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A cutting-edge mystery novel that combines the illustrations of Batman artist Terry Beatty with a New York Times bestelling author. Manhattan, 1948. America's most famous exstriptease artist, glamorous Maggie Starr, now runs her late husband's newspaper syndicate, distributing the Wonder Guy comic strip. Wonder Guy, soaring superhero, represents all that is good about pos A cutting-edge mystery novel that combines the illustrations of Batman artist Terry Beatty with a New York Times bestelling author. Manhattan, 1948. America's most famous exstriptease artist, glamorous Maggie Starr, now runs her late husband's newspaper syndicate, distributing the Wonder Guy comic strip. Wonder Guy, soaring superhero, represents all that is good about postwar America. But when the cartoon character's publisher winds up dead, Maggie finds herself working with her stepson Jack Starr (also her V.P. and chief troubleshooter) to find a killer among cartoonists, wives, mistresses and minions of a different sort of "syndicate"-suspects with motives that are anything but superheroic.


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A cutting-edge mystery novel that combines the illustrations of Batman artist Terry Beatty with a New York Times bestelling author. Manhattan, 1948. America's most famous exstriptease artist, glamorous Maggie Starr, now runs her late husband's newspaper syndicate, distributing the Wonder Guy comic strip. Wonder Guy, soaring superhero, represents all that is good about pos A cutting-edge mystery novel that combines the illustrations of Batman artist Terry Beatty with a New York Times bestelling author. Manhattan, 1948. America's most famous exstriptease artist, glamorous Maggie Starr, now runs her late husband's newspaper syndicate, distributing the Wonder Guy comic strip. Wonder Guy, soaring superhero, represents all that is good about postwar America. But when the cartoon character's publisher winds up dead, Maggie finds herself working with her stepson Jack Starr (also her V.P. and chief troubleshooter) to find a killer among cartoonists, wives, mistresses and minions of a different sort of "syndicate"-suspects with motives that are anything but superheroic.

30 review for A Killing in Comics

  1. 5 out of 5

    Josh

    If you're into comics, specifically silver age superhero comics, and crime fiction then this is a book for you. Jack Starr is a licensed PI playing second fiddle to his attractive stepmother at Starr Syndicate but that doesn't stop him from assuming the lead role when it comes to murder. When a prominent businessman dies under suspicious circumstances, Jack can't help but investigate, especially as this prominent businessman controls the interests of the biggest property in comics - Wonder Man. W If you're into comics, specifically silver age superhero comics, and crime fiction then this is a book for you. Jack Starr is a licensed PI playing second fiddle to his attractive stepmother at Starr Syndicate but that doesn't stop him from assuming the lead role when it comes to murder. When a prominent businessman dies under suspicious circumstances, Jack can't help but investigate, especially as this prominent businessman controls the interests of the biggest property in comics - Wonder Man. What follows is a largely formulaic whodunit which keeps the reader guessing until the stock-standard reveal at the conclusion of the book. My rating: 3/5 stars. Sure there were moments of intrigue and the characters did interest me, specially a couple of suspects under Starr's microscope but the plot was largely formulaic and didn't offer anything outside the norm for a traditional pulp-centered whodunit.

  2. 5 out of 5

    Jam

    I hoped to enjoy this book, but in the end I was kind of meh. It didn't help that the mystery is kind of obvious pretty early on, no shock twists there, but it was also kind of skimpy. I wanted more about the business, more about the characters, but everything was quite superficial. The set up, the small details of that era for comic production was good and done by someone who knew what they were talking about, but there wasn't enough if it. In conclusion, lightweight. The mystery wasn't and the I hoped to enjoy this book, but in the end I was kind of meh. It didn't help that the mystery is kind of obvious pretty early on, no shock twists there, but it was also kind of skimpy. I wanted more about the business, more about the characters, but everything was quite superficial. The set up, the small details of that era for comic production was good and done by someone who knew what they were talking about, but there wasn't enough if it. In conclusion, lightweight. The mystery wasn't and the rest of it wasn't shiny enough to compensate. Not a bad read, but nothing spectacular either.

