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Mennonite Community Cookbook

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This “grandmother of all Mennonite cookbooks” brings a touch of Mennonite culture and hospitality to any home that relishes great cooking. Mary Emma Showalter compiled favorite recipes from hundreds of Mennonite women across the United States and Canada noted for their excellent cooking into this book of more than 1,100 recipes. These tantalizing dishes came to this countr This “grandmother of all Mennonite cookbooks” brings a touch of Mennonite culture and hospitality to any home that relishes great cooking. Mary Emma Showalter compiled favorite recipes from hundreds of Mennonite women across the United States and Canada noted for their excellent cooking into this book of more than 1,100 recipes. These tantalizing dishes came to this country directly from Dutch, German, Swiss, and Russian kitchens. Old-fashioned cooking and traditional Mennonite values are woven throughout. Original directions like “a dab of cinnamon” or “ten blubs of molasses” have been standardized to help you get the same wonderful individuality and flavor. Showalter introduces each chapter with her own nostalgic recollection of cookery in grandma’s day—the pie shelf in the springhouse, outdoor bake ovens, the summer kitchen. First published in 1950, Mennonite Community Cookbook has become a treasured part of many family kitchens. Parents who received the cookbook when they were first married make sure to purchase it for their own sons and daughters when they wed. This 65th anniversary edition adds all new color photography and a brief history while retaining all of the original recipes and traditional Fraktur drawings. Check out the cookbook blog at mennonitecommunitycookbook.com


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This “grandmother of all Mennonite cookbooks” brings a touch of Mennonite culture and hospitality to any home that relishes great cooking. Mary Emma Showalter compiled favorite recipes from hundreds of Mennonite women across the United States and Canada noted for their excellent cooking into this book of more than 1,100 recipes. These tantalizing dishes came to this countr This “grandmother of all Mennonite cookbooks” brings a touch of Mennonite culture and hospitality to any home that relishes great cooking. Mary Emma Showalter compiled favorite recipes from hundreds of Mennonite women across the United States and Canada noted for their excellent cooking into this book of more than 1,100 recipes. These tantalizing dishes came to this country directly from Dutch, German, Swiss, and Russian kitchens. Old-fashioned cooking and traditional Mennonite values are woven throughout. Original directions like “a dab of cinnamon” or “ten blubs of molasses” have been standardized to help you get the same wonderful individuality and flavor. Showalter introduces each chapter with her own nostalgic recollection of cookery in grandma’s day—the pie shelf in the springhouse, outdoor bake ovens, the summer kitchen. First published in 1950, Mennonite Community Cookbook has become a treasured part of many family kitchens. Parents who received the cookbook when they were first married make sure to purchase it for their own sons and daughters when they wed. This 65th anniversary edition adds all new color photography and a brief history while retaining all of the original recipes and traditional Fraktur drawings. Check out the cookbook blog at mennonitecommunitycookbook.com

30 review for Mennonite Community Cookbook

  1. 5 out of 5

    Sahara

    I find it hard to believe the recipes came from the earlier generations of simple hard working people. The ingredients are very processed 1950's- 60's sounding stuff. I am giving it 2 stars because I'm a sucker for any cook book, even if hot dogs are on the ingredients list.

