free hit counter code Eat That Frog! Publisher: BBC Audiobooks America; Unabridged edition - GoBooks - Download Free Book
Ads Banner
Hot Best Seller

Eat That Frog! Publisher: BBC Audiobooks America; Unabridged edition

Availability: Ready to download

The legendary Eat That Frog! (more than 450,000 copies sold and translated into 23 languages) provides the 21 most effective methods for conquering procrastination and accomplishing more. This new edition is revised and updated throughout, and includes brand new information on how to keep technology from dominating our time.


Compare
Ads Banner

The legendary Eat That Frog! (more than 450,000 copies sold and translated into 23 languages) provides the 21 most effective methods for conquering procrastination and accomplishing more. This new edition is revised and updated throughout, and includes brand new information on how to keep technology from dominating our time.

30 review for Eat That Frog! Publisher: BBC Audiobooks America; Unabridged edition

  1. 4 out of 5

    ريحانة

    A self-development book that seems like a long PowerPoint presentation, with tons of quotes from people I never heard of. So I'm supposed to be inspired and motivated by a certain Jonathan Smerkfeese who says "Procrastination. Such a bad, bad thing"? What I learned from this book, however, is how to write a self-development book. Let me share these ten easy steps with you: Step number one: Pick a title. Nothing revolutionary. Any mind-numbing sequence of words can turn into a title. The Princess i A self-development book that seems like a long PowerPoint presentation, with tons of quotes from people I never heard of. So I'm supposed to be inspired and motivated by a certain Jonathan Smerkfeese who says "Procrastination. Such a bad, bad thing"? What I learned from this book, however, is how to write a self-development book. Let me share these ten easy steps with you: Step number one: Pick a title. Nothing revolutionary. Any mind-numbing sequence of words can turn into a title. The Princess in the Dungeon? Sure! This could be a book about spotting pedophiles. Step number two: Start with an introduction filled with over-promises. Don't worry about under-delivering; it's the reader's responsibility to change, yours is to get them all psyched up about needing that change. Step number three: Come up with chapter titles, and dig for random quotes to use at the beginning of each chapter. Step number four: Write small paragraphs of supposedly motivating and inspiring bunkum. Write as many paragraphs as possible. Don't be shy, repeat the same point over and over again until you bring it home, then take it out again, then back home again. Step number five: Do not forget to throw in as many general statements as possible. "A lot of Americans think... All successful people say... Everyone knows that..." The fountain of credibility. This is it. Drink from it and quench everyone's thirst. Step number six: Include a step-by-step guide to something. Anything. The "step-by-step" part is irrelevant; the order doesn't matter. Step number seven: Come up with an acronym, then design a method around it. Like, from the top of my head, the S.N.A.C.K. method. What is the mighty S.N.A.C.K. method you ask? I'm glad you got that curiosity gene in you! S.N.A.C.K. stands for Stare Nonchalantly At Cute Kid. Learn to identify people with the S.N.A.C.K. behavior, and you got yourself a certificate, delivered personally from me, on how to spot pedophiles. Step number eight: Tell people what to do. Tell the reader to close one eye, lift an arm 67° in the air, lean on the fridge, and then proceed to remember all the people they saw in the mall that day, for potential pedophiles. Step number nine: Go crazy with formatting. Bold, underline and italicize. As Rose Taxtbeest says, "When you italicize words, you actually put pretty dresses on them." Step number ten: At the end of each chapter, no matter how short and irrelevant, present the reader with a quick summary. Then, add borders to that block of text. Whatever you said there has now become official and formal. That's it. If you can write/type, you can be an author. There is a readership out there for every kind of hokum.

  2. 5 out of 5

    Stephanie *Eff your feelings*

    I finished this book a couple of days ago..........and I wanted to put a review in right away to get it in at the top of the week, but there was the Super bowl, then Monday I had to make dog food (you did read that correctly), last night Justified was on.....and that needs your full attention. This morning I had class for my Ballot Judge position for the primary March 6 (that promises to be a clusterf#¥k my friends). Now I'm stuck at work, and have to type this out on my IPad which is not the fa I finished this book a couple of days ago..........and I wanted to put a review in right away to get it in at the top of the week, but there was the Super bowl, then Monday I had to make dog food (you did read that correctly), last night Justified was on.....and that needs your full attention. This morning I had class for my Ballot Judge position for the primary March 6 (that promises to be a clusterf#¥k my friends). Now I'm stuck at work, and have to type this out on my IPad which is not the fastest way to type, so that's annoying. Customers keep coming up, wanting to buy something.....the nerve. Like majority of the human race, I have some procrastination issues,. So I thought I'd pickup the classic, but unfortunately named, Eat That Frog for some guidance. This book is full of great common sense tools to get yourself to do what you'd rather not do. Basically what you need to do is make lists. On the top of that list you put the thing you would rather avoid doing the most. This would be your "Frog". Then do that thing first, or eat that frog......then work your way down that list from the next slightly smaller, less ugly frog, down to prime rib, Oreos, tacos and cherry pie at the end of the list, if you could ever get there. This book is geared toward the work environment, specificity office type work, which is not what I do. I draw people for a living (from life), so when the author wrote about picking out the most difficult thing you would all day to do first, I imagined picking out the screaming two year old from the crowd first, followed by the stumbleing drunk......ect. So, I do plan to eat some frogs right after I beat a few people on Words With Friends.

