free hit counter code Of Men and Their Making: The Selected Non-fiction of John Steinbeck - GoBooks - Download Free Book
Ads Banner
Hot Best Seller

Of Men and Their Making: The Selected Non-fiction of John Steinbeck

Availability: Ready to download

Paperback. Pub Date :2003-07-03 Pages: 448 Language: English Publisher: Penguin Classics Steinbecks writing was fuelled by a need to observe things firsthand. whether as a journalist or novelist. The huge success of THE GRAPES OF WRATH enabled him to travel the world. ceaselessly writing about the great events of each decade. This collection brings together the greatest of Paperback. Pub Date :2003-07-03 Pages: 448 Language: English Publisher: Penguin Classics Steinbecks writing was fuelled by a need to observe things firsthand. whether as a journalist or novelist. The huge success of THE GRAPES OF WRATH enabled him to travel the world. ceaselessly writing about the great events of each decade. This collection brings together the greatest of those dispatches - from countries as diverse as Vietnam. Britain. Morocco and Italy. In addition. it reproduces America and the Americans. a gripping account of the US in the 1960s based on Steinbecks observations on racism. moral decline & the environment.The extremely enjoyable book makes an important point about Steinbecks oeuvre. showing just how important journalism was to his career as a writer.


Compare
Ads Banner

Paperback. Pub Date :2003-07-03 Pages: 448 Language: English Publisher: Penguin Classics Steinbecks writing was fuelled by a need to observe things firsthand. whether as a journalist or novelist. The huge success of THE GRAPES OF WRATH enabled him to travel the world. ceaselessly writing about the great events of each decade. This collection brings together the greatest of Paperback. Pub Date :2003-07-03 Pages: 448 Language: English Publisher: Penguin Classics Steinbecks writing was fuelled by a need to observe things firsthand. whether as a journalist or novelist. The huge success of THE GRAPES OF WRATH enabled him to travel the world. ceaselessly writing about the great events of each decade. This collection brings together the greatest of those dispatches - from countries as diverse as Vietnam. Britain. Morocco and Italy. In addition. it reproduces America and the Americans. a gripping account of the US in the 1960s based on Steinbecks observations on racism. moral decline & the environment.The extremely enjoyable book makes an important point about Steinbecks oeuvre. showing just how important journalism was to his career as a writer.

49 review for Of Men and Their Making: The Selected Non-fiction of John Steinbeck

