexuality, Allberry argues that homosexuality is included in the sexual sins that Jesus spoke of, and clarified in the writings of Paul the Apostle. In doing so, Allberry transitions to talk about homosexuality in relation to a believer, to the church, and to the unbelieving world. In each case, Jesus is the answer. Jesus has the power to change desires; and Jesus gives the all believers the ability to love those who struggle with same sex attraction and those who identify as gay. Although the Bible never promises for same sex attraction and desires for the same sex to be eradicated in this life, he promises to eradicate all sin in the life to come. Allberry exhorts believers to treat homosexuals with love, and to treat them as individuals, not as statistics or stereotypes. In doing so, he urges believers to share the gospel with unbelieving homosexuals, but to share it as if the Good News is for them, not against them, because it is for them. He references Al Mohler’s exhortation that believers should love gay people more than their gay friends love them, and that believers should love homosexuals more than they love their homosexuality. This short pamphlet is extremely helpful in cultivating a biblical view of homosexuality and in determining how to deal with same sex attraction as a believer, as a church in relation to other believers, and as a church in relation to the world.

  3. 4 out of 5

    Jill

    I really had no interest in reading this book - I only read it because the author is giving a talk, we are live streaming it at church, and I wanted to know whether I would be able to go without punching a hole in our overhead projector. I really struggle with the way LGBT people are preached about in churches, and I was worried this book would follow a similar vein of confusion, poor communication and a wistful longing for days gone by - when gay people weren't out and you could still slap your I really had no interest in reading this book - I only read it because the author is giving a talk, we are live streaming it at church, and I wanted to know whether I would be able to go without punching a hole in our overhead projector. I really struggle with the way LGBT people are preached about in churches, and I was worried this book would follow a similar vein of confusion, poor communication and a wistful longing for days gone by - when gay people weren't out and you could still slap your secretary on the bum without ramifications. I'm not gay but I'm also not a huge jerk, so I've struggled a lot with these kinds of resources in the past. (Also, LGBT people are people, not "a hot topic of the moment "- way to be weird, blurb.) First off, a strong warning - I would not recommend this book to non-Christians. A couple of people in the reviews have and honestly, I think that's very short sighted. It assumes a lot of biblical knowledge and assumes that readers put God's way first in their lives - obviously this is not the case for non-Christians. I don't think it's a good evangelistic resource. Another review pointed out that the book also fails to apologise for a lot of the ways the Christian community has harmed LGBT people in the past. This is really true - the book doesn't really discuss any history at all, and also focuses largely on the people you'd expect - cis gay and lesbian people with strong relationships in the church. There are lots of other bits too that I found very problematic - I couldn't possible mention all of them in such a short review. BUT there were some bits I just loved. The parts about how Christians can react when people (both Christian and non-Christian) come out to them were really good - spoiler, it's be nice to them and keep being their friend. I also liked the author's suggestions about how adhering strongly to traditional (and non-biblical) gender roles can make churches tough places for lots of people, but especially LGBT people; and about welcoming gay couples into churches. It was also great to read a book of this kind written by someone who is actually SSA (his preferred term). The author was always compassionate, and didn't rely on any junk science like a lot of Christian books of this kind do. There were some parts where I was mad and felt the generational difference between us but overall he came across well and seemed like a nice dude. If you're Christian, and especially if you're an old Christian white dude who doesn't have gay friends, I'd recommend this book. I hope frankly, that older more conservative Christians do read it and that, despite its faults, it can have a positive impact around the way we treat and speak about LGBT people/SSA in our churches.

  4. 5 out of 5

    Ben Kester

    Like most books you'd find in a Christian bookstore, this is written for the WASP subculture. It fits the genre nicely. It is consistent with church teachings. It is safe. You can flip through it in a couple minutes and wonder if there really is nothing new under the sun. If the church followed this book from the start, we would be in a different place. They didn't, though. The church started a war against those different from them. This quick read didn't have time for that history and treats the Like most books you'd find in a Christian bookstore, this is written for the WASP subculture. It fits the genre nicely. It is consistent with church teachings. It is safe. You can flip through it in a couple minutes and wonder if there really is nothing new under the sun. If the church followed this book from the start, we would be in a different place. They didn't, though. The church started a war against those different from them. This quick read didn't have time for that history and treats the issue as if we were starting from a clean slate.

  5. 4 out of 5

    Mark Jr.

