free hit counter code Death Wears a Mask - GoBooks - Download Free Book
Ads Banner
Hot Best Seller

Death Wears a Mask

Availability: Ready to download

Amory Ames is looking forward to a tranquil period of reconnecting with reformed playboy husband Milo after an unexpected reconciliation following the murderous events at the Brightwell Hotel. Amory hopes a quiet stay at their London flat will help mend their dysfunctional relationship. However, she soon finds herself drawn into another investigation when Serena Barrington Amory Ames is looking forward to a tranquil period of reconnecting with reformed playboy husband Milo after an unexpected reconciliation following the murderous events at the Brightwell Hotel. Amory hopes a quiet stay at their London flat will help mend their dysfunctional relationship. However, she soon finds herself drawn into another investigation when Serena Barrington asks her to look into the disappearance of valuable jewelry snatched at a dinner party. Unable to say no to an old family friend, Amory agrees to help lay a trap to catch the culprit at a lavish masked ball hosted by the notorious Viscount Dunmore. But when one of the illustrious party guests is murdered, Amory is pulled back into the world of detection, enlisted by old ally Detective Inspector Jones. As she works through the suspect list, she struggles to fend off the advances of the very persistent viscount even as rumors swirl about Milo and a French film star. Once again, Amory and Milo must work together to solve a mystery where nothing is as it seems, set in the heart of 1930s society London. "Death Wears a Mask" is the second novel in Ashley Weaver's witty and stylish Amory and Milo Ames mystery series.


Compare
Ads Banner

Amory Ames is looking forward to a tranquil period of reconnecting with reformed playboy husband Milo after an unexpected reconciliation following the murderous events at the Brightwell Hotel. Amory hopes a quiet stay at their London flat will help mend their dysfunctional relationship. However, she soon finds herself drawn into another investigation when Serena Barrington Amory Ames is looking forward to a tranquil period of reconnecting with reformed playboy husband Milo after an unexpected reconciliation following the murderous events at the Brightwell Hotel. Amory hopes a quiet stay at their London flat will help mend their dysfunctional relationship. However, she soon finds herself drawn into another investigation when Serena Barrington asks her to look into the disappearance of valuable jewelry snatched at a dinner party. Unable to say no to an old family friend, Amory agrees to help lay a trap to catch the culprit at a lavish masked ball hosted by the notorious Viscount Dunmore. But when one of the illustrious party guests is murdered, Amory is pulled back into the world of detection, enlisted by old ally Detective Inspector Jones. As she works through the suspect list, she struggles to fend off the advances of the very persistent viscount even as rumors swirl about Milo and a French film star. Once again, Amory and Milo must work together to solve a mystery where nothing is as it seems, set in the heart of 1930s society London. "Death Wears a Mask" is the second novel in Ashley Weaver's witty and stylish Amory and Milo Ames mystery series.

30 review for Death Wears a Mask

  1. 5 out of 5

    Phrynne

    I really enjoyed the first book in this series so it was an easy decision to move on to #2. It turned out to equally good so I was happy! Amory and Milo continue to fall out and make up. Milo does seem to be out of line but maybe that's how the rich lived in those days. Of course someone is murdered at a house party attended by Amory and she is asked to help solve the crime. The investigation becomes quite involved and confusing but Amory solves it all in the end. It is easy to become involved wit I really enjoyed the first book in this series so it was an easy decision to move on to #2. It turned out to equally good so I was happy! Amory and Milo continue to fall out and make up. Milo does seem to be out of line but maybe that's how the rich lived in those days. Of course someone is murdered at a house party attended by Amory and she is asked to help solve the crime. The investigation becomes quite involved and confusing but Amory solves it all in the end. It is easy to become involved with the two main characters. They are both charming and witty and their dialogue is very well written. The tension between them really works, as their most entertaining comments usually occur when they are sparring. I will be continuing the series to see what happens to the two of them.

  2. 5 out of 5

    Sarah

    I cannot for the life of me figure out why Amory hasn’t fired Winnelda or sent Milo packing.

