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Collects Siege (2010) #1-4 & Siege: Cabal Norman Osborn has one obstacle left between him and world domination...Asgard! Will he take control and become all-powerful? Can the Marvel heroes trust each other long enough to stop him? What will be left when the dust settles? Collects Siege (2010) #1-4 & Siege: Cabal Norman Osborn has one obstacle left between him and world domination...Asgard! Will he take control and become all-powerful? Can the Marvel heroes trust each other long enough to stop him? What will be left when the dust settles?


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Collects Siege (2010) #1-4 & Siege: Cabal Norman Osborn has one obstacle left between him and world domination...Asgard! Will he take control and become all-powerful? Can the Marvel heroes trust each other long enough to stop him? What will be left when the dust settles? Collects Siege (2010) #1-4 & Siege: Cabal Norman Osborn has one obstacle left between him and world domination...Asgard! Will he take control and become all-powerful? Can the Marvel heroes trust each other long enough to stop him? What will be left when the dust settles?

30 review for Siege

  1. 4 out of 5

    Jeff

    Siege was the culmination of the Dark Reign crossover event, which had the potential to be amazing and generally, in Bendis’ hands, it was. The Marvel Universe does a 180 and Dark Reign saw Norman Osborn and his evil Avengers take control, but Osborn’s command (if he ever had any) over the Cabal (the Evil Illuminati) has slowly waned, but his pal Loki’ll stick with him. Osborn has been Loki’s patsy for some time and now it’s time to finalize his grand plan with the prize just within in reach. The Siege was the culmination of the Dark Reign crossover event, which had the potential to be amazing and generally, in Bendis’ hands, it was. The Marvel Universe does a 180 and Dark Reign saw Norman Osborn and his evil Avengers take control, but Osborn’s command (if he ever had any) over the Cabal (the Evil Illuminati) has slowly waned, but his pal Loki’ll stick with him. Osborn has been Loki’s patsy for some time and now it’s time to finalize his grand plan with the prize just within in reach. The plan: engineer an incident that forces a U.S. confrontation with Asgard, which is currently hanging over Broxton, Oklahoma. Initially, even Thor is overwhelmed by the forces of H.A.M.M.E.R. (“Hammer don’t hurt ‘em.”) The real Avengers to the rescue. Note the looming reflection in Osborn’s face plate. Wait for it… Boo-yah! Bottom line: Bendis has the knack to be able to put together the core books for these events and have them not only make sense but be entertaining. Some of the tie-in books for Dark Reign and Siege are horrible, but reading this one will whet your appetite for the better volumes.

  2. 5 out of 5

    Terence

    HAMMER Director Norman Osborn has decided to defy Presidential orders and wield his powers at their utmost to destroy Asgard. Fortunately some still stand with Asgard and against Norman Osborn. Siege is the ultimate outcome everyone expected when Norman Osborn was placed in charge of world security. A heinous crime against a people group that couldn't be ignored. He chose Asgard and surprisingly he had enough muscle to get the job done. This series is pure mayhem with things being destroyed left a HAMMER Director Norman Osborn has decided to defy Presidential orders and wield his powers at their utmost to destroy Asgard. Fortunately some still stand with Asgard and against Norman Osborn. Siege is the ultimate outcome everyone expected when Norman Osborn was placed in charge of world security. A heinous crime against a people group that couldn't be ignored. He chose Asgard and surprisingly he had enough muscle to get the job done. This series is pure mayhem with things being destroyed left and right. Some characters die while others show their true selves to the world. Siege is a story of rebirth through destruction, but anyone looking for intricate plot lines should look elsewhere.

  3. 4 out of 5

    Anne

    Siege is everything I love about Bendis! It feels like everything that started in Civil War has finally come full circle. Not that there is ever any real finality in comics (graphic novels, whatever), but you do get closure on some of the issues that have been hanging out in the Marvel/Avenger universe for quite some time. *sigh* The End...ish.

  4. 4 out of 5

    Nicolo

    I didn’t finish this story when it first came out due to “event fatigue.” Marvel had too many crossover events that a few years ago I just ceased to follow the monthly comics and waited for the trade. I actually started on the first two issues but dropped it when I was overwhelmed by the tie-ins. Ironically, Marvel touted this as a small scale event, and perhaps the company was aware of their overabundance of events. This was indeed smaller in scale since it only had four issues and I was able t I didn’t finish this story when it first came out due to “event fatigue.” Marvel had too many crossover events that a few years ago I just ceased to follow the monthly comics and waited for the trade. I actually started on the first two issues but dropped it when I was overwhelmed by the tie-ins. Ironically, Marvel touted this as a small scale event, and perhaps the company was aware of their overabundance of events. This was indeed smaller in scale since it only had four issues and I was able to read all of it in one sitting since those books were available digitally on the Marvel Digital Comics Unlimited resource on Marvel.com. The Siege in question here was an actual military action by Norman Osborn, also known as the Green Goblin, and his villainous cohorts on Asgard. With a lot of heroes in hiding due to Osborn’s rule as director of H.A.M.M.E.R., Asgard stood as an ostentatious symbol of defiance in these dark times. Osborn wanted it brought down and he succeeded, though that was not the only one to fall on that momentous day. This could have easily been folded into the monthly Thor title, but I understood why this needed its own miniseries. The ramifications of the Siege brought about a sea change in story direction, which ended a lot of story threads and begat new ones. The Dark Reign was over and Asgard literally fell. The Sentry finally became unhinged and killed Ares before he himself was brought down like a rabid dog. Steve Rogers became America’s top cop, inheriting a role once worn by Nick Fury, Tony Stark and Norman Osborn; and the Avengers could operate in the open again, essentially heralding a new “Heroic Age.” Just in time really, I was beginning to tire of Osborn in charge of everything. I enjoyed this story a lot. Admittedly, I would always be partial to story where Thor gets to swing his hammer a lot and bring down a lot of bad guys. It was a good story with a lot of warriors fighting and dying by the platoon. There was a different flavor to Brian Bendis’ dialogue that I liked and Oliver Coipel’s beautiful pencils are always a draw for me. This story rated an easy four stars from me.

