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'Women are writing many of the things male sf writers thought could never be written; they are making us examine tenets and shibboleths we thought were immutable. The mightily thewed warrior trip is one of these. People like Ursula Le Guin, Joanna Russ, Kate Wilhelm ... are making that seem hideously ridiculous' - Harlan Ellison In Women of Wonder, Pamela Sargent has assemb 'Women are writing many of the things male sf writers thought could never be written; they are making us examine tenets and shibboleths we thought were immutable. The mightily thewed warrior trip is one of these. People like Ursula Le Guin, Joanna Russ, Kate Wilhelm ... are making that seem hideously ridiculous' - Harlan Ellison In Women of Wonder, Pamela Sargent has assembled a collection of amazing stories which show that some of the most exciting and innovative writing in science fiction is being produced by women. Women in Science Fiction (1975) essay by Pamela Sargent The Child Dreams (1975) poem by Sonya Dorman That Only a Mother (1948) story by Judith Merril Contagion (1950) novelette by Katherine MacLean The Wind People (1959) story by Marion Zimmer Bradley The Ship Who Sang (1961) novelette by Anne McCaffrey When I Was Miss Dow (1966) story by Sonya Dorman The Food Farm (1967) story by Kit Reed Baby, You Were Great (1967) story by Kate Wilhelm Sex &/or Mr. Morrison (1967) story by Carol Emshwiller Vaster Than Empires & More Slow (1971) novelette by Ursula K. Le Guin False Dawn (1972) story by Chelsea Quinn Yarbro Nobody's Home (1972) story by Joanna Russ Of Mist, & Grass, & Sand (1973) novelette by Vonda N. McIntyre Cover illustration by Candy Amsden.


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'Women are writing many of the things male sf writers thought could never be written; they are making us examine tenets and shibboleths we thought were immutable. The mightily thewed warrior trip is one of these. People like Ursula Le Guin, Joanna Russ, Kate Wilhelm ... are making that seem hideously ridiculous' - Harlan Ellison In Women of Wonder, Pamela Sargent has assemb 'Women are writing many of the things male sf writers thought could never be written; they are making us examine tenets and shibboleths we thought were immutable. The mightily thewed warrior trip is one of these. People like Ursula Le Guin, Joanna Russ, Kate Wilhelm ... are making that seem hideously ridiculous' - Harlan Ellison In Women of Wonder, Pamela Sargent has assembled a collection of amazing stories which show that some of the most exciting and innovative writing in science fiction is being produced by women. Women in Science Fiction (1975) essay by Pamela Sargent The Child Dreams (1975) poem by Sonya Dorman That Only a Mother (1948) story by Judith Merril Contagion (1950) novelette by Katherine MacLean The Wind People (1959) story by Marion Zimmer Bradley The Ship Who Sang (1961) novelette by Anne McCaffrey When I Was Miss Dow (1966) story by Sonya Dorman The Food Farm (1967) story by Kit Reed Baby, You Were Great (1967) story by Kate Wilhelm Sex &/or Mr. Morrison (1967) story by Carol Emshwiller Vaster Than Empires & More Slow (1971) novelette by Ursula K. Le Guin False Dawn (1972) story by Chelsea Quinn Yarbro Nobody's Home (1972) story by Joanna Russ Of Mist, & Grass, & Sand (1973) novelette by Vonda N. McIntyre Cover illustration by Candy Amsden.

30 review for Women of Wonder: Science-Fiction Stories by Women about Women

  1. 4 out of 5

    Olethros

    -Un concepto de partida sobresaliente y un resultado llamativo.- Género. Relatos. Lo que nos cuenta. El libro Mujeres y maravillas (publicación original: Women of Wonder. SF Stories by Women about Women, 1975) es una antología de relatos de ciencia ficción escritos por mujeres, con Pamela Sargent a cargo de la selección y de un estupendo ensayo que, a modo de introducción y demasiado actual en algunos aspectos de fondo a pesar de que han pasado cuarenta años, analiza la presencia de la mujer en la -Un concepto de partida sobresaliente y un resultado llamativo.- Género. Relatos. Lo que nos cuenta. El libro Mujeres y maravillas (publicación original: Women of Wonder. SF Stories by Women about Women, 1975) es una antología de relatos de ciencia ficción escritos por mujeres, con Pamela Sargent a cargo de la selección y de un estupendo ensayo que, a modo de introducción y demasiado actual en algunos aspectos de fondo a pesar de que han pasado cuarenta años, analiza la presencia de la mujer en la literatura de “lo fantástico”, tanto desde la perspectiva de escritoras como de personajes. Si hoy en día la disparidad autores/autoras continúa (como en tantas otras profesiones y trabajos), imagínense como era entonces y sorpréndanse, estimados lectores, con lo que ofrecían (por mi parte, solo indicar que, si no me equivoco, todas las autoras ya han tenido algún trabajo reseñado en este blog y varios en el caso de alguna de las escritoras). ¿Quiere saber más de este libro, sin spoilers? Visite: http://librosdeolethros.blogspot.com/...