    I fear that we have already descended into the sloganeering phase of the argument over homosexual acts, just as we did long ago with abortion. “It’s a choice!,” shout the pro-choicers. “It’s a life!,” shout the pro-lifers. With regard to homosexuality, “It’s a choice!” isn’t exactly the Christian position. And this seems to be the special contribution of a man like Sam Alberry. He is clearly a Bible-believing, gospel-loving, evangelical Christian. And yet he experiences same-sex attraction (SSA). I fear that we have already descended into the sloganeering phase of the argument over homosexual acts, just as we did long ago with abortion. “It’s a choice!,” shout the pro-choicers. “It’s a life!,” shout the pro-lifers. With regard to homosexuality, “It’s a choice!” isn’t exactly the Christian position. And this seems to be the special contribution of a man like Sam Alberry. He is clearly a Bible-believing, gospel-loving, evangelical Christian. And yet he experiences same-sex attraction (SSA). He did not choose to experience these desires (that’s why “it’s a choice” isn’t a good slogan in this debate); but precisely because he is a Christian (and a pastor) he has chosen not to act on them. He will not validate and reify that attraction by calling himself a “gay Christian.” He lives a celibate life. Alberry explains theologically how regenerated people could experience SSA, and he explains exegetically in a short space how wrong it is to try to twist the Bible into validating homosexual acts. Little of this material is new; Alberry’s virtue is his ability to explain it winsomely in short space, backed up by his personal testimony and experience. I will mention, however, that Alberry made one key argument that needs to be added to every Western Christian’s understanding. It’s key because it reminds us that we may not let the sloganeering between conservatives and “the gay Christians” turn into an agree-to-disagree, permanent standoff. We can’t agree; we can’t grant Christian recognition to people who endorse homosexual behavior.* Why? Because otherwise we face the judgment of our Lord, Alberry says. He points to Christ’s words to the church at Thyatira in Revelation 2. Christ holds them accountable because they “tolerate that woman Jezebel, who calls herself a prophetess and is teaching and seducing my servants to practice sexual immorality and to eat food sacrificed to idols” (Rev. 2:20). A number of erstwhile evangelicals have become modern-day Jezebels. Just because Thomas Nelson publishes their books doesn’t mean we’re brothers. The only criticism I could possibly have would be regarding Alberry’s counsel to pastors who find a homosexual couple attending their church. He said he wouldn’t make their sexual activities the first item of discussion—and I can certainly understand that. I mean, I think I would say, “Hello! Welcome!” first. I wasn’t quite sure I understood what Alberry was recommending, and perhaps the UK is just a different culture, but it seems to me that along with the call to faith in the gospel (which Alberry rightly makes central) comes Jesus’ call to repentance. I wouldn’t incorporate anyone into the life of the church in any way who hasn’t already received that call with obedience. Again, I was a bit confused as to what Alberry was saying here. The book is brief. It’s biblical. You could easily hand it to a Christian struggling with same-sex attraction—or a church struggling with how to help its members bear that particular temptation. I definitely recommend this book, and I appreciate Sam’s willingness to make himself vulnerable before the Christian community for our own good. I received a review copy from Christian Audio, and Sam himself read the content. I think that’s the best way to experience an audio book—I like to hear the author himself. *There is a difference between an immature Christian who doesn’t yet understand the issues and a leader who is morally obligated to know better. I don’t say that we refuse to call the former “Christians.”

  6. 5 out of 5

    Cliff

    Excellent treatment of the subject! Please read and think through this book.

  7. 5 out of 5

    Daniel Ligon

    This is the book on homosexuality that Christians need right now. Sam Allberry speaks with both biblical authority and personal experience on this topic. He presents an excellent biblical case for there being only two options for the Christian: heterosexual marriage or celibate singleness. Allberry, a single pastor in England who has struggled with same-sex attraction for years, is firm on truth and orthodoxy while still being compassionate to those who deal with this particular temptation. In t This is the book on homosexuality that Christians need right now. Sam Allberry speaks with both biblical authority and personal experience on this topic. He presents an excellent biblical case for there being only two options for the Christian: heterosexual marriage or celibate singleness. Allberry, a single pastor in England who has struggled with same-sex attraction for years, is firm on truth and orthodoxy while still being compassionate to those who deal with this particular temptation. In this short, accessible book, Allberry briefly tells his story, presents the biblical case against homosexual behavior, and then offers wise counsel to Christians and churches dealing with this issue.