  3. 5 out of 5

    Jaclyn

    Death Wears a Mask is the utterly charming follow-up to Ashley Weaver Murder at the Brightwell (which I also loved). This second installment continues the momentum of the first, throwing it’s amateur lady detective, Amory Ames into another investigation and into more relationship drama with her husband, Milo. Asked by a family friend, Serena Barrington, to look into the apparent theft of her jewels during a dinner party, Amory finds herself looking at the motives of the dinner guests. Amory’s re Death Wears a Mask is the utterly charming follow-up to Ashley Weaver Murder at the Brightwell (which I also loved). This second installment continues the momentum of the first, throwing it’s amateur lady detective, Amory Ames into another investigation and into more relationship drama with her husband, Milo. Asked by a family friend, Serena Barrington, to look into the apparent theft of her jewels during a dinner party, Amory finds herself looking at the motives of the dinner guests. Amory’s reputation from the events at the Brightwell have preceded her arrival in London, and Serena is sure that Amory can put her investigative skills to use and catch the culprit. Amory is not really given a chance to refuse, and so begins her investigation, which leads to murder, mayhem and disguises (okay, well, just one). In addition to Amory’s investigation she also has to contend with more trouble in her marriage to Milo. While they had reconnected during the events of Murder at the Brightwell, Milo appears to back to his old habits when he’s photographed with a popular actress. It seems that Amory has to make a decision about what to do about her husband, does she let him get away with his apparent infidelities or does see seek out a divorce and make a clean break. Now, I have to admit I have my own pet theory about Milo’s apparent playboy behaviour. I am 95% certain that Milo is a spy or some sort of government agent. There are just too many red flags that seem to indicate that this might be the case. Something is just not right with his convenient explanations or his sudden appearances at certain events. At any rate, the conflict between Amory and Milo makes for good reading and it complements the mystery really well. That said, I do hope that book three brings these two together on a more common ground; the waffling about their relationship and the deep-seated problems never seem to totally get resolved. Is Amory ever going to be able to trust her husband who clearly does not share everything with his wife? But, hey, it will bring me back for book three, so the author clearly knows what she’s doing. In addition to the Amory’s relationship turmoil, the setting and it’s heroine continue to charm. 1930s London was a lot of fun. While Death Wears a Mask isn’t high on historical detail, the atmosphere of the 1930s, and it’s opulence, at least for the rich, gives this series a wonderful sense of place. Amory and Milo do not represent the masses. Amory has no commitments and no career; her social life is her entire life it seems. In a lot of ways Amory could have become a boring character, instead I find her appealing, having an earnestness that one wouldn’t expect of a woman of her class. I also like the fact that crime solving is an outlet for Amory, a career of sorts. I would really like to see how this idea of Amory as an independent investigator will change through the series. Death Wears a Mask is another wonderful adventure with the intrepid Amory Ames. The setting and its light mystery continues to charm as does its heroine and her relationship woes. This is the perfect read for those who like a more character-driven mystery, as well as much less focus on the procedure of solving the crime. Fans of the first book, you wont be disappointed. Originally reviewed at The Book Adventures. *Review copy provided by the publisher via NetGalley.

  4. 4 out of 5

    Linda

    Death Wears A Mask took up two months after Murder At The Brightwell. I enjoyed this mystery and DI Jones was once again along for the ride. I will leave it to other readers as to how they feel about Amory’s and Milo’s relationship. As for me, I needed to remind myself that the married couple were part of the British upper class and the 1930s retained a rigid social structure. There was a constant push/pull with a dose of unwillingness to listen to each other- i.e., marriage mind games. At one po Death Wears A Mask took up two months after Murder At The Brightwell. I enjoyed this mystery and DI Jones was once again along for the ride. I will leave it to other readers as to how they feel about Amory’s and Milo’s relationship. As for me, I needed to remind myself that the married couple were part of the British upper class and the 1930s retained a rigid social structure. There was a constant push/pull with a dose of unwillingness to listen to each other- i.e., marriage mind games. At one point, Amory considered a desperate measure. But I am hooked on this series. The atmosphere was stylish and moody ala Agatha Christie. The quips were entertaining. The whodunit was well-written and the characterization was clever. The suspense flowed and for the most part, there were no awkward pauses.

  5. 4 out of 5

    Bryn

    After enjoying the first book in the series, this was a big disappointment, mainly because of the continuing dysfunctional relationship between Amory and Milo. They are both such potentially likeable characters, but I got so, so tired of Milo's cluelessness about the effect of his behavior on his wife and Amory's unwillingness to discuss it. I just don't understand why he thinks he can just come and go with no explanation and dine with women who aren't his wife, and then he is surprised that Amo After enjoying the first book in the series, this was a big disappointment, mainly because of the continuing dysfunctional relationship between Amory and Milo. They are both such potentially likeable characters, but I got so, so tired of Milo's cluelessness about the effect of his behavior on his wife and Amory's unwillingness to discuss it. I just don't understand why he thinks he can just come and go with no explanation and dine with women who aren't his wife, and then he is surprised that Amory is upset about it. "But it didn't mean anything." "Nothing happened." Yeah, whatever. But it is even harder to understand that Amory doesn't just say, "If you're going somewhere, you have to tell me. Better yet, bring me with you. That's what loving couples do. And don't you ever, ever go out for dinner alone with another woman. That is just insulting." But after spending most of the book refusing to discuss it, she excuses him with the realization that he's just "not at her beck and call" as if that explains it and everything's ok. My husband isn't at my beck and call either, but he would never treat me with the same cavalier indifference Milo shows her. I'll believe "spunky heroine" when she starts acting like it, in her marriage as elsewhere. One more book in this series, and if they're still doing this stupid dance, I'm done.

  6. 5 out of 5

    Lisa

    I enjoyed this light-hearted mystery with a major amount of glamour! Set in London in 1932 Amory and Milo Ames become involved in another high-class murder which is carried out during a masked ball no less. This is written from Amory's POV and she is a naive but charming and intelligent high society lady. Don't think too hard about this one, if you can allow yourself to enjoy it it is very rewarding - fast-paced, funny and intriguing. I will certainly be reading more in this series.

