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In seeking to discover his inner self, the brilliant Dr. Henry Jekyll discovers a monster. This spine-chilling thriller is a terrifying study of the duality of man's nature, and it is the book which established Stevenson's reputation as a writer. Also included in this volume is Stevenson's collection of short stories The Merry Men containing two other sinister tales Markheim In seeking to discover his inner self, the brilliant Dr. Henry Jekyll discovers a monster. This spine-chilling thriller is a terrifying study of the duality of man's nature, and it is the book which established Stevenson's reputation as a writer. Also included in this volume is Stevenson's collection of short stories The Merry Men containing two other sinister tales Markheim and Thrawn Janet.


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In seeking to discover his inner self, the brilliant Dr. Henry Jekyll discovers a monster. This spine-chilling thriller is a terrifying study of the duality of man's nature, and it is the book which established Stevenson's reputation as a writer. Also included in this volume is Stevenson's collection of short stories The Merry Men containing two other sinister tales Markheim In seeking to discover his inner self, the brilliant Dr. Henry Jekyll discovers a monster. This spine-chilling thriller is a terrifying study of the duality of man's nature, and it is the book which established Stevenson's reputation as a writer. Also included in this volume is Stevenson's collection of short stories The Merry Men containing two other sinister tales Markheim and Thrawn Janet.

30 review for Dr. Jekyll and Mr. Hyde with the Merry Men & Other Stories

  1. 5 out of 5

    Ria

    ⚫ The Strange Case Of Dr. Jekyll and Mr. Hyde: 5/5 Sooo it took me like 5 months to finish this. Look I read like 10 pages in October, 20 in December and the rest in March. I was just not in the mood for gothic horror. I should have totally reread this but it’s me so I didn’t. That being said, I don’t really have anything to say because I didn’t keep notes. I want to comment on this tho: I saw articles where people mentioned that there may have been homosexual innuendos. I tots get why ⚫ The Strange Case Of Dr. Jekyll and Mr. Hyde: 5/5 Sooo it took me like 5 months to finish this. Look I read like 10 pages in October, 20 in December and the rest in March. I was just not in the mood for gothic horror. I should have totally reread this but it’s me so I didn’t. That being said, I don’t really have anything to say because I didn’t keep notes. I want to comment on this tho: I saw articles where people mentioned that there may have been homosexual innuendos. I tots get why people think that the male characters may have been gay. I mean almost no women, the men really enjoying the company of other men... Look I don’t know if it’s true or not. I only know 1 thing and that is: ⚫ The Merry Men: 3/5 Oh no this black man is chasing me. ⚫ Will o' the Mill: 3/5 ⚫ Markheim: 2.8/5 Don’t forget to buy presents I guess. ⚫ Thrawn Janet: 2?/5 Yay Scottish dialect! Shit is not even 10pages long. ⚫ Olalla: 4/5 ⚫ The Treasure of Franchard: 3/5 Yyeeahhh… sooo… Jekyll and Hyde is his only good work. Is that a hot take? Probably not but I also don’t care. Shit was like 3€ so it was worth it I guess. I just wanted to read Jekyll.

  2. 4 out of 5

    ~

    I bought this book, as really, I was only interested in reading Dr Jekyll and Mr Hyde, but I ended up reading the short stories that followed afterwards, too. My favourite in this collection was in fact, Dr Jekyll and Mr Hyde. Something that stands out, and quite impresses me, is that Stevenson wrote this book about an individual, and the conflicting parts of their personality, in a time when the subject matter was a pretty grey area. The writing though, really didn't thrill me. The impression I I bought this book, as really, I was only interested in reading Dr Jekyll and Mr Hyde, but I ended up reading the short stories that followed afterwards, too. My favourite in this collection was in fact, Dr Jekyll and Mr Hyde. Something that stands out, and quite impresses me, is that Stevenson wrote this book about an individual, and the conflicting parts of their personality, in a time when the subject matter was a pretty grey area. The writing though, really didn't thrill me. The impression I received while reading this, is a lot of it seems to be in a sort of note form, and I felt as if I was in the middle of a dull conversation with someone. I honestly think, that being a short story, it could have been made a lot more intriguing, if Stevenson had explored and developed his characters further, I might have took more away from it. The other stories contained in this were not as good as the first. I found The merry men to be quite bizarre, and I had trouble reading it. That said, this is a decent short story collection, and the front cover is marvellous. A great addition to my already heaving bookcase!