  8. 4 out of 5

    Rachel Schultz

    Very well done. Made me want to read more by Sam Allberry

  9. 5 out of 5

    Jeanie

    The answer to the question Is God Anti-Gay. NO, the verse and many others that support that is "those who are heavy laden" come to me. And as Jesus himself said that he only came for the sick and just as the sick know they need the doctor, those that are in sin know we need a savior. When we take Jesus as a savior, we also need to take him as our Lord, and that is when our heart is changed. So the question is homosexuality a sin? Yes it is and is supported both in the new testament and old. Jesu The answer to the question Is God Anti-Gay. NO, the verse and many others that support that is "those who are heavy laden" come to me. And as Jesus himself said that he only came for the sick and just as the sick know they need the doctor, those that are in sin know we need a savior. When we take Jesus as a savior, we also need to take him as our Lord, and that is when our heart is changed. So the question is homosexuality a sin? Yes it is and is supported both in the new testament and old. Jesus affirming that God created sex for marriage between a man and a woman to show the gospel. This is explained clearly and supported with scripture in this read. We need to think thru that marriage is gender based and a good Godly marriage shows when a husband and wife understand their gender roles. Unfortunately, we as Christians and the church have missed the mark. So who should read this book? I hope everyone who calls themselves a Christian will. Sam Allberry himself struggles with same sex attraction and gives very clear instructions on how we are to respond to those that struggle with same sex attraction. In relationships response is crucial; a Godly balance of grace and truth. Grace does not lead others to sin but shares the truth with love. So we as Christians we should be not be anti-Gay but pro-Christ. Sharing the truth with grace. A complimentary review copy was provided to me by Cross Focused Reviews (A Service of Cross Focused Media, LLC). I was not required to write a positive review. The opinions I have expressed are my own

  10. 4 out of 5

    Brittany McDowell

    Great beginner resource for a Biblical, yet personal perspective on same-sex attraction/homosexuality. Good differentiation between SSA and homosexuality.

  11. 5 out of 5

    Grant Fawcett

    This is a very helpful, humble and gently written approach to a difficult subject. Submitted to the Gospel and holding Christ at the center!

  12. 5 out of 5

    Laura Reid

    Excellent insight into our loving Father

  13. 5 out of 5

    Josh

    Though this is not a long book at all (88 pages), it is extremely thorough and very well written. I have to admit that I have never heard of Sam Allberry until I read this book, but he made quite a good initial impression on me with this book dealing with homosexuality. The chapters are as follows: 1. Getting started: the Bible, marriage and sex 2. The Bible and homosexuality - Surely a same-sex partnership is OK if it's committed and faithful? - But Jesus never mentions homosexuality, so how can Though this is not a long book at all (88 pages), it is extremely thorough and very well written. I have to admit that I have never heard of Sam Allberry until I read this book, but he made quite a good initial impression on me with this book dealing with homosexuality. The chapters are as follows: 1. Getting started: the Bible, marriage and sex 2. The Bible and homosexuality - Surely a same-sex partnership is OK if it's committed and faithful? - But Jesus never mentions homosexuality, so how can it be wrong? 3. Homosexuality and the Christian - Aren't we just picking and choosing which Old Testament laws apply? 4. Homosexuality and the church - Can't Christians just agree to differ on this? 5. Homosexuality and the world Conclusion - What should I do if a Christian comes out to me? Sam is very upfront and honest at the beginning of the book by telling readers that he is a Pastor who not only has struggled with same-sex attraction (SSA), but someone who still struggles with it. I found this quote from Sam on the differences between someone who describes themselves as "gay" and someone who struggles with same-sex attraction to be very interesting and informing: "It sounds clunky to describe myself as 'someone who experiences same-sex attraction'. But describing myself like this is a way for me to recognize that the kind of sexual attractions I experience are not fundamental to my identity. They are part of what I feel but are not who I am in a fundamental sense. I am far more than my sexuality." Sam truly desires to drive home the point early on in his book that when someone describes themselves as "gay" they are not just referring to their sexual orientation, but use that term to describe their identity and lifestyle as a whole (which Sam does not want to do). We, as Americans, tend to hear the word "gay" and take it to the extreme, and if someone close to us were to confess that they were struggling with Same-sex attraction, or thought that they might in fact be "gay", then most of our reactions to those people would be anything but honoring to Christ. I am "preaching to the choir" with that last sentence as someone who has been the object of a lustful glance from members of the gay community, my initial reaction was revulsion instead of a desire to pray for that person to be delivered from their sin like God graciously did for me. Sam's book was a huge challenge to everything I thought I knew about people struggling with Same-sex attraction, and the lessons I learned from reading this book (along with some other resources) will be ones that I pass on my College Community Group as a way to encourage them to be people that others who are struggling with Same-sex attraction will come to for counsel and prayer. If I had to say something negative about the book, I think it would have done the book some good if Sam Allberry had given us a little bit more information about his personal experience struggling with Same-sex attraction, how he combats against it (i.e. accountability partners), resources that the church can use to better reach out to those struggling with this, etc. Sam does share some things about himself, but I kept waiting for more personal details to be given. I don't think this damages the book at all, just a small, petty gripe on my behalf. Title: Is God Anti-Gay?: And Other Questions about Homosexuality, the Bible and Same Sex Attraction. Author: Sam Allberry Publisher: The Good Book Company (2013) Disclosure of Material Connection: I received this book free from the publisher through the The Good Book Company book review bloggers program on Cross Focused Reviews. I was not required to write a positive review. The opinions I have expressed are my own. I am disclosing this in accordance with the Federal Trade Commission's 16 CFR, Part 255 : "Guides Concerning the Use of Endorsements and Testimonials in Advertising."