  7. 4 out of 5

    Melanie (Mel's Bookland Adventures)

    Level of obsession: high to very high

  8. 4 out of 5

    Ivonne Rovira

    Pity poor Amory Ames, a bright, young thing who has just reconciled with her devilishly handsome and charming (but philandering) Milo. Even in August 1932, the couple doesn’t want for money, and they’ve been working on their five-year-old marriage since it almost died along with two murder victims in the series’ debut, Murder at the Brightwell. Amory believes that the bad times are finally over, but no such luck! Now that they’re back in London, Milo Ames appears once again, to be straying, and Pity poor Amory Ames, a bright, young thing who has just reconciled with her devilishly handsome and charming (but philandering) Milo. Even in August 1932, the couple doesn’t want for money, and they’ve been working on their five-year-old marriage since it almost died along with two murder victims in the series’ debut, Murder at the Brightwell. Amory believes that the bad times are finally over, but no such luck! Now that they’re back in London, Milo Ames appears once again, to be straying, and yet another corpse turns up on during a masquerade ball thrown by an aristocratic lady’s man with his eye on Amory. Needless to say, the endlessly curious Amory, urged on by an old family friend, Serena Barrington, takes it upon herself to discover what the police cannot from the members of her social set and uncover the culprit. I did not think that I would like Murder Wears a Mask as well as Murder at the Brightwell — and, at first, I didn’t. But the jewel heist that opens the novel and the splendidly drawn characters soon had me glued to the novel. The charming Amory, the period touches, and the clever dialogue put me in the mind of a less dour Harriet Vane or another Tuppence Beresford. What a delight! Even though I sort of guessed the perpetrator before the big reveal, I never stumbled onto his motive. Yet, even if I had, the novel was so charming and riveting, that I wouldn’t have cared a fig! Now, if I could only figure out how I will be able to wait until the third novel in the series, A Most Novel Revenge, is released in October! Too bad I don’t have the option to flee to Monte Carlo or Paris in the company of Milo and Amory. Caveat emptor: I listened Audible edition of Murder at the Brightwell, in which narrator Billie Fulford-Brown did a charming job narrating; however, Fulford-Brown was replaced with Alison Larkin, who sounds like Billie Burke in film The Wizard of Oz. The voice narration was so annoyingly screechy that I had to return the Audible edition and read the book in the Kindle format.

  9. 4 out of 5

    Beth

    I'm a little amazed at how much I'm enjoying what's a fairly thin series. The atmosphere is the selling point here: it's a unique look at the 1930s upper class. (It's not a Sayers sort of atmosphere, though - I can't see fitting Lord Peter into this scene.) Which might mean that part of the appeal of this series is its rarified air, that it plays on wish fulfillment, that there's something escapist about someone who wears beautiful dresses and goes to parties and doesn't need to work. Or maybe t I'm a little amazed at how much I'm enjoying what's a fairly thin series. The atmosphere is the selling point here: it's a unique look at the 1930s upper class. (It's not a Sayers sort of atmosphere, though - I can't see fitting Lord Peter into this scene.) Which might mean that part of the appeal of this series is its rarified air, that it plays on wish fulfillment, that there's something escapist about someone who wears beautiful dresses and goes to parties and doesn't need to work. Or maybe there's something touching about that same person - who seems not to have a care in the world - being really cut up over her husband's carelessness. This works because it's historical. I think a modern-day equivalent would make me roll my eyes over the first-world problems of it all. But here's Amory, who grows up knowing nothing but the life she has, with limited contact to the very different world half a city away; her world doesn't provide her with tools to bridge the gap, or even to understand it. All of which is to say that the central mystery, which is thin, feels more substantial because of the characters - and the characters feel more substantial, even though their conflict isn't new, because of the way they play off each other and the setting. This book really does rehash the previous book's dilemma, but it is more specific - photographic evidence! - and Amory is finally able to express just how drastic of an option she's considering. (How times have changed.) This specific historical interplay elevates the characters and the mystery, and somehow these thin disparate elements combine to form something pretty great.

  10. 4 out of 5

    Nicky

    Reviewed for The Bibliophibian. Death Wears a Mask is another competent cozy-ish mystery in the same vein as the first, with the side plot of Amory’s playboy husband being, well, a playboy. There’s a fair bit of relationship drama here, where he gets into compromising situations and she refuses to quite believe he’s faithful to her. Plenty of misunderstandings on her side, while he’s actually mostly perfect (cares about her, acts wild but is faithful, etc). Spare me. I hope the oh-no-is-he-cheati Reviewed for The Bibliophibian. Death Wears a Mask is another competent cozy-ish mystery in the same vein as the first, with the side plot of Amory’s playboy husband being, well, a playboy. There’s a fair bit of relationship drama here, where he gets into compromising situations and she refuses to quite believe he’s faithful to her. Plenty of misunderstandings on her side, while he’s actually mostly perfect (cares about her, acts wild but is faithful, etc). Spare me. I hope the oh-no-is-he-cheating drama is over as of this book, because yeesh. The mystery itself was somewhat predictable, as was the resolution of the relationship drama. The attraction remains that it’s just a really easy and fast read, without being too involving emotionally or too full of guts and gore. A mild pleasure rather than something that bowled me over in any fashion. Actually, I’m so lukewarm on this and only a little warmer on the following book (which I’ve already read — I’m just behind on actually writing up my reviews) that I wonder why I’m continuing with the series when I have so many lovely things to read.