  3. 5 out of 5

    Kostas

    In Robert Louis Stevenson’s short writing career it is certain that we cannot help but admire him for his great style and his imagination as he wrote some of the most classic children's stories that have passed through the centuries and have managed to remain, even today, quite well-known. However, one of the most important stories of Stevenson’s career, which came to him - even if it was somewhat strange - through a dream, is definitely ‘The Strange Case of Dr Jekyll and Mr Hyde’ as he created In Robert Louis Stevenson’s short writing career it is certain that we cannot help but admire him for his great style and his imagination as he wrote some of the most classic children's stories that have passed through the centuries and have managed to remain, even today, quite well-known. However, one of the most important stories of Stevenson’s career, which came to him - even if it was somewhat strange - through a dream, is definitely ‘The Strange Case of Dr Jekyll and Mr Hyde’ as he created one of the most famed personalities that left its mark in the Horror genre. Along in this volume we see also and Stevenson’s 1887 collection, ‘The Merry Men & Other Tales and Fables’; a collection of stories of mystery, crime and madness. The Strange Case of Dr Jekyll and Mr Hyde The story of this novella follows Utterson, a lawyer and close friend of Dr Jekyll’s, as, after an unfortunate incident, he discovers along with his cousin that Hyde, a strange and an entirely unusual guy, lives in Dr Jekyll’s residence. But, despite his efforts to discover his origins, he will discover that Hyde is a much more mysterious personality than he had expected. However, all that will change when after a horrendous incident he will have to seek Hyde and bring him to justice. Only that, what he will discover later is something, entirely, unreal and he will find himself against with something that he would had never believed possible and will change his life forever. I must admit that before this novella I hadn’t had the chance before to read any of Stevenson’s stories. Nevertheless though, the story proves that it certainly deserves its fame as Stevenson has managed to create one of the strongest, and most important, personalities in the history of the Horror genre and to make, through his characters, a magnificent atmosphere. Coming to its end I must say that it, indeed, leaves with a feeling that it could, certainly, have been developed a little more if Stevenson wanted it, but either way we cannot help but admire him for his ideas and for his, truly, unique and wonderful style. 8/10 The Merry Men The second story of this collection focuses on Charles who, after his studies in Edinburgh, returns to his home in Aros, an isolated isle at the coasts of Scotland, to seek the treasures of a lost Spanish Armada. However, Aros is an isle that is well-known for its wild waves and when a ship, as he will discover that is seeking too these lost treasures, gets caught in the waves of “The Merry Men” he will find himself against with his peculiar Uncle, and also with a black man that he believes he is the Devil himself. It is a story, I could say, of mystery and madness with Stevenson showing his influences from his travel to the Isle of Erraid who went with his father when he was a young kid. As far as it comes to his writing it still remains quite good but, even though I certainly can’t say that it is a great story, what stands out here is Stevenson's, wonderful, descriptions that show his love and his passion for the sea. 7/10 Will O 'the Mill The third story focuses on Will, a young man who lives with his foster parents in an isolated village in the mountains, and who dreams from his childhood to seek his own adventures in the world. But one day, as he will meet a traveller, he will begin to see things with a different perspective and, renouncing any commitment of marriage and of the life itself, he find himself on a lonely path that would later put him in Death’s hands. It is a sad, and slightly strange, story but, even though Stevenson tries to pass some philosophical messages, it greatly lacks both with its plot and with this, particular, protagonist as we see him going through the stages of life and renouncing everything. 6/10 Markheim The next story focuses on Markheim who, after being late to get a Christmas present for his girlfriend, finds himself in an antique shop. Only, despite the dealer’s good will to sell to him a rare item, he will be faced with a murder and with an, unusual, creature that will try to offer him back his life as he knew it and discharge him of his vicious acts. It’s a story of an unspeakable murder that manages to combine pretty well also and the supernatural element with Stevenson putting the protagonist in an internal battle of Good-vs-Evil. It is definitely not an impressive story as much as ‘The Strange Case of Dr Jekyll and Mr Hyde’, but it is cleverly enough written as to become in the end, at least, satisfying. 6.5//10 Thrawn Janet This story follows, through an unnamed narrator, the events of Reverend Soulis in a small village as he comes up against with a witch that he believes she is possessed by the Devil himself. This story is, one of the two that Stevenson wrote, completely in the Scottish dialect and this will, perhaps, make it a little more difficult than it actually is (especially for those who will read it in its original form). Nevertheless, it is a fairly small and quite strange story with a, relatively, good central idea but without succeeding to impress as much as the rest stories of this collection. 5/10 Olalla The next story follows an, unnamed, soldier who, after recovering from his wounds from the battle of the Peninsular War, will be sent to reside temporarily with a noble family. Only that in this house he will discover that something very odd is happening and he will be faced with a beautiful girl, that he could not help but fall in love with her, and also with an unusual creature that its only desire is to drink his blood. It is a very beautiful story, written in the same wonderful style as ‘The Strange Case of Dr Jekyll and Mr Hyde’, and with Stevenson creating an, incredibly, dreamlike atmosphere. It is definitely one of the best stories in this collection and personally, I believe, perhaps also and the most magical one that Stevenson wrote in his career. 8.5/10 The Treasure of Franchard The last story is a little different from the rest of this collection as it is the only one that doesn’t have any supernatural element. It follows Desprez, a provincial French doctor who, after an accident with a stable-master, meets an orphan child and, seeing that he is much wittier than he shows, he will invite him to stay in his home. However, Desprez is a man who always wanted to build his simple life to something better and when, luckily, he discovers a lost treasure in an deserted place his dreams perhaps might come true. But when, after a strange incident, this treasure disappears as suddenly as it came the young Jean-Marie will find himself against with the guiltiness of this theft, and also with the possibility to return once again back to his orphan life. Only that, what Desprez hadn’t counted on is that when one day his fate turns against him, the young Jean-Marie will surprise him with the most unique way and will show him something that he had forgotten. The story, even though it doesn’t have any supernatural elements, proves a very beautiful and sweet story as Stevenson takes us through the life of that era in France, and showing us that there can be love even when you least expect it. It’s a beautiful story and, probably, the sweetest of all too. 7.5/10 Closing, I would only add that this collection has certainly a quite different variety of stories, with some being good and others not so much, but most of them, definitely, show Stevenson’s true talent and, that, I believe makes the biggest difference here.