  14. 5 out of 5

    Mike

    Allberry is open-hearted, generous, wise and also gay...or perhaps, to put it more clearly: he has same sex attractions. He's also a Christian. This short book doesn't mince matters about sin - homosexual activity is only one of various sins that St Paul, for instance, lists in his gospels. He never singles it out as being worse or better than other sins, sins that may be more familiar to the rest of us. Since homosexual behaviour is a sin, it has to be dealt with as other sins. Brought to Chris Allberry is open-hearted, generous, wise and also gay...or perhaps, to put it more clearly: he has same sex attractions. He's also a Christian. This short book doesn't mince matters about sin - homosexual activity is only one of various sins that St Paul, for instance, lists in his gospels. He never singles it out as being worse or better than other sins, sins that may be more familiar to the rest of us. Since homosexual behaviour is a sin, it has to be dealt with as other sins. Brought to Christ, and forgiven. Many people won't agree, including many Christians, but Allberry states that homosexual behaviour is one of the non-negotiables. If it sounds as if he's condemning people with SSA, he's not, and much of the book talks about how to accept such people, how to love them in Christ, how to make them part of the church family. It's not always an easy journey for those on either side of the friendship, but it's a far better way of living than hiding things in the closet...or anywhere else. Allberry doesn't look at the issue of why people might have same sex attraction, though he does mention that there can be a variety of reasons. And it would have been good to have had some more concrete examples of situations in which Christians and people with SSA have come together in friendship. The website - http://www.livingout.org/ - however, has a number of stories, and this is a good place to follow up after reading the book. It's a solid, gospel - good news - book, and one we all need in this time of confusion.

  15. 5 out of 5

    John

    Allberry is pastoral and thoughtful with a very difficult subject in this much needed book. There are other books that provide more theological and biblical mea than Allberry's does, but none that do so as pastorally as he does. It's the best starter book for the issue hands down.

  16. 4 out of 5

    Susan

    This is a little book that looks at what the Bible has to say about homosexuality, which is an important topic for the church and followers of Christ to handle properly. One thing I really liked about this book is that although the author is focusing on same sex attraction any number of sins could be inserted. The point being that no sin is worse than another and we are all sinners because we live in a fallen world. So, the question is what do we do about it? Our sins alone don’t define us and t This is a little book that looks at what the Bible has to say about homosexuality, which is an important topic for the church and followers of Christ to handle properly. One thing I really liked about this book is that although the author is focusing on same sex attraction any number of sins could be inserted. The point being that no sin is worse than another and we are all sinners because we live in a fallen world. So, the question is what do we do about it? Our sins alone don’t define us and they don’t bar us from a relationship with Jesus, but we are called to refrain from acting out on our sins. I found this book helpful on a subject that can be a divisive subject among believers.

  17. 5 out of 5

    Drake

    This is THE book that I would give to both Christians and non-Christians on this subject. Allberry's book is short but filled with rich, biblical teaching that carefully places the topic of homosexuality within the context of the gospel itself. His writing is also filled with both compassion and grace as he emphasizes that the gospel is good news for everyone, including gay people. Very well done.

  18. 5 out of 5

    Jimmy

    So much ink has been spilled concerning the topic of homosexuality, both for and against, and you might ask, “Why another book?” What makes this one different? I would say if one has to read only one book on this subject from a Christian perspective this would be it since the beauty of this book is its balance, simplicity, brevity, clarity, honesty and the author pastoral heart. Right off the bat, the book opens up with a personal introduction from the author’s own life—and his struggle with homo So much ink has been spilled concerning the topic of homosexuality, both for and against, and you might ask, “Why another book?” What makes this one different? I would say if one has to read only one book on this subject from a Christian perspective this would be it since the beauty of this book is its balance, simplicity, brevity, clarity, honesty and the author pastoral heart. Right off the bat, the book opens up with a personal introduction from the author’s own life—and his struggle with homosexual desires at a young age. Immediately I realized that this book isn’t just ABOUT homosexuals but also TO any possible homosexual readers. That’s an important angle! This book is gospel centered and not just a special condemnation of homosexuals. For instance, he writes on page 8, “God’s message for gay people is the same as his message for everyone. Repent and believe.” Readers will discover that Sam Allberry makes an important distinction between “homosexuals” and those with same sex attractions (what he calls SSA for short). I agree with Allberry’s rationale: He does not wish to ground his whole identity in his sexual struggle. Having counsel people as a pastor myself, I see this is a crucial point for Christians to understand, that no matter what sexual sins one struggle with, a believer must ground their identity in Christ and that relationship and union with Christ is now what defines them rather than their pet sin. What amazed me was how Allberry was able cover this within the first few pages into the book. Allberry’s work is not just a collection of biblical proof texts that homosexuality is a sin though he does have a chapter on the Bible’s view of homosexuality. While a biblical view of homosexuality is foundational to the discussion, given that the book is written in mind for those who struggle with SSA and also the Church, Allberry moves beyond the thesis that homosexuality is a sin. He has a practical and biblical perspective for those who choose to be single as a way of being obedient to Jesus. There’s a chapter on the Church’s responsibility to those with SSA within the church and another chapter on the church’s relationship to homosexuals in the world. He does not get into the political realm but focuses on witnessing and loving homosexuals to the Cross. The format of the book was helpful in reinforcing the content of the book: I enjoyed the side bars throughout the book raising various questions of practical concern and objections. Allberry provides a good answer to the objection of why can’t faithful homosexuals be married on pages 39-40. I also appreciate the use of bold font to capture important points or terms throughout the book. Allberry also had some good illustrations to communicate the point he is trying to make. I recommend Pastors, believers struggling with SSA and all believers to get the book. Rating: 5 stars of 5. NOTE: This book is provided to me free by The Good Book Company and Cross-Focused Reviews without any obligation for a positive review. All opinions offered above are mine unless otherwise stated or implied.