  3. 5 out of 5

    Randy

    Jack and Maggie Starr. his stepmother, ran the Starr Syndicate, a comic strip distributor started by the Major, his father, her late husband. Maggie, a famous ex-stripper, handled the business end and Jack was the troubleshooter, a licensed P.I. with only one customer: the Starr Syndicate. It was his job to keep things clean in the world of strips and the talent, the writers and artists. In A KILLING IN THE COMICS, Jack is attending the fiftieth birthday party for publisher Danny Harrison, publis Jack and Maggie Starr. his stepmother, ran the Starr Syndicate, a comic strip distributor started by the Major, his father, her late husband. Maggie, a famous ex-stripper, handled the business end and Jack was the troubleshooter, a licensed P.I. with only one customer: the Starr Syndicate. It was his job to keep things clean in the world of strips and the talent, the writers and artists. In A KILLING IN THE COMICS, Jack is attending the fiftieth birthday party for publisher Danny Harrison, publisher of Americana Comics. Things go bad when Donny, wearing the costume of their number one superhero, Wonder Guy, collapses as he's about to cut the cake, accidentally falling on the big knife in his hand, driving it into his chest. An accident. Only it wasn't an accident as poison is found in the dead man's tissues. The knife may have actually hastened a death already on the way. Jack joins in the case wanting to head things off before word got out to the public about the accident that was really a murder. Plenty of suspects from the two men who'd created Wonder Guy as teenagers, only to be paid a pittance for the rights and worked on the books and strip as work-for-hire talent to the creator of the second biggest hero, Batwing, to the mistress to the wife. It goes on. Max Allen Collins has created a fun pair of detectives in this first novel. A second followed and a third has been written for Hard Case Crime.

  4. 5 out of 5

    Barbara

    I read this because of the comics connection, and it was entertaining enough. I would almost give it four stars, but there are too many small annoyances to the book: The author tries a little too hard to capture the period setting, with overly detailed descriptions of the suits and hats people are wearing. And the focus on Jack Starr's (the narrator) ex-striptease dancer stepmother's weight is obnoxious. I like the roman-a-clef aspect though.

  5. 5 out of 5

    David

    This is one tasty book. Especially for lovers of comic book history. Of course, the author takes the time to tell the reader that this is work of fiction, even if closely following the history of Superman and Batman, though they use other names. Collins does a fantastic job of recreating the "glory" days of early comics and reminding (or educating the reader) about the seamier roots of the comic book industry. Collins writes this one from the first person and that gets fun in a few spots as the This is one tasty book. Especially for lovers of comic book history. Of course, the author takes the time to tell the reader that this is work of fiction, even if closely following the history of Superman and Batman, though they use other names. Collins does a fantastic job of recreating the "glory" days of early comics and reminding (or educating the reader) about the seamier roots of the comic book industry. Collins writes this one from the first person and that gets fun in a few spots as the narrator takes the time to offer some very short comical asides to the reader. He offers these teasingly, not too much to spoil the story or slow the action, but a quick aside that just makes us laugh a bit and recognize that the author is not taking himself too seriously. The mystery is pretty straightforward. In fact, if you can't figure it out by the end then you weren't paying attention. Collins plays in a fair manner with his readers, providing the necessary clues. Then, in a nod to the old Thin Man or Charlie Chan movies-- he gathers all of the suspects into one room and offers the reveal as each one protests their innocence. Great fun! This novel is fun to read, even if the author warns the reader that it is fictional. I know from reading other materials that he has much of his fictional background correct and his pseudonyms are so thinly disguised as to risk legal action, I suppose. Yet, he has done a fine job of presenting these characters in the light of their real-life counterparts-- Highly Recommend it. Just noticed it is the first of a series-- so now I need to pick up the next one!