  4. 5 out of 5

    ChattyNatty

    Woooooo I finally finished! I will say the extreme irony of this book is that it was the shortest I have read in a while yet somehow also the longest time I’ve taken to read a book in the last couple of years... I’ve wanted to read Jekyll and Hyde for a while due to its seemingly omnipresent influence in pop culture and I was not disappointed! I thoroughly enjoyed the story and it’s philosophical and ethical twists and I wanted to read more. I did not expect the full extent of how difficult it i Woooooo I finally finished! I will say the extreme irony of this book is that it was the shortest I have read in a while yet somehow also the longest time I’ve taken to read a book in the last couple of years... I’ve wanted to read Jekyll and Hyde for a while due to its seemingly omnipresent influence in pop culture and I was not disappointed! I thoroughly enjoyed the story and it’s philosophical and ethical twists and I wanted to read more. I did not expect the full extent of how difficult it is to properly read written Scottish dialect however 😂 my brain felt like it was in self destruct mode every time I attempted to piece together a sentence. Aside from that, there were a few other good stories in here! I really enjoyed Markheim because I’m a total sucker for a 50 page monologue on eternal misery and self doubt, plus it subverted my expectations for this type of storytelling genre of the time. The last story the treasure of Franchard, was unusual but rapidly got better and at times reminded me slightly of an Oscar Wildesque type story. So in short, even though it took me an age and my brain melted a decent few times, I actually quite enjoyed this collection and was surprised at what the author of Treasure Island could bring to the table.

  5. 5 out of 5

    Kellie

    Only read this for Jekyll & Hyde but Will O' The Mill was surprisingly sweet Only read this for Jekyll & Hyde but Will O' The Mill was surprisingly sweet

  6. 5 out of 5

    Itziar

    I could not finish with the last story The treasure of Franchard since I did not find it interesting after so many short stories in this compilation, I have also found it sort of repetitive. All in all I have enjoyed it pretty much and really appreciated the two stories written in Scottish The merry men and Thrawn Janet being the later my favorite story in this book. While reading these two stories I did not know, however, wheter to laugh or to cry; above all when I began with the first on I could not finish with the last story The treasure of Franchard since I did not find it interesting after so many short stories in this compilation, I have also found it sort of repetitive. All in all I have enjoyed it pretty much and really appreciated the two stories written in Scottish The merry men and Thrawn Janet being the later my favorite story in this book. While reading these two stories I did not know, however, wheter to laugh or to cry; above all when I began with the first one and since I got used to the dialect. I am glad I have studied Swedish and German dialectoly, so I could get into Scottish... Dr Jekyll and Mr Hyde is with no doubt a masterpiece and it is a shame I could not enjoy it that much because I already knew the plot.

  7. 4 out of 5

    João Esteves

    Dr. Jekyll and Mr. Hyde - 3,5 The Merry Men - 3/5 Will O' the Mill - 3/5 Markheim - 3/5 Thrawn Janet - 4/5 Olalla - 2/5 The Treasure of Franchard - 3/5

  8. 5 out of 5

    Vrixton Phillips

    I've got a running theory that 1) Utterson is an unreliable narrator and completely lying about the other two narratives to cover for his racist, imperialist views AND the fact that Jekyll named him heir to his fortune. 2) Hyde is Jekyll's mixed-race son [where is the Jekyll/Hyde "Wide Sargasso Sea" spinoff?] 3) he's violent and angry because it's Victorian England and everyone's racist af and keep looking at him funny. 4) MP Carew probably got what was coming to him. But in more mainstream term I've got a running theory that 1) Utterson is an unreliable narrator and completely lying about the other two narratives to cover for his racist, imperialist views AND the fact that Jekyll named him heir to his fortune. 2) Hyde is Jekyll's mixed-race son [where is the Jekyll/Hyde "Wide Sargasso Sea" spinoff?] 3) he's violent and angry because it's Victorian England and everyone's racist af and keep looking at him funny. 4) MP Carew probably got what was coming to him. But in more mainstream terms, it's an okay read. A good yarn, a bit wordy, a bit much in places, I'd say this 54-page story could probably be a tight 30; even shorter if it were written today, but you probably wouldn't get that great atmosphere of RLS describing the different shades of brown smog in Soho and the streetlights that never get put out in the morning because of the area's [implied] lawlessness [not to mention all those dirty "women of different nations" amirite? ugh. The Sun couldn't set on the British Empire fast enough. Good riddance.] As I said, a decent read. Glad I finally got around to reading it.