  2. 5 out of 5

    Arlynn

    I don't think I could live without this cook book. It is beyond fabulous. It was the Ph.D. dissertation for a home economics major in 1950 Iowa. She traveled all over the United States and Europe for a compendium of recipes that best represented the cooking of people of her culture and faith. I still use a sweet bread recipe that was 150 years old in 1950. Some good things never change. This book speaks to an era when most people lived on farms, and every part of the animal was utilized. If you I don't think I could live without this cook book. It is beyond fabulous. It was the Ph.D. dissertation for a home economics major in 1950 Iowa. She traveled all over the United States and Europe for a compendium of recipes that best represented the cooking of people of her culture and faith. I still use a sweet bread recipe that was 150 years old in 1950. Some good things never change. This book speaks to an era when most people lived on farms, and every part of the animal was utilized. If you couldn't make shoes our of it, or tan it, by gosh you could make sausage - just don't skimp on the herbs. She has wonderful cakes, pies, puddings, roasts, but the real thrill is reading the recipes of things you would not make in a million years. Scrambled pig pancreas, anyone? Horse Oysters? Maybe I exaggerate, but it's fun. I was so crazy about I picked up a second copy (like new) at a resale shop, for my daughters. Too bad. Either they won't cook or they go to the internet. They are cooking illiterates, as far as I am concerned, being unwilling to take the time to study recipes in detail and compare them with the reverence they deserve. They can bury me with my copy.

  3. 4 out of 5

    Karen Hannum

    This is still on my shelf (unlike many others) So I will be reevaluating it throughout this year. I did not get rid of it, but nor do I remember it or any recipe from it. Maybe I held onto it for a sauerkraut recipe?

  4. 5 out of 5

    Lori Tatar

    This is not our mom's, nor our grandmother's nor maybe even your great grandmother's cookbook. These are mostly old, authentic, traditional recipes that have been passed down for generations. I even found a few that I thought were lost. You'll be using the freshest ingredients since only a rare few call for a can of anything. And, in case you need it, there is a spot at the back with instructions on what to cook for a barnraising, enough for 175 men. There are more tips and general suggestions a This is not our mom's, nor our grandmother's nor maybe even your great grandmother's cookbook. These are mostly old, authentic, traditional recipes that have been passed down for generations. I even found a few that I thought were lost. You'll be using the freshest ingredients since only a rare few call for a can of anything. And, in case you need it, there is a spot at the back with instructions on what to cook for a barnraising, enough for 175 men. There are more tips and general suggestions as well, which I found as interesting as the recipes.

  5. 4 out of 5

    Jamesirwin19

    Three generations of Irwin cooks have used this. My grandmother, my mother, and now me. Quite simply, this my favorite cookbook. The meatloaf recipe saved me from having to admit to my Aunt Mary that I didn't know how to cook meatloaf. More importantly, it saved me from the 30 minute long lecture on "how she would cook it".

  6. 5 out of 5

    Nancy Gail

    Great cookbook with a lots of traditional recipes. It's a little hard to read and choose as there are a lot of recipes and no photos of finished food. Some recipes are simple and could use further instruction.

  7. 5 out of 5

    Donna Godfrey

    This is the book I used when I learned to cook and I go to it often. I have my grandma's copy and that makes it special because she taught me to love to cook.

  8. 4 out of 5

    Sandra

    Best Shoo Fly Pie recipe. Also the chicken pot pie

  9. 5 out of 5

    Kristen

    Classic cooking

  10. 4 out of 5

    Fredrick Danysh

    A collection of old-fashioned recipes from the Mennonite community. There are over 1,100 delicious recipes in this collection. Everything is made from scratch.

  11. 5 out of 5

    Angela Burkholder

  12. 4 out of 5

    Jane

  13. 4 out of 5

    Diana

  14. 4 out of 5

    Sherri Ann

  15. 4 out of 5

    Phil

  16. 5 out of 5

    Patricia

  17. 5 out of 5

    Lavender Blossoms

  18. 4 out of 5

    Liz Waters

  19. 5 out of 5

    Gracie

  20. 5 out of 5

    Vanessa

  21. 4 out of 5

    Miriam

  22. 5 out of 5

    Cindy

  23. 4 out of 5

    Kyle

  24. 4 out of 5

    Diana

  25. 4 out of 5

    Vicki

  26. 5 out of 5

    Nicole

  27. 5 out of 5

    HeraldPress

  28. 5 out of 5

    Katie Olleman

  29. 5 out of 5

    Ramona

  30. 4 out of 5

    jewlz

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