  11. 5 out of 5

    Veronica

    I listened to the audiobook for this reread. Overall, I found the narrator's voice for Amory didn't match what I had in my head. This voice was too high and pinched. She did better with some of the other female character voices. Original review - read in January 2016: This was a fitting follow-up to the first book in the series,Murder at the Brightwell. While the mystery aspect of it isn't the strongest, the charged dynamics between amateur sleuth Amory and her rakish husband, Milo, are what intr I listened to the audiobook for this reread. Overall, I found the narrator's voice for Amory didn't match what I had in my head. This voice was too high and pinched. She did better with some of the other female character voices. Original review - read in January 2016: This was a fitting follow-up to the first book in the series,Murder at the Brightwell. While the mystery aspect of it isn't the strongest, the charged dynamics between amateur sleuth Amory and her rakish husband, Milo, are what intrigued me the most.

  12. 5 out of 5

    Kirsten

    Another enjoyable and fun historical mystery with Amory and her ne'er-do-well husband, Milo. I have to say that Milo grows on me in this one. Once again, she goes to a party and - gasp! - death occurs. (After a point, wouldn't you stop inviting the Ames?) These books are written with a light touch, but they are no lightweights. Real issues are confronted and dealt with intelligently. We also have jewel thieves, abusive partners, and discussion of divorce.

  13. 5 out of 5

    Sarah

    'Amory Ames is a wealthy young woman who regrets her marriage to her notoriously charming playboy husband, Milo. Looking for a change, she accepts a request for help from her former fiancé, Gil Trent, not knowing that she’ll soon become embroiled in a murder investigation that will test not only her friendship with Gil, but will upset the status quo with her husband. Amory accompanies Gil to the Brightwell Hotel in an attempt to circumvent the marriage of his sister, Emmeline, to Rupert Howe, a d 'Amory Ames is a wealthy young woman who regrets her marriage to her notoriously charming playboy husband, Milo. Looking for a change, she accepts a request for help from her former fiancé, Gil Trent, not knowing that she’ll soon become embroiled in a murder investigation that will test not only her friendship with Gil, but will upset the status quo with her husband. Amory accompanies Gil to the Brightwell Hotel in an attempt to circumvent the marriage of his sister, Emmeline, to Rupert Howe, a disreputable ladies’ man. Amory sees in the situation a grim reflection of her own floundering marriage. There is more than her happiness at stake, however, when Rupert is murdered and Gil is arrested for the crime. Amory is determined to prove his innocence and find the real killer, despite attempted dissuasion from the disapproving police inspector on the case. Matters are further complicated by Milo’s unexpected arrival, and the two form an uneasy alliance as Amory enlists his reluctant aid in clearing Gil’s name. As the stakes grow higher and the line between friend and foe becomes less clear, Amory must decide where her heart lies and catch the killer before she, too, becomes a victim.' ____________________________ 3.5 stars, rounded up to 4 stars. Death Wears a Mask is the second book in Ashey Weaver's debut series, The Amory Ames Mystery Series and is a historical mystery set in the 1930s. This book read very much like a game of Clue with a murder occurring during a big house party and a set number of suspects and conspicuous rooms in play. Clue will forever be my favorite childhood game and so I love a good plot that reads this way. At the same time though I didn't really enjoy the way everything was introduced, it seemed a bit convoluted and childish the scheme that she and Mrs. Barrington cooked up. I really enjoy the dynamic between Amory and Milo, even though he's infuriating. I never find them more amusing than when their sparing or making digs at each other. I jut wish that Amory stood up for herself a little more. Milo really took a big step back from where he's come in the first book. He is so absolutely infuriating at times, h is disregard for her feelings and his thoughtlessness to humilate her by having his name printed time and again in connection with other women. Regardless of whether or not things are as they seem in the gossip rags he is still responsible for putting himself into such positions, even if he does always have an exucse at the ready. I still however have the feeling that he might be a spy. Please, please, please let it be so, it would would make him ever so much more likable for me. Overall I enjoyed the spot of danger and the unfolding of the mystery. I'm looking forward to continuing with the series and would recommend it to others.