  5. 4 out of 5

    Martin

    "SIEGE" capped years of storylines, from Avengers Disassembled, through House of M, Civil War, Secret Invasion and finally "Dark Reign". It is a satisfying crossover event, reminiscent of a Hollywood Summer Blockbuster. Because he is all sorts of crazy - and with some nudging by Loki, the Norse God of Mischief - Norman Osborn finally cracks and orders, then leads, the invasion of Asgard. The heroes finally decide that Osborn has gone too far and they decide to bring him down. Often criticized fo "SIEGE" capped years of storylines, from Avengers Disassembled, through House of M, Civil War, Secret Invasion and finally "Dark Reign". It is a satisfying crossover event, reminiscent of a Hollywood Summer Blockbuster. Because he is all sorts of crazy - and with some nudging by Loki, the Norse God of Mischief - Norman Osborn finally cracks and orders, then leads, the invasion of Asgard. The heroes finally decide that Osborn has gone too far and they decide to bring him down. Often criticized for writing long, decompressed crossovers, Bendis gives us a brisk 4-parter that hits all the right notes: big stakes, big brawls, funny one-liners, and also realistic dialogue [for a comic book]. Olivier Coipel's art is great, as usual. And let's not forget the inks by Mark Morales and the colors by Laura Martin. The result is an absolutely beautiful book that is a joy to read. While a good read in its own right, I feel reading some of the companion volumes (such as Siege: Thor and - especially - Siege: Dark Avengers) will greatly improve the reader's enjoyment of this book. Their contents add other layers to the main story, and that helps make an already good book even better. "SIEGE" did not revolutionise comics. It wasn't meant to. But, for my money, as an [entertaining] event comic, it doesn't get much better than this.

  6. 4 out of 5

    Sesana

    For a crossover event, this is actually quite good. I may be biased on that mark, though. I hated Civil War, and the Registration Act, and I'm no fan of the Osborn storyline. I don't really understand how he worked his way into the position that he did. Then again, the characters don't seem to get it either, so at least I'm not alone there. I might have ended up liking anything that did away with either one, much less both, even if it had ended up being terrible. Good thing it isn't. Pulling off For a crossover event, this is actually quite good. I may be biased on that mark, though. I hated Civil War, and the Registration Act, and I'm no fan of the Osborn storyline. I don't really understand how he worked his way into the position that he did. Then again, the characters don't seem to get it either, so at least I'm not alone there. I might have ended up liking anything that did away with either one, much less both, even if it had ended up being terrible. Good thing it isn't. Pulling off a big even like this is really tough. There's a tendency to cram as many characters as possible onto every page, at the expense of clarity. Bendis does an admirable job of avoiding the worst of this. Yes, there are a lot of characters, but far less than there could have been. Even some major characters are entirely offstage. Better yet, there's only a handful of characters who are given significant time on panel. The end result is that Siege feels no more cluttered than many team books, and far less so than Avengers vs. X-Men had. It also helps that Bendis can write some great dialog. I've said this before when reviewing one of Bendis's books: he makes his characters sound like people. It's surely not the best dialog he's ever written, but it's believable and sounds authentic: this is what these characters would be saying under these circumstances. This is a really short event, though. Only four issues? It gives the impression that Marvel just wanted it to be over with. It feels a little rushed, especially in the buildup and the aftermath. A few lines in the last issue give the impression that everything in this book happened over the course of a single day, which is an almost impossibly rushed timeline. I have read better crossover events. But I've also read far, far worse, especially recently. As far as events go, this is one of the most believable, with the least amount of handwaving.