  2. 4 out of 5

    Erik Graff

    I was lucky to get into science fiction early, substantially through the excellent collections assembled by Judith Merril. Women in the field were rare then. In grade school at the time, I didn't give it a thought. She was my favorite anthologist at the time. The fact that almost all the sf writers I read outside of her publications were guys didn't strike me as at all peculiar. Then came the late sixties and high school and a whole bunch of women suddenly appeared in the bookstores and dimestore I was lucky to get into science fiction early, substantially through the excellent collections assembled by Judith Merril. Women in the field were rare then. In grade school at the time, I didn't give it a thought. She was my favorite anthologist at the time. The fact that almost all the sf writers I read outside of her publications were guys didn't strike me as at all peculiar. Then came the late sixties and high school and a whole bunch of women suddenly appeared in the bookstores and dimestore carousels. Some of these books had introductions making a point of the gender of the authors, proclaiming that it was something new and good and progressive. Indeed, it was often different, a widening of the genre. I'd been accustomed to the sciences explored being the hard ones, physics and chemistry mostly. The women were, generally and to my perception, bringing in the softer ones: sociology, psychology, anthropology. My own interests had moved from astronomy and physics in grade school to the social sciences, so this was appreciated. Maybe it even had some influence in this migration of interest. Pamela Sargent assembled in her Women of Wonder series and other, similar anthologies, some of the more prominent women in the field. Her selections were good and the feminist themes in some of the stories were, for me, eye-opening, even challenging.

  3. 5 out of 5

    Pippi Bluestocking

    This is a collection worth reading - however, I warn you that it is terribly outdated. It was published in the '70s but the stories date since the '40s. While there are fine SF stories back in their golden age, the way authors treated certain themes might make one cringe today - and this includes women authors too. However, when viewed as a whole, every story in this collection touches on a range of aspects of women's lives, with most prominent the way women's bodies are policed by society. Read i This is a collection worth reading - however, I warn you that it is terribly outdated. It was published in the '70s but the stories date since the '40s. While there are fine SF stories back in their golden age, the way authors treated certain themes might make one cringe today - and this includes women authors too. However, when viewed as a whole, every story in this collection touches on a range of aspects of women's lives, with most prominent the way women's bodies are policed by society. Read it for: historical reasons, Sargent's excellent introduction, the stories by Le Guin and McIntyre. Don't read it: if you have more recent SF by women available to read * = recommended * Pamela Sargent - Introduction Fascinating & illuminating piece of literary criticism. What is amazing about this collection is that it was published in the '70s. It is part of how women build their own presence in SF, not some literary professor's attempt to collect these stories later. Sargent's essay reflects that. Sonya Dornan - The Child Dreams Short poem. Judith Merril - That Only a Mother Early SF by a woman, centred around anxieties on giving birth in a post-atomic world. A similar theme with a similar ending has been revisited by Kelly Sandoval in "The Right Sort of Monsters". Katherine MacLean - Contagion First contact, contagious disease ensues. Marion Zimmer Bradley - The Wind People No comment. Anne McCaffrey - The Ship Who Sang Human brains transplanted into ships - lovely premise although the brains belonged to children with disabilities. No. For ships with brains, I recommend Ann Leckie's "Ancillary Justice". Sonya Dorman - When I was Miss Dow Alien changes sexes and finds out what it's like to be a woman. A fun story, classic example of what early feminist SF was like. Tiptree-awarded. Joe Haldeman's "Camouflage" (also Tiptree-awarded) deals with a similar theme. * Kit Reed - The Food Farm Fat girl is sent to a special school to lose weight. This stunned me a bit. It was the one story in the whole book that felt the most contemporary, as if it was published yesterday. * Kate Wilhelm - Baby, You Were Great Entertainment industry gone wild. A woman's life is on constant display and she wants out. Excellent. Pairs well with James Tiptree's "The Girl Who Was Plugged In", although the styles and stories are very different. Carol Emshwiller - Sex and/or Mr. Morrison This kinda freaked me out. Obsessive, frantic. Exquisite writing, but not my cup of tea. * Ursula Le Guin - Vaster Than Empires and More Slow One of the stories in this collection you will remember. Part of Le Guin's Hainish stories. A ship of explorers tries to figure out a new planet and they really didn't expect what they found (neither will you). Amazing dynamics between characters. Fascinating setting-as-character. I'm still unsure about how autism is treated in this story, though. Chelsea Quinn Yarbro - False Dawn Imagine the bleakest dystopia. Then add rape. The end. I understand where it comes from, but it is exactly the kind of thing that wouldn't be published today and rightfully so. It happened to be the last one I read from this book and it marred my whole experience. Joanna Russ - Nobody’s Home A future utopia where people can teleport (my suspension of disbelief died at this one) and everyone is very smart and polyamorous. Poor girl in the story is stupid - meaning, she has your and my kind of brains. Memorable, though not my favourite from Russ. * Vonda McIntyre - Of Mist, and Grass, and Sand Excellent. A healer with three snakes (isn't this the coolest thing?) must deal with inter-cultural conundrum. Feels like fantasy, but it isn't. Nebula winner, novelette that later became the first chapter of novel "Dreamsnake", also a Nebula winner - and also excellent.