  9. 5 out of 5

    Rebecca Milne

    The story of Jekyll and Hyde is one that many know for the stereotypical doppelgänger and gothic romanticism that it presents. However, the book Dr Jekyll and mr Hyde takes a while to get to the main themes and the climax of the novel. The Merry men tales are an alright read for analysis but not essential for anyone. The Merry men talks a bit about race near the end which ties in contextually to Stevenson’s main piece. Will of the mill is a good read and is especially good to analyse as it inclu The story of Jekyll and Hyde is one that many know for the stereotypical doppelgänger and gothic romanticism that it presents. However, the book Dr Jekyll and mr Hyde takes a while to get to the main themes and the climax of the novel. The Merry men tales are an alright read for analysis but not essential for anyone. The Merry men talks a bit about race near the end which ties in contextually to Stevenson’s main piece. Will of the mill is a good read and is especially good to analyse as it includes correlated devices which sits well after Jekyll and Hyde but perhaps good on its own without the stories that follow. All honesty I could not read Olalla or the stories that followed, I found Stevenson hard to read and the plots were not an easy read, accentuated by including dialect and the merry men being individual stories themselves.

  10. 4 out of 5

    Aravena

    Robert Luis Stevenson’s The Strange Case of Dr Jekyll and Mr Hyde is one of those stories that I had known since forever, but never actually read—until now, that is! In addition to that iconic dual personality tale, there are also some other of RLS’ short stories, which are mostly dark, somber, and tragic Gothic fiction, with a couple of exceptions. Jekyll and Hyde is obviously the main feature here, and even with the knowledge about the story and its famous plot twist, it’s still very intriguin Robert Luis Stevenson’s The Strange Case of Dr Jekyll and Mr Hyde is one of those stories that I had known since forever, but never actually read—until now, that is! In addition to that iconic dual personality tale, there are also some other of RLS’ short stories, which are mostly dark, somber, and tragic Gothic fiction, with a couple of exceptions. Jekyll and Hyde is obviously the main feature here, and even with the knowledge about the story and its famous plot twist, it’s still very intriguing to see how it’s executed. Told from an observer’s point of view, it uses devices such as letters of correspondence to present layers of mystery and slowly unpeel them in thrilling fashion. Boy, do I envy the unspoiled people who read the story back when it’s first published, not suspecting the tragic answer to the mystery. Along with Jekyll & Hyde, I consider Will o’ the Mill and Olalla as the strongest tales of the bunch. Will might actually be my personal favorite; what it’s lacking in thrills, it makes up for in pathos. It’s an achingly poignant tale of a man who once yearned for adventure and romance, but eventually settled for a grounded life fully on his own terms. I like it a lot, even if it may seem like a downer on the surface. Olalla, meanwhile, is a tragic (view spoiler)[love and vampire (hide spoiler)] story that I enjoyed thanks to the atmosphere and bittersweet earnestness of its narrator. Markheim and The Treasure of Franchard have interesting premises, especially the former, which tells a story about a murderer in an antique store and his psychological struggle in deciding whether to do more evil. In contrast, Franchard is easily the most light-hearted story in the collection, featuring a philosopher wannabe French doctor and the amusing relationship he has with his wife and adopted son. There are parts of these two stories that I found tedious, but both of them ends very strongly. I struggled the most with the remaining two stories, due to their use of Scottish language; The Merry Men has a certain character that speaks in Scottish, while Thrawn Janet is entirely told in that language. The glossary helped to certain extent, though. The Merry Men took a bit too long to get into the interesting part, while Thrawn Janet is a short but uncompromisingly dark story that I feel a strong need to re-visit someday with more effort to decipher the language. As per usual, the Wordsworth Classic edition comes with a foreword that neatly lays out the abbreviated profile of Stevenson and his writing style. Stevenson apparently described the collection as “awkward”, but I find these stories enjoyable due to the strength and diversity of their premises. The Victorian-style narrative and long-winded passage occasionally grate on me, but I tended to find something (or several things) that I like from each story, which as a whole, constitutes a study on contradictions and never-ending clash between social norms and the primal desire inside human beings.