  7. 5 out of 5

    Sam Quixote

    Asgard is stranded in Midgard (Earth) hovering 12 feet above Oklahoma making everyone a little uneasy to have a city full of gods appear in the midst of the most powerful nation in the world. Norman Osborn, leader of HAMMER, ignores the President’s orders and launches a full scale war against Asgard, sending his Dark Avengers against Thor and his cohorts. Throw into the mix Steve Rogers and Nick Fury leading an array of old and new heroes and you have one big superhero fight. “Siege” feels like Asgard is stranded in Midgard (Earth) hovering 12 feet above Oklahoma making everyone a little uneasy to have a city full of gods appear in the midst of the most powerful nation in the world. Norman Osborn, leader of HAMMER, ignores the President’s orders and launches a full scale war against Asgard, sending his Dark Avengers against Thor and his cohorts. Throw into the mix Steve Rogers and Nick Fury leading an array of old and new heroes and you have one big superhero fight. “Siege” feels like the culmination of a larger story with lots of strands coming together in this book and more than a few large events happening to change the course of later stories. Maybe it’s because I didn’t follow the books leading up to this one but I wasn’t as blown away with this book as others were. Sure, some characters die and a couple of big changes happen, but it’s nothing most readers of superhero comics haven’t seen before (and the rule at Marvel is that nobody stays dead besides Peter Parker’s Uncle Ben). Also the title is misleading – Asgard isn’t really besieged. Superheroes fight around it but there’s no real siege to speak of. A siege would imply the besieged play a bigger part in the story but as it is it feels like Asgard is more of a catalyst than a focal point of the story. It’s not really incorporated into the fighting so the story ends up looking and reading like any other superhero fight that could’ve taken place anywhere. Ultimately “Siege” is one big argy-bargy of colourful characters knocking each other about with little substance such as character, dialogue or story to make it a better read.

  8. 4 out of 5

    James DeSantis

    If I were to review this based on the first two issues it be a easy 4.5. It's fun and exciting but then... Well what is Siege you ask. Well Asgard is on earth! Well it's floating above earth anyway instead of another dimension (I think it's another dimension usually, right?) and now Norman, you know the Green fucking Goblin, wants to take it. Siege is about Norman's final move to take everything from everyone, and the first issue is really a siege on Asgard. Of course Thor is like 'Nah brah that If I were to review this based on the first two issues it be a easy 4.5. It's fun and exciting but then... Well what is Siege you ask. Well Asgard is on earth! Well it's floating above earth anyway instead of another dimension (I think it's another dimension usually, right?) and now Norman, you know the Green fucking Goblin, wants to take it. Siege is about Norman's final move to take everything from everyone, and the first issue is really a siege on Asgard. Of course Thor is like 'Nah brah that ain't happening" but can he really do much against Sentry? The walking talking insane fucking Superman type? Good: The opening is exciting and fun but it's really issue 2 where shit kicks into gear. Thor is in trouble, heroes are gathering, Norman is losing it, and Ares finds out the truth. The fights are exciting and the deaths hit big. It's colorful, sad, and exciting all at once. Also the new status quo did set up some interesting things in the end. Bad: Issue 3-4 aren't bad but same old same old. BIG brawls with so much shit you can't even keep up with on screen. Then we get this Naruto looking baddie that's kind of lame. Sorry I just like villains being human like, scarier that way. Overall this event was solid. It was short, fun, and exciting. I loved the Dark Avengers so it's very sad to see it go but this worked for a good conclusion to House of M/Civil War events leading up to Dark Reign and then ending with Siege. A 3 out of 5.

  9. 4 out of 5

    Mike

    What a payoff. I'm sure there are Marvel readers who are bitching about how Bendis is overextended and concerned that he isn't putting his highest quality into each work. That may be true of a few books over the last couple of years, but there is no better example of high quality than this series. This book is not his usual character study, where the value of a story is in the way our heroes react personally to adversity. Rather, this is the balls-out third-act action climax to a very creative an What a payoff. I'm sure there are Marvel readers who are bitching about how Bendis is overextended and concerned that he isn't putting his highest quality into each work. That may be true of a few books over the last couple of years, but there is no better example of high quality than this series. This book is not his usual character study, where the value of a story is in the way our heroes react personally to adversity. Rather, this is the balls-out third-act action climax to a very creative and challenging story arc that Bendis and Queseda masterminded. The final chapter was especially wide-eyed for me, and yet each of the big "moves" make total sense. That too takes a great deal of thought and forethought to make the story threads and plot machinations come together like this did. Plus I can't wait to see what new juicy moves they come up with next!