  1. 4 out of 5

    Ryan

    Steinbeck is best known as a chronicler of the 1930s. In this book, the day-to-day reality of those times (and others) is recorded even more sharply than in his fiction. Vivid, searching, often surprising, this collection of articles is a worthy complement to the Steinbeck canon. Steinbeck recalls the 1930s not with bitterness but with nostalgia. The simplicity of the life he lived came to seem right and good. He learned to live comfortably and contentedly on less than fifty dollars a month; when Steinbeck is best known as a chronicler of the 1930s. In this book, the day-to-day reality of those times (and others) is recorded even more sharply than in his fiction. Vivid, searching, often surprising, this collection of articles is a worthy complement to the Steinbeck canon. Steinbeck recalls the 1930s not with bitterness but with nostalgia. The simplicity of the life he lived came to seem right and good. He learned to live comfortably and contentedly on less than fifty dollars a month; when larger sums finally came his way, his first reaction was terror. He shunned cities (‘closed and shuttered industrial cemeteries’), preferring to settle close to the sea and live off its bounty. A large part of his daily protein food came from the sea, and he raised vegetables all year round - kale, lettuce, chard, turnips and carrots. He never peeled a potato without planting the skins. Keeping clean, however, was an enduring difficulty. For a time he used a soap made of pork fat, wood ashes and salt. It took the future Nobel Prize winner ‘much sunning’ to get the stench out of his sheets. The stand-out pieces are ‘Dubious Battle in California’, ‘The Harvest Gypsies’ and ‘Starvation Under the Orange Trees’ - and I will not do Steinbeck the disservice of quoting them. These are the seeds from which The Grapes of Wrath sprung, and rival that great novel's punching power. Duller pieces follow, mostly about writing, adaptations of his books and who starred in them. Thankfully we shift to his dispatches from World War 2. Denied entrance to the US army, Steinbeck's value as a reporter was quickly recognised. His reportage plays to his lifelong strength of seeing big events through the ‘little’ people’s eyes. When posted in England he notes the success of the Dig for Victory campaign with pride. He observes the girls ‘who have shot enemies out of the sky and gone back to mending socks.’ In Dover, he observes the British quality that will lead them to triumph over Fascism - ‘they are incorrigibly, incorruptibly unimpressed.’ His later reports on the Vietnam War outraged even dedicated fans. What they could not understand was how someone who hated the bullies at home also hated the bullies overseas. If you think the Vietnam War was wrong, you may agree that Steinbeck at least was sincerely wrong in supporting it. A lifelong Democrat who idolised FDR and the New Deal, he hated the very notion of Communism. Other writers (such as John Updike) perhaps made more nuanced cases for the war. But few writers troubled to fly there, don fatigues, and live among the troops - which included two of Steinbeck’s grown sons. Journalism floors jingoism early on. Big battles, he notes, are like a bullfight, with lines established and clear. But Vietnam was a war with no fronts and no rear. It was everywhere, like ‘a thin, ever-present gas.’ Any person, any place, may erupt without warning into Armageddon. Steinbeck did not demonise the enemy but didn't avert his eyes when they placed machine guns inside peasant houses next to the captured children. If Steinbeck lacks the finished edge of an Ernest Hemingway, he has far more heart, and heart may, in the end, offer greater riches. This book is full of them.

  2. 5 out of 5

    Eric

  3. 4 out of 5

    Johnny B. Rempit

  4. 4 out of 5

    Heather

  5. 5 out of 5

    Sandy Jackson

  6. 5 out of 5

    benjamin Hassall

  7. 4 out of 5

    Susan

  8. 5 out of 5

    Benjammin

  9. 4 out of 5

    James

  10. 5 out of 5

    JJ

  11. 5 out of 5

    Musa Zaghloul

  12. 4 out of 5

    Frank Sounder

  13. 4 out of 5

    Brendan Coffey

  14. 4 out of 5

    jennet wheatstonelllsl Proc

  15. 5 out of 5

    Mark Ronan

  16. 4 out of 5

    Rob Maher

  17. 5 out of 5

    John Ervin

  18. 4 out of 5

    Barbara

  19. 4 out of 5

    Jaidev

  20. 4 out of 5

    Jimmy

  21. 4 out of 5

    Martyn Webster

  22. 5 out of 5

    Michael Scott

  23. 4 out of 5

    Noteeth

  24. 4 out of 5

    Emilie Marshall

  25. 5 out of 5

    Jasper

  26. 4 out of 5

    Isaac SK

  27. 4 out of 5

    Emma Sedlak

  28. 5 out of 5

    Rebecca

  29. 4 out of 5

    Tom

  30. 5 out of 5

    Darla

  31. 4 out of 5

    Kathy

  32. 5 out of 5

    Mohammad

  33. 4 out of 5

    Pawel

  34. 5 out of 5

    Sue

  35. 4 out of 5

    Bookscmc

  36. 5 out of 5

    Yasmin

  37. 4 out of 5

    Darcy Stewart

  38. 5 out of 5

    Steve Brady

  39. 4 out of 5

    Nada

  40. 5 out of 5

    Teresa

  41. 5 out of 5

    Scott

  42. 5 out of 5

    Lara Abdallah

  43. 4 out of 5

    Steph

  44. 4 out of 5

    Jillian

  45. 5 out of 5

    Amanda Skjoldal

  46. 4 out of 5

    Sarah Draheim

  47. 5 out of 5

    Bernie

  48. 4 out of 5

    Chiffchaff Birdy

  49. 5 out of 5

    Alicia

Add a review

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Loading...
We use cookies to give you the best online experience. By using our website you agree to our use of cookies in accordance with our cookie policy.