  11. 4 out of 5

    Johnny

    A while back I read Stevenson's "Treasure Island", and I must say that is a far better book. Partly due to "Jekyll & Hyde" not being a complete novel but only a 55 page short story, which also goes far different than I had imagined. The final chapter alone is told from Jekyll's point of view. Here he writes about his experiments, his search for the duality of mankind (the civilizes versus the primitive) en his attempts to isolate those parts of a personality. The largest part of the story is tol A while back I read Stevenson's "Treasure Island", and I must say that is a far better book. Partly due to "Jekyll & Hyde" not being a complete novel but only a 55 page short story, which also goes far different than I had imagined. The final chapter alone is told from Jekyll's point of view. Here he writes about his experiments, his search for the duality of mankind (the civilizes versus the primitive) en his attempts to isolate those parts of a personality. The largest part of the story is told by an attorney, and deals primarily with the strange encounters with Hyde and an attempt to explain what's going on. The well known conclusion is a plot twist, but the story suddenly ends after the revelation in Jekyll's letter without any reaction of the other characters. This book also contains six other short stories. A part of "The Merry Men" is hard to read because one of the characters is constantly talking in a Scottish dialect. But the rest of the story has a tremendous amount of detail concerning the descriptions of the forces of nature. Really beautiful language where you can picture the scenes perfectly, and as a writer who always has a hard time describing surroundings, I can only be jealous. I like this story best of all because of the language used. Too bad the ending is so sudden, unexpected, and unexplained. "Will o' the Mill" is a little boring compared to the other stories, and made me feel sad. "Markheim" has the best ending in this collection, and the story forms a nice whole. "Thrawn Janet" is mostly unreadable once again due to the Scottish dialect. Then there are the not so memorable "Olalla", about a chance meeting leading to a love pushed away, and "The Treasure of Franchard", about the literal execution of a philosophy about wealth, a story lacking the beautiful language of "The Merry Men" but content wise the must fun to read, and with a satisfying ending as well.

  12. 5 out of 5

    Vee_Bookish // YA Book Blogger

    Okay, I read the entirety of Dr Jekyll and Mr Hyde, which was tedious to read at best. Then I got to the short story, The Merry Men. After 3-4 pages of intensive descriptions of rocks on a small island I was ready to scream. At which point the author decided to subject me to pages of a Scottish accent, which went like this: ‘We fand her in Sandag Bay, Rorie an’ me, and a’ thae braws in the inside of her. There’s a kittle bit, ye see, about Sandag; whiles the sook rins strong for the Merry Men; an Okay, I read the entirety of Dr Jekyll and Mr Hyde, which was tedious to read at best. Then I got to the short story, The Merry Men. After 3-4 pages of intensive descriptions of rocks on a small island I was ready to scream. At which point the author decided to subject me to pages of a Scottish accent, which went like this: ‘We fand her in Sandag Bay, Rorie an’ me, and a’ thae braws in the inside of her. There’s a kittle bit, ye see, about Sandag; whiles the sook rins strong for the Merry Men; an’ whiles again, when the tide’s makin’ hard an’ ye can hear the Roost blawin’ at the far-end of Aros, there comes a back-spang of current straucht into Sandag Bay. Weel, there’s the thing that got the grip on the Christ-Anna. She but to have come in ram-stam an’ stern forrit; for the bows of her are aften under, and the back-side of her is clear at hie-water o’ neaps. But, man! the dunt that she cam doon wi’ when she struck! Lord save us a’! but it’s an unco life to be a sailor—a cauld, wanchancy life.' I can understand Scottish suprisingly well but jesus fucking christ on a bicycle peddling flowers that was freaking awful to read and that's only a small part of it. Back to Dr Jekyll and Mr Hyde, the book was interesting but tedious to read. The author over-describes everything until I was bored to tears and due to cultural differences (well, we are a good century apart) I had no clue what he saying quite often. Also felt like it needed an extra chapter to finish the story properly.

  13. 4 out of 5

    Adam

    I enjoyed parts of this book, but some of Stevenson's short stories aren't for me, here is my review broken down book by book: Dr. Jekyll & Mr Hyde: An essential read for anyone who cares for literature, or Stevenson, yet I do find the last chapter especially unnecessary. 7/10 The Merry Men: A decent read, but if you have trouble reading Scottish, which Stevenson loves to write in, it might be worth a miss. 6/10 Will O' the Mill: Another decent read but largely forgettable. 6/10 Markheim: One of the I enjoyed parts of this book, but some of Stevenson's short stories aren't for me, here is my review broken down book by book: Dr. Jekyll & Mr Hyde: An essential read for anyone who cares for literature, or Stevenson, yet I do find the last chapter especially unnecessary. 7/10 The Merry Men: A decent read, but if you have trouble reading Scottish, which Stevenson loves to write in, it might be worth a miss. 6/10 Will O' the Mill: Another decent read but largely forgettable. 6/10 Markheim: One of the better stories here, probably on par with DJ&MH. 7/10 Thrawn Janet: Refer to my comment about Scottish again. I just skimmed this one. 4/10 Olalla: One of my two favourites from the book, an interesting look at/allegory for romance. 8/10 The Treasure of Franchard: My other favourite, due to it being an interesting look out how philosophy can help/hinder your life. 8/10 Overall: A mixture of good short stories, but some are worth a read, whereas others, just aren't. 6.5/10