  3. 4 out of 5

    Alya

    I read this book and I think its not bad. It is full of useful tools and tips to get you to stop procrastinating. But there are better books out there. The best book I've read on this topic is the Procrastination Elimination Method by John Isaac. It's not really famous.. its like a hidden gem. It addresses the core experiences and perceptions that cause procrastination to begin with. I give 3 stars to Eat That Frog because the author seems to have put in a lot of effort. I read this book and I think its not bad. It is full of useful tools and tips to get you to stop procrastinating. But there are better books out there. The best book I've read on this topic is the Procrastination Elimination Method by John Isaac. It's not really famous.. its like a hidden gem. It addresses the core experiences and perceptions that cause procrastination to begin with. I give 3 stars to Eat That Frog because the author seems to have put in a lot of effort.

  4. 4 out of 5

    Cory Zorker

    Nothing revolutionary, but a good (and quick) recap of the things we need to do to get stuff done. The key premise is that if we ate a live frog first thing in the morning, everything else would be easy compared to that. It's a good reminder to concentrate on the most important task instead of getting mired down in the smaller, unimportant ones. The author gives 21 steps to getting things done: 01. Set the table (spend some time writing out your goals for year, month and week). Prioritize those and Nothing revolutionary, but a good (and quick) recap of the things we need to do to get stuff done. The key premise is that if we ate a live frog first thing in the morning, everything else would be easy compared to that. It's a good reminder to concentrate on the most important task instead of getting mired down in the smaller, unimportant ones. The author gives 21 steps to getting things done: 01. Set the table (spend some time writing out your goals for year, month and week). Prioritize those and concentrate on the most important ones. 02. Plan your day in advance (on paper). 03. 80/20 rule: 20% of your work will constitue 80% of your acheivements. Concentrate on that 20%. 04. Consider the consequences of what you choose to work on. 05. ABCDE method. Organize your tasks by value (a,b,c...) and priority (1,2,3...). 06. Focus on key result areas. 07. Obey the law of forced efficiency. 08. Prepare thoroughly. The 6Ps: Proper Prior Planning Prevents Poor Performance. If you're Rob Lowe you can use the 7Ps ;p. 09. Do your homework! If you're not improving, you're getting worse. 10. Leverage your talents. 11. Identify your key constraints. 12. Take it one barrel at a time (baby steps). 13. Put pressure on yourself. 14. Maximize personal powers. Select the key times of the day when you are most productive and work on your tasks at those times. 15. Motivate yourself (be your own cheerleader). 16. Practice creative procrastination. You're not going to be able to get everything done so put off the less important tasks. 17. Do the most difficult task first (eat that frog). 18. Slice and dice your tasks. Break your tasks into smaller, more manageable chunks. 19. Create large blocks of time to get your work done. 20. Develop a sense of urgency. 21. Single-handle every task.

  5. 5 out of 5

    Donna

    Think on paper. 1. Write down your goals, set deadlines, list steps to achieve goals, organize steps into a plan by priority and sequence, do something every day on your highest-impact goal. Do now: list 10 goals. Pick your highest-impact goal, set a deadline, make a plan, take action. 2. Make a master list of everything you want to do, make a list for the coming month, make a list for the coming week and for the next day. When planning a project, list all the steps and organize them by priority an Think on paper. 1. Write down your goals, set deadlines, list steps to achieve goals, organize steps into a plan by priority and sequence, do something every day on your highest-impact goal. Do now: list 10 goals. Pick your highest-impact goal, set a deadline, make a plan, take action. 2. Make a master list of everything you want to do, make a list for the coming month, make a list for the coming week and for the next day. When planning a project, list all the steps and organize them by priority and sequence. Do now: list everything to be done in the next 24 hours, list all projects. For each goal/project, prioritize and sequence the tasks involved. 3. Work on the 20% of the tasks that contribute to high value results first. Don't clear up small tasks first. Do now: list key goals, activities, projects, responsibilities. Decide which 20% of these tasks will contribute 80% of results (Pareto principle). 4. Think long term: 5, 10, 20 years. 'The law of Forced Efficiency says that "There is never enough time to do everything, but there is always enough time to do the most important thing."' What are my highest value activities? What can I and only I do that will make a real difference? What is the most valuable use of my time right now? Do now: Work on the most valuable task right now. 5. Outsource, delegate, eliminate. Do now: Abandon activities that aren't contributing to goals. 6. ABCDE tasks: A tasks are high priority, B tasks must be done eventually, C tasks might be nice, D tasks can be delegated, E tasks should be eliminated. Do now: go through your list of tasks and label them ABCDE. 7. key result areas of management are planning, organizing, staffing, delegating, supervising, measuring, and reporting. key result areas of sales are prospecting, building rapport and trust, identifying needs, presenting persuasively, answering objections, closing the sale, and getting resales and referrals. Do now: Determine your key result areas. Grade your performance in each area. Make a plan to improve in the areas where you're worst. 8. List the three most important goals in: career, family, financial, health, development, social/community, problems/concerns. Spend quality time at work and quantity time at home. Do now: work when you're working 9. Prepare your workspace and get on with the job. Do now: clean your desk. 10. Take it one step at a time. Do now: select a goal you've been procrastinating on, list the steps, and do one. 11. Never stop learning. Read in your field one hour each day. Take courses and seminars. Listen to audio programs in your car. Do now: identify key skills that you need to learn and make a plan to learn one. 12. What are you good at? What do you do easily and well that is difficult for other people? Looking back at your career, what has been most responsible for your success in life and work to date? What have been the most significant frogs you have eaten in the past? What is it that you do that gets you the most compliments and praise from other people? What do you do that positively affects the work and performance of other people more than anything else? Do now: focus your plans so that you're doing the things you're best at. 13. Identify what is holding you back, what is the limiting factor. Do now: Determine the constraint that is most impeding your progress toward your most important goal. 14. Create your own deadlines. 15. Take care of your health:sleep, eating, exercise. 16. Practice positive self talk. Positive mental attitude: look for the good in every situation, 'difficulties come not to obstruct but to instruct,' look for the solution to every problem, think and talk continually about your goals. Do now: control your thoughts, accept responsibility for what happens to you, don't criticize or blame others, focus forward. 17. Don't become addicted to technology. Do now: Turn off technology for one hour in the morning and one hour in the afternoon. Take a day off each week from keeping in touch with the world through technology. 18. Break down tasks in order to feel good about making progress. Salami: outline a task in detail and complete a slice. Swiss cheese: work for 5-10 minutes on a task. 19. Schedule blocks of time and eliminate distractions. 20. Build up momentum as you work fast. Create your own sense of urgency. "Do it now! Do it now! Do it now!" or "Back to work! Back to work! Back to work!" Do now: When you are given a task or responsibility, take care of it quickly and report back fast. 21. Don't be stopping and starting your task.