  19. 5 out of 5

    Peter Jones

    A very helpful book for those who are struggling with same sex attraction and for churches, ministers, and lay people who counsel, evangelize, or talk to homosexuals. It was a good reminder that the temptation to homosexuality is like any other temptation in the Christian life. It needs to be fought by prayer, the support of Christian friends, and looking to Christ and his cleansing power. As a pastor, it made me want to be more prepared to minister to those coming out of the homosexual lifestyl A very helpful book for those who are struggling with same sex attraction and for churches, ministers, and lay people who counsel, evangelize, or talk to homosexuals. It was a good reminder that the temptation to homosexuality is like any other temptation in the Christian life. It needs to be fought by prayer, the support of Christian friends, and looking to Christ and his cleansing power. As a pastor, it made me want to be more prepared to minister to those coming out of the homosexual lifestyle and those who trust in Christ, but still struggle with same sex temptation. It also reminded me to not be afraid, to be compassionate to individuals struggling with this sin, and to be aware of how common it has become in our culture. It did have some drawbacks. First,provides a very basic outline. It would great if a Christian pastor who has shepherded homosexuals could write a book giving more insight into how to minister to them over the long haul. That will surely become more of counseling burden in the coming decades. Second, there is no discussion of the politics of sodomy. This may be because it is outside the purview of the book. But the political side of sodomy is huge, whether Christians want it to be or not. For one on one discussion with homosexuals the book was great. For how to interact with a world cramming sodomy down our throats it was not. Finally, there was one statement that I thought needed to be qualified. He says that a homosexual should not be confronted on his homosexuality until he has been told about Christ (p. 64-65). He says he wants to start with the Gospel and then move to the person's sexual behavior. This is the modern evangelical way to do things. And there is a place for that approach. However, it is often the case that the need for the Gospel is only seen in light of one's sense of their own sinfulness. In other words, if you want people to see their need for Christ they must recognize their own depravity. So while I agree we should not pounce on a homosexual. I do not agree that we must begin with the Gospel and then move to sin. Often, we must work the other way.

  20. 5 out of 5

    Hufflepuff Book Reviewer

    I am currently doing research from many different perspectives in order to figure out whether or not I think homosexuality is sin, as it's an issue I am very conflicted about. Being such a pivotal issue in today's society, it is not something that I want to get wrong. Written by a celibate pastor who struggles with same-sex attraction, Is God Anti-Gay is the first book I have read on the subject, and I quite liked it! Allberry's work is insightful, thoughtful, well-written, transparent, and hones I am currently doing research from many different perspectives in order to figure out whether or not I think homosexuality is sin, as it's an issue I am very conflicted about. Being such a pivotal issue in today's society, it is not something that I want to get wrong. Written by a celibate pastor who struggles with same-sex attraction, Is God Anti-Gay is the first book I have read on the subject, and I quite liked it! Allberry's work is insightful, thoughtful, well-written, transparent, and honest. The author's words are filled with compassion and understanding--even while he does not waver in his position that any sexual activity outside of heterosexual marriage falls short of God's intentions and is thus sin. I found Alberry's arguments and his examination of scripture to be generally thorough and convincing. I was disappointed, though, that he didn't address whether or not committed homosexual relationships were a societal concept during Biblical times--as I'd heard many Christians from the affirming side make the argument that the Bible's references to homosexuality do not pertain to committed homosexual relationships but only to the type of promiscuous relationships that were supposedly rampant during Biblical times. This is probably the strongest argument that I've heard from the affirming side, and I wanted to know what Allberry's rebuttal might be!

