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Road to Perdition (Graphic Novel)

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Rock Island, Illinois -- 1929. Michael O'Sullivan is a good father and a family man -- and also the chief enforcer for John Looney, the town's Irish Godfather of crime. As Looney's Angel of Death, O'Sullivan has done the bidding of Chicago gangsters Al Capone and Frank Nitti as well -- but when a gangland execution spells tragedy for the O'Sullivan family, a grieving fathe Rock Island, Illinois -- 1929. Michael O'Sullivan is a good father and a family man -- and also the chief enforcer for John Looney, the town's Irish Godfather of crime. As Looney's Angel of Death, O'Sullivan has done the bidding of Chicago gangsters Al Capone and Frank Nitti as well -- but when a gangland execution spells tragedy for the O'Sullivan family, a grieving father and his adolescent son find themselves on a winding road fo treachery, revenge, and revelation.Writer Max Allan Collins is a two-time winner of the Private Eye Writers of America's Shamus Award for his Nathan Keller historical thrillers True Detective and Stolen Away. Award-winning artist Richard Piers Raynner spent four years working on the artwork for Road to Perdition, a labor of love that has resulted in some of the most stunningly realistic drawings of 1930s Chicago ever seen on printed page.


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Rock Island, Illinois -- 1929. Michael O'Sullivan is a good father and a family man -- and also the chief enforcer for John Looney, the town's Irish Godfather of crime. As Looney's Angel of Death, O'Sullivan has done the bidding of Chicago gangsters Al Capone and Frank Nitti as well -- but when a gangland execution spells tragedy for the O'Sullivan family, a grieving fathe Rock Island, Illinois -- 1929. Michael O'Sullivan is a good father and a family man -- and also the chief enforcer for John Looney, the town's Irish Godfather of crime. As Looney's Angel of Death, O'Sullivan has done the bidding of Chicago gangsters Al Capone and Frank Nitti as well -- but when a gangland execution spells tragedy for the O'Sullivan family, a grieving father and his adolescent son find themselves on a winding road fo treachery, revenge, and revelation.Writer Max Allan Collins is a two-time winner of the Private Eye Writers of America's Shamus Award for his Nathan Keller historical thrillers True Detective and Stolen Away. Award-winning artist Richard Piers Raynner spent four years working on the artwork for Road to Perdition, a labor of love that has resulted in some of the most stunningly realistic drawings of 1930s Chicago ever seen on printed page.

30 review for Road to Perdition (Graphic Novel)

  1. 4 out of 5

    Canavan

    ✭✭✭½

  2. 5 out of 5

    Jelinas

    I watched the film version first, so maybe I'm a little biased, but I wasn't too terribly impressed by this graphic novel. I mean, it was pretty good, and the artwork was excellent, but it just didn't have the same impact on me as the film did. Road to Perdition is a graphic novel about Michael O'Sullivan, an enforcer for the Looneys, an Irish mob family. The Looneys betray Michael and his vengeance is great. Along with his son, Michael Jr., he takes his revenge on the Looney family for what they I watched the film version first, so maybe I'm a little biased, but I wasn't too terribly impressed by this graphic novel. I mean, it was pretty good, and the artwork was excellent, but it just didn't have the same impact on me as the film did. Road to Perdition is a graphic novel about Michael O'Sullivan, an enforcer for the Looneys, an Irish mob family. The Looneys betray Michael and his vengeance is great. Along with his son, Michael Jr., he takes his revenge on the Looney family for what they've done to his. Collins does a fair job of drawing real people from that era into his story, and it's clear that he did a lot of research. The story itself is a stock vengeance tale -- it's always entertaining to see the bad guys get their due. But the pacing of the novel felt a little rushed to me. I couldn't get attached to any of the characters because the action unfolded so swiftly, with little development of the characters. The ending of the movie is significantly different from the ending of the novel. While I kind of liked the novel's ending, I can see why they changed it for the film -- the ending they chose is better suited to the movie they made. Maybe I would've enjoyed the graphic novel more if the edition I read hadn't included a long preface by the author. It reminded my of Chuck Palahniuk's afterword in Fight Club, where he basically talks about what an amazing job he did writing this novel. While I can understand and appreciate that Collins poured a lot of passion and energy into this project, it doesn't help me to enjoy it more to see him boasting about himself and getting high on his own opinion of what he considers his vast talent. It reminds me of this scene in one of my favorite guilty pleasures, Center Stage. During a rehearsal, the director of the ballet tels the prima ballerina, "I need to see the movement, not the effort behind it." Overall, I thought it was a solid graphic novel, and worth reading. It just didn't blow me away the way Michael O'Sullivan kicking down a door and shoving a gun in my face should have.