  14. 5 out of 5

    QNPoohBear

    Amory Ames is looking forward to rekindling her romance with her rakish husband Milo but agrees to attend a dinner party at the home of her mother's friend Mrs. Barrington. Mrs. Barrington has an ulterior motive for inviting Amory; Mrs. Barrington wants Amory to discover what has happened to her missing jewels. Amory isn't sure the jewels were stolen in the first place but agrees to help. The suspect list includes the Barrington's nephew, James Harker; a famous tennis player, Mr. Foster; the han Amory Ames is looking forward to rekindling her romance with her rakish husband Milo but agrees to attend a dinner party at the home of her mother's friend Mrs. Barrington. Mrs. Barrington has an ulterior motive for inviting Amory; Mrs. Barrington wants Amory to discover what has happened to her missing jewels. Amory isn't sure the jewels were stolen in the first place but agrees to help. The suspect list includes the Barrington's nephew, James Harker; a famous tennis player, Mr. Foster; the handsome and very roguish Viscount Dumore; Dumore's rumored mistress Mrs. Garmond; a Mr. Garmond; a pair of spinster sisters, Marjorie and Felicity Rccles; and a newly wed couple from different social classes. Amory has her work cut out for her but when Mrs. Barrington suggests they lay a trap for the thief at a masquerade ball hosted by Lord Dumore, Amory goes along with the plan. Then one of the suspects dies and Detective Inspector Jones enlists Amory's help to find out who the murderer was. Amory has her hands full dealing with her husband's routine disappearances, his appearances in the gossip rags on the arm of a lovely French actress and fending off the advances of Viscount Dunmore. She's determined to solve the mystery herself to keep occupied until she decides what to do about Milo. I enjoyed this book much more than Murder at the Brightwell. The mystery grabbed me right away and I had a very hard time putting the book down until I knew everything. Though I guessed half the mystery, I never guessed who did it. There were so many suspects and so many motives that it could have been any of them. I didn't feel the story was overpopulated with characters though since most of the story focuses on Amory. There's a lot more Amory and Milo and their relationship. All love scenes are hinted at as Amory and Milo attempt to kiss and make up. I liked Amory a lot more in this story. I felt bad for her and agreed that Milo was not being a very good husband. He's selfish and doesn't consider how his actions, no matter how innocent he claims them, reflect on Amory and how much she cares what others think of her. He should have more respect for her feelings. They seem to love one another but as Anory says sometimes love just isn't enough. There are a ton of new characters here. Mrs. Barrington seems nice if a little forceful and maybe forgetful. Her husband seems to love her which is unusual in an upper-class marriage of that time. I liked Mr. Barrington until his secrets were revealed. (Not a spoiler everyone has secrets). I also really liked Amory's new friend, Mrs. Douglas-Hughes. She's refreshingly open and kind, a result of her American upbringing and time spent on the stage. Her husband is not particularly appealing. He has secrets and he's a bit stuffy. I also liked sweet Felicity Eccles and wanted to know more about her. I disliked her sister Marjorie right away and was convinced that Marjorie was bullying her sister about something. They don't have much of a story but one may be a thief or murderer or both. Amory's maid Winnelda is cute and a more toned down version of Queenie in the "Her Royal Spyness" mysteries. The male characters don't fare as well as the women. The remaining men don't have many redeeming qualities and one should be arrested. I had bad vibes about that person right away and knew they were up to no good. The revelations about him surprised me though I disliked him immensely. I recommend this series to fans of 1920s and 30s set mysteries. Downton Abbey fans may enjoy the high society aspect.

  15. 5 out of 5

    Gerry

    It is 1932 and Amory Ames and her (supposedly) reformed playboy husband Milo are exchanging friendly banter (as they often do) in their London flat prior to going for an evening meal at the Barrington's home. 'Remind me why we are going to the Barrington's tonight?' asks Milo. The best reason Amory can offer is, 'She's an old friend of my mother's' to which Milo sardonically replies, 'All the more reason to avoid her.' But avoid her they don't and the evening is a prequel to an enticing mystery, It is 1932 and Amory Ames and her (supposedly) reformed playboy husband Milo are exchanging friendly banter (as they often do) in their London flat prior to going for an evening meal at the Barrington's home. 'Remind me why we are going to the Barrington's tonight?' asks Milo. The best reason Amory can offer is, 'She's an old friend of my mother's' to which Milo sardonically replies, 'All the more reason to avoid her.' But avoid her they don't and the evening is a prequel to an enticing mystery, which involves a whole host of fascinating characters. The evening leads to an invitation to a masked ball at Lord Dunmore's London residence two nights hence that all the guests - and more - from the dinner party will be attending. Amory is undecided about going but when Mrs Barrington tells her that she needs her help as she believes that someone is stealing from her and, knowing Amory's reputation in dealing with an earlier case, she feels that she is the ideal person to help in identifying the culprit. Amory can't resist a challenge so she agrees to attend. She goes alone, having organised a mask and suitable outfit, but Milo, masked and accompanied by an unexpected companion, also arrives. Amory is far from pleased and avoids contact until she cannot avoid doing so after a gunshot has been heard on the upper floor. One of the guests is discovered dead and suicide is initially suspected. But once Detective Inspector Jones is called in, it turns out be something completely different. And to complicate matters is the discovery of more missing jewellery. Mrs Barrington presses Amory to continue her investigations but Amory is reluctant to do so, saying, 'But surely the police ...' before Mrs Barrington interrupts her with 'The police will do what they can, of course, but they cannot go where you go, Mrs Ames. They haven't the influence in our sphere that you do. You know that people of our set won't be open with policemen ... but they will be open with you. You were able to do it before, on the south coast, I'm asking you to do it again now.' And so the mystery develops with Amory speaking with all the leading suspects, of which none appears a front runner. It is a great atmosphere, superb setting with plenty of tension, not only between the various suspects but also between Amory and Milo plus between Amory and a couple of persistent suitors. And eventually an unexpected end reveals what has happened and who is the guilty party. Amory, with, of course, a little assistance from Inspector Jones, has done a splendid job and we look forward to more of the same.

