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Will Write for Food: The Complete Guide to Writing Cookbooks, Blogs, Memoir, Recipes, and More

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The go-to soup-to-nuts guide on how to really make money from food writing, both in print and online With recipe-driven blogs, cookbooks, reviews, and endless foodie websites, food writing is ever in demand. In this award-winning guide, noted journalist and writing instructor Dianne Jacob offers tips and strategies for getting published and other ways to turn your passion i The go-to soup-to-nuts guide on how to really make money from food writing, both in print and online With recipe-driven blogs, cookbooks, reviews, and endless foodie websites, food writing is ever in demand. In this award-winning guide, noted journalist and writing instructor Dianne Jacob offers tips and strategies for getting published and other ways to turn your passion into cash, whether it's in print or online. With insider secrets and helpful advice from award-winning writers, agents, and editors, Will Write for Food is still the essential guide to go from starving artist to well-fed writer.


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The go-to soup-to-nuts guide on how to really make money from food writing, both in print and online With recipe-driven blogs, cookbooks, reviews, and endless foodie websites, food writing is ever in demand. In this award-winning guide, noted journalist and writing instructor Dianne Jacob offers tips and strategies for getting published and other ways to turn your passion i The go-to soup-to-nuts guide on how to really make money from food writing, both in print and online With recipe-driven blogs, cookbooks, reviews, and endless foodie websites, food writing is ever in demand. In this award-winning guide, noted journalist and writing instructor Dianne Jacob offers tips and strategies for getting published and other ways to turn your passion into cash, whether it's in print or online. With insider secrets and helpful advice from award-winning writers, agents, and editors, Will Write for Food is still the essential guide to go from starving artist to well-fed writer.

30 review for Will Write for Food: The Complete Guide to Writing Cookbooks, Blogs, Memoir, Recipes, and More

  1. 4 out of 5

    Elizabeth

    If this book were aimed at international English-speaking would-be food writers, I would give it 4 stars. But because it is a tiny bit parochial with its bias for writing material for the USA, I felt compelled to lower the score. A book cannot have "complete" in the title if it is only aimed at one country's citizens. Also, while the book is not at all a cookbook, I've grouped it in the cookbooks simply because there is a large section on how to write a cookbook. Here is why I read it: When searc If this book were aimed at international English-speaking would-be food writers, I would give it 4 stars. But because it is a tiny bit parochial with its bias for writing material for the USA, I felt compelled to lower the score. A book cannot have "complete" in the title if it is only aimed at one country's citizens. Also, while the book is not at all a cookbook, I've grouped it in the cookbooks simply because there is a large section on how to write a cookbook. Here is why I read it: When searching for the origin of the bizarre notion to omit water from ingredients list, I came across Will Write for Food as being one of the references for food writers. This quote from Dianne Jacob's blog came up in the internet search: I'm going to try, and –yes– to nitpick. Such is the job of an editor. […] I thought you might want to know about the most common mistakes. […]       5. Listing water as an ingredient. Just bring it up in the method and state the amount. Such as "Add 1 cup of ice water, a few splashes at a time, until the dough comes together."   [– Dianne Jacob, …will write for food | 7 Most Common Recipe Writing Errors (diannej[dot]com/2010/7-most-common-recipe-writing-errors/)] So I got the book out of the library to learn if there were other strange editorial decrees. There are! In baking, know the difference between liquid and dry measure. Do not use a scale to measure ingredients, even if you think it's more accurate, unless you are a baker and your publisher has agreed. I know some chefs feel strongly about using weights for dry ingredients, but most American home cooks do not use scales to measure flour. Most do not use the metric system either, so keep measurements in cups, tablespoons, and teaspoons [Chapter 8 | Mastering the Art of Recipe Writing, p.193] ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ Typically, water is not used in the ingredients list, because it is not considered something that must be prepared in advance. [Chapter 8 | Mastering the Art of Recipe Writing, p.195] Sigh. Water is not used in the ingredients list? Typically by whom and where? What authority decided this silliness? Is it just word of mouth in the editorial world? Double Sigh. Why are we incapable of using a scale to measure all ingredients? Even when we’re not baking! And. Is it true that American cooks do not use scales to measure flour? I understand that many Americans may not use the metric system (since the USA is one of only 3 countries in the world that has not adopted the metric system). A scale is so much easier to use, and so much more accurate than cups and spoons! Perhaps Dianne Jacob would have been better off beginning with "if the recipe is to be published only in the USA and only for its citizens". If there were other books on how to write recipes, it wouldn't be such a problem. However, there appear to be very few. Indeed, Jacob notes in her introduction that this is one of the reasons she wrote this book. Aside from the recipe ingredients list and measuring strangeness, the book is filled with writing exercises and many other very good tips for people wanting to edit, speak, and/or write about food and be paid to do so. There are also several references to other books about food, or that feature food to read (although aside from the mention of Rex Stout's Nero Wolfe mysteries, most of the fiction books listed seem a little on the fluffy side - but that is likely a matter of taste*). +++++++++++++++++++ Being an unpaid hobby blogger, I will definitely take many of Jacob's tips under advisement. Except this one: Get rid of repetition of ideas, inconsistencies, overstatement (especially too many exclamation points), and disproportionate emphasis. [Chapter 4: On Food and Blogging, p.75] I happen to LIKE zillions of exclamation points!!!!!! There is NO way I'll ever stop using them!! Even if I know categorically that "whooping exclamation-points" are wrong wrong wrong and would never sell my writing - if I were trying to sell it. Those exclamation points are part of my voice. ++++++++++++++++++ I still don't know who decided that water should not be listed in a recipe's ingredients list, even if it is an integral ingredient. It must be a relatively new decree, because water IS listed in the ingredients lists of recipes in "The Joy of Cooking" by Irma S. Rombauer and Marion Rombauer Becker. And not just in the baking sections either. ++++++++++++++++++++++++ * There is no mention of Donna Leon's Brunetti series, Chitra Banerjee Divakaruni's Mistress of Spices, Erica Bauermeister's School of Essential Ingredients, Amor Towles' A Gentleman in Moscow, etc. etc. But perhaps it's because these writers are not "food" writers....