  4. 4 out of 5

    Wendle

    Let’s start with my favourites. Plural, because there were a few strong ones here. Baby You Were Great was that perfect balance of fascinating new-tech sci-fi and creepy fucked up sci-fi. The idea that everything you see and even feel can be recorded for other people to experience, and how that can be exploited and manipulated. Lots to digest and unpack here, and that’s how I love my science fiction! In a much more subtle, understated way, I also really loved Nobody’s Home. In a world where instan Let’s start with my favourites. Plural, because there were a few strong ones here. Baby You Were Great was that perfect balance of fascinating new-tech sci-fi and creepy fucked up sci-fi. The idea that everything you see and even feel can be recorded for other people to experience, and how that can be exploited and manipulated. Lots to digest and unpack here, and that’s how I love my science fiction! In a much more subtle, understated way, I also really loved Nobody’s Home. In a world where instantaneous travel exists, this story speculates how that might affect love and family and friendships, in such an open and lovely way. It also touches on genetic engineering and the value placed on intelligence–higher and higher. There were a few stories I was really drawn into, but ultimately let down by, too. The one I have the strongest feelings about is False Dawn. Set in a polluted dystopia this story was at first really interesting, following a mutant woman with archery skills who was being hunted by pirates. I was all in on this narrative… until it took a terrible turn, leaving our main character defenseless, mutilated, raped, and suddenly falling in love with the random bloke who rescues her. Erm… no, thank you. Overall I really enjoyed this book, and reading stories written by and specifically about women. I will always need more feminist science fiction in my life, and I can’t wait to read more in this series. A longer review can be read at my book blog: Marvel at Words.

  5. 4 out of 5

    Carla B. Estruch

    La reseña del prólogo de Pamela Sargent ya la tenéis en Fábulas estelares y espero reseñar pronto los cinco relatos que más me han gustado. Cathurya los ha reseñado todos, por si os interesa. La reseña del prólogo de Pamela Sargent ya la tenéis en Fábulas estelares y espero reseñar pronto los cinco relatos que más me han gustado. Cathurya los ha reseñado todos, por si os interesa.

  6. 5 out of 5

    M—

    Crap. Even with the list of prestigious writers collected here, do not waste your time with this collection. Most of the stories contained in this collection were new to me, and apparently to be respected as a feminist writer in the seventies was to spend your time writing really stupid stories of despair and futility and dwelling on women's natural nobility being crushed. Do not bother reading: The Child Dreams (1975) by Sonya Dorman | A poem. Gaah. There are three anthologies of Women of Wonder s Crap. Even with the list of prestigious writers collected here, do not waste your time with this collection. Most of the stories contained in this collection were new to me, and apparently to be respected as a feminist writer in the seventies was to spend your time writing really stupid stories of despair and futility and dwelling on women's natural nobility being crushed. Do not bother reading: The Child Dreams (1975) by Sonya Dorman | A poem. Gaah. There are three anthologies of Women of Wonder stories, and Sargent has placed a single poem — not one of her own, thank goodness, but bad enough — a the start of each of these anthologies. Honestly, why would you do this? Poetry can be an incredibly evocative medium, and I am passionately in love with many poems and select poets. This poem is not even readable. That Only a Mother (1948) by Judith Merril | Woman gives birth to child lacking arms and legs and doesn't notice, much to her husband's horror when he returns from war and get a chance to express this in the last four paragraphs. This story was apparently written to allow the author to explore setting half-hints and innuendos throughout a story. I cannot imagine that this technique was innovative in the 70s, but maybe it was in the 40s? It doesn't even rate as high as trite in reading it now. Contagion (1950) by Katherine MacLean | Group of settlers all set up to colonize a planet land and find a forgotten colony already there, and they're carrying a virus that turns the settlers into clones. Setting aside the fact that that premise is ridiculously illogical, I am frustrated with the focus of appearance in the story. Appearance and personal association with appearance is the deliberate focus of this story, which I know because Sargent has told me so point-blank in the preface blurb. While reading the story set-up, about all the female settlers finding the single (that they've encountered) surviving colonist (male) unbelievably attractive and fascinating to the extent that they all want to leave their established long-term relationships in favor of him, I really wanted the story to unveil that the colonist had some sort of pheromones that caused the women to respond this way, thus framing the story as a contemplation of love and desire. I found the actual story so much less interesting. The Wind People (1959) Marion Zimmer Bradley | Space-faring woman unwisely becomes pregnant (oops!) and, as infants are unable to survive in space, opts to declare herself dead and maroon herself and her child on a random, empty planet. Who would possibly think this was a good idea? Later, as the child grows to adulthood, incestuous desires develop. I really, really don't like Zimmer Bradley, and this story makes me dislike her even more. Aside from the nicely unintentional advocacy for responsible birth control and possibly for contingency plans, this story is pointless. When I Was Miss Dow (1966) by Sonya Dorman | Alien shapeshifts into woman for a time; doesn't want to switch back. This was actually passably interesting, in an extremely introspective sort of way, but not a story I'd ever recommend. The Food Farm (1967) by Kit Reed | Eating disorder somehow intertwined with pop-star infatuation; leads to psychopathic plan to force-feed people. Wut. Sex and/or Mr. Morrison (1967) by Carol Emshwiller | What the hell? I have just read this story thrice over and I can not even distinguish a plot, to say nothing of a point. Emshwiller's afterward to this story is quoted, "It would be nice to live in a society where the genitals were really considered Beauty. It seems to me any other way of seeing them is obscene." Emshwiller is a psycho. False Dawn (1971) by Chelsea Quinn Yarbro | Stuck in some sort of post-atomic dystopic future, a mutated woman gets raped, rescued, and limps off with her rescuer. That's about it. Nobody's Home (1972) by Joanna Russ | Convoluted tale of teleportation theorizing on how instantaneous transport would affect interpersonal relationships, but not boring. These are kind of worth your time: The Ship Who Sang (1961) by Anne McCaffrey | Okay. I am a great fan of McCaffrey's, and the novel of this same name is one of my favorites. It's nice that the opening chapter is recognized here, but it's far better to experience this story as part of a novel than as a stand-alone tale. Baby, You Were Great (1967) by Kate Wilhelm | Creepy creepy creepy story about voyeurism, rape, control, and ratings. Extremely well-crafted and powerful; not enjoyable at all to read. Vaster than Empires and More Slow (1971) by Ursula K. Le Guin | Le Guin is great and this story no less so, but it's keeping poor company here. Read it in a collection of her works instead. Of Mist, Sand, and Grass (1973) by Vonda N. McIntyre | A novella about a post-apocalyptic world featuring a fascinating blend of modern technological advancements and traditional behaviors, but rather rough and unfinished. McIntyre eventually developed this novella into the first third of an award-winning novel. Read the novel instead. To give credit where credit is due, Sargent's essay to introduce this anthology — Women in Science Fiction or Women of Science Fiction, depending on whether you go by the title listed in the contents or the title at the head of the essay — is quite, quite good; probably the best of the three essays Sargent wrote for these anthologies. But you may have to grit your teeth through footnotes sprawling multiple pages (Footnote 10 took up five).