  6. 4 out of 5

    Doctor Moss

    A noirish mystery story about the murder of a comic book magnate, this story is itself comic bookish in style and feel. That’s not a bad thing — I think it’s an intentional style choice that goes well with the story and the noir genre. The murder has that comic book edge — Donny Morrison, co-head of Americana Comics dies at his own birthday party, dressed as his lead comic character, Wonder Guy. Morrison falls on the knife he’s just about to cut his birthday cake with. But, as it turns out, it wa A noirish mystery story about the murder of a comic book magnate, this story is itself comic bookish in style and feel. That’s not a bad thing — I think it’s an intentional style choice that goes well with the story and the noir genre. The murder has that comic book edge — Donny Morrison, co-head of Americana Comics dies at his own birthday party, dressed as his lead comic character, Wonder Guy. Morrison falls on the knife he’s just about to cut his birthday cake with. But, as it turns out, it wasn’t the knife that killed him. He was poisoned. The characters in the story, led by private detective Jack Starr, are likewise comic bookish. Starr is the son of Maggie Starr, one time striptease artist and now head of Starr Syndicate, a comic strip publisher (publishing a comic strip version of Wonder Guy in partnership with Morrison’s Americana publications). Other characters — the police detective Chandler, Wonder Guy’s creative team (Moe Shulman and Harry Spiegel), Morrison’s mistress named Honey Daily — are versions of comic book stereotypes brought to fictional life by Collins’ storytelling. I think it works. It’s not great literature, but it’s entertaining. It’s light, it’s noirish, and it will keep you going from page to page to figure out who killed Donny Morrison and why. The story is a purposely thinly veiled fictionalization of the story of DC Comics and Superman. Many of the characters, including Spiegel and Shulman, have obvious real world parallels — Collins acknowledges Gerard Jones’ Men of Tomorrow as “the true story behind my imaginary tale.” Kind of makes me want to read that book as well.

  7. 5 out of 5

    Mark

    I really like our local Quad Cities' Treasure Max Allen Collin's work...meticulously researched historical mystery period pieces...especially enamored with his Nate Heller series..."Killing in Comics" is the 1st of 3 Jack & Maggie Starr mysteries & if your a comic book fan, this is right in your wheel house...set in NYC in the early post-WWII years, thinly disguised characters harken back to the early Halcyon days of the beginnings of the comic book & syndication business...not Nate Heller, but I really like our local Quad Cities' Treasure Max Allen Collin's work...meticulously researched historical mystery period pieces...especially enamored with his Nate Heller series..."Killing in Comics" is the 1st of 3 Jack & Maggie Starr mysteries & if your a comic book fan, this is right in your wheel house...set in NYC in the early post-WWII years, thinly disguised characters harken back to the early Halcyon days of the beginnings of the comic book & syndication business...not Nate Heller, but decent stuff nonetheless!!!

  8. 4 out of 5

    Nigel Thomas

    I like Max Allan Collins. Riffing on Chandler, Hammett et al, reading this is like watching a forties film noir. As other commentators have said it’s a light read so don’t look for complexity. The joy comes from the homage to the language of hard-boiled crime of the forties. Plus extra pleasure points if you are a comic book geek. It won’t take you long to figure out who he’s building a story around. Good fun for a holiday read.

  9. 5 out of 5

    Chris Hansen

    With it's many clever allusions to comic book luminaries of the 40's,this book is an entertaini g romp for fans of comic book history. Set in a thinly veiled doppelganger of DC comics it has plenty of old school noir tropes including the old gathering if all the suspects to reveal the killer. . Very entertaining.

  10. 4 out of 5

    Dean

    I quite enjoyed this, but not as much as I hoped. Being a comics fan, I certainly appreciated the thinly disguised characters based on real people, but that novelty wears off after a time. The actual murder mystery itself is very thin, with the eventual suspect being pretty uninspired. Just about recommended for fans of comics history, but nobody else.

  11. 4 out of 5

    Ian Banks

    Fun and breezy but very light and a hero who's just a little too good to be true. It follows the beats of this kind of story a little too slavishly to be genuinely original but is a fun way to while away a couple of hours.

  12. 4 out of 5

    Mark Levandoski

    Nice little murder mystery. Very good for comic book fans who also like the murder mystery angle, done in a kinda pulp feel. Excellent cover painting for this edition.

  13. 4 out of 5

    Dave Robertson

    Fun read, looking forward to the follow up.

  14. 4 out of 5

    Robert

    What a FUN book! I can’t wait to read more in this series!