  21. 5 out of 5

    Bob O'bannon

    I'm getting this book for all my church officers right now. It's the best thing I've read on this increasingly volatile issue. Allberry is himself a man who struggles with same-sex attraction (SSA), which gives the book added credibility. But the author strongly maintains the orthodox position on the issue while also giving practical instruction on how Christians can love, listen to and understand those dealing with SSA. "Wouldn't it be great if, of all people, it was their Christian friend they I'm getting this book for all my church officers right now. It's the best thing I've read on this increasingly volatile issue. Allberry is himself a man who struggles with same-sex attraction (SSA), which gives the book added credibility. But the author strongly maintains the orthodox position on the issue while also giving practical instruction on how Christians can love, listen to and understand those dealing with SSA. "Wouldn't it be great if, of all people, it was their Christian friend they felt most able to approach?" (p.75). Yes, indeed it would. Maybe this book can help make it so.

  22. 4 out of 5

    Matthew Manchester

    This book excelled in what it was made for, mainly giving a short, condensed, and clear doctrine and answers about homosexuality, temptation, and how to handle practical matters in church and day-to-day life. These practical sections are where the author shines through the most. His wisdom and gracefulness as he writes for both the Christian and the non-Christian is amazing. Anyone who reads this book, particularly those who struggle with SSA, will feel welcomed and loved, yet hopefully challenge This book excelled in what it was made for, mainly giving a short, condensed, and clear doctrine and answers about homosexuality, temptation, and how to handle practical matters in church and day-to-day life. These practical sections are where the author shines through the most. His wisdom and gracefulness as he writes for both the Christian and the non-Christian is amazing. Anyone who reads this book, particularly those who struggle with SSA, will feel welcomed and loved, yet hopefully challenged and convicted.

  23. 4 out of 5

    Amy Kannel

    A very short (I read it in one quick sitting) but wise and helpful little book. Only an introduction to complex and sensitive issues, but the way the author (who experiences same-sex attraction but chooses to remain celibate) answers some of the "classic" questions/objections on both sides is winsome and compelling.

  24. 4 out of 5

    Brian Pate

    Excellent!! I read this short (85-page) book in preparation to lead a discussion with my teens in light of the Supreme Court decision regarding same-sex marriage. I need to get a box of these to hand out -- to those struggling with SSA, to those struggling with loving gays, to those questioning whether the Bible opposes homosexuality. This book tackles it all!

  25. 5 out of 5

    Derek Shaw

    As a homosexual man, I felt that Mr. Allberry's position towards the LGBT community is unsympathetic and unable to understand the core desire for connection and partnership that we all have. As God stated, "It is not good for man to be alone", and yet that is exactly what Mr. Allberry would expect of every LGBT person. It's sad and discouraging that this book can be so highly rated.

  26. 5 out of 5

    Jesvin Jose

    Our culture today is obsessed with freedom, at any cost! Homosexuality as such is a hot-button issue. Abortion is another. The church often hasn’t helped with clarity on these issues, with many churches giving in to cultural pressures, instead of being counter-cultural. Sam Allberry is a wise guide, helping Christians see the issue of homosexuality through a Biblical lens. I admire the clarity and wisdom in this book, especially the first few chapters. More importantly, I admire Sam’s compassion Our culture today is obsessed with freedom, at any cost! Homosexuality as such is a hot-button issue. Abortion is another. The church often hasn’t helped with clarity on these issues, with many churches giving in to cultural pressures, instead of being counter-cultural. Sam Allberry is a wise guide, helping Christians see the issue of homosexuality through a Biblical lens. I admire the clarity and wisdom in this book, especially the first few chapters. More importantly, I admire Sam’s compassionate tone throughout. The Bible’s teaching Sam first looks at God’s design for man and woman from Genesis 1 and 2, followed by a closer look at Bible passages that forbid homosexuality. He outlines two purposes of sex from the early chapters of Genesis: procreation and unity. He then deep-dives into key Biblical passages that directly mention homosexuality: Genesis 19:4-5, Leviticus 18:22 and 20:13, Romans 1:18-32, 1 Corinthians 6:9-10 and 1 Timothy 1:9-10. It is clear from these passages that homosexual sin is serious in the eyes of God, it is “unnatural”, it is a “sign of God’s judgment”. Yet, Sam is quick to point out that homosexual sin is not the only kind of serious sin. Further, he shows that it is possible for those struggling with SSA to be made new in Christ (despite the lingering feelings and temptations). In Christ, we have a new identity and standing. Our identity in Christ must define all of us, including those struggling with SSA. Sam doesn’t mince words as he concludes the chapter, “The consistent teaching of the Bible is clear: God forbids homosexual activity”. The struggling Christian Sam then encourages Christians struggling with SSA to pray confidently, think clearly and share honestly. God understands our anguish, temptations and sins, so it is right to ask Him for help. Homosexual feelings also don’t disqualify anyone, nor do they define anyone – in Christ, we are clean and in Him, we are secure! Further, dealing with homosexual struggles mustn’t be a solitary affair – we need other Christians, whatever the nature of our struggles. Sam also beautifully tackles some key questions outlining the blessings and struggles of singleness. There is a lot of wisdom in this short chapter. The Church and the world Sam then looks at how the church can help those struggling with SSA and be an effective witness to the world around them. Among other practical things, Sam suggests that churches must be “ready and equipped to walk alongside such brothers and sisters”. Singleness must never be belittled but honored. If someone shares their struggles with us, our first response must be thankfulness for their openness, followed by an assurance of privacy. Next, we need to listen to their story with the goal of deepening friendship with them. Finally, we need to pray for them faithfully. The key to our witness in the world, he suggests, is “gospel clarity” coupled with “relational credibility”. Conclusion Sam understands the struggles of SSA Christians because he himself struggles with SSA. Yet, his identity is not defined by it. His identity is in Christ and his satisfaction comes from Him. The book drips with wisdom and grace. Sam’s writing is bold, yet kind. I really enjoyed reading this short book and am happy to commend it to you. *I received this complimentary book from Good Book Company, but I was not required to write a positive review.* This review was first published here: https://jesvinjose.home.blog/2020/03/...