  7. 4 out of 5

    Tad Callin

    I bought used copy of this book for $1.79 many years ago - and when I read it back then, I came away with a negative first impression. Over the years, though, I grew up quite a bit, and my tastes changed; so did my priorities. Now that I value representation more, and have learned a thing or two about perspectives outside of my cisgender/white male/heterosexual worldview, I wanted to revisit this volume with fresh eyes. I also wanted to apply my experiences as a first-reader for an Escape Artist I bought used copy of this book for $1.79 many years ago - and when I read it back then, I came away with a negative first impression. Over the years, though, I grew up quite a bit, and my tastes changed; so did my priorities. Now that I value representation more, and have learned a thing or two about perspectives outside of my cisgender/white male/heterosexual worldview, I wanted to revisit this volume with fresh eyes. I also wanted to apply my experiences as a first-reader for an Escape Artists podcast to see if maybe my initial reaction would differ from a more objective evaluation. The Volume Itself: Pamela Sargent's introductory essay, as other reviewers have pointed out, reads like a "who's who" of writers whose careers had not yet blossomed in 1974. The three oldest stories date from before 1960, the oldest being Judith Merrill's 1948 story "That Only A Mother" - so this clearly is meant to showcase relatively contemporary writers. The essay seems to be an attempt to define the collection as an attempt to promote female writers on their merits without framing this volume as being representative of a particularly feminist platform. That's probably good if the intent is to dispel the "women don't write sci-fi" myth by attracting male readers who are leery of being lectured. But because the collection avoids taking a particular position, and isn't aiming for historical significance, it contains several stories that simply haven't aged well. There is an abundance of cringe-inducing body shaming, awkward speculation about alternative lifestyles in the far future, and self-conscious grappling with the expertise of women in science. Despite this, it does make for an interesting snapshot of the market in the early 1970s, and gives a glimpse into the early careers of some true legends who were just finding their feet at the time. There are only 12 stories and a poem here, so I'll summarize my thoughts as concisely as I can: The Child Dreams, Sonya Dorman - Poetry is not my forte, but I enjoyed this brief, 3-stanza introduction. (3/5 stars) That Only A Mother, Judith Merrill (1948) - This story ran on Pseudopod in May 2017, and it still functions well as a story of the horror of war in the budding atomic age. The story is structured around a plot twist which more jaded modern readers will probably see coming early on - but because hints and innuendos are used to convey the underlying attitudes of the characters, the story side-steps the problem of baldly stating what we might now see as very problematic attitudes. Rooting the horror of the story around a child born with severe disabilities is, itself, problematic. However, by leaving so much unsaid in the subtext, this story almost leaves itself a plausible defense for the way it calls into question how we place value on other people. The story implies - and we bring our own baggage to what we infer from it. (3/5 stars) Contagion, Katherine MacLean (1950) - A colony ship faces several difficult choices when they encounter a virus that transforms everyone into a copy of one man. An intriguing concept, the writing focuses more on solving the hard science problem than on developing realistic characters. The introduction to the story generously claims that the tale "is also about physical appearance and its relationship to our personal identity, as well as to our feelings about others." The truth is that the characters are not well differentiated by the author, except in their physical descriptions - which weirdly makes the story feel like a self-parody. And the "surprise" ending leaves the situation essentially unresolved, and those feelings unexplored. (1/5 stars) The Wind People, Marion Zimmer Bradley (1958) - Decades before writing her popular Camelot-based fantasy series, this story is written with a hint of the poetic prose that would mark her later novels. However, the contrived situation of a mother who maroons herself with her infant son and raises him alone on a planet populated by invisible people (one of whom is apparently the boy's father) stretches the suspension of disbelief to the breaking point. The uncomfortable Oedipal aspects of the story threaten to overwhelm the prose even as the reader struggles to figure out what the stakes of the story really are. (2/5 stars) The Ship Who Sang, Anne McCaffrey (1961) - Again confronting problematic attitudes about people with disabilities, the central conceit of this story is that severely deformed human infants can be turned into the "brains" of magnificent starships. Of course, a core assumption in this universe seems to code the ships as "female" and their human "brawn" as "male" - and the characters seem confined to rather stereotypical roles in that framework. This story was one of several which formed the basis of her later "Brain and Brawn" ship series, and it reads very much like an origin story, suffering from the sense that it closed at the end of its own first chapter. (2/5 stars) When I Was Miss Dow, Sonya Dorman (1966) - Apparently, these aliens can take human form, and - the details are vague as to why, or how their collective existence works, or what their motivations are. The POV character takes the form of a stereotypical secretary who develops a (probably) inappropriate relationship with a scientist. The way the sexual politics are laid out, it is hard to discern exactly who the author believes is exploiting whom in this story, but on every level, every interpretation feels appalling. (1/5 stars) The Food Farm, Kit Reed (1966) - Imagine a world in which body-shaming worked both ways. In this piece, a girl develops a fixation on a pop star who likes his girls as big as possible; and when her parents send her for a radical treatment that alters her metabolism, the pop star regretfully tells her she'll never be big enough for him - but he enlists her help in "training" other girls to meet his standards. The writing made it hard to parse what was happening, and this story angered me on many levels, but I'll leave it there. (0/5 stars) Baby, You Were Great, Kate Wilhelm (1967) - It wouldn't be very difficult to update this story as a comment on our own social media-driven society. A technology exists that can transmit emotions, and so one woman who feels emotions more easily becomes the star of a Truman Show-style broadcast. As with our own world, though, the problem doesn't rest in the technology itself as much as in the flawed people using it. Of the stories in this collection, this one comes closest to making a coherent indictment of the stereotypes it displays. Still, the dated and stilted dialogue and the implausibility of the situation make it difficult to understand what the stakes are or who the real "bad guy" of the story actually is. (2/5 stars) Sex and/or Mr. Morrison, Carol Emshwiller (1967) - This bizarre little piece would be more at home in a collection of stories specifically about questioning gender roles. The point of view character is a thoroughly unreliable narrator about whom we learn little beyond their indiscernible motivations - and that the title character is their object of desire. Beyond that, though, the writing is less concerned with conveying information about the characters and more concerned with expressing the fetishized desires of the POV character. It's not that I particularly disapprove of the characters desires - I just don't understand what they are, what they expect to happen, or what Mr. Morrison might think of the whole affair. (1/5 stars) Vaster Than Empires and More Slow, Ursula K. LeGuin (1971) - As stories about the exploration of gender roles and politics go, this was hands down the strongest of the bunch. Other than the central character's autism (which, considering the time this was written, was a little known and poorly understood condition), I found most of the characters' idiosyncrasies to be interesting and understandable. The main weaknesses of this story stemmed from the lack of a single protagonist - the ensemble nature of the ship's crew and the omniscient third-person point of view made it unclear until the back third of the story who the "main character" was supposed to be. Still, LeGuin's imagination and craft are on full display here. (3/5 stars) False Dawn, Chelsea Quinn Yarbro (1972) - Setting aside my personal distaste for post-apocalyptic dystopias, and for stories which focus on sexual assault, I found this tale to be grim and truncated. It wasn't at all clear to me that the male lead (a one-armed revolutionary) is the protagonist until the female character was raped - up to that point, when her agency was ripped away, she seemed to be the driving character of the story. But unless this was an excerpt from a larger work, the world built for us here is incoherent and spends too much time talking about politics and revolutions that don't really enter into the story at hand. (2/5 stars) Nobody's Home, Joanna Russ (1972) - The extended/blended family in this story is probably the most fully realized future society in this collection. And while the central conflict is a little obscure and sets the stakes very low, I found it to be the most poignant and relatable problem of all. (3/5 stars) Of Mist, and Grass, and Sand, Vonda N. McIntyre (1973) - Easily my favorite story of the bunch, this sketched out a world in which medicine is seen as magic, and in which trust is the most difficult commodity to come by. This story managed to make a strong feminist statement by appearing to not to comment on gender at all, while coding itself around tropes like the witchcraft and witches, the symbolism of snakes, and the unspoken burden carried by the central character. This story functioned well as a standalone, but still gave the impression of being part of a larger, more complex world. (3/5 stars)