  15. 4 out of 5

    Dave

    "A Killing In Comics" is the first of three volumes in the Jack and Maggie Starr series, followed by "Strip For Murder" and "Seduction of the Innocent." It is a terrific historical mystery very much in the tradition of Collins' Nathan Heller series. It is hard boiled and filled with period references. It packs just the right amount of attitude and humor to be highly readable. Although the background of the story is certainly steeped in the comic book publishing world of the late forties, you don "A Killing In Comics" is the first of three volumes in the Jack and Maggie Starr series, followed by "Strip For Murder" and "Seduction of the Innocent." It is a terrific historical mystery very much in the tradition of Collins' Nathan Heller series. It is hard boiled and filled with period references. It packs just the right amount of attitude and humor to be highly readable. Although the background of the story is certainly steeped in the comic book publishing world of the late forties, you don't have to know much about that industry to enjoy it. Take a glad-handing, overweight publishing executive. Dress him in a superhero costume - Wonder Guy to be precise. And, have him drop dead while cutting the cake at his birthday party thrown at his mistress's suite at the Waldorf-Astoria with his wife in attendance as well as several comic writers who are bitter about their contracts. All of a sudden, it seems like you have the makings of a story. Better yet, throw in a gorgeous world-famous ex-stripper who runs a comic syndicating service and her stepson, a private detective. Also, throw in s mobster or two, a homicide detective, a blonde whose blue eyes seem to hypnotize every man, and half a dozen others with murder motives and you've got a lot real good story brewing. Nothing weak or flimsy about this story. This is a solid one.

  16. 4 out of 5

    Johnny

    Discovering Max Allan Collins’ Seduction of the Innocent where a pastiche of the infamous psychiatrist who wrote a supposedly non-fiction Seduction of the Innocent (insisting that because homosexuals perceived Batman and Robin’s, Bruce Wayne’s and Dick Grayson’s, relationship to be homosexual that the comic is a major cause of homosexual behavior) is murdered, I was delighted. To find the preceding volume, A Killing in Comics, was a double-delight. Anyone who has seen the recent action film where Discovering Max Allan Collins’ Seduction of the Innocent where a pastiche of the infamous psychiatrist who wrote a supposedly non-fiction Seduction of the Innocent (insisting that because homosexuals perceived Batman and Robin’s, Bruce Wayne’s and Dick Grayson’s, relationship to be homosexual that the comic is a major cause of homosexual behavior) is murdered, I was delighted. To find the preceding volume, A Killing in Comics, was a double-delight. Anyone who has seen the recent action film where the big dude from Krypton fights the black-caped fellow from Gotham is sure to recognize that Will Hander is a fictional reminder of how Bill Finger was treated. At least, he finally received credit on the big screen! In the same way, it isn’t hard to see how the more famous Rod Krane represents in some ways, the artist usually credited with creating Batman (in spite of Finger’s contribution). I suppose any reader would recognize that the blue and red costume with a big “W” on the chest (standing for “Wonder Guy”) is a fictional “stand-in” for a guy with a big “S” on his chest. And, do you suppose there is any relationship to DC (originally Detective Comics but later a symbol of patriotism) Comics and Americana Comics? Do you suppose Spiegel and Shulman, the creative team for “Wonder Guy”, bear any resemblance to another two creators whose names were emblazoned upon the opening credits of a superhero movie? Even the character who quickly becomes the murder victim, Donny Harrison, seems to be a deliberate send-up of Harry Donenfeld (who, to the best of my knowledge did start out in smut but didn’t die in a superhero costume). Even to the perspective of his mistress (Sunny Paley, Donenfeld’s real-life mistress, sounds a lot like “Honey Dailey” in the novel.), Collins conjures up memories of both the savory and unsavory aspects of comics history. Indeed, would Frank Calabria be a reference to mobster Frank Costello? Frankly, these fictional nods to comic history are both funny and, behind the scenes, enlightening.—even for those of us who have read Collins’ primary source material (Gerard Jones’ Men of Tomorrow: Geeks, Gangsters and the Birth of the Comic Book. The protagonist is a veteran turned Private Investigator (and Vice-President of a syndication company). He has an unmistakable similarity to Mike Hammer and that should be no surprise given Collins’ work on the comic, Mike Danger, and collaboration with Mickey Spillane. Indeed, Jack Starr in the novel is actually reading I, The Jury at one point. Since it occurs in the first chapter, I don’t feel like I’m spoiling anything to have indicated that the founder and head of Americana Comics dies in a superhero costume. But I can’t really share anything else about the plot without giving away something vital. Let’s just say, it makes perfect sense. And, after all I’ve already shared, you know that if you like comics and mysteries set in earlier eras, A Kill in Comics is almost sure to be for you.