  16. 4 out of 5

    Alyssa Maxwell

    Ashley Weaver has made me fall in love with 1930s England! Through her narrative and dialogue, she captures the sophistication of British society and even the debauchery that often went along with it. I felt completely immersed in the period and enjoyed the references to the clothing, jewelry, slang, and pastimes that marked the era. But mostly I adore the characters of Amory and her husband Milo. We're often kept guessing whether Milo can be trusted, but even when he appears to be at his worst Ashley Weaver has made me fall in love with 1930s England! Through her narrative and dialogue, she captures the sophistication of British society and even the debauchery that often went along with it. I felt completely immersed in the period and enjoyed the references to the clothing, jewelry, slang, and pastimes that marked the era. But mostly I adore the characters of Amory and her husband Milo. We're often kept guessing whether Milo can be trusted, but even when he appears to be at his worst he is unerringly charming. And Amory is the epitome of a British woman with a stiff upper lip even though she might be crying inside. Their relationship, as well as the larger mystery thread, is an intricate dance that keeps the reader on their toes!

  17. 5 out of 5

    Linda Baker

    Death Wears a Mask begins about two months after the events of Murder at the Brightwell. Milo and Amory Ames have retired to their country estate, mostly to avoid the press, but also to try to repair their faltering marriage. Things on the relationship front seem to be proceeding well and they hope the tabloid furor has died down. However, when you are young, rich and beautiful in 1930s London, the press is always on hounding you. Milo's well-deserved reputation as a playboy doesn't help. Upon th Death Wears a Mask begins about two months after the events of Murder at the Brightwell. Milo and Amory Ames have retired to their country estate, mostly to avoid the press, but also to try to repair their faltering marriage. Things on the relationship front seem to be proceeding well and they hope the tabloid furor has died down. However, when you are young, rich and beautiful in 1930s London, the press is always on hounding you. Milo's well-deserved reputation as a playboy doesn't help. Upon their return to London, one of the first invitations they receive is from Lady Serena Barrington, an old friend of Amory's mother. Their presence is requested at a dinner party. Upon arrival, they encounter a group that is only somewhat familiar. The group includes a woman of mystery, a voluble nephew of the Barrington's, two sisters, a tennis star, a highly placed foreign office official and his American wife, and the very dodgy Lord Dunmore. Lord Dunmore delights in scandalizing Society at every opportunity. Serena Barrington has a personal agenda, however; there have been a series of jewel thefts occurring at her dinner parties. All the guests at the dinner party were also guests at the parties in question. She asks Amory to investigate the thefts, based upon her success at the Brightwell Hotel. When her old acquaintance, Inspector Jones, now of Scotland Yard, also asks for her help she accedes. After all, Amory can go places in Society where Inspector Jones cannot. When a murder occurs at a masquerade ball hosted by the dodgy Lord Dunmore, Amory is committed to the investigation fully. Everyone at this particular ball seems to be wearing a mask, both literally and figuratively. Things are not good on the homefront, though; Milo appears to be embroiled in more playboy behavior with a French actress. The fact that I enjoy this series so much is quite a tribute to Ashley Weaver's writing chops. Everyone in Amory's world seems to be living useless lives of shopping, lunching and partying. No one even seems to be aware that there is a world depression, not to mention events in the rest of Europe at the time. In spite of that, I like Amory quite a lot. She is reckless at times but dogged in her search for answers. I can't find the same liking for Milo who seems to be determined to hurt Amory with his seeming philandering and poor excuses. I have my pet theories about Milo and while he redeems himself somewhat at the end of Death Wears a Mask, I am not convinced! The relationship tension is a plus, though; will she kick him to the curb or will he come clean at last? Death Wears a Mask is a very enjoyable look at an era long gone; one in which there were idle aristocrats who lived lives of complete leisure. No wonder they got up to so much hanky-panky! I also have to give Minotaur kudos for the beautiful, evocative covers on both books in the series.

  18. 4 out of 5

    Amy

    3.5 stars Almost a 4 star read, but the culprit was just a tad too obvious for me. He/she had a predictable motive that I guessed before the murder even took place. I do love Amory Ames, though. She is strong, feminine, and not stupid. I like her relationship with the Inspector. It is so refreshing to have an understanding policeman! (view spoiler)[ That said, I soooo thought he was being set up as a love interest! Were his wife and kiddies supposed to come out of nowhere like that? And if it isn 3.5 stars Almost a 4 star read, but the culprit was just a tad too obvious for me. He/she had a predictable motive that I guessed before the murder even took place. I do love Amory Ames, though. She is strong, feminine, and not stupid. I like her relationship with the Inspector. It is so refreshing to have an understanding policeman! (view spoiler)[ That said, I soooo thought he was being set up as a love interest! Were his wife and kiddies supposed to come out of nowhere like that? And if it isn't love, what is his motivation for allowing Amory on the cases? (hide spoiler)] I also like the tangled relationship with her husband. I have mixed feelings with Milo Ames. I like him, but I am frustrated by him. His motivation feels so obscure at times. Perhaps the problem is, the readers hears about his past infidelities from Amory, but we never actually get examples or reasons to think poorly of him. It is this weird mix of "HE IS SUCH A CHEATING TURD" and "Except...we have no examples, stories, nothing, in fact, but the reference to scandal magazines." So did he cheat in the past? Or was it all misunderstandings? Is that supposed to be part of the tension of their marriage? Or is that just something the reader accepts as part of their history? It left me super confused and distracted from the otherwise winning romantic tension between them. Overall, though, I am rapidly becoming an Amory Ames fan! Already have the next one on hold at my library.