  6. 5 out of 5

    Justin Tate

    The whole book boils down to "do the hardest task first" and "make checklists." Not exactly rocket science, but I gotta admit I'm finding myself using the catchy phrase "Eat That Frog!" as a reminder to stop putting off daunting tasks. And I love checklists. Since I'm currently in a moment of high stress time management, it's exactly what I needed to hear. To really save time, listen to the audio version. It's unabridged and only 2.5 hours. The whole book boils down to "do the hardest task first" and "make checklists." Not exactly rocket science, but I gotta admit I'm finding myself using the catchy phrase "Eat That Frog!" as a reminder to stop putting off daunting tasks. And I love checklists. Since I'm currently in a moment of high stress time management, it's exactly what I needed to hear. To really save time, listen to the audio version. It's unabridged and only 2.5 hours.

  7. 4 out of 5

    Krishna Chaitanya

    Eat your big and ugliest frog first As disgusting as it may sound, if you put it into practical use, the results would be extremely good. This books is a slim one, follows a particular style and offers practical advice. This book is aimed at any working professional with tips and tricks to improve your productivity and do good in life in general. Any working professional who’s having a tough time at work, doing overtime and under achieving then this book is a must read. It offers 21 rules right fr Eat your big and ugliest frog first As disgusting as it may sound, if you put it into practical use, the results would be extremely good. This books is a slim one, follows a particular style and offers practical advice. This book is aimed at any working professional with tips and tricks to improve your productivity and do good in life in general. Any working professional who’s having a tough time at work, doing overtime and under achieving then this book is a must read. It offers 21 rules right from organising your work place, prioritising your tasks and decent amount of practical advice to shift your mindset towards success. This book can be completed in a single stretch but it’s highly encouraged to take your time, absorb the content and put it into practical use and keep revisiting from time-to-time when you feel like you’re getting side tracked.

  8. 4 out of 5

    Lulu

    This book may be better for doers than thinkers. I read it about a year ago, and really liked it. A lot. It gave me a good kick start to getting things done. But then procrastination crept back, and the frog effect wore off. I'm a right-brain thinker, so I probably should have just tattooed the saying on the back of my hand. I've just started reading "The Now Habit: A Strategic Program for Overcoming Procrastination and Enjoying Guilt-Free Play" by Neil Fiore, and it's a better fit for me. "Eat This book may be better for doers than thinkers. I read it about a year ago, and really liked it. A lot. It gave me a good kick start to getting things done. But then procrastination crept back, and the frog effect wore off. I'm a right-brain thinker, so I probably should have just tattooed the saying on the back of my hand. I've just started reading "The Now Habit: A Strategic Program for Overcoming Procrastination and Enjoying Guilt-Free Play" by Neil Fiore, and it's a better fit for me. "Eat That Frog" is excellent, but it didn't sufficiently address the reasoning behind my not getting stuff done. That is: fear of failure, a terrible fear of being criticized for everything I do (geez, even when I grind my coffee I can hear my Dad's voice: "You need to grind those beans a little finer/coarser"), fear of doing something so well that I'll never be able to replicate the job, fear that if I complete "this task" that I'll then have to move on to "that hideous task" ... Yeah, so I'm just doing a little self-analysis on myself, and once that's done I'll be perfect, and I'll probably reread this book on occasion just to keep me on track.