  27. 5 out of 5

    Mae Walker

    I really appreciated how Sam fit all the relevant issues and questions to do with the topic of homosexuality back into the broader picture of the gospel. For example, living in a fallen world with sin's consequence, temptation itself not being a sin but a product of living in a sinful world (and something everyone including Jesus struggled with), the gospel and message of Jesus being the best news possible for everyone, and the call of Jesus to everyone to "deny [themselves] and take up their cr I really appreciated how Sam fit all the relevant issues and questions to do with the topic of homosexuality back into the broader picture of the gospel. For example, living in a fallen world with sin's consequence, temptation itself not being a sin but a product of living in a sinful world (and something everyone including Jesus struggled with), the gospel and message of Jesus being the best news possible for everyone, and the call of Jesus to everyone to "deny [themselves] and take up their cross daily and follow me]." Especially in the final reflection from Sam about Jesus being the bread of life,"what our souls need to live...It is Jesus who satisfies our deepest emotional and spiritual needs. He is the prize- for all of us, irrespective of our issues and complexities. Anyone who comes to him will find fullness of life." It was also confronting and interesting to read as Sam is abundantly clear on what the Bible says, yet he isn't just saying it to be difficult as he himself struggles with SSA and is celibate. His passion for Jesus, the good news of the gospel, and the purity of the church is phenomenal to read and a great witness to the power of the gospel. However, while the book is exhaustive for its size and extremely theological, I don't think the relatively short answers to some questions were quite enough for a complete look into the topic as there wasn't much room for looking into different interpretations (which do exist). The merits of the book lie in the personal experience of the author, the clarity and succinctness of points made, and the foundation of the book in strong theological gospel truths relevant to everyone.