  19. 5 out of 5

    Sherry

    If you'd like to escape real life and enter into a world filled with intrigue and colourful characters, this series is for you. Set in England during the 1930s, this mystery series stars a spunky amateur sleuth and her charming husband. Plenty of red herrings to keep you guessing and a stylish atmosphere add up to a most satisfying read.

  20. 4 out of 5

    Katie

    On the one hand, Amory and Milo need to sit down and have a long conversation about what they each expect from their marriage. On the other hand, I am okay if it's all (fairly) smooth sailing for here on out.

  21. 5 out of 5

    Jess

    Okay, I have a teensy tiny note and while I get why Amory thinks she can't change Milo, she's not wrong to want him to be a better husband!! I wish she didn't think she was asking for too much because she does. Regardless, still super charming and I can't wait to read more.

  22. 5 out of 5

    Grace

    Milo and Amory very much need to sit down and just talk to each other already. That said, I am very much enjoying this series even as they hurt me, on a deep personal level.

  23. 5 out of 5

    Samantha

    It was amazing, really, what murder had done for my marriage. Ashley Weaver begins Death Wears a Mask with another great opening line. Amory and Milo Ames are back, in another riveting mystery adventure. They're still serving up Tracy Lord and C.K. Dexter Haven vibes from The Philadelphia Story. The second installment in this series is once again the perfect blend of mystery, romance, humor, and glamour. It's easy to read and a lot of fun. It's two months after the events of Murder at the Brig It was amazing, really, what murder had done for my marriage. Ashley Weaver begins Death Wears a Mask with another great opening line. Amory and Milo Ames are back, in another riveting mystery adventure. They're still serving up Tracy Lord and C.K. Dexter Haven vibes from The Philadelphia Story. The second installment in this series is once again the perfect blend of mystery, romance, humor, and glamour. It's easy to read and a lot of fun. It's two months after the events of Murder at the Brightwell. After spending some quality time together at their estate, Milo and Amory have arrived at their London flat to mingle with high society. An old friend of Amory's mother seeks out Amory's help in uncovering who has been stealing her jewels from her home. The women lay out a trap to catch the thief at the masked ball of Lord Dunmore. But when a body shows up at the masquerade, Amory finds herself going from trying to catch a thief to trying to unmask a killer. Meanwhile, Milo is embroiled in a rumored romance with a French movie star that's in all the society papers. And Lord Dunmore (a viscount with a wicked reputation) is determinedly pursuing Amory. Weaver gets right to the point, providing a succinct recap and immersing us right away in 1932 London society. I love Amory's narrative voice. This book really makes you wish you were living the high life in the 1930s. The setup is reminiscent of To Catch a Thief, with that phrase even sprinkled throughout the novel. It's well plotted, with plenty of red herrings and a great range of suspects with various motives. Weaver sketches the scenes, settings, and characters beautifully. I loved the introduction to the cast of characters, with the descriptions of their physical features and personality traits. It feels like you're right there with them. There are some recurring characters from book one who are very fun to see again. Milo and Amory have a swoon-worthy romance but the course of true love never did run smooth. They must always be at odds, though the reasons for their friction are understandable. Since Death Wears a Mask is a sequel, it's gotta be bigger and better so we have a love rectangle instead of a triangle this time around. Milo is a cheeky devil. As well as reminding me of a Cary Grant character, he recalls the droll hero of an Oscar Wilde play, such as Lord Arthur Goring in An Ideal Husband. He's always ready with the quips, and he and Amory have many a barbed exchange. Their chemistry sizzles. Will someone please turn the Amory Ames Mysteries into a TV show starring Ruth Wilson and Aidain Turner? It would be so great. Weaver knows just how to dole out pertinent information, and has it come from just the right sources. Amory is a wonderfully intrepid heroine. She's very resourceful in her investigating and in cultivating helpful connections. The novel pokes fun at some genre conventions and it's very funny. This series gives me the same warm feeling that watching an episode of Poirot or Marple does. I guess that's why they call them cozy mysteries. When I start an Amory Ames book, I have to devour it in a day. I love these books. If you haven't read them, start with Murder at the Brightwell. You're in for a treat.

  24. 4 out of 5

    R.L.

    This story is set during a period I seldom get a chance to read, the roaring twenties, when ladies wore gowns to fancy balls, alcohol is illegal in America but not England, and they enjoy the modern conveniences of telephones, elevators and cars. The author paid close attention to bring out these details in such a way so as to not draw attention. I also appreciated learning a few good words like quidnunc. What a wonderful way to describe a busybody. The main character Amory is married to Milo, a This story is set during a period I seldom get a chance to read, the roaring twenties, when ladies wore gowns to fancy balls, alcohol is illegal in America but not England, and they enjoy the modern conveniences of telephones, elevators and cars. The author paid close attention to bring out these details in such a way so as to not draw attention. I also appreciated learning a few good words like quidnunc. What a wonderful way to describe a busybody. The main character Amory is married to Milo, a strikingly handsome man (from all accounts). They have gone through some serious ups and downs in their short marriage, but things seem to be going very well. But this happy feeling is dampened all too soon. Amory garnished some creds in the amateur sleuth department from her “Murder at Brightwell” adventure, so now she has one of her mother’s oldest friends asking her for help with finding a jewel thief. The clues multiply quickly. Amory has made it a goal to speak to each of the people who are suspected, but then things change with a terrible bang. I found the characters believable. I love how Amory comes to some very mature conclusions about her relationship with her husband. I look forward to getting to know more about these fascinating characters in future novels. I received this book from NetGalley