  9. 5 out of 5

    Heidi The Reader

    Brian Tracy gives simple and easily acted-upon suggestions for stream lining and maximizing your productivity. The title itself, Eat That Frog!, refers to completing the biggest, ugliest task you may have on your plate on any given day. If you do whatever that is first (the frog), in the morning when you're at your most energetic and before anything else distracts you, then at least you can say you got something done today. Most everything else will seem almost easy by comparison... at least, th Brian Tracy gives simple and easily acted-upon suggestions for stream lining and maximizing your productivity. The title itself, Eat That Frog!, refers to completing the biggest, ugliest task you may have on your plate on any given day. If you do whatever that is first (the frog), in the morning when you're at your most energetic and before anything else distracts you, then at least you can say you got something done today. Most everything else will seem almost easy by comparison... at least, that's the theory. At first, I thought all of the ideas in this book sounded almost too simple. But as the short audiobook continued, it became more clear just why Tracy is considered one of the leaders in his field of expertise. Taken altogether, this book gives someone the tools to turn their life around (if they're in a bad place) or take them to the next level, if they're already on their way. It's not just about learning tools to boost your efficiency, it's also about discovering what you do best and then prioritizing doing THAT to the best of your ability. The most intriguing idea in here, to me, was "practice creative procrastination". As we couldn't possibly get everything done that we ever have to do in one day, by doing the things that MUST get done, you can procrastinate on the things that won't sink the ship if they're left undone. You're doing things, yet not doing things and feeding the inner procrastinator. It's like having your cake and eating it too. I'm not a big procrastinator. What I am is a collector of ideas and methods. I'm always open to improving myself or the way that I do things. In fact, I can be too gung-ho when it comes to implementing some of the ideas I read in self-help books. For example, a couple years ago I changed my life through "the magic of tidying up" and was so successful at removing the knick-knacks littering the house that my husband thought I was moving out. But seriously, I can take things to the extreme. So, I'm encouraged that this book mainly consists of writing lists, scheduling and prioritizing tasks. That shouldn't freak out the hubby. And I do find myself doing other, less important things when a big, fat frog of a chore is staring me in the face. At least now, I'm aware of what I'm doing and knowledge is the first step on the road to change. Recommended for readers looking for a few simple tips to maximize their productivity.

  10. 5 out of 5

    Tamar overwhelmed by work - on temporary hiatus

    This is a great book, and to tell you the truth, I’ve got frogs jumping all over my desk and they are the mean and ugly kind. I know the rules, I know the techniques and I’ll happily return to them as soon as I finish reading all my GR Friends’ reviews, and the stack of books on my computer, tablets, and telephones – and oh, I really want to tackle that closet, and try some new recipes, oh, oh, and I’d like to go out for half an hour to see what’s new at the supermarket, the deck could really us This is a great book, and to tell you the truth, I’ve got frogs jumping all over my desk and they are the mean and ugly kind. I know the rules, I know the techniques and I’ll happily return to them as soon as I finish reading all my GR Friends’ reviews, and the stack of books on my computer, tablets, and telephones – and oh, I really want to tackle that closet, and try some new recipes, oh, oh, and I’d like to go out for half an hour to see what’s new at the supermarket, the deck could really use a scrub, I haven’t taken my walk yet today, and I absolutely have to update and reload my Xiaomi box with the latest apps for movies and TV programs that I will never watch. That list on my desk grows longer and longer, as I add more and more things that I really want to prioritize. What’s a person to do? I love all my bad habits and vices. Let’s face it, the more interests and opportunities for immediate gratification available, the less likely I’ll be willing to squander all those delectable endorphins on eating frogs! When the frogs are threatening to eat me, that is when I step up to the plate and get the jobs done. Seriously though, if you haven’t figured out these methods on your own, or if you need to be reminded how great you’ll feel if you can sleep all night without worrying about all the work piling up on your desk, you really should read Tracey’s book.

  11. 5 out of 5

    Ahmed A

    "There is never enough time to do everything you have to do. You are literally swamped with work and personal responsibilities, projects, stacks of magazines to read....But the fact is you are never going to caught up. You will never get on top of your tasks" The key is: Prioritize your tasks! That's the book in three words! But how?! Brian Tracy will show you how in this book, Eat That Frog! The ugly one first! Very practical book. You would love this book if you actually applied the exercises thr "There is never enough time to do everything you have to do. You are literally swamped with work and personal responsibilities, projects, stacks of magazines to read....But the fact is you are never going to caught up. You will never get on top of your tasks" The key is: Prioritize your tasks! That's the book in three words! But how?! Brian Tracy will show you how in this book, Eat That Frog! The ugly one first! Very practical book. You would love this book if you actually applied the exercises throughout the book, and re-read it again and again. Books that are for personal development or business require active reading, taking notes, and reading again, until the knowledge you learn becomes a part of you. I have an audio copy and I still listen to it every once on a while, whenever I feel I'm getting behind on some tasks, or whenever I stop practicing some of it's methods. This books helped me a lot and it still helping me all the time. From the ABCD method, the creative procrastination, developing plans, considering the consequences, and much more. This is my all time reference for better future, since I first read it. I wish I was told about this book early in time. Very early. It's a very useful tool, applicable methods.

