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Freud: The Penultimate Biography

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In this unofficial, unauthorized sequel to Peter Gay’s groundbreaking Freud: A Life of Our Time, D. Harlan Wilson reveals a side of the man that has proven too disturbing and risqué for past biographers. Based on newly recovered diaries, microfiche, letters, and secret tape recordings, Freud: The Penultimate Biography recounts the daring sexual exploits of the father of ps In this unofficial, unauthorized sequel to Peter Gay’s groundbreaking Freud: A Life of Our Time, D. Harlan Wilson reveals a side of the man that has proven too disturbing and risqué for past biographers. Based on newly recovered diaries, microfiche, letters, and secret tape recordings, Freud: The Penultimate Biography recounts the daring sexual exploits of the father of psychoanalysis. Once considered to be impotent by the age of forty, if only according to the written testimonies of his wife, Freud is now revealed as an uncompromising flâneur, the figurehead of masculine sexuality and phallic prowess that everybody knew he was. It is a dangerous and at times shocking chronicle that puts the very nature of desire on trial. “Wilson’s torrid biography of Sigmund Freud has quickly become my fondest guilty pleasure. And I have many guilty pleasures.” —John Sappington Marmaduke, Professor of Psychology and Men’s Studies at the University of Fostoria


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In this unofficial, unauthorized sequel to Peter Gay’s groundbreaking Freud: A Life of Our Time, D. Harlan Wilson reveals a side of the man that has proven too disturbing and risqué for past biographers. Based on newly recovered diaries, microfiche, letters, and secret tape recordings, Freud: The Penultimate Biography recounts the daring sexual exploits of the father of ps In this unofficial, unauthorized sequel to Peter Gay’s groundbreaking Freud: A Life of Our Time, D. Harlan Wilson reveals a side of the man that has proven too disturbing and risqué for past biographers. Based on newly recovered diaries, microfiche, letters, and secret tape recordings, Freud: The Penultimate Biography recounts the daring sexual exploits of the father of psychoanalysis. Once considered to be impotent by the age of forty, if only according to the written testimonies of his wife, Freud is now revealed as an uncompromising flâneur, the figurehead of masculine sexuality and phallic prowess that everybody knew he was. It is a dangerous and at times shocking chronicle that puts the very nature of desire on trial. “Wilson’s torrid biography of Sigmund Freud has quickly become my fondest guilty pleasure. And I have many guilty pleasures.” —John Sappington Marmaduke, Professor of Psychology and Men’s Studies at the University of Fostoria

43 review for Freud: The Penultimate Biography

  1. 4 out of 5

    Vincenzo Bilof

    The second installment of the “Black Author Trilogy,” the biography of Sigmund Freud serves as a bridge between self-empowerment and self-realization. To better understand how this particular book fits into a trilogy of separate biographies, I would refer you to the first sentence in the third paragraph of my review of Adolf Hitler: The Terminal Biography, which is the first book in the series. The Hitler book is an international bestseller, although the second book in the trilogy is only slight The second installment of the “Black Author Trilogy,” the biography of Sigmund Freud serves as a bridge between self-empowerment and self-realization. To better understand how this particular book fits into a trilogy of separate biographies, I would refer you to the first sentence in the third paragraph of my review of Adolf Hitler: The Terminal Biography, which is the first book in the series. The Hitler book is an international bestseller, although the second book in the trilogy is only slight less popular, though more popular than the third book in the trilogy. I won’t spoil exactly “what” happens in the book, because the plot devlopments and method of character development used by the author in the narrative include an exposition, rising action, climax, rising action, and resolution, like all good books. However, this book is non-fiction, since it’s a biography, and it’s subject matter is Sigmund Freud when Sigmund Freud is not mentioned; D. Harlan Wilson makes a case that everything is about Freud at all times. Freud is everywhere. The Freud biography considers the concept of the ego as it might relate to the discovery of identity, something that is constantly evolving and shifting; the chapters serve as vivid snapshots of moments that depict how we discover and treat aspects of our subconscious, as well as our desire to manipulate reality to create world we can understand. The book itself serves as a sort of coping mechanism for the curse of discovery; the awareness that our reality is defined by our perception is a relatively frightening thought, if we decide to accept that the universe is nothing but chaos or some manifestation of our subconscious. The biography takes this idea as if it’s a dialogue with Freud, or perhaps a reversal of Freud’s system; the famous doctor is turned inside-out. “I see that you have inflicted us with a realization of our realization, and you must realize, Freud, that you are also a victim or a servant to the subconscious.” I don’t think the biographer wrote that sentence, but I believe it might serve as a simple statement that brings Freud into focus, as the book does. Since I began reading the trilogy, I have been inspired to change my diet; I now eat whole foods and watch my carb intake. The Freud book does discuss the mental fortitude required to maintain self-discipline; the psychological implications discussed in the actions/dialogue of the characters and events depicted in the novel are sometimes metaphorical, sometimes not. I interpreted the book itself as a sort of “writer’s” coping mechanism by which the writer should free themselves from the shackles of reality in an effort to determine what reality is and how it affects our understanding of the world. The book also discusses death. I found these parts of the book difficult to relate to because I’m not dead. However, people sometimes die, and the book discusses this at length. I learned something interesting. D. Harlan Wilson has written a book about the subconscious from the subconscious, while analyzing how the subconscious is rejected subconsciously. If Adolf Hitler and Oedipus had tea together, this book would summarize their debate.