  8. 5 out of 5

    Su

    Lo que más rescato de esta antología es la introducción. "Mujeres en la Ciencia Ficción". Me resulta tan apasionada y conocedora. incluso diría que queda chico, tengo la impresión de que Pamela Sargent podría explayarse más e incluso publicar un libro entero dedicado a ella. Motivo para una tesis quizás. Los relatos que incluyen son variados sin relación entre sí. Plumas independientes. Tengo mis favoritos como "La nave que cantaba" el poema "La niña sueña". Y algunos que no logro, todavía enten Lo que más rescato de esta antología es la introducción. "Mujeres en la Ciencia Ficción". Me resulta tan apasionada y conocedora. incluso diría que queda chico, tengo la impresión de que Pamela Sargent podría explayarse más e incluso publicar un libro entero dedicado a ella. Motivo para una tesis quizás. Los relatos que incluyen son variados sin relación entre sí. Plumas independientes. Tengo mis favoritos como "La nave que cantaba" el poema "La niña sueña". Y algunos que no logro, todavía entender, por ejemplo "El sexo y el Sr. Morrison" (si no me equivoco de titulo) no dejo de pensar en ese porque no le encuentro sentido. Sin duda, ha sido bueno conocer tantas autoras desconocidas.

  9. 4 out of 5

    Cocodras

    Me ha encantado. Algunos me han parecido brillantes, me han dejado con la boca abierta y sin respiración. Imaginación al poder, bien construidos, con ritmo, tensión, haciéndonos pensar sobre temas todavía actuales y alguno de estos relatos tienen ya unos cuantos años. Me han fascinado casi todos: Los habitantes del viento, La nave que cantaba, Más vasto que los imperios y más lento (en este me costó entrar, pero luego... tremendo y fascinante), Bruma, Hierba y Arena... Por mencionar algunos. Sé Me ha encantado. Algunos me han parecido brillantes, me han dejado con la boca abierta y sin respiración. Imaginación al poder, bien construidos, con ritmo, tensión, haciéndonos pensar sobre temas todavía actuales y alguno de estos relatos tienen ya unos cuantos años. Me han fascinado casi todos: Los habitantes del viento, La nave que cantaba, Más vasto que los imperios y más lento (en este me costó entrar, pero luego... tremendo y fascinante), Bruma, Hierba y Arena... Por mencionar algunos. Sé que la ciencia ficción es un género que aleja a muchas lectoras y lectores, pero esta antología va más allá del género, es literatura de la buena.

  10. 5 out of 5

    Laura Gaelx

    Como en toda antología, los relatos incluidos son muy diversos, tanto en su estilo y longitud como en su calidad. Lo que se merece cinco estrellas (o más) es la labor de curadora de Pamela Sargent. El extenso prólogo en el que repasa la presencia de las mujeres en la ciencia ficción, tanto como autoras como entre sus personajes, es impagable. Está repleto de referencias a novelas y relatos (todos previos a 1974, cuando se publica originalmente esta antología). Además, cada trabajo seleccionado s Como en toda antología, los relatos incluidos son muy diversos, tanto en su estilo y longitud como en su calidad. Lo que se merece cinco estrellas (o más) es la labor de curadora de Pamela Sargent. El extenso prólogo en el que repasa la presencia de las mujeres en la ciencia ficción, tanto como autoras como entre sus personajes, es impagable. Está repleto de referencias a novelas y relatos (todos previos a 1974, cuando se publica originalmente esta antología). Además, cada trabajo seleccionado se incluye por mostrar alguna faceta de la experiencia social de ser mujer actual (o, para el caso, de la década de los 70) en su vertiente especulativa.

  11. 5 out of 5

    Jose Antonio Granado

    Recopilación de relatos de la época de la "Nueva Ola", todos de geniales autoras y todos impregnados de esa "rareza" que podemos encontrar en los relatos de los 60-70 de ciencia ficción. La calidad es altísima y le quito una estrella simplemente porque por mi culpa no he sabido conectar al 100% con alguna de las historias. Para mi gusto han destacado por encima del resto los relatos de Le Guin, Vonda McIntyre, Joanna Russ y el de Ann McCaffrey.

  12. 4 out of 5

    Omaira

    Reseña completa a falta de caracteres Reseña completa a falta de caracteres

  13. 4 out of 5

    Jan Priddy

    I love this collection for introducing me to a number of wonderful writers. For introducing me to Vonda McIntyre alone, this book was invaluable.

  14. 5 out of 5

    Ali

    Amazing anthology that traverses a whole host of topics in sci-fi. Sargent's introduction is incredible and gives great insight into the history of female writers of the genre, and the subsequent stories are both entertaining to read and evocative. I highly recommend this.