  14. 5 out of 5

    Ksenia

    To be honest I liked Dr. Jekyll and Mr. Hyde the most and as far as I have seen it looks like this is the case with most people. That being said, I did enjoy most of the other stories. They are philosophical and I think well written. 'Thrawn Janet' is actually written in Scots, so it was rather hard to read for me. The Merry Men just wasn't really for me because of the theme(s) of the plot. Here is my rating of each story: Dr. Jekyll and Mr. Hyde: 4,5/5 The Merry Men: 2/5 Will O' the Mill: 3,5/5 Mark To be honest I liked Dr. Jekyll and Mr. Hyde the most and as far as I have seen it looks like this is the case with most people. That being said, I did enjoy most of the other stories. They are philosophical and I think well written. 'Thrawn Janet' is actually written in Scots, so it was rather hard to read for me. The Merry Men just wasn't really for me because of the theme(s) of the plot. Here is my rating of each story: Dr. Jekyll and Mr. Hyde: 4,5/5 The Merry Men: 2/5 Will O' the Mill: 3,5/5 Markheim: 4/5 Thrawn Janet: 2/5 Olalla: 3/5 The Treasure of Franchard: 4/5

  15. 5 out of 5

    Alex Apostol

    Dr. Jekyll and Mr. Hyde is a story we were required to read in school, but I loved it none the less and is one I would like to re-read now. Everyone knows the story and it's one that is retold over and over again- the one of dual personalities, one being evil and the other good. That never stops being scary for me and I'm sure it will even find its way into my own work someday.

  16. 5 out of 5

    Max Bauer

    Old literature is always dear to my heart since it is like a little climpse into a different era. My favourite was, of course Dr. Jekyll And Mr. Hyde. It is such an intruiging, interesting story that I couldn't put it down for hours. Will o' the Mill was the most boring one and I almost didn't finish it, the ending was good tho.

  17. 4 out of 5

    Ryan Finlayson

    I only read Jekyll and Hyde. Final chapter was the most entertaining for me personally.

  18. 4 out of 5

    Alexa Wardle

    Keep your eye out for a new blogpost on this book at www.thebritishstoryteller.wordpress.com. Coming soon! Keep your eye out for a new blogpost on this book at www.thebritishstoryteller.wordpress.com. Coming soon!

  19. 4 out of 5

    Daniel Kilgrave

    I completely believe I was Mr Hyde in another life.

  20. 4 out of 5

    Fred H

    A nice short story really well written and easy to follow. Great thematic depth with beautiful imagery and generally just a really interesting story.

  21. 4 out of 5

    Zara

    3/5 stars

  22. 5 out of 5

    Alex Rotherham

    The stories in this collection vary from a complete waste of time, to amazing and worthwhile reads. I've rated and reviewed each story independently below. Dr. Jekyll and Mr. Hyde 4/5 I must admit, I was rather disappointed with the conclusion of this story. The first 80% was an interesting, well written mystery that, while I already knew what the mystery was that was unfolding, I felt excited to see how it unravels. But then we reach the great final chapter, the last 20% of the book, and the wri The stories in this collection vary from a complete waste of time, to amazing and worthwhile reads. I've rated and reviewed each story independently below. Dr. Jekyll and Mr. Hyde 4/5 I must admit, I was rather disappointed with the conclusion of this story. The first 80% was an interesting, well written mystery that, while I already knew what the mystery was that was unfolding, I felt excited to see how it unravels. But then we reach the great final chapter, the last 20% of the book, and the writer seems to have given up himself on how the mystery is to unfold, and so suddenly a letter from Dr. Jekyll explains it all to us, and Mr. Utterson. I imagine Mr. Stevenson came up with this idea for a story, and just started writing, and reached a point where he was fed up, or could not find a way to tie up the loose ends, and just decided, I’ll just explain what it was all about and move on. The potential for this story, especially of the time was huge, and I suppose that is part of why it has survived so well-it was great for its time. The Merry Men 2/5 My first complaint on this read is the over use of accent. One of the main characters uses a heavy Scottish dialect that the author attempted to portray in detail with the text. But in his choice of using words to reflect the Scottish language rather than anglicising, he has made it nearly impossible for me to decipher what this character is meant to be saying. Yes, a Scottish glossary is provided in the back, but it even lacks, and having to flip through it for multiple words in a row detracts massively from the reading. This heavily tarnishes both the legibility of the story and my ability to enjoy it. As I reached the conclusion, and try to put together what was supposed to have happened, I get the idea it was a decent story, and a decent idea; yet was destroyed in the name of artistic dialogue. Will o’ the Mill 5/5 The best story so for of this collection, yes much better than Dr.Jekyll and Mr. Hyde. This one is clearly structured and paced. Strangely, this seems to not have garnered any notice unlike the previous 2 stories that both have. Perhaps this story is too straight forward and simple; or clear and human. The final chapter broke quite sharply from the commonality of the rest of the story, but retained the tone of calm, thoughtful simplicity. I could strangely both sympathise and empathise with Will; making at points the story felt like my story, and other points, the story I successfully avoided but understand. Markheim 5/5 Another brilliant short story. A wonderful yet simple description of a dark event that leads us into the mind of one man, it could be any man, and his vision of himself versus the reality. It paints a picture of who is good and who is evil; is it a choice, or is it forced upon us by the circumstances of our reality. Thrawn Janet N/A I gave up trying to read this one, as it is entirely written in the Scottish dialect, and if you see my comments for The Merry Men, you can understand why I gave up on this story very quickly. Ollalla 1/5 This story feels somewhat pointless, meaningless and quite incomplete to me. At one point, I thought this may be a ghost story, but no. At another, I thought this may be a subtle vampire story, but that was not developed either. This has a beginning, and maybe half of a middle, at certainly no good ending. It’s if nothing else, an infuriating read, as it did succeed to gain my interest into the fates, and the pasts, of the characters, but then did not provide anything towards either. The Treasure of Franchard 4/5 A bit of a more pleasant read. A simple tale, a happy sad tale. One of fate and circumstance, greed and misfortune. A tragedy, but with an almost polite happy ending. Certainly one of his better reads.