  10. 4 out of 5

    Brandon

    2010's Siege event by Brian Michael Bendis and Olivier Coipel is the culmination of nearly a decade in build-up across the Marvel Universe, the likes of which has not been seen since. Starting with Avengers Disassembled, Brian Michael Bendis was given the reigns of the entire Marvel Universe. Taking apart the Avengers and replacing them with the new, fresh, almost street-level New Avengers team, Bendis would make the title an essential backbone of the Marvel Universe. The 2000s were full of big 2010's Siege event by Brian Michael Bendis and Olivier Coipel is the culmination of nearly a decade in build-up across the Marvel Universe, the likes of which has not been seen since. Starting with Avengers Disassembled, Brian Michael Bendis was given the reigns of the entire Marvel Universe. Taking apart the Avengers and replacing them with the new, fresh, almost street-level New Avengers team, Bendis would make the title an essential backbone of the Marvel Universe. The 2000s were full of big line-wide crossovers for all of Marvel Comics, most of these being written by Bendis himself, and the flagship New Avengers team would constantly play off of them. From the decimation of the X-Men in House of M, to the Superhuman Registration Act and death of Captain America in Civil War, to Skrull attacks and Norman Osborn's rise to power in Secret Invasion, and all the way up to Dark Reign. Norman Osborn has taken over SHIELD and turned it into HAMMER, making our standard protagonists illegal while he replaces them with his own shadowy reflection of them in the form of the Dark Avengers. Osborn went from a supervillain, to a leading member of the Thunderbolts, to a man in charge of some of America's greatest powers. And all of this comes to a head in Siege. None of these above things happen in Siege, of course, but they have to be explained. Why? Because the story scarcely makes sense without them. With no context, Siege is a generic crossover event where Asgard, and your favourite superheroes, try to defend themselves against Norman Osborn's evil forces. When you trace a decade's worth of story you can see the culmination of every character's story arc, but if you take this collection on its own it feels like yet another big Marvel crossover that promises lots of action but with no real character growth. It's overly reliant on your familiarity with Marvel's 2000s era continuity- but for fans of Marvel in this time period, it's an incredible treat. What really makes this book work is Olivier Coipel's beautiful artwork. With Mark Morales on inks, every page of Siege feels like the massive epic battle it promises to be. The characters are expressive and full of life, whether they're screaming battle cries or showing shock at the depths of war on display. There are times when even these larger-than-life characters feel dwarfed by the grand scenery of Asgard floating in the sky, slowly crumbling underneath Osborn's assault. Coipel has a talent of making the superhero and supervillain costumes look like proper armour and fashion, even when they're the same old skintight spandex you usually associate them with. Alongside Laura Martin's vibrant and varied colour pallet, Siege manages to strike a great balance between cartoonish superhero action and a tense war where you (rightly so) fear for the lives of your favourite characters. Chris Eliopoulos, the letterer for Siege, has the monumental task of trying to position Bendis' often long-winded and quippy dialogue, and he manages to position the words carefully enough that they match the flow of the story and don't interrupt Coipel's detailed artwork. There's a large cast of characters here, each with their own unique dialogues. Norman Osborn as the Iron Patriot with his computer interface, Ares with his bolded and loud mouth, the host of Asgardian characters with their own unique font, The Sentry and The Void with their inverted speech, and our superheroes themselves, all text given its own appearance to help you keep track of what's happening. The sound effects become part of the artwork as each SKRAKKADOOM and SLLLLICE flies through the page and helps direct your eye through the busy and often crowded fight scenes. Overall, Siege is one of my favourite Marvel Comics events. It's a rewarding experience and fitting end for a decade's worth of stories. If you're willing to go back and follow the threads of each character arc you can see the influence of every title and how it changes the outcome of Siege itself. If you're not, and just want an action-packed fun comic to flip through, it still delivers all the big fights and fanfare you want to see. Either way, it's a fun story I would highly recommend.

  11. 5 out of 5

    Dávid Novotný

    Pretty straightforward, action packed story, which leaves ypu with good feeling. Bad guys gets their ass kecked, lost heroes returns, friendships are restored. All in pretty nice and clear drawing that helps action scenes to stand out. 4,5*

  12. 4 out of 5

    Kay

    I read this in a vacuum, so I'm not so sure how this holds up on its own. All other reviews say it's a great crossover, so it must be me not fully appreciating the work/story here... I gave this 3 stars since there were parts that I really enjoyed (Osborn being cray, and Iron Man's "too soon" joke at the end, and the issue "The Way Things Are" from Free Comic Book Day 2009) and parts that I really did not enjoy (the art, and Sentry turning into Cthulhu...). Also, no one seems to address Volstagg a I read this in a vacuum, so I'm not so sure how this holds up on its own. All other reviews say it's a great crossover, so it must be me not fully appreciating the work/story here... I gave this 3 stars since there were parts that I really enjoyed (Osborn being cray, and Iron Man's "too soon" joke at the end, and the issue "The Way Things Are" from Free Comic Book Day 2009) and parts that I really did not enjoy (the art, and Sentry turning into Cthulhu...). Also, no one seems to address Volstagg and the football stadium full of people incident...? I missed everything in between Civil War and Siege, so I don't really know how/in what comics Osborn rose up to become the head of H.A.M.M.E.R. and lead his own motley crew of "Avengers"... But, that all falls apart here, so, the end?