  15. 5 out of 5

    Warwick Stubbs

    Never have I read a short-story book where the introduction was longer than any of the short-stories. But it is worth reading, and shines a light on the state of women and their stories, both as writers and as fictional characters, in the world of 70s science fiction. First story 'That Only a Mother' is memorable for the type of reaction that might have been expected from the parents of a newborn that was "different". Hopefully the world has moved on and today the title might reappear as 'That B Never have I read a short-story book where the introduction was longer than any of the short-stories. But it is worth reading, and shines a light on the state of women and their stories, both as writers and as fictional characters, in the world of 70s science fiction. First story 'That Only a Mother' is memorable for the type of reaction that might have been expected from the parents of a newborn that was "different". Hopefully the world has moved on and today the title might reappear as 'That Both Parents'. 5/5 'Contagion' was an interesting story that delves into genetic appearances and the prejudices that go along with that, while asking the always important question "just how important are our looks when relating to one another? 4/5 'The Wind People' had a great premise with a fantastic story that turned into a massive cop-out at the end. Disappointing. 3/5 'The Ship Who Sang' reads like a draft for an incomplete and unfleshed out novel. When I saw the "book" in a shop, I rejoiced thinking that Anne McCaffrey had taken the time to rewrite and expand the short-story, only to discover the book was a fix-up of more stories. There's great ideas here, but McCaffrey seems incapable of expanding those ideas. Unsatisfying. 2/5 'When I Was Miss Dow' - an alien inhabiting the body of a human and dealing with two brain hemispheres instead of one. Interesting. 4/5 'The Food Farm' Not sure how I feel about this one. It's about food. But it also about fat people. 3/5 'Baby, You Were great' by Kate Wilhelm I was looking forward to but it was ultimately not very interesting. I think it was a bout fame. Can't quite remember. 2/5 'Sex and / or Mr Morrison' Weird. In a good way. But also leaves you wondering "wtf???" 3/5 'Vaster Than Empires and More Slow' A well written tale about understanding and communicating that which is most alien to us. But I did find it a little boring to begin with. 4/5 'False dawn' Can't remember anything about this story. ...something to do with an apocalypse? ?/5 'Nobody's Home' Not the best thing I've read from Joanna Russ 2/5 'Of Mist, and Grass, and Sand' Though I didn't enjoy this story all that much, my partner did, and found it well-written. It details a post-apocalyptic world where a healer uses snakes to cure people. It is memorable though, and a number of images remain glued to my thoughts. 4/5 Overall, I think the Introduction by Pamela Sargent is the most interesting work in this collection, and none of the stories are classics, even if 'The Ship Who Sang' may have that status (or not - I personally think it's a clunker). All of the stories are well written and serve the purpose of presenting female viewpoints through the pages of science fiction.

  16. 4 out of 5

    Dion

    Decent collection. The introduction isn't fantastic since it reads more like a massively long selection of short story reviews and grows boring. The stories themselves are a bit of a grab bunch. One of them has an explicit (and unnecessary) rape scene and while it's told from a woman's POV, it's really all about the man she meets and the people after *him*. Another story has every woman on a ship falling in love/lust with some red-headed colonist. A third has a son falling in lust/love with his Decent collection. The introduction isn't fantastic since it reads more like a massively long selection of short story reviews and grows boring. The stories themselves are a bit of a grab bunch. One of them has an explicit (and unnecessary) rape scene and while it's told from a woman's POV, it's really all about the man she meets and the people after *him*. Another story has every woman on a ship falling in love/lust with some red-headed colonist. A third has a son falling in lust/love with his mother who is denying that the natives of the planet exist even though she was impregnated by one. There was one really chilling story about childhood mutations and paternal infanticide, but that was it. I'd say it's worth reading if you have nothing better to do.

  17. 4 out of 5

    Alexa

    An engaging collection of short stories, with an introduction worthy of reading all by itself. Many of the stories are rather grim and need to be taken in small bites. There were two variations on the theme of motherhood that I enjoyed. The two pieces of genius were Ursula K. Le Guin’s “Vaster Than Empires and More Slow,” and Vonda N. McIntyre’s “Of Mist, and Grass, and Sand,” which (I believe) later became the novel Dreamsnake. An engaging collection of short stories, with an introduction worthy of reading all by itself. Many of the stories are rather grim and need to be taken in small bites. There were two variations on the theme of motherhood that I enjoyed. The two pieces of genius were Ursula K. Le Guin’s “Vaster Than Empires and More Slow,” and Vonda N. McIntyre’s “Of Mist, and Grass, and Sand,” which (I believe) later became the novel Dreamsnake.

  18. 4 out of 5

    Shamsia

    Recopilación de relatos cortos de ciencia ficción sobre mujeres, de mujeres y con mujeres. Sea un mundo post apocalíptico donde se cura con serpientes, un mundo más o menos actual donde a las chicas adolescentes rellenitas se las envía a adelgazar a la fuerza a un convento, un planeta donde va un grupo de gente peculiar con reminiscencias de "Solaris", una madre haciendo lo que puede para que su hija sea feliz, y una larga lista, el tema es el mismo. Y hay un relato para todas en este volumen. Ma Recopilación de relatos cortos de ciencia ficción sobre mujeres, de mujeres y con mujeres. Sea un mundo post apocalíptico donde se cura con serpientes, un mundo más o menos actual donde a las chicas adolescentes rellenitas se las envía a adelgazar a la fuerza a un convento, un planeta donde va un grupo de gente peculiar con reminiscencias de "Solaris", una madre haciendo lo que puede para que su hija sea feliz, y una larga lista, el tema es el mismo. Y hay un relato para todas en este volumen. Mary Wollstonecraft Godwin estaría orgullosa de ustedes, chicas.