  12. 4 out of 5

    Reid

    Brian Tracey puts together a book full of useful ideas on how to be more productive. His chapter summaries on p113 are a good resource to review. 1. Set the table: Decide what you want 2. Plan the day in advance: Think on paper 3. Apply the 80/20 rule: 20% of activity produces 80% of the results 4. Consider the consequences: of your 20% activities 5. Practice creative procrastination: put off things of low value 6. Use the A B C D E Method continually: prioritize 7. Focus on key result areas: concentrat Brian Tracey puts together a book full of useful ideas on how to be more productive. His chapter summaries on p113 are a good resource to review. 1. Set the table: Decide what you want 2. Plan the day in advance: Think on paper 3. Apply the 80/20 rule: 20% of activity produces 80% of the results 4. Consider the consequences: of your 20% activities 5. Practice creative procrastination: put off things of low value 6. Use the A B C D E Method continually: prioritize 7. Focus on key result areas: concentrate on results you HAVE to have 8. The Law of Three: ID and focus on the top three before anything else 9. Prepare thoroughly before you begin: get set up to get things done 10. Take it one oil barrel at a time: do it one step at a time 11. Upgrade your key skills: sharpen your sword to do more and better 12. Leverage your special talents:do things are good at wholeheartedly 13. Identify your key constraints: get rid of bottlenecks, choke points 14. Put pressure on yourself: think like you are on vacation tomorrow 15. Maximize your personal power: work hard at your best times of day 16. Motivate yourself into action: look at the positive now and move on 17. Get out of tech sinks: tech stuff can be time killers 18. Slice and dice the task: break it down, do one piece 19. Create large chunks of time: to focus on certain things 20. Develop sense of urgency: move fast on key tasks 21. Single handle every task: start and fully complete most imp't task

  13. 4 out of 5

    Maryann

    I saw the author, Brian Tracy, several years ago at a seminar as a motivational speaker and became a fan. Needed some extra motivation on getting tasks done recently and 'Eat That Frog' definitely helps with re-prioritizing things on the task list and making a plan to get them done. Listening to the audio book is even that more effective. Here are the notes I made while listening (his major principles): Decide what I want. Plan every day in advance. 20% of my activities are 80% of my results - an I saw the author, Brian Tracy, several years ago at a seminar as a motivational speaker and became a fan. Needed some extra motivation on getting tasks done recently and 'Eat That Frog' definitely helps with re-prioritizing things on the task list and making a plan to get them done. Listening to the audio book is even that more effective. Here are the notes I made while listening (his major principles): Decide what I want. Plan every day in advance. 20% of my activities are 80% of my results - and these are the tasks we usually procrastinate the most on. Consider the consequences of not completing the tasks. Prioritize the task list, start with the most important. Focus on my key result areas. Always do the most important things first. Continually upgrade my skills, even if only for 15 minutes a day. Leverage my special talents. Identify the constraints and find ways to alleviate them. Break down huge tasks into smaller steps. Pressure myself with a sense of urgency. Figure out my high points of energy in the day and schedule my most demanding tasks then. Be optimistic and focus on the solution, not the problem. I am allowed to procrastinate on low value tasks. Do the most difficult task (frog) first thing in the mroning. Create larger blocks of time for key tasks. Do nothing else until your main task is done - no multi-tasking.

  14. 5 out of 5

    Reading_ Tam_ Ishly

    🙋After a long time, I finally picked up a self-help book which I have been wanting to read for years. For a pro who's amazing at procastination, I have been procrastinating doing the same but this time I had to pick it up and actually read the physical copy so that I get the maximum benefit out of it. First of all, it doesn't preach. Second, it doesn't tell you fixed rules. Third, it is not intimidating. Fourth, there are no unnecessary details. Fifth, it talks about only one topic, that is, get the m 🙋After a long time, I finally picked up a self-help book which I have been wanting to read for years. For a pro who's amazing at procastination, I have been procrastinating doing the same but this time I had to pick it up and actually read the physical copy so that I get the maximum benefit out of it. First of all, it doesn't preach. Second, it doesn't tell you fixed rules. Third, it is not intimidating. Fourth, there are no unnecessary details. Fifth, it talks about only one topic, that is, get the most difficult or that one thing that would benefit you the most to be done with realistic, efficient ways and methods. The summary towards the end of each chapter keeps you focused and evaluate. But I love the summary towards the end of the book so much! It is everything I needed. I love how this book focused on only one topic but elaborating various methods or means to achieve this one task. The chapters are really short. The writing doesn't waste words. It is as real as it gets. This book is actually helping me these days and I am so glad a self-help book actually works. I have been following this concept for the past one month. And I am still following it. Surprisingly surprising myself ☺️ So is it effective? You bet!

  15. 5 out of 5

    Ariana

    I gritted my teeth through this whole book. Having just re-read the exceptional Getting Things Done: The Art of Stress-Free Productivity, by David Allen, this book felt poorly-written, poorly-organized, and poorly conceived. The author is brutal and his suggestions mostly make me want to run the other way. Get up early. Stay up late. Nose to the grindstone. Work work work work work work work. The most successful people work work work work work work work. He offers billions of made-up statistics I gritted my teeth through this whole book. Having just re-read the exceptional Getting Things Done: The Art of Stress-Free Productivity, by David Allen, this book felt poorly-written, poorly-organized, and poorly conceived. The author is brutal and his suggestions mostly make me want to run the other way. Get up early. Stay up late. Nose to the grindstone. Work work work work work work work. The most successful people work work work work work work work. He offers billions of made-up statistics (citing no sources) for what separates the productive people from the unproductive people. Ugh. But, I kept reading because, (A) the book is very short, and (B) I got a couple of useful ideas from it. I would give the book one and a half stars, if I could, because the two ideas I got from the book that were useful were, actually, very useful: Eat that frog: Do (or begin) the hardest thing you have to do or the thing you are the most inclined to procrastinate about first and then everything else you have to do will feel easier by comparison. 80/20: There are many things on your to-do list, but about 20% of them will have more of an impact on your life than the other 80%. Those are the ones you are most likely to procrastinate on, because they are the things that have the most weight to them, but they are not necessarily any more time-consuming than the rest of the tasks you have to do which will have less of a positive impact on your life. Aim to do more of the tasks in the 20% and de-prioritize the other 80% of the tasks. Now that you've read my summary of the best points in the book, you don't have to read the book, yourself. Save yourself the trouble. Read The Now Habit: A Strategic Program for Overcoming Procrastination and Enjoying Guilt-Free Play, instead. It's much better. But even that's not as good as Getting Things Done: The Art of Stress-Free Productivity. Nobody does it like David Allen.