  2. 4 out of 5

    Ashley

    This book had such a wealth of useful information for people at all levels of food writing. It has a ton of resources and ideas for where to develop certain skills further, and I have lots and lots of passages bookmarked. Such a great tool!

  3. 4 out of 5

    Kerry

    This is one of the most helpful and concrete books about any type of writing that I've read. Most books about writing are abstract and give you advice that doesn't take you through the steps of exercising it. While the book got off to a rocky start for me because I feel it's irrelevant--when the publication industry has undergone enormous changes since print reigned supreme--how well-established food writers worked their way to the top because these people have been doing what they do for decade This is one of the most helpful and concrete books about any type of writing that I've read. Most books about writing are abstract and give you advice that doesn't take you through the steps of exercising it. While the book got off to a rocky start for me because I feel it's irrelevant--when the publication industry has undergone enormous changes since print reigned supreme--how well-established food writers worked their way to the top because these people have been doing what they do for decades; beginning food writers will not follow the same trajectory and cannot hope to. Otherwise, from blogging to queries to writing cookbooks, this guide leaves no stone unturned and offers plenty of ways that a food writer (or really any writer) getting their start may pursue entry into the industry.

  4. 5 out of 5

    Gail

    Dianne has written a detailed resource for anyone wanting to get into writing about food. She is thorough in her research and detailed in her advice, covering the obvious as well as the not-so-obvious possibilities of creating a life in the food-writing space. No wonder her book is used as a textbook. While I didn't do the three exercises at the end of each chapter, I was intrigued by them. It would be fun to read what my foodie friends would write in response. Great resource. Dianne is a nation Dianne has written a detailed resource for anyone wanting to get into writing about food. She is thorough in her research and detailed in her advice, covering the obvious as well as the not-so-obvious possibilities of creating a life in the food-writing space. No wonder her book is used as a textbook. While I didn't do the three exercises at the end of each chapter, I was intrigued by them. It would be fun to read what my foodie friends would write in response. Great resource. Dianne is a national treasure.