  19. 5 out of 5

    Quinn

    A neat collection of short stories. Not all were enjoyable - in fact, I was bored with over half of them - and not all really offer much in regards to 'Women studies'. The only stories I enjoyed are ones that all deserve five-star ratings: "Contagion" was a masterpiece, "The Ship Who Sang" which was equally as epic, "Of Mist, and Grass, and Sand", and "Vaster Than Empires, and More Slow". The rest were, to be honest, boring and tedious in that they were capable of so much more, but still enjoyab A neat collection of short stories. Not all were enjoyable - in fact, I was bored with over half of them - and not all really offer much in regards to 'Women studies'. The only stories I enjoyed are ones that all deserve five-star ratings: "Contagion" was a masterpiece, "The Ship Who Sang" which was equally as epic, "Of Mist, and Grass, and Sand", and "Vaster Than Empires, and More Slow". The rest were, to be honest, boring and tedious in that they were capable of so much more, but still enjoyable enough to not be rendered completely turned off by the idea of continuing on until the end.

  20. 5 out of 5

    Melinda

    A fabulous collection of classic SciFi short stories containing feminist themes which enhance the individual stories. New to the SciFi genre I couldn't put this collection of shorts down. Given the classic nature, these stories seem ageless. Great writing, huge fan of the feminist theme and it was great exposure to various authors. Variety was appreciated, definitely looking to exploring more of the writings from the authors featured.

  21. 5 out of 5

    Vanessa

    Debo admitir que no me gustaron todas las historias. La última novela corta de esta recopilación y La nave que cantaba son algunas de mis nuevas favoritas. Sin embargo, debo admitir las obvias pero importantes diferencias de estos cuentos con respecto a los escritos por hombres. Hay preocupación por temas como la maternidad, el romance, la apariencia física y son casi tan importantes en la trama como la ciencia, los viajes, el descubrimiento de nuevos ecosistemas. Recomiendo muuucho este libro.

  22. 5 out of 5

    Bookshark

    This is a hard book to rate, because even though some of the stories are great, several of them are not very good or are not science fiction. The best of the actual sci-fi stories: - Contagion, by Katherine MacLean - The Ship Who Sang, by Anne McCaffrey - Baby, You Were Great, by Kate Wilhelm - Vaster Than Empires and More Slow, by Ursula K. LeGuin

  23. 4 out of 5

    Brandon

    The book contains 12 stories. I would say I liked, or really liked 8 of them. I few I didn't enjoy that much but they certainly weren't bad. There was one that was absolutely horrible though and I really don't even know what it was doing in the book. Besides that one anomaly (The Food Farm) I thought this book was well worth reading!

  24. 4 out of 5

    Lara

    A collection of stories which, not only through their explicit themes of exploration and empathy, but also in their pairing of boldness and sensitivity, feel current, even timeless. A book that triggered a reading binge when it was starting to wane, I'm finally reading for curiosity and discovery again.

  25. 5 out of 5

    Dale Jones

    I was this collection was okay. I thought some of the stories had interesting premises but lacked execution. Some of them were great, others just boring so I skipped them. My favorite was The Wind People by Marion Zimmer Bradley, "That Only a Mother" – Judith Merril, Sex and/or Mr. Morrison" – Carol Emshwiller.

  26. 5 out of 5

    Kristina

    This collection reminded me why I love science fiction! These are disturbing, thought-provoking and heart-wrenching stories representing sci-fi at its best. The introduction is a little dated when read today but it provides interesting insight into the world with which these authors had to contend.

  27. 4 out of 5

    CKE387

    Here are the stories that I liked from the collection: That Only a Mother by Judith Merrill Contagion by Katherine MacLean The Ship Who Sang by Anne McCaffrey The Food Farm by Kit Reed and Of Mist, and Grass, and Sand by Vonda N. McIntyre

  28. 5 out of 5

    Ideath

    Some of the stories are so highly anthologized i kinda sighed when i ran across them, but re-read 'em because they're still good. This was a gift from Megan, who spotted it in the goodwill books section and wanted to feed my ladies of sci fi binge.

  29. 5 out of 5

    Brian Cohen

    Solid compilation of worthy stories, only four stars because there weren’t any that made me add other works by the author to my ‘want to read’ list, which the best collections do. However, the volume is pretty short. I would gladly read others in the Women of Wonder series based on this one.

  30. 5 out of 5

    Isabel Jazmín

    Una antología muy entretenida, que permite acercarse a muchas autoras nuevas para mí: solamente conocía y había leído a dos de las trece incluidas.

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