  16. 4 out of 5

    Nidhi Kaushik

    "EAT THAT FROG" is unrivalled of the good books I have read. This book is about eating the big ugly frog first, that is doing the tough, ugly work which you have been avoiding before finishing off the other uncomplicated tasks. It is all about taking that first stride. Simply get up and do it even if you have no clue or no enthusiasm or no love. I am going to follow the tips which are cited in the book and are applicable to me. I would recommend this book to all the people, especially the youth o "EAT THAT FROG" is unrivalled of the good books I have read. This book is about eating the big ugly frog first, that is doing the tough, ugly work which you have been avoiding before finishing off the other uncomplicated tasks. It is all about taking that first stride. Simply get up and do it even if you have no clue or no enthusiasm or no love. I am going to follow the tips which are cited in the book and are applicable to me. I would recommend this book to all the people, especially the youth or who are commanded by their indolence and end up procrastinating, (which actually nobody likes doing) than performing their tasks.

  17. 4 out of 5

    Brent

    A very basic collection of tips to beat procrastination. Geared very much toward sales and "business" people. Nothing really groundbreaking. I was intrigued by how much the advice ran completely counter to much more valuable (to me) guide for professional creatives found in The Accidental Creative: How to Be Brilliant at a Moment's Notice. In contrast to that book's encouragement to respect your natural rhythms, take rest, and refill the well, Eat That Frog seemed more about ignoring your intuiti A very basic collection of tips to beat procrastination. Geared very much toward sales and "business" people. Nothing really groundbreaking. I was intrigued by how much the advice ran completely counter to much more valuable (to me) guide for professional creatives found in The Accidental Creative: How to Be Brilliant at a Moment's Notice. In contrast to that book's encouragement to respect your natural rhythms, take rest, and refill the well, Eat That Frog seemed more about ignoring your intuition and grinding away at thankless chores until you somehow "arrive" as a success. Maybe that was the real problem for me. There was nothing here about enjoying the process, or the satisfaction of mastery. It was all about beating yourself into submission to win some external success, like a raise or a promotion. Even when the author mentions the now basic idea of getting into flow (Flow: The Psychology of Optimal Experience) he completely misstates the entire concept, claiming that the trick to achieving it was to be work ever faster and somehow force your brain into some sort of mental hyperspeed, an idea that is found nowhere in Csíkszentmihályi's book. The more I remember about this book, the less I like it. Bottom line: If you're looking for a short collection of oversimplified self-psychology hacks to help you climb the corporate ladder, that this might be the book for you. If you're looking for anything deeper, keep moving.

  18. 5 out of 5

    Dana Cristiana

    4,5 stars. I haven't read many "self-help" books in my life, but I have to say that this one is the best of them all! This Tracy guy made some research, but not only that. He has many experiences and from them he shows us how to deal with time. This book is talking mainly about being great on your job, but you can take it for other things as well. Tracy is teaching us 21 steps that (combined in a way or another) can help us manage the time we have, how to stop wasting it away and start right away w 4,5 stars. I haven't read many "self-help" books in my life, but I have to say that this one is the best of them all! This Tracy guy made some research, but not only that. He has many experiences and from them he shows us how to deal with time. This book is talking mainly about being great on your job, but you can take it for other things as well. Tracy is teaching us 21 steps that (combined in a way or another) can help us manage the time we have, how to stop wasting it away and start right away with the things that actually help us in life. This book is great! I want to reread it and study it more. Tracy teaches us about the ABCDE method, about how to take big things step by step, how to cut the quest in slices and many other great advice. It is called "Eat the Frog" because when you have a big issue to solve and you feel like not doing it, it's like a big frog in front of you. As a conclusion, take a notebook, a pen/pencil/marker/whatever, this book and go study it. Eat this Frog!

  19. 4 out of 5

    Sarah

    Great book for anyone trying to tackle their personal obstacle that's keeping them from moving faster towards their goals, whatever those goals may be. The book is based on the saying by Mark Twain that if the first thing you do each morning is to eat a live frog, you can go through the day with teh satisfaction of knowing that that is probably the wost thing that is going to happen to you all day long. The book contains lessons on prioritizing, how spending a couple of minutes outlining and pri Great book for anyone trying to tackle their personal obstacle that's keeping them from moving faster towards their goals, whatever those goals may be. The book is based on the saying by Mark Twain that if the first thing you do each morning is to eat a live frog, you can go through the day with teh satisfaction of knowing that that is probably the wost thing that is going to happen to you all day long. The book contains lessons on prioritizing, how spending a couple of minutes outlining and prioritizing what you need and want to get done will let you get double done that day. There's also a lot of cute little snippets of wisdom concerning optimism, attitude, service, energizing your day, clarifying your goals, creating healthy habits, and making your contribution to your family/community/career as maximized as possible without necessarily spending more time on it.

