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The Penguin Book of Romantic Poetry

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The Romanticism that emerged after the American and French revolutions of 1776 and 1789 represented a new flowering of the imagination and the spirit, and a celebration of the soul of humanity with its capacity for love. This extraordinary collection sets the acknowledged genius of poems such as Blake's 'Tyger', Coleridge's 'Khubla Khan' and Shelley's 'Ozymandias' alongsid The Romanticism that emerged after the American and French revolutions of 1776 and 1789 represented a new flowering of the imagination and the spirit, and a celebration of the soul of humanity with its capacity for love. This extraordinary collection sets the acknowledged genius of poems such as Blake's 'Tyger', Coleridge's 'Khubla Khan' and Shelley's 'Ozymandias' alongside verse from less familiar figures and women poets such as Charlotte Smith and Mary Robinson. We also see familiar poets in an unaccustomed light, as Blake, Wordsworth and Shelley demonstrate their comic skills, while Coleridge, Keats and Clare explore the Gothic and surreal.


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The Romanticism that emerged after the American and French revolutions of 1776 and 1789 represented a new flowering of the imagination and the spirit, and a celebration of the soul of humanity with its capacity for love. This extraordinary collection sets the acknowledged genius of poems such as Blake's 'Tyger', Coleridge's 'Khubla Khan' and Shelley's 'Ozymandias' alongsid The Romanticism that emerged after the American and French revolutions of 1776 and 1789 represented a new flowering of the imagination and the spirit, and a celebration of the soul of humanity with its capacity for love. This extraordinary collection sets the acknowledged genius of poems such as Blake's 'Tyger', Coleridge's 'Khubla Khan' and Shelley's 'Ozymandias' alongside verse from less familiar figures and women poets such as Charlotte Smith and Mary Robinson. We also see familiar poets in an unaccustomed light, as Blake, Wordsworth and Shelley demonstrate their comic skills, while Coleridge, Keats and Clare explore the Gothic and surreal.

30 review for The Penguin Book of Romantic Poetry

  1. 5 out of 5

    Kitty

    This is a book I read for university, so I only read the works of Wordsworth, Keats, and Shelley. Wordsworth: there were a few of his poems that I enjoyed but to be honest I'm just not entirely sure that the Romantic works are something I enjoy. It may also be that I don't enjoy his works because I have just read a great many of them in one go, meaning that after a while it becomes apparent that there are many similarities within each work. Keats: I enjoyed Keat's work slightly more. There is a s This is a book I read for university, so I only read the works of Wordsworth, Keats, and Shelley. Wordsworth: there were a few of his poems that I enjoyed but to be honest I'm just not entirely sure that the Romantic works are something I enjoy. It may also be that I don't enjoy his works because I have just read a great many of them in one go, meaning that after a while it becomes apparent that there are many similarities within each work. Keats: I enjoyed Keat's work slightly more. There is a sense of clarity within Keats work that in some ways makes his poetry feel more approachable than that of Wordsworth. Shelley: I have always enjoyed Shelley's work so it was no hardship to read his poetry.

  2. 4 out of 5

    Holly Foley (Procida)

    Finally finished this tome. I am shocked by the amount of poetry that doesn't rhyme (around 70 percent) I am also amazed by the elaborate vocabulary used throughout the late 17 , early 1800 to describe fairly simple settings and situations. Poems have so many fewer words than novels or stories but seem to use too many words to capture the feeling or instant or thought or scene that they are designed to portray. It is also noted how very much all the romantic poets influenced each other and sound Finally finished this tome. I am shocked by the amount of poetry that doesn't rhyme (around 70 percent) I am also amazed by the elaborate vocabulary used throughout the late 17 , early 1800 to describe fairly simple settings and situations. Poems have so many fewer words than novels or stories but seem to use too many words to capture the feeling or instant or thought or scene that they are designed to portray. It is also noted how very much all the romantic poets influenced each other and sounded similar. I got into this to read Percy Blythe Shelley's work to try to relate it to Mary Shelley. But Shelley sounded just like Coleridge , Wordsworth and the rest. Did a lot of skimming!

  3. 4 out of 5

    Joe Davidson

    Obviously, in a book this big you're going to come across some poems that really light your fire and some that are only so so. DO NOT MISS "Darkness" by Lord Byron. Also, if it were somehow possible for Charolotte Smith's poems (overwrought though they may be) to take on a human form and then do me, well I'd totally sign up for that.

  4. 4 out of 5

    Acacia

  5. 4 out of 5

    Joseph Herrera

  6. 4 out of 5

    Ramajana

  7. 4 out of 5

    Chris Bastedo

  8. 4 out of 5

    Nancy

  9. 5 out of 5

    John

  10. 5 out of 5

    Jack Clark

  11. 5 out of 5

    Chiara

  12. 4 out of 5

    Simon Walsh

  13. 5 out of 5

    Merany Eldridge

  14. 4 out of 5

    Jessica Dees- Feuerstein

  15. 4 out of 5

    Hannah

  16. 5 out of 5

    Struan Scobbie

  17. 4 out of 5

    Dan

  18. 4 out of 5

    Emma

  19. 4 out of 5

    Rachel

  20. 4 out of 5

    Sonia

  21. 4 out of 5

    Kim

  22. 5 out of 5

    Kanchan

  23. 4 out of 5

    Elliot Costi

  24. 4 out of 5

    Myles Rhinds

  25. 5 out of 5

    Amelia Howard

  26. 4 out of 5

    Jaime Mostany Aranoa

  27. 5 out of 5

    David Hull

  28. 5 out of 5

    Serena Janes

  29. 4 out of 5

    JC

  30. 5 out of 5

    Viki

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