  3. 4 out of 5

    Michael P.

    It is rare to say that the movie is better than the book, but the film is better than this book. To be fair, I saw the film first, they aren’t quite the same, and so my expectations may have influenced my reception of this graphic novel. Still, I found the story less interesting and the telling less skilled. Collins overwrites, not allowing the pictures to do their share of the work, but having said so, I admit that the artist is not the best story teller. I think the movie plot improves on the It is rare to say that the movie is better than the book, but the film is better than this book. To be fair, I saw the film first, they aren’t quite the same, and so my expectations may have influenced my reception of this graphic novel. Still, I found the story less interesting and the telling less skilled. Collins overwrites, not allowing the pictures to do their share of the work, but having said so, I admit that the artist is not the best story teller. I think the movie plot improves on the original, and the actors make their characters seem more real than the original creators do. This IS a pretty good graphic novel. I’m glad that I read it, but I expected it to be better than it is. Anyone reading this who has not seen the film may want to seek out comments from someone who also has not seen the film but has read this book. They are more likely to approach the material the same way that you do. I hope that my comment help those who have seen the film.

  4. 4 out of 5

    Dave

    Abrupt endings, like the multitude of lives discarded in the bloodletting of this story, seem almost paradoxically appropriate. It's been years since I saw this movie, and while the premise is the same, there are some differing scenes. It is certainly a tale of graphic vengeance, wrapped in the holy undercurrent of 1930s Catholic sacrament and forgiveness. Otherwise, perdition awaits. This is the struggle that Michael O'Sullivan, a.k.a. "The Angel of Death" deals with as he mourns the loss of hi Abrupt endings, like the multitude of lives discarded in the bloodletting of this story, seem almost paradoxically appropriate. It's been years since I saw this movie, and while the premise is the same, there are some differing scenes. It is certainly a tale of graphic vengeance, wrapped in the holy undercurrent of 1930s Catholic sacrament and forgiveness. Otherwise, perdition awaits. This is the struggle that Michael O'Sullivan, a.k.a. "The Angel of Death" deals with as he mourns the loss of his family at the hands of his former employers. I am eager to watch the movie again to see what I missed the first time.

  5. 5 out of 5

    Joseph

    Another strange instance where the movie was far better than the book. I'm not one for comics, but this one was disappointing because the movie Road to Perdition is one of my favorite movies. The story was completely different in the movie. The main character Michael O'Sullivan was a heartless mass-murderer in the book, but in the movie he was a sympathetic character on an ill-fated quest for revenge. Anyhow, watch the movie, don't read the graphic novel.

  6. 5 out of 5

    Dacia

    This was the first (and so far only) graphic novel I'd ever read. It was surprisingly good. There was a decent mix of action and story, and pretty soon reading the novel in pictures became easy. I watched the movie after I read the book. For some reason I thought a movie made from a graphic novel would stick more closely to the story line. It did, somewhat, but the movie was still lacking something - a crucial something - that made the book better.

  7. 5 out of 5

    Jordan

    This was a gripping, page-turning awesome crime story. I highly recommend it. It's not light on the action and bloodshed either! But the real great stuff is the suspense, the relationship between the father and son in the book, and the art too. Excited to see the film too!

  8. 5 out of 5

    Colford Bennet

    Different from the movie but a good graphic novel! I've used it in my writing classes.

  9. 5 out of 5

    Armando

    is the story about a mob chief enforcer and how he is betrayed and his wife and youngest child are killed. After the tragic dead of his wife and kid he and his older child avenge them.

  10. 5 out of 5

    Mel

    This was a fun read. It was drawn well; the story was engaging and I have to confess I couldn't really put it down.

  11. 4 out of 5

    Skip

  12. 4 out of 5

    Dan

  13. 4 out of 5

    Cory

  14. 5 out of 5

    David Kiersh

  15. 4 out of 5

    Timothy

  16. 5 out of 5

    Ryan

  17. 5 out of 5

    Vinay Badri

  18. 5 out of 5

    Trusca

  19. 5 out of 5

    Chelsea Minor

  20. 5 out of 5

    Eric Manning

  21. 4 out of 5

    Lucas Shiomi

  22. 5 out of 5

    Moby-Nostromo

  23. 5 out of 5

    Scotty Cameron

  24. 5 out of 5

    nyota

  25. 5 out of 5

    Paul Clifford

  26. 5 out of 5

    Sage

  27. 4 out of 5

    Paula

  28. 5 out of 5

    Ann Robertson

  29. 4 out of 5

    Sheldon

  30. 5 out of 5

    Andrea

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