  23. 4 out of 5

    Mark Carew

    An excellent idea, still relevant today. Man is composed of light and shadow, good and bad, or evil, for the theologically inclined. Stevenson tests this idea out in Dr Henry Jekyll, a well-respected doctor, and takes the concept through to its logical conclusions. Incidentally, the 1920 silent movie, with John Barrymore as Jekyll, does a great job in showing how Jekyll must resist the strains on his morals, by denying himself the attractive ladies in the fleshpots of Victorian London. Jekyll ca An excellent idea, still relevant today. Man is composed of light and shadow, good and bad, or evil, for the theologically inclined. Stevenson tests this idea out in Dr Henry Jekyll, a well-respected doctor, and takes the concept through to its logical conclusions. Incidentally, the 1920 silent movie, with John Barrymore as Jekyll, does a great job in showing how Jekyll must resist the strains on his morals, by denying himself the attractive ladies in the fleshpots of Victorian London. Jekyll can not, however, resist his dark side for long and so Hyde is born, thanks to some mystical potion. Hyde must, and does, let his dark shadow roam free; the book's Hyde has a taste for violence. Hyde tramples a young girl, still quite a shocking incident today. Sir Danvers Carew (a walk on part in the book) is clubbed to death. Note how Carew has a greater role in the movie, as well as a new name (George), and brings Jekyll to the nightspots where his vice is sexual temptation. The charge of hypocrisy hangs in the air of these places, which are filled with married, well-to-do gentleman in top hats and capes. (In the movie, Jekyll's temptation is also made more awkward because he is in love with Carew's daughter, Millicent, a new character). The tale in the book is told non-chronologically and is a deliberate attempt to keep the mystery of who is Hyde alive for as long as possible. The reader needs to look hard at points and recognise that the small deformed man in the narrative is Hyde. A reader might easily think Jekyll and Hyde are two separate people until the big reveal – the author’s intention, of course, but as with other novels with unreliable narrators, a piece of trickery that is not always welcome. Explanations are provided by Dr Lanyon and Jekyll at the end. This is not an easy read, but such a classic that you need to read it twice, at least, to do it justice.

  24. 4 out of 5

    Mark Davis

    As a fan of the gothic and the supernatural, I was amazed it's taken me this long to pick up this long-talked about classic. Overall I loved the themes explored, I just wish the plot and execution were better. Stevenson seems to indulge in trivialities that would be okay in a full-length novel, but bog down the pace and chill factor in a short story. There are so many missed opportunities to build tension, mystery and horror, almost as if Stevenson was treating the writing process as a chore. Ag As a fan of the gothic and the supernatural, I was amazed it's taken me this long to pick up this long-talked about classic. Overall I loved the themes explored, I just wish the plot and execution were better. Stevenson seems to indulge in trivialities that would be okay in a full-length novel, but bog down the pace and chill factor in a short story. There are so many missed opportunities to build tension, mystery and horror, almost as if Stevenson was treating the writing process as a chore. Again, some of the imagery and language is beautiful, I just feel it is used in the wrong places. I wanted to know so much more about Jekyll, his ambitions, his relationships, his previous work, and instead, we only really get to know him by his confession at the end; when the tension is over. I couldn't help draw comparisons with Dorian Gray, due to the duality of a man of high esteem in society, but Oscar Wilde was far more willing to look into his titular character's life, relationships and emotions. Yes, Stevenson created a good deal of intrigue by making Jekyll elusive, but it could have reeled us in more, given us glimpses into his life and mindset, so that ultimately we cared more about him as a character. That said, there is a reason this work has endured and it is undoubtedly an incredible commentary on the duality of man and the oppressive state of the high class in terms of self-expression. The concept is incredibly tantalising and draws on themes that still intrigue us in society today. I just wanted more, and that can often be the highest praise or lowest criticism possible.