  13. 4 out of 5

    C.J. Edmunds

    Finally catching up with the Marvel event that shook the Marvel Universe, I must say that this is another must collect event from Brian Michael Bendis. Following events from Secret Invasion, Dark Reign, Civil War and the recent return of Thor courtesy of J.Michael Strazynski's run, this hardcover collection comes in the heels of mixed opinions regarding the presence of Asgard in Midgard. In the vernacular, it means that THOR has revived his kingdom of Asgard and had it floating atop the plains of Finally catching up with the Marvel event that shook the Marvel Universe, I must say that this is another must collect event from Brian Michael Bendis. Following events from Secret Invasion, Dark Reign, Civil War and the recent return of Thor courtesy of J.Michael Strazynski's run, this hardcover collection comes in the heels of mixed opinions regarding the presence of Asgard in Midgard. In the vernacular, it means that THOR has revived his kingdom of Asgard and had it floating atop the plains of Oklahoma and this in turn doesn't sit well with Norman Osborne, aka GreenGoblin and now head of H.A.M.M.E.R., an organization that replaced Nick Fury's S.H.I.E.L.D. following the events of Secret Invasion and Civil War. Just when you think that it couldn't get any worse (for the characters) and any better (for us readers), Bendis just gives us another event to die for and worth collecting. Osborne has made a deal with Thor's duplicitous brother, Loki, to "remove" Asgard from Earth and has agreed that Osborne's forces will do the deed as it will be also to Loki's benefit to return Asgard to its rightful place, minus THOR, who currently was in exile following his actions in his own title, and thus leaving Balder his brother to rule Asgard in his stead and fully receptive to Loki's suggestions. And this is where you get your bucks worth of the Bang you have come to enjoy since Bendis has written event after event for Marvel. Expect Superheroes like Iron Man, Thor, Captain America and other Avengers fighting to counter the attack on Asgard made by Osborne in his own iron suit. Who wins? Well, both sides suffer losses for sure but not for naught. Read on to know what SIEGE is all about as we anticipate the next MARVEL event to be collected, which is currently running called, FEAR ITSELF, and features the machinations of the Red Skull and appearance of the God of Fear!

  14. 4 out of 5

    RG

    This started off really strongly but then just became your typical fighting event.

  15. 5 out of 5

    Gavin

    This is where shit finally goes down. Things come to a head, and it is one of the most satisfying ends to an Event like this in a long while. There is a lot of action, a lot of behind the scenes things that make more sense if you read the supporting issues but still, this is the meat and potatoes of the whole thing. Norman Osborn and his Dark Avengers attack Asgard, laying Siege to it, and in so doing, actually end up causing the wounds from Civil War to be mended a little, as all the heroes actu This is where shit finally goes down. Things come to a head, and it is one of the most satisfying ends to an Event like this in a long while. There is a lot of action, a lot of behind the scenes things that make more sense if you read the supporting issues but still, this is the meat and potatoes of the whole thing. Norman Osborn and his Dark Avengers attack Asgard, laying Siege to it, and in so doing, actually end up causing the wounds from Civil War to be mended a little, as all the heroes actually end up working together to fight against the forces of evil. It includes a return or two that surprises many, a few deaths, and Thor literally pounding the shit out of people with Mjolnir. It also serves as a bridge between Civil War/Dark Reign and the new Heroic Age. The heroism begins here as there are some fantastic pieces of action and the major guns of the Marvel Universe getting to unleash hell. Well worth a read, though I need to read a few more supporting side titles because some of the people I have no understanding of their motivations/appearances. That being said, this is great fun. Essential.

  16. 4 out of 5

    John

    I'm not a big fan of these giant all-star throw down types of event books, but as they go this is a pretty good one. It's Norman Osborn and his bogus Avengers vs. Cap & Nick Fury the now illegal Avengers fighting over Asgard, which is floating a few feet above Kansas. There's a ton of back story involved here which was a bit confusing, but this is basically just one big tag team match,and fairly entertaining one. I'm not a big fan of these giant all-star throw down types of event books, but as they go this is a pretty good one. It's Norman Osborn and his bogus Avengers vs. Cap & Nick Fury the now illegal Avengers fighting over Asgard, which is floating a few feet above Kansas. There's a ton of back story involved here which was a bit confusing, but this is basically just one big tag team match,and fairly entertaining one.

  17. 5 out of 5

    Eòsaph

    read this in single issues. wowee. don't wanna spoil it. just get it when it comes out in tpb

  18. 5 out of 5

    The Rudie Librarian (Brian)

    This is a gritty story of what happens when deceit and manipulation get out of control. Good stuff.