  17. 5 out of 5

    Mark Plaid

    Manhattan, the summer of 1948, and Donny Harrison, the boss at Americana Comics celebrates his fiftieth birthday in the suite at the Waldorf he rents for his mistress Miss Harriet "Honey" Daily. However, he kindly invited his wife. For the party he dressed as Wonder Guy, the comic book super hero whose popularity made Donny Harrison rich and Americana a prominent publishing company. Among the party guests are Harry Spiegel and Moe Shulman, the creators of Wonder Guy who are well paid, but not ri Manhattan, the summer of 1948, and Donny Harrison, the boss at Americana Comics celebrates his fiftieth birthday in the suite at the Waldorf he rents for his mistress Miss Harriet "Honey" Daily. However, he kindly invited his wife. For the party he dressed as Wonder Guy, the comic book super hero whose popularity made Donny Harrison rich and Americana a prominent publishing company. Among the party guests are Harry Spiegel and Moe Shulman, the creators of Wonder Guy who are well paid, but not rich. They do not own any rights to their creation. Jack Starr also attends. Starr works for his stepmother who runs the Starr Syndicate, a company that syndicates comic strips to newspapers that she started when Her first chosen profession, burlesque stripping, became illegal in New York. Starr Syndicate exclusively publishes the Wonder Guy daily comic strips. Upon cutting the cake, Donny abruptly falls to the floor and lands on the cake knife. He dies instantly. It is assumed that he had a heart attack and unfortunately stabbed himself as he collapsed. Further in investigation reveals poison in Donny's system that caused his collapse. Investigators believe someone tampered with Donny's diabetes medication. As it happens, Spiegelman and Shulman were in negotiations with Maggie Starr at Starr Syndicate for a big deal on a new creation. Now they're the top suspects in a murder case. Maggie needs her poetential clients either cleared or convicted soon in order to properly conduct business at her company. She puts Jack on the job whose one of many hats at the syndicate is their own private investigator. He's a licensed private investigator and uses it exclusively for the company. Now that Jack's on the case he hopes his familiarity and his father's good name among the suspects and witness can get him on the inside track the police can't access. Max Allan Collins masterfully uses the trappings of a classic 1940s hard-boiled mystery in a narrative style comparable to masters Raymond Chandler and Mickey Spillane and makes it all his own with a twist of 21st Century iron and nostalgia. As if Collin's writing didn't provide enough to lend to the authentic feel of A Killing in Comics but the rich Eisner-esque black and white illustrations of Terry Beatty, with their square-jawed heroes and bee-stung lipped ladies bring much more to the feel of the book which is fun from the first letter to the last. Collins certainly butters his bread by writing nostalgically for his period mysteries like this one but he brings with him a wit and demeanor that slightly rings of someone who knows where history goes after this period. Its amazing how he does it with enough subtlety that could almost be missed. A Killing in Comics provides addictive and fun reading for almost anyone but especially for Max Allan Collins fans who must not skip this one.

  18. 4 out of 5

    Matthew Lipson

    I'm going to start this review with a disclaimer. *I'm not a fan of the traditional mystery. I am a Max Allan Collins fan.* I picked up this book for 2 reasons: 1) the author; and 2) I'm a comic book collector. Okay, the cover and the interior illustrations, too. With all the rest of Collins' books I have read, I expected more of a crime novel and not a detective mystery, which is what I got. I hate to say this book was the weakest of all his books I have read. The constant breaking of the 3rd wal I'm going to start this review with a disclaimer. *I'm not a fan of the traditional mystery. I am a Max Allan Collins fan.* I picked up this book for 2 reasons: 1) the author; and 2) I'm a comic book collector. Okay, the cover and the interior illustrations, too. With all the rest of Collins' books I have read, I expected more of a crime novel and not a detective mystery, which is what I got. I hate to say this book was the weakest of all his books I have read. The constant breaking of the 3rd wall and repetitive phrases were clunky and not as endearing or humorous as, I think, Collins thought they would be. And, while I recognized all the players even though fictionalized, he turned them into cliches, as he forced them into the genres mold. The beautiful mistress of the unattractive murder victim, the wronged wife, etc. Our main character, his mother, and the investigating police officer were refreshing as they did step away from the norm drastically, but they were dragged down by the rest of the cast. As light Summer reading you may take to a beach and forget in the sand, this would be the perfect read. But, if you want something more and, in the end, rememberable, go for Two for the Money or, for something in between, start the Quarry series.