  5. 4 out of 5

    Annie

    This book is truly a complete guide for food writing (blogger, restaurant critic, freelance writer/journalist, cookbook writer, and even fiction writer with plots involving food). The author provides steps to get started, resources to check, things to consider, and pitfalls to avoid.

  6. 5 out of 5

    Teresa

    A little dated but all the information was great and extremely useful. I would totally recommend this book to anyone thinking of doing any form of food writing.

  7. 4 out of 5

    Gregg

    Good for light reference, thorough enough in that it provides resources for deeper exploration in each topic.

  8. 5 out of 5

    Sarah

    Note to self: reread

  9. 4 out of 5

    Ashani Hettige

    A great learning resource for food bloggers and everyone else in the "Food writing" breadth.

  10. 5 out of 5

    Christa Eker

    Brilliant book. Full of so many pointers and tips I can see this being a useful tool to go back to time and again.

  11. 5 out of 5

    Linda Kissam

    This book is kind of a finishing school course for food writers. Read this and you'll definitely smooth out some rough edges and learn new attitudes that get you invited in the front door and then asked back. If it is a polished look you're after in the foodie field, this would be the vehicle to step in to get there. A great book for new food writers, it also has value for more seasoned writers. It hits all the right "hot spots" including how to make an income from food writing, how to publish yo This book is kind of a finishing school course for food writers. Read this and you'll definitely smooth out some rough edges and learn new attitudes that get you invited in the front door and then asked back. If it is a polished look you're after in the foodie field, this would be the vehicle to step in to get there. A great book for new food writers, it also has value for more seasoned writers. It hits all the right "hot spots" including how to make an income from food writing, how to publish your own cookbook, and how to create and sustain a foodie blog. I appreciated the list of powerful action verbs and some suggestions on how to describe food correctly. Want to know if Top Ten Stories and Roundups are reviews or some other category? Check out page 152. What's the key to writing a good recipe title? It is on page 186. What's the 411 on accepting and reviewing free products? The answer starts on page 81. What types of work can a food writer do? Get a cappuccino and a Snickers bar, then turn to page 30.

  12. 4 out of 5

    Cindy

    I actually only made it to page 114, but after having this book out for literally six months from the library, I figured it was time to give it up. This is a very detailed book about all the ins and outs of writing in the world of food. It contains information about query letters, the sorts of publications that will access you, how to build a portfolio, and, my personal favorite writing exercises. I'd love to try to tackle this book again and finish it, but my head's just not in the right space n I actually only made it to page 114, but after having this book out for literally six months from the library, I figured it was time to give it up. This is a very detailed book about all the ins and outs of writing in the world of food. It contains information about query letters, the sorts of publications that will access you, how to build a portfolio, and, my personal favorite writing exercises. I'd love to try to tackle this book again and finish it, but my head's just not in the right space now. Still, I recommend this to anyone that wants to learn how to food write -- or just write.

  13. 4 out of 5

    Maryann

    I find this book very helpful for use in my food writing class, which I teach during interterm. It's wonderful to have a text that I can use for that. This new edition is updated from the last version to include changes in technology.

  14. 5 out of 5

    S.

    Excellent updated information on recipe format and writing, includes blogging etiquette.

  15. 4 out of 5

    Whitney Archer

    Meh...pretty generic writing advice.

  16. 5 out of 5

    Barrie

    a book that I should probably buy- it's a workbook for bloggers- lots of great information from ablogger that I already read all the time- having all this great info in one place is wonderful!

  17. 4 out of 5

    Dave

  18. 5 out of 5

    Snow

  19. 5 out of 5

    Vonny LeClerc

  20. 5 out of 5

    Sharon

  21. 5 out of 5

    Ang Perkins

  22. 5 out of 5

    Lauren Emms

  23. 5 out of 5

    April

  24. 4 out of 5

    Jolee

  25. 4 out of 5

    Jessie

  26. 4 out of 5

    Jennie

  27. 5 out of 5

    Veronica Monsegur

  28. 4 out of 5

    ئة فكرة لمشروع صغير من غير راس مال-محمود الدقم: مئة فكرة لمشروع صغير من غير راسمال

  29. 5 out of 5

    Bex

  30. 5 out of 5

    Marita

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