  19. 4 out of 5

    Ottery StCatchpole

    This review has been hidden because it contains spoilers. To view it, click here. Having read this, I've finally figured out what's wrong with the superhero books that Marvel and DC are currently putting out right now. Siege isn't so much a testament to that as it has already been testified time and again in the previous runs of Brian Michael Bendis. What's wrong with Marvel's comics is that people who didn't grow up loving superheroes, people who started their careers writing and drawing independent books all took over the big two superhero companies. Mr. Brian Michael Bendi Having read this, I've finally figured out what's wrong with the superhero books that Marvel and DC are currently putting out right now. Siege isn't so much a testament to that as it has already been testified time and again in the previous runs of Brian Michael Bendis. What's wrong with Marvel's comics is that people who didn't grow up loving superheroes, people who started their careers writing and drawing independent books all took over the big two superhero companies. Mr. Brian Michael Bendis is himself an example of just that. He came from independent comics, crime fiction being his genre, to superheroes and brought that whole aesthetic with him. Does it work? Somewhat, but more often than not, no. His various Avengers books being perfect examples, Siege only being the latest. When you have the God of Thunder, a billionaire super genius, an old frozen super soldier, Luke Cage, throw in Wolverine and Spiderman and you've got a team of heavy weight characters who should be dealing with cosmic scale dilemmas on a daily basis, yet Mr. Bendis pits them against Norman Osborn and Loki, who is playing Osborn. Before that we had the skrulls. The only problem with these scenarios, aside from being repetitive and done before, which is not the main problem, the Avengers have dealt with bigger problems before over the course of their regular titles and honestly, these characters should not and are not resoundingly able to carry the threat they should shoulder. Spider-man has single handedly fought the Green Goblin time and again, he's fought the Sinister Six for the love of Christmas, which is the A-list of his rogues gallery all at once on more than one occasion, even Batman has never done that. And that is seriously saying something. Yet Osborn, is elevated to a threat level, in his human guise no less, that pairs him with the Avengers. This is ludicrous. Now you might have thought the skrulls being space fairing aliens and all really are more of a threat for the Avengers but here again, the Avengers have gotten in between the Skrulls and the Kree in an interstellar war, AND the skrulls and the X-men's own Shi'ar. The Super-skrull by himself used to get beat back by the Fantastic Four on an almost bi-monthly basis back in the day. And Loki? Well Thor has and will continue to handle him, solo, in his own book. While I will give Mr. Bendis props for making Wolverine and Spider-man Avengers, and even Luke Cage and making him a far more interesting and 3 dimensional character, Siege merely repeats what has now become a comicly redundant formula for these line wide Marvel comic book events. A major disaster in which a ton of civilians die sets of a large battle ... The question that begs to ask itself is, after the explosion that killed a school before starting Civil War, the genocide before that of most of the mutants, and Genosha before even that, and the skrulls invading New York city why the devil would anyone want to be around any superhero, ever? It is a ridiculous echo, used rather heavy handedly of real world events namely September 11th, which sadly has been what has been the norm at Marvel comics. But politics like real world events happen faster than these line wide crossovers can be planned and executed always seeming to leave the politics and storylines of Marvel comics reading like something from last year or the past decade. Norman Osborn taking over from Tony Stark and leading the superhero initiative of the US. We get it, when corporations aren't running our government, the crazies are. This is not anything new nor is it presented in any realistic, seamless or even for a fictional universe, plausible way. It just isn't. Norman Osborn is a known killer. Unless you retcon that, the man is evil and he has lousy hair and a worse attitude, who would seriously appoint a total civilian to a position of extreme power, such as director of S.H.I.E.L.D.? Seriously? This makes the Bush era administration look sane. Mr. Bendis has a great ear for dialogue, and he writes the characters differently, a very important skill when reading a book with so many different characters. It isn't easy making a group of super geniuses not sound the same, or in this case testosterone filled angsty super dudes. But the story beats are weak, writing is more than merely telling a story, its the author choosing what to show us, and this book is not filled with interesting scenes or brilliant battles. Heck reading the book and not being familiar with Spider-man you'd be hard pressed to think Osborn and Peter had any kind of grudge against one another. There was no sense of this being an Avengers book. With all the myriad characters in the story you don't really get a sense that any group are the protagonists of the story. There are so many characters and so many things packed into a four part story that honestly everything comes out as rushed and not well paced. Not a very heroic attempt at ushering in the Heroic Age. Definitely not a good book, and I had been looking forward to reading this for a long time. A pity really, and an example of how comic books have moved away from the more appealing escapist nature of the genre, and the heroic standard that superheroes set. The heroes spend more time arguing with one another than with the villains, and the villains do likewise, that you wonder that any team functions. And all the scenes of war seem wasted since you aren't given much to really humanize or make you care about these characters. The artwork is the only thing work anything about this book, sadly. The art is spectacular and amazing, which makes it an even sadder book to think that Mr. Coipel's efforts could be better spent doing other more interesting books, like perhaps, LOSH. :)