  25. 4 out of 5

    Harry Tidby

    I have read several classics which, being classics, have a certain level of buzz around them in the literary community. Often times I find myself enjoying these books, but not to the degree that I perhaps thought I would; sometimes I cannot even bring myself past 80 pages *cough Great Expectations cough*, but thankfully with Jekyll and Hyde, this was not the case. The prose flows brilliantly, the story is gripping and intriguing even when the main twist is known to almost anyone who has ever hea I have read several classics which, being classics, have a certain level of buzz around them in the literary community. Often times I find myself enjoying these books, but not to the degree that I perhaps thought I would; sometimes I cannot even bring myself past 80 pages *cough Great Expectations cough*, but thankfully with Jekyll and Hyde, this was not the case. The prose flows brilliantly, the story is gripping and intriguing even when the main twist is known to almost anyone who has ever heard of the book, let alone read it, and the dingy, dark setting is immaculately done. It took only a total of two hours for me to read it - and even then I was pacing myself as not to skip on any details - but for those two hours I truly felt that I existed within that universe, and that's really what I look for in a novel. Quite frankly I feel a bit robbed that I didn't get to study this book in my GCSE year, and was instead stuck with Spies by Michael Frayn (which in no way would I recommend) however, I am so thoroughly glad to have rectified my previous neglect of this novel I give this book 4.7 stars, and would recommend it to anyone with even a passing interest in literature.

  26. 4 out of 5

    Gijs

    This review has been hidden because it contains spoilers. To view it, click here. I had good hopes that the story would be as thrilling and exciting as the Breaking Bad series. The parallel between the Walter White/Heisenberg duality and Jekyll/Hyde is what drew me to this classic story. However, the way the story was built is definitely a disappointment. The introduction in my Wordsworth edition informs me Stevenson rewrote the story as an allegorical thriller and destroyed his first version which was a simple thriller. As a result, the story now misses any form of suspense. I had good hopes that the story would be as thrilling and exciting as the Breaking Bad series. The parallel between the Walter White/Heisenberg duality and Jekyll/Hyde is what drew me to this classic story. However, the way the story was built is definitely a disappointment. The introduction in my Wordsworth edition informs me Stevenson rewrote the story as an allegorical thriller and destroyed his first version which was a simple thriller. As a result, the story now misses any form of suspense. Even if it has the narrative embedding (the story starts with Utterson’s point of view, a good friend of Hyde), there is hardly a build-up to a climax. Finally, the language lacks the gothic grandeur of e.g. Frankenstein with its long-spun sentences and archaic fashion or the poetically charming English of Rhyme of the Ancient Mariner.

  27. 5 out of 5

    James

    I was very surprised to learn that this book was only 50 pages long, as the 2 protagonists are so well known throughout cultural references. The book moves quite quickly as a short story should and still engages the reader despite knowing the general events before reading. I am surprised that this has its place in folklore though as the premise is so far fetched. Some could compare this far fetchedness to Frankenstein but that book has so much more plot and character development. As for the othe I was very surprised to learn that this book was only 50 pages long, as the 2 protagonists are so well known throughout cultural references. The book moves quite quickly as a short story should and still engages the reader despite knowing the general events before reading. I am surprised that this has its place in folklore though as the premise is so far fetched. Some could compare this far fetchedness to Frankenstein but that book has so much more plot and character development. As for the other short stories, I decided to pass. I was 2 chapters into the Merry Men and found it hard to follow. Realising that I bought the book for Jekyll and Hyde, I put the book down ready to move on to my next choice

  28. 5 out of 5

    Sarah Kreß

    A nice little classic to read. I didn't know before that Dr. Jekyll and Mr. Hyde is but a short story and that the author has written many others just as good or even better. Overall an entertaining read if youdon't mind slow developing stories with lots of descriptions. Thelanguage can sometimes be a bit challenging (especially for a non native speaker) as he writes some of his stories in a heavy scottish accent and there is a hint of racism (the black men...) that is a bit foreighn and annoyin A nice little classic to read. I didn't know before that Dr. Jekyll and Mr. Hyde is but a short story and that the author has written many others just as good or even better. Overall an entertaining read if youdon't mind slow developing stories with lots of descriptions. Thelanguage can sometimes be a bit challenging (especially for a non native speaker) as he writes some of his stories in a heavy scottish accent and there is a hint of racism (the black men...) that is a bit foreighn and annoying to todays readers, but you have to consider the time it has been written in I guess. All of the stories have one thing in common and that is the exploration of the human mind, which is and always will be a fascinating topic.

  29. 5 out of 5

    Julia Kamerling

    In spite of me having dropped this collection of short stories due to me not having any interest in them anymore and only having bought the book to read about Dr. Jekyll and Mr. Hide, it is a classic one has to read. Every story is well-written, but the Scottish use of language can make it difficult to understand at times. Perchance this also has to do with me dropping the work. All in all, a good book. However, once again, it was not my cup of tea.

  30. 4 out of 5

    Lewis

    The audio-book that I listened to only had the Jekyll and Hyde story so this is just a review for that! 4.5 stars - I loved this story a lot. Gothic literature is just so melodramatic and grimly whimsical that I fall in love right away. I loved how Stevenson explored the duality and non-mutual-exclusivity of good and evil.

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