  20. 5 out of 5

    غيداء الجويسر

    Updated review 31 March 2016: If you follow the 21 rules, your life will be as productive as u wish. Though, I followed some of the 21 rules for a short time then I went back to my old Procrastination, maybe they have to be 'revised' from time to time ;) Updated review 31 March 2016: If you follow the 21 rules, your life will be as productive as u wish. Though, I followed some of the 21 rules for a short time then I went back to my old Procrastination, maybe they have to be 'revised' from time to time ;)

  21. 5 out of 5

    Maciej Nowicki

    Eat that Frog by Brian Tracy is about time management and personal productivity. If sometimes you find yourself cleaning your house, organizing files on your PC etc. instead of doing really important things that you should find this book really useful. Although many of these tiny activities seem to be productive they aren’t the best use of your time. So what you really should be doing is eating that Frog which means doing your most important task. Simultaneously, it is the task which has the gre Eat that Frog by Brian Tracy is about time management and personal productivity. If sometimes you find yourself cleaning your house, organizing files on your PC etc. instead of doing really important things that you should find this book really useful. Although many of these tiny activities seem to be productive they aren’t the best use of your time. So what you really should be doing is eating that Frog which means doing your most important task. Simultaneously, it is the task which has the greatest influence on your current situation. Anyway, the book has 21 chapters and each of those chapters covers one specific tip on how to get more done, to stop procrastinating and use your time more wisely. The chapters are easily digestible, they all have actionable tips that you can apply to get better at your time management. The flip side of that is 21 things is pretty a lot and that might be a bit overwhelming. I have also found the chapters a little bit redundant and had the impression that the book might be compressed even more. So there are a few general principles which you have to follow in order to get more done in less time. First, you have to assign your priorities by taking a few steps. For instance, make a list of things to do and consider the consequences of doing nothing with these tasks. Which of these unfinished tasks could be the worst to your role within your company. Then, use the Pareto principle (also known as the 80/20 rule) – in this example it means to focus on 20% of your tasks as they deliver 80% of your results. When you have your most crucial task defined plan them in advance. A day without a plan can easily be a wasted day so make sure that you have time in your day to take care of your priorities. The interesting thing was the argument that we should avoid multi-tasking. You should devote all your attention to one thing at a time and you would be amazed at how much more you could accomplish than if you were trying to do five things at once. Easier said than done, nevertheless, the examples provided by the author were worth reading and pretty convincing. I have touched only a few of rules provided by Brian Tracy but if I had to choose around 10 out of 21 the most important tips on personal productivity it would be: 1. Plan every day in advance 2. Consider the consequences of doing nothing 3. Apply the Pareto principle 4. Focus on key results 5. Upgrade your key skills 6. Identify your key constraints 7. Get out of your comfort zone...(if you like to read my full review please visit my blog https://leadersarereaders.blog/eat-th...)

  22. 4 out of 5

    Grace

    Even though this book has a lot of cliches, it was still enjoyable. I picked up a few pointers. If you are a procrastinator or just plain overwhelmed with too much work on your plate, it is a fantastic read.

  23. 5 out of 5

    Melody Warnick

    Irony: I owned a copy of this book about not procrastinating for about five years before I finally read it.

  24. 4 out of 5

    Amy | Foxy Blogs

    I failed this book. I started listening to it in December and then got distracted (which goes against the concept of this book). I picked it back up 7 months later and finished it. *facepalm* Kind of funny when I think about all the skills the book is teaching a person on how not to procrastinate and it took me 7 months to finish it. Don't get me wrong I'm not saying it's a commentary on the book but more on me. I guess I should probably read it again at some point and try to do a better job I failed this book. I started listening to it in December and then got distracted (which goes against the concept of this book). I picked it back up 7 months later and finished it. *facepalm* Kind of funny when I think about all the skills the book is teaching a person on how not to procrastinate and it took me 7 months to finish it. Don't get me wrong I'm not saying it's a commentary on the book but more on me. I guess I should probably read it again at some point and try to do a better job sticking to it before I rate the book.

  25. 4 out of 5

    Julia Doherty

    You will often see me post online that today I have to "eat a few frogs". This is now a way of life for me! I think Brian Tracy is a genius! You will often see me post online that today I have to "eat a few frogs". This is now a way of life for me! I think Brian Tracy is a genius!

  26. 5 out of 5

    Vaishali

    Absolutely essential reading for anyone who's human. Fantastic insight so typical of Brian Tracy. Go through this repeatedly, until it becomes a part of you. Absolutely essential reading for anyone who's human. Fantastic insight so typical of Brian Tracy. Go through this repeatedly, until it becomes a part of you.

  27. 4 out of 5

    Leah

    Great book! Basically prioritize your most important task first and do it until it's done. Prepare your next day and week in advance. For large tasks break them into bite size pieces with deadlines. Find out what you're good at and develop other skills needed. Develop urgency and motivation to do the tasks. 21 ways to stop procrastinating and get more done: 1. set the table - write out goals and objectives 2. plan out your next day and week 3. apply 80/20 rule to everything, focus on the 20 4. priori Great book! Basically prioritize your most important task first and do it until it's done. Prepare your next day and week in advance. For large tasks break them into bite size pieces with deadlines. Find out what you're good at and develop other skills needed. Develop urgency and motivation to do the tasks. 21 ways to stop procrastinating and get more done: 1. set the table - write out goals and objectives 2. plan out your next day and week 3. apply 80/20 rule to everything, focus on the 20 4. prioritize goals 5. ABCDE method - before you work on tasks organize by value and priority and work on your most important activities first 6. focus on key result areas - identify those that you have to do 7. practice law of efficiency 8. prepare thoroughly before you begin 9. upgrade your skills 10. leverage your special talents 11. identify key constraints - alleviate them 12. one task at a time 13. put the pressure on yourself 14. maximize personal powers 15. motivate yourself into action 16. practice creative procrastination 17. do most difficult task first 18. break large and daunting tasks into small bite size pieces 19. create large blocks on time to focus 20. develop urgency 21. most important task first and until that's done don't do anything else