  20. 4 out of 5

    Asounani

    WOOOOO

  21. 5 out of 5

    André

    It took me just a couple of very intensive reading hours to get through Siege. I had read some of Brian Michael Bendis' work before, as Powers, House of M and Civil War but this time he hit the spot. I couldn't stop reading until I reached the end and I would have continued all night long if there was more. "The Marvel Universe is under the control of its greatest villains. Norman Osborn - the man previously known to the world as the Green Goblin - is the commander of H.A.M.M.E.R., the internatio It took me just a couple of very intensive reading hours to get through Siege. I had read some of Brian Michael Bendis' work before, as Powers, House of M and Civil War but this time he hit the spot. I couldn't stop reading until I reached the end and I would have continued all night long if there was more. "The Marvel Universe is under the control of its greatest villains. Norman Osborn - the man previously known to the world as the Green Goblin - is the commander of H.A.M.M.E.R., the international peacekeeping force." This part of the story starts with Siege: The Cabal, where the reader is shown Osborn's madness is again overwhelming him. As he goes paranoid and while, after losing Namor and Emma Frost's support, Doom leaves the cabal and actually attacks him, Norman is seen falling prey to Loki's mischief. Afterwards the book collects Siege #1-4, where the attack on Asgard actually happens and comes to a somewhat surprising and close to apocalyptic end. Siege is a very interesting story from the beginning, having its roots in the latest big Marvel events, probably better noticed by those following the cabal and also Thor, told just at the right pace to make the reader feel excited but not like jumping pages to the end. It's easily understood by anyone that knows what's generally been happening in the Marvel Universe. The war on Asgard allows the author to bring a lot of heroes and villains into play and still be able to peek into their personal troubles, their personality, so that by the end of this event, everything could change or just come back to normal, and all would be fairly within limits of credibility. SPOILERS As Osborn's, the full power of H.A.M.M.E.R. and the initiative are attacking Asgard, Steve Rogers gets the true Avengers into play, joined by Fury's Secret Warriors and later by a still recovering Iron Man into play. They manage to beat the attacking forces and disable the Iron Patriot armour but there is still one force to contend with - the "also" mentally unstable Sentry. Finally losing all control, Robert Reynolds fully unleashes the Void after destroying Asgard and becomes a danger to the whole world. When even the might of Thor's lightning and the heroes empowered by the Norn stones seem unable to stop him, Iron Man remotely crashes the H.A.M.M.E.R. helicarrier on him making him revert to human form. Reynolds begs the heroes to kill him and when they notice he is again losing control over the Void, Thor does just that and burns his body on the sun. In this single event, Thor has shown the extent of his determination, Loki demonstrated that even he cares for Asgard's existence over his own plans, Iron Man and Steve Rogers made heroic comebacks and in the end, friendships seem renewed. NO MORE SPOILERS The Siege of Asgard, together with the X-men's Utopia stories, reset the Marvel Universe, preparing it for a Heroic Age, which seems to want to prove that after all the trouble, through the Civil War and the Secret Invasion, the superheroes can still find their old places in the world, as recognized defenders but also as friends with hopes of happiness. But any Marvel reader knows this will not be the end of the story, that problems will keep coming and the cycle will begin again, so all I can ask of the writers is that they do so in style, with the quality that Brian Michael Bendis showed in Siege. I must also make due reference to the amazing illustrations, penciled by Olivier Coipel or, in The Cabal, by Michael Lark. If not a masterpiece, in level with what can be done with separate, more independent graphic novels as Maus, Persepolis, Watchmen or even Sandman are considered (I still have to read some of those), I believe Siege is as good a novel as I've ever seen given its context. I recommend Siege for all of Marvel's usual readers as I believe only those with enough knowledge of the current state of affairs in the Marvel Universe and of most of the characters can enjoy all that this graphic novel has to offer. This review was originally published on my blog

  22. 4 out of 5

    Iowa City Public Library

    Siege ends several Marvel Comics story arcs that date back to 2006, including the Civil War, the death of Captain America, the whole Asgard moving to Oklahoma thing, and the Dark Avengers, put together by the Green Goblin. A few characters seem to have bitten the dust as well, tho death is always provisional in comics. Ares, God of War in particular goes out with a splash, and it’s hard to see much future for the Sentry. Story arcs like these tend to move kind of slowly, so it’s a little startli Siege ends several Marvel Comics story arcs that date back to 2006, including the Civil War, the death of Captain America, the whole Asgard moving to Oklahoma thing, and the Dark Avengers, put together by the Green Goblin. A few characters seem to have bitten the dust as well, tho death is always provisional in comics. Ares, God of War in particular goes out with a splash, and it’s hard to see much future for the Sentry. Story arcs like these tend to move kind of slowly, so it’s a little startling here to see so many changes made at once. The Sentry btw has one of my favorite origin stories, told in New Avengers. At some point in the past supervillain Mastermind has wiped out everyone’s memories of the Sentry including the Sentry’s own. So no one knows he exists, but there are comic books about him, and from these the Avengers deduce that he existed, and still does. Clever, no? Marvel seems to be turning their backs on the kind of company wide mega-story they’ve been selling the last several years. They’ve branded their new approach “The Heroic Age,” meaning that if you pick up a Spider-Man, you’ll get a Spider-Man story, not an installment in some other storyline. While this may curtail the ambitions of their story-telling, it should solve the problem of finding a sensible sequence to read their bigger stories in. It also looks like they’ll be focusing on characters with movie franchises. --John From ICPL Staff Picks Blog

  23. 4 out of 5

    Judah Radd

    ***second read** This is way, way better after reading Dark Avengers, Siege, Mighty Avengers, New Avengers, The Initiative, Dark X-Men, Utopia and the other Dark Reign shit. The weight of these critical moments were lost on me the first time. With the added context, I found myself much more engaged and emotionally involved. This is a very epic showdown. There are some panels that are seriously max epic. I was wrong when I wrote my first review. This isn’t a let down; it’s a satisfying conclusion ***second read** This is way, way better after reading Dark Avengers, Siege, Mighty Avengers, New Avengers, The Initiative, Dark X-Men, Utopia and the other Dark Reign shit. The weight of these critical moments were lost on me the first time. With the added context, I found myself much more engaged and emotionally involved. This is a very epic showdown. There are some panels that are seriously max epic. I was wrong when I wrote my first review. This isn’t a let down; it’s a satisfying conclusion to a major era in Marvel comics. ****first read**** This is ok. Not my fav... but it was a decent way to spend some time. The art was very good. The story was meh. I wasn’t invested in the plot. I also thought this was a pretty weak resolution to the events that began in Disassembled and Civil War. On the plus side, there was some sweet Ares action. There were also some good Loki being Loki moments. The story mostly seemed like filler. An overall boring entry. Oh well. At least it resolves some stuff, albeit unsatisfyingly. 3 stars.