  19. 4 out of 5

    Dusty Wallace

    I've heard nothing but great things about Max Alan Collins but this book didn't live up to that praise. The humor is repetitive and banal. The characters are so clearly based on real-life characters that you might as well use their real names. Or else come up with something wildly different from the characters you're referencing. On the plus side, there's a fantastic mystery at the heart of this book that makes you keep reading regardless of any stylistic objections. And it all pays off nicely i I've heard nothing but great things about Max Alan Collins but this book didn't live up to that praise. The humor is repetitive and banal. The characters are so clearly based on real-life characters that you might as well use their real names. Or else come up with something wildly different from the characters you're referencing. On the plus side, there's a fantastic mystery at the heart of this book that makes you keep reading regardless of any stylistic objections. And it all pays off nicely in the end. I know that not every Collins book is comedy so I'll probably try some of his other work and see if that suits me better.

  20. 4 out of 5

    Jason

    I have read and collected most of Max Allan Collins' books for years, but I have always ignored his work in comic books. I keep up with all of his new books so I can cherry-pick the ones that fall in the series I collect, but this stand-alone caught my eye. It's a mystery set a year or two after World War 2 ended, in the comic book industry. It has some comic illustrations at the beginning of every chapter, but otherwise it is a fairly traditional mystery, written in a light-toned noir style. It I have read and collected most of Max Allan Collins' books for years, but I have always ignored his work in comic books. I keep up with all of his new books so I can cherry-pick the ones that fall in the series I collect, but this stand-alone caught my eye. It's a mystery set a year or two after World War 2 ended, in the comic book industry. It has some comic illustrations at the beginning of every chapter, but otherwise it is a fairly traditional mystery, written in a light-toned noir style. It was enjoyable, with Collins' usual well-written characters.

  21. 4 out of 5

    Carole

    Set in 1948 New York City, the action centers around comics--books, strips, radio plays, movies and movie serials. At his 50th birthday celebration party, Donny Harrison, publisher of Americana Comics, is murdered. Maggie Starr, owner of Starr Syndicate, puts her stepson, Jack Starr, on the case to find the killer. Starr Syndicate, distributor of many comic strips to newspapers, etc., has a vested interest in Americana Comics and so Jack gets on the trail of the murderer.

  22. 5 out of 5

    Robin

    Max Allan Collins (creator of the Road to Perdition graphic novel) scribed this murder mystery that's an enjoyable read. Similar to classic Ellery Queen, this crime novel is set in the world of comics circa 1948. See if you can spot the thinly-veiled refernces to real-life people and characters from the comics. Pow!

  23. 5 out of 5

    Frank

    A nice, light mystery set in the 1940's comic industry. The period flavor seems a bit sprinkled on, and especially someone who actually works in the comic industry could have given us a little bit more about the actual reality of the comics biz, but hey, if you're into comics and mysteries, you could do worse that spend a few hours with this book.

  24. 4 out of 5

    Adrienne

    I loved this book. Jack is the male version of me. The smarth-mouthed jokes and the easy pace of the book made me wish it was 600 pages longer. I recommend it to anyone who enjoys a classica whodunit, set in the time of pin up girls and comic superheroes.

  25. 5 out of 5

    Laura

    This review has been hidden because it contains spoilers. To view it, click here. Interesting, competent mystery. I liked the post-WWII setting and the comics angle. For some reason, Collins' writing style just doesn't grab me though.

  26. 5 out of 5

    Thomas Zahler

    Really liked this one. I'm a comics guy myself, and it was nice to see the pastiches of classics comics creators. Haven't really read too many books in this style, but it was a lot of fun.

  27. 4 out of 5

    Jim

    i wonder if collins would change the book any w/joe shuster's soft-core porn coming to light in the past few months.

  28. 5 out of 5

    Christa

    I'd most recenlty enjoyed Max Allen Collins' take on the CSI novels. I liked the kitsch of the setting.

  29. 4 out of 5

    Matt

    Fun little detective story. I almost figured out whodunit, but not totally. The main character's pretty interesting and the 1948 setting is too.

  30. 5 out of 5

    Brad Smithart

    The almost-silly near-parody of the early comic book industy (Batwing=Batman; Rod Krane=Bob Kane) made this one of the least enjoyable of Collins' works that I've read.

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