  28. 4 out of 5

    Paul Froehlich

    Sam Allberry is a gay Christian who says his faith is "a wonderful source of comfort and joy." Yet that faith requires him to be single and celibate. Unless he changes his sexual orientation, he faces a life sentence of no sex and living alone. I can't imagine much joy in that, but to each his own. A good marriage is one of the life factors most strongly and consistently associated with happiness, says psychologist Jonathan Haidt in ‎The Happiness Hypothesis. Those who enjoy a good marriage and t Sam Allberry is a gay Christian who says his faith is "a wonderful source of comfort and joy." Yet that faith requires him to be single and celibate. Unless he changes his sexual orientation, he faces a life sentence of no sex and living alone. I can't imagine much joy in that, but to each his own. A good marriage is one of the life factors most strongly and consistently associated with happiness, says psychologist Jonathan Haidt in ‎The Happiness Hypothesis. Those who enjoy a good marriage and the experiences of raising children and of spoiling grandchildren understand what a harsh rule it is to deprive fellow believers of those life factors. Allberry's faith offers only two hopes to gay Christians: 1) that their sexual orientation will change, or 2) that they marry someone of the opposite sex anyway without change. I wonder how straight Christians would react if they were presented with that Hobson's choice? Allberry makes a series of dubious assertions to justify that life sentence. Here are some of them: ▪︎Because the first marriage was between a man and a woman -- Adam and Eve -- therefore that is the only permissible form of marriage. The Old Testament patriarchs, however, typically had more than one wife at a time. Polygamy also diverges from the Adam-and-Eve model, yet scripture does not generally denounce these patriarchs as sinners for their polygamy So variance from the monogamous model was permitted, but purportedly not from the heterosexual model; this seems like an arbitrary interpretation rather than a principled one. ▪︎" We are simply not designed for miltiple sexual relationships," claims Allberry. Maybe not, but DNA analysis indicates that polygamy was the norm for long periods of human existence. That's why modern humans have almost twice as many female as male ancestors. While almost all women were bearing children, reproduction was reserved for a smaller number of men. ▪︎Jesus said marriage is exclusively for heterosexuals and is forbidden to homosexuals, according to Allberry's interpretation. Of course no verse to that effect exists. If it really were a significant rule, one would think Jesus would have clarified it. Ironically, a sexual sin Jesus did specifically condemn -- remarriage after divorce, which He called adultery -- is rarely talked about nowadays by Chistians, even though it is far more widespread than same-sex relations. In fact, four out of five evangelicals staunchly support an admitted serial adulterer in the White House. ▪︎The destruction of Sodom is proof that God rejects homosexuality, Allberry asserts. It is clear from Genesis 19 that the men of Sodom wanted to rape Lot's visitors. Allberry's error is in equating homosexual rape with consensual sex between married men. Heterosexual rape is just as wrong, but no Christians claim that therefore consensual sex between men and women is wrong, too. Besides, later verses indicate that Sodom's sins included oppression, indifference to the poor, etc. In short, it's a scriptural perversion to cite the destruction of Sodom as proof that God condemns homosexuality. ▪︎Leviticus 18 and 20 call same-sex behavior an "abomination." That's also what Paul calls long hair on men (1Cor. 11:14.) The Leviticus verses may have referred to men abusing boys, as opposed to sex between consenting adults. But Allberry interprets these verses broadly, rather than narrowly. ▪︎Allberry cites Romans 1:18-32 where Paul condemns "shameful lusts" and "shameful acts" between men. Paul also calls it a disgrace when women don't cover their heads in church, saying such women should have their heads shaved.(1Cor. 11:6). He also condemns women who braid their hair or wear gold or pearls. (1Tim. 2:9) Few Christians today subscribe to the Pauline views on head covering and hair braiding, dismissing them as applicable only in culture in which they were given. Yet they insist Paul's words about homosexuality are universal, even though in his day little was understood about sexual orientation and its profound psychological roots. It seems arbitrary to pick and choose, in the absence of a clear rule, which New Testament prohibitions don't count anymore and which ones do. ▪︎ Sex outside of marriage is forbidden to all Christuans, regardless of their sexual orientation. A variety of surveys of evangelicals, however, reveal that the large majority do not practice what they say they believe. Young adults between the ages of 18 and 29 who identify themselves as evangelicals are almost as sexually active as their non-Christian peers. Yet young gay Christians are expected to follow the rule that their straight counterparts commomly violate. Gays are more likely to be confronted about their sexual sin in the public square than are straight fornicators. In short, there is gross hypocrisy in insisting that gays must follow a restriction that most Christians don't. Like it or not, the traditional sexual ethic has collapsed. It won't be revitalized by books like this. One Allberry statement I agree with is that "what the Bible says about homosexuality...needs to be looked at as part of the wider message of the gospel." We should view the handful of passages about same-sex relations in light of broad principles such as "love your neighbor as yourself," which is called the summary of the whole law. (Gal. 5:14) This Golden Rule tells us to cultivate compassion. That compassion should affect how we read the few verses. Jesus often chose compassion over the law, by healing on the Sabbath, by eating with the unwashed, by not stoning the adulteress. As Jay Michaelson writes in God vs. Gay, “Leviticus does not shape the boundaries of compassion; compassion shapes the boundaries of Leviticus.” ###

  29. 5 out of 5

    Jerrod Griebel

    Last summer, I heard Sam Allberry speak at a CRU conference. His book “Is God Anti-gay?” is essentially his in-person testimony and teaching on the topic, but more developed and drawn out. At its core, I think Allberry’s scriptural evidence to support his argument is quite sound and difficult to disagree with. The only reason I gave this 4 stars (rather than 5) is because I think that his claims would have been stronger supported with more stories from his own life as well as from other SSA Chri Last summer, I heard Sam Allberry speak at a CRU conference. His book “Is God Anti-gay?” is essentially his in-person testimony and teaching on the topic, but more developed and drawn out. At its core, I think Allberry’s scriptural evidence to support his argument is quite sound and difficult to disagree with. The only reason I gave this 4 stars (rather than 5) is because I think that his claims would have been stronger supported with more stories from his own life as well as from other SSA Christians. But on the whole, this short primer on the topic is well worth the read.

  30. 4 out of 5

    Cydney Fletcher

    Sam Allberry has great insight on this topic since he is a Christian that struggles with same sex attraction. I enjoyed his perspective on the issue and how he shares ways to help others we know that struggle with this issue. I don't think this short book has all the answers, and I will definitely continue reading about the subject. However, I found this little book to be a great launch pad for continued learning and understanding of the topic.

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