  25. 4 out of 5

    Jessi

    Oof. I am loving this series as much for the exploration of Amory and Milo's marriage as the mysteries that Amory keeps tripping into. After the reconciliation of the last book, Milo (seemingly?) continues his amorous ways after only a couple of months. But the book doesn't start out that way. It begins with a dinner party. One where the hostess, knowing of Amory's involvement in solving a murder, pulls her aside and asks for help discovering who is stealing her jewels. The group that is gathered Oof. I am loving this series as much for the exploration of Amory and Milo's marriage as the mysteries that Amory keeps tripping into. After the reconciliation of the last book, Milo (seemingly?) continues his amorous ways after only a couple of months. But the book doesn't start out that way. It begins with a dinner party. One where the hostess, knowing of Amory's involvement in solving a murder, pulls her aside and asks for help discovering who is stealing her jewels. The group that is gathered at her party is comprised of the same people who have been in the house for each theft. An injudicious statement by the hostess' nephew sets Amory and Milo back onto a bumpy road and it's not helped when Amory insists on investigating the death of that same nephew. While the enjoyment I had for this book makes me desperately ready to read the next book, I truly hope that the push-pull of this marriage and Amory's feelings don't continue past that tome. It's nice now, but it's getting repetitious fast. We either need to see more of Milo's feelings or have Amory actually stick with her resolution at the end of this book.

  26. 4 out of 5

    Lorraine

    Mr. & Mrs. Ames are successful again! In Death Wears a Mask (Amory Ames Mystery, #2), by Ashley Weaver, Amory is requested by a friend of her mother’s to assist in finding a criminal who is taunting her in a very particular way. Amory agrees, but has her doubts. After spending a couple of months in the country with her husband, Milo, the move back to London & the social scene has Amory uestioning her marriage again. What did Amory see that has shaken her confidence in her marriage? Of course, it Mr. & Mrs. Ames are successful again! In Death Wears a Mask (Amory Ames Mystery, #2), by Ashley Weaver, Amory is requested by a friend of her mother’s to assist in finding a criminal who is taunting her in a very particular way. Amory agrees, but has her doubts. After spending a couple of months in the country with her husband, Milo, the move back to London & the social scene has Amory uestioning her marriage again. What did Amory see that has shaken her confidence in her marriage? Of course, it is not long before Amory is at a Masked Ball given by a notorious lord, and a shot is heard - then a dead body is discovered. The author gives great detailed descriptions of fashion in 1930s London accompanied with sparkling jewels, and gossip! Amory is in the thick of it again, but this time Milo is with her. Now what does Milo do at the end that has Amory questioning her lack of confidence in her marriage? Very enjoyable! The characters prove quite interesting & believable! Ms. Weaver does a super job once again. I definitely like this series. Onto #3!

  27. 4 out of 5

    Roman Clodia

    Another light and charming cosy mystery from Weaver set in 1930s upper-class London where a jewellery thief strikes at a masked ball. Amory Ames and her deliciously wayward husband Milo are a delight, and the tensions in their marriage are what lifts this away from other cosy mystery series: there's a frisson of sensuality and real chemistry between them in a genre which tends to shy away from sex. The story itself is, of course, improbable with a flurry of revelations at the end, and more than Another light and charming cosy mystery from Weaver set in 1930s upper-class London where a jewellery thief strikes at a masked ball. Amory Ames and her deliciously wayward husband Milo are a delight, and the tensions in their marriage are what lifts this away from other cosy mystery series: there's a frisson of sensuality and real chemistry between them in a genre which tends to shy away from sex. The story itself is, of course, improbable with a flurry of revelations at the end, and more than a few near-rape scenes that we're supposed to accept and move on from - despite that, a light story, strong on dialogue, with a delightful couple at its heart. Perfect girly switch-off reading.

  28. 5 out of 5

    Marta

    This is classic mystery done ala Dame Agatha. I found it a bit too traditional in both pacing and characters who seem to exist to be suspects, but don't have lots of dimension. The tension between Avery and her husband Milo, which was wonderful in the first book, felt a bit like it was dragging on in this one. I will give book three a shot, hoping for a more interesting puzzle and some change in their dynamic.

  29. 5 out of 5

    Stephanie

    This series is my new addiction. Before I'd even finished this one, I'd already checked out the other three books that are out so far (and bought the ebook novella that comes between Books 3 and 4). Really, isn't that all I need to say? :)

  30. 5 out of 5

    Louise

    I enjoyed this one as much as the first one in the series.

Add a review

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Loading...
We use cookies to give you the best online experience. By using our website you agree to our use of cookies in accordance with our cookie policy.