  28. 4 out of 5

    GridGirl

    Argh, this book was a real struggle for me, even though it was fairly short. The reason for that is: I am not the target audience. The target audience are employees. This book teaches them what they already knew they needed to do to become better at their job but never did because they were afraid of change and probably won’t ever do because they still are. This is perfect for anyone working a 9 to 5 who has never heard anything about time management or has never wasted a thought on improving th Argh, this book was a real struggle for me, even though it was fairly short. The reason for that is: I am not the target audience. The target audience are employees. This book teaches them what they already knew they needed to do to become better at their job but never did because they were afraid of change and probably won’t ever do because they still are. This is perfect for anyone working a 9 to 5 who has never heard anything about time management or has never wasted a thought on improving their job performance. Granted, the book is quite a few years old, but even back then the ideas were not brand new. The author even admits himself that he “borrowed” ideas from other authors, if I remember correctly. He also repeats the same techniques and uses different names for them to make them seem like they are something different. Well, self-improvement books always sell, no matter what, right? Before I leave you with my final rating, a quick warning: if you are a student, self-employed or have free choice over your working time in any other way, stay away from this book. If you are generally interested in books like this one, you’re probably trying to do the best work you can for uni or work. I personally was searching for something that would help me juggle all my responsibilities more easily and help me improve my results with the same time of studying. The only thing that book did was pushing toxic mindsets on me. “Work harder, try to be better than you already are, set yourself fake deadlines, decide what task is most important for your future.” No, but no thank you. I’m already stressed enough. 1/5

  29. 4 out of 5

    Azn

    I was biased toward self-help books, to me, they were useless. Just common sense put into different words that people with midlife crisis deemed as gospel for about a month until the next motivational self-help book came along. Eat that frog cracked that bias, and 8/10 is the highest rating I could give, at the moment, to a book that I had a disdain for before I even started. The book was a surprise, it lead me to understand the appeal of self-help books. You cannot see these types of books as i I was biased toward self-help books, to me, they were useless. Just common sense put into different words that people with midlife crisis deemed as gospel for about a month until the next motivational self-help book came along. Eat that frog cracked that bias, and 8/10 is the highest rating I could give, at the moment, to a book that I had a disdain for before I even started. The book was a surprise, it lead me to understand the appeal of self-help books. You cannot see these types of books as instruction manuals or encyclopedia of advice, you have to see them as salesmen and hypnotists in paper form. This book's primary objective isn't to tell you what to do, it is to coax you, persuade you, and draw you the image of the person who you COULD be. People fail in life not because they don't know to improve their lives, it's because of various factors that influence their decision to be lazy. These factors are deep-seated within our Western culture and exemplified by the frequent reminders to do what you enjoy best. This is not what successful people do, you have to scrub away these factors and change the foundation of your work ethics to succeed, and this is what the author, Brian Tracy preaches. 8/10

  30. 5 out of 5

    Elham

    Rate: 2.8 ⭐⭐ I think it is repetitive in the inside, but here is the summary provided at the end of the book: 1. Set the table: Decide what you want 2. Plan the day in advance: Think on paper 3. Apply the 80/20 rule: 20% of activity produces 80% of the results 4. Consider the consequences: of your 20% activities 5. Practice creative procrastination: put off things of low value 6. Use the A B C D E Method continually: prioritize 7. Focus on key result areas: concentrate on results you HAVE to have 8. The Rate: 2.8 ⭐⭐ I think it is repetitive in the inside, but here is the summary provided at the end of the book: 1. Set the table: Decide what you want 2. Plan the day in advance: Think on paper 3. Apply the 80/20 rule: 20% of activity produces 80% of the results 4. Consider the consequences: of your 20% activities 5. Practice creative procrastination: put off things of low value 6. Use the A B C D E Method continually: prioritize 7. Focus on key result areas: concentrate on results you HAVE to have 8. The Law of Three: ID and focus on the top three before anything else 9. Prepare thoroughly before you begin: get set up to get things done 10. Take it one oil barrel at a time: do it one step at a time 11. Upgrade your key skills: sharpen your sword to do more and better 12. Leverage your special talents:do things are good at wholeheartedly 13. Identify your key constraints: get rid of bottlenecks, choke points 14. Put pressure on yourself: think like you are on vacation tomorrow 15. Maximize your personal power: work hard at your best times of day 16. Motivate yourself into action: look at the positive now and move on 17. Get out of tech sinks: tech stuff can be time killers 18. Slice and dice the task: break it down, do one piece 19. Create large chunks of time: to focus on certain things 20. Develop sense of urgency: move fast on key tasks 21. Single handle every task: start and fully complete most imp't task

Add a review

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Loading...
We use cookies to give you the best online experience. By using our website you agree to our use of cookies in accordance with our cookie policy.