  2. 4 out of 5

    Jennifer

    D. Harlan Wilson is a tremendous liar and a genius, the two traits most important in a novelist. I continue to be entertained by his ridiculous and absurd fake biographies. If you suppose that what a biographer chooses to say about their subject tells more about the biographer than their subject and take that supposition to the nth degree this is what you'll get. The book mentions Freud quite a bit but is not any more about him than Wilson's Hitler: The Terminal Biography was about Hitler. My fa D. Harlan Wilson is a tremendous liar and a genius, the two traits most important in a novelist. I continue to be entertained by his ridiculous and absurd fake biographies. If you suppose that what a biographer chooses to say about their subject tells more about the biographer than their subject and take that supposition to the nth degree this is what you'll get. The book mentions Freud quite a bit but is not any more about him than Wilson's Hitler: The Terminal Biography was about Hitler. My favorite line from the book: "Here’s a tip: the more you critique this book, the more it will critique you."

  3. 5 out of 5

    R.A. Harris

    *explodes*

  4. 4 out of 5

    Jamie Grefe

    D. Harlan Wilson has gone off the strange end with his brilliant THE BIOGRAPHIZER TRILOGY and this "penultimate" biography of Freud, catapulting off of Wilson's HITLER biography (also, damn strange, yet oddly satisfying), and expanding upon the idea of writing a book as quickly as he can, speaks to us through ab-ripping diet tips and techniques, Sigmund Freud's short-lived high school career as a basketball player, the hilarity of writers' conferences, and Wilson's therapeutic (i.e. chiropractic D. Harlan Wilson has gone off the strange end with his brilliant THE BIOGRAPHIZER TRILOGY and this "penultimate" biography of Freud, catapulting off of Wilson's HITLER biography (also, damn strange, yet oddly satisfying), and expanding upon the idea of writing a book as quickly as he can, speaks to us through ab-ripping diet tips and techniques, Sigmund Freud's short-lived high school career as a basketball player, the hilarity of writers' conferences, and Wilson's therapeutic (i.e. chiropractic) relationship to his publisher. And more. Much more. Confused? You should be. You will be. However, at the same time, you'll find yourself compelled to keep reading these thoughts from your unpredictable biographizer, Mr. D. Harlan Wilson. So, if you're looking to read something fast that's not quite fiction, not quite a biography, not quite stable, but richly readable and extremely chaotic, in the best possible way, treat yourself to a dose of Freud--have a cigar, good friend!

  5. 4 out of 5

    Ochir-Erdene

  6. 4 out of 5

    Oscar Westerholm

  7. 4 out of 5

    KnNaRfF

  8. 5 out of 5

    John Lawson

  9. 5 out of 5

    Justin Grimbol

  10. 5 out of 5

    Dave Bensette

  11. 5 out of 5

    Elizabeth

  12. 4 out of 5

    Andersen Prunty

  13. 4 out of 5

    Sunakshi

  14. 4 out of 5

    Hamzà Coh

  15. 5 out of 5

    Michael Allen Rose

  16. 5 out of 5

    Mia Redgrave

  17. 5 out of 5

    Arthur Graham

  18. 5 out of 5

    Ben Arzate

  19. 5 out of 5

    Natalie

  20. 4 out of 5

    Mike Kleine

  21. 5 out of 5

    Merzbau

  22. 5 out of 5

    Daniel Vlasaty

  23. 4 out of 5

    Chris Bowsman

  24. 4 out of 5

    D.

  25. 4 out of 5

    Dave

  26. 5 out of 5

    Elisa

  27. 4 out of 5

    Nicola Fantom

  28. 5 out of 5

    Frederick Rotzien

  29. 5 out of 5

    Tim

  30. 5 out of 5

    Sandy Trand

  31. 5 out of 5

    Betty

  32. 4 out of 5

    Jazz

  33. 5 out of 5

    Claudia

  34. 4 out of 5

    NormaCenva

  35. 5 out of 5

    Amy

  36. 4 out of 5

    Sherry

  37. 5 out of 5

    Heidi

  38. 5 out of 5

    Tasha

  39. 5 out of 5

    Pamela Stadden

  40. 5 out of 5

    Richard Hicks

  41. 4 out of 5

    Charlene Wedgner

  42. 5 out of 5

    Gracey Thomason

  43. 4 out of 5

    Debbie Carnes

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