  24. 5 out of 5

    George

    I have mixed feelings about this one. It's an improvement over Marvel's last big event, "Secret Invasion," which was a four-issue miniseries stuffed into eight issues. The series' obligatory 'death of a hero' scene makes more sense, also. I thought the Wasp's death in Secret Invasion was done for shock value, and as such was rather senseless and stupid. The negatives: I didn't like the art. The story, while readable, felt rather sketchy because I didn't read all the tie-in issues. This feels like I have mixed feelings about this one. It's an improvement over Marvel's last big event, "Secret Invasion," which was a four-issue miniseries stuffed into eight issues. The series' obligatory 'death of a hero' scene makes more sense, also. I thought the Wasp's death in Secret Invasion was done for shock value, and as such was rather senseless and stupid. The negatives: I didn't like the art. The story, while readable, felt rather sketchy because I didn't read all the tie-in issues. This feels like a reboot, a way to return everything to the status quo. Considering the events of Civil War, the fact that everyone could just kiss and make up was a bit unbelievable to me. Civil War wasn't perfect, but at least it changed things up. I guess comics fans are conservative by nature, and don't want anything to change.

  25. 4 out of 5

    Garrett Cook

    There's a lot to like about a Marvel Universe ruled over by a cabal of supervillains, but I cannot help but feel Bendis' transparent liberalism has made Marvel too preachy. Marvel used to be a company whose comics were concerned about the lives of their flawed and very real heroes instead of a laundrylist of epic political disasters. When Faustian madman Osborn oversteps his bounds and literally strikes at the gods, I feel patronized and like I'm being forcefed political truths. I might share th There's a lot to like about a Marvel Universe ruled over by a cabal of supervillains, but I cannot help but feel Bendis' transparent liberalism has made Marvel too preachy. Marvel used to be a company whose comics were concerned about the lives of their flawed and very real heroes instead of a laundrylist of epic political disasters. When Faustian madman Osborn oversteps his bounds and literally strikes at the gods, I feel patronized and like I'm being forcefed political truths. I might share these political views, but those who don't are not going to change theirs when presented with something like this.

  26. 5 out of 5

    Eric Mikols

    Considering this book claims to have been building since Avengers Disassembled, I'm a little disappointed. There's some cool moments, though not as many as you would think. There's more wrong with this book than there is strength. I feel like it needed to be more than four issues and to slow down on the action. It doesn't feel like a war, just a quick battle that lasted for a few hours. With the main point of the story being to return the Marvel universe back into the heroes hands. However, it j Considering this book claims to have been building since Avengers Disassembled, I'm a little disappointed. There's some cool moments, though not as many as you would think. There's more wrong with this book than there is strength. I feel like it needed to be more than four issues and to slow down on the action. It doesn't feel like a war, just a quick battle that lasted for a few hours. With the main point of the story being to return the Marvel universe back into the heroes hands. However, it just doesn't feel like such a powerful and dramatic change. The art is nice, though it always looked better with the Thor book. I did enjoy this book, but it could have been better.

  27. 4 out of 5

    Shannon Appelcline

    This is actually a sprightly little conclusion to the Civil War/Dark Reign arc at Marvel. In just four issues it manages to offer a solid conclusion and change to the status quo, without dragging on as these big crossovers often do. Looking back at it, Siege is not only a nice game changer, but also a great look at the Marvel Universe at a very specific point in time. Finally, Bendis' scripting is worth commenting on, as it's fun and sometimes funny as well. All around, a nice spine to the event.

  28. 5 out of 5

    TJ Shelby

    This review has been hidden because it contains spoilers. To view it, click here. Wow, after a mediocre build up Bendis delivered a pretty decent pay off. Osborn leads the Dark Avengers in an attack against Asgard, pisses off Thor, the Sentry rips Ares apart (I mean that literally not figuratively...and yes, it was bad ass), Nick Fury makes a public reappearance, Thor kills the Sentry, and Steve Rogers is back to head S.H.I.E.L.D. under the stipulation that the U.S. Government rescind the Registration Act.

  29. 5 out of 5

    Tehanu

    Brian Michael Bendis is the best player in Marvel. Nice conclusion to the things that started back in Avengers: Disassembled, I missed some things due to the selection of the collection, but all in all it was great. Brian Michael Bendis is the best player in Marvel. Nice conclusion to the things that started back in Avengers: Disassembled, I missed some things due to the selection of the collection, but all in all it was great.

  30. 5 out of 5

    Christian Smith

    this is a perfectly executed comic. an amazing story. i dont even really like the concept of the siege story line but this was really good. only thing i didn't like is that the last issue in it came before the main event. so why didn't they put it at the beginning of the book. whatever. still good.

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