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  A renowned eccentric, dandy, and man-about-town, Oscar Wilde was foremost a dazzling wit and dramatic genius whose plays, poems, essays, and fiction contain some of the most frequently quoted quips and passages in the English language.   This volume features a wide selection of Wilde’s literary output, including the comic masterpiece The Importance of Being Earnest, an imme   A renowned eccentric, dandy, and man-about-town, Oscar Wilde was foremost a dazzling wit and dramatic genius whose plays, poems, essays, and fiction contain some of the most frequently quoted quips and passages in the English language.   This volume features a wide selection of Wilde’s literary output, including the comic masterpiece The Importance of Being Earnest, an immensely popular play filled with satiric epigrams that mercilessly expose Victorian hypocrisy; The Portrait of Mr. W. H., a story proposing that Shakespeare’s sonnets were inspired by the poet’s love for a young man; The House of Pomegranates, the author’s collection of fairy tales; lectures Wilde delivered, first in the United States, where he exhorted his audiences to love beauty and art, and then in England, where he presented his impressions of America; his two major literary-theoretical works, �The Decay of Lying” and �The Critic as Artist”; and a selection of verse, including his great poem The Ballad of Reading Gaol, in which Wilde famously declared that �each man kills the thing he loves.”   A testament to Wilde’s incredible versatility, this collection displays his legendary wit, brilliant use of language, and penetrating insight into the human condition.  


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  A renowned eccentric, dandy, and man-about-town, Oscar Wilde was foremost a dazzling wit and dramatic genius whose plays, poems, essays, and fiction contain some of the most frequently quoted quips and passages in the English language.   This volume features a wide selection of Wilde’s literary output, including the comic masterpiece The Importance of Being Earnest, an imme   A renowned eccentric, dandy, and man-about-town, Oscar Wilde was foremost a dazzling wit and dramatic genius whose plays, poems, essays, and fiction contain some of the most frequently quoted quips and passages in the English language.   This volume features a wide selection of Wilde’s literary output, including the comic masterpiece The Importance of Being Earnest, an immensely popular play filled with satiric epigrams that mercilessly expose Victorian hypocrisy; The Portrait of Mr. W. H., a story proposing that Shakespeare’s sonnets were inspired by the poet’s love for a young man; The House of Pomegranates, the author’s collection of fairy tales; lectures Wilde delivered, first in the United States, where he exhorted his audiences to love beauty and art, and then in England, where he presented his impressions of America; his two major literary-theoretical works, �The Decay of Lying” and �The Critic as Artist”; and a selection of verse, including his great poem The Ballad of Reading Gaol, in which Wilde famously declared that �each man kills the thing he loves.”   A testament to Wilde’s incredible versatility, this collection displays his legendary wit, brilliant use of language, and penetrating insight into the human condition.  

30 review for The Collected Oscar Wilde (Classics)

  1. 5 out of 5

    Johann (jobis89)

    “Yet each man kills the thing he loves.” After being such a huge fan of The Picture of Dorian Gray, I knew I needed to explore more of Wilde’s writing. Unfortunately this was a bit of a mixed bag for me! Dorian Gray is at the very beginning and I decided not to reread it - I’ll do that another day. After this we had Lord Arthur Saville’s Crime, wherein Lord Arthur is told by a palm reader that it is in his destiny to be a murderer... however, he wants to get married but decides he has no right to “Yet each man kills the thing he loves.” After being such a huge fan of The Picture of Dorian Gray, I knew I needed to explore more of Wilde’s writing. Unfortunately this was a bit of a mixed bag for me! Dorian Gray is at the very beginning and I decided not to reread it - I’ll do that another day. After this we had Lord Arthur Saville’s Crime, wherein Lord Arthur is told by a palm reader that it is in his destiny to be a murderer... however, he wants to get married but decides he has no right to do so until he has committed the murder. Hilarity ensues... Then there was The Canterville Ghost which was an absolute blast! It’s about the Otis family who move into a haunted house, but no matter what the ghost does, the family refuse to be frightened. It was so incredibly funny at times with Mr Otis advising the ghost that maybe he should oil his chains and Mrs Otis delivering lines like “I don’t at all care for blood-stains in a sitting room.” LOL. The combination of the macabre with some comedy was just perfect! Following this we have a number of stories for children that Wilde has written. These were hit and miss for me personally. Certain themes and messages became a bit repetitive - there was always a lovely message at the end, but sometimes the message made me roll my eyes... have I become cynical in my old age?! Next up was A House of Pomegranates which is a collection of his fairy tales. Again, all beautifully written - I can never fault that - but I am not a huge fairy tale person? So again, up and down! The collection closes with The Ballad of Reading Gaol, which Tes @paperbackbones had told me about before, which is a poem that Wilde had written in exile following his release from the same prison. The inclusion of this poem at the very end left quite a different tone from the stories that preceded it. It narrates the execution of a fellow inmate, highlighting the punishments that all convicts share. I don’t read much poetry but thought this one was well-written and impactful. So whilst this collection was hit and miss, I will continue to love this man’s voice 😍 3.5 stars.

  2. 5 out of 5

    Wiebke (1book1review)

    This was just perfect. What else could I say? The writing and wit of Oscar Wilde is just admirable and hilarious. The adaptations on this audiobook made them come to live and it was so much fun listening I often forgot I was not alone but felt like part of the audience in the theater. I recommend this to anyone who has wanted to give Oscar Wilde a go.

  3. 4 out of 5

    classic reverie

    This is my second time reading The Picture of Dorian Gray & I loved it more then my first time; if that is possible! Very poignant story on so many levels & it sure does teach us about morality & life; despite Wilde's proclaimed prelude thought - "There is no such thing as a moral or immoral book. Books are well written, or badly written. That is all' This is my second time reading The Picture of Dorian Gray & I loved it more then my first time; if that is possible! Very poignant story on so many levels & it sure does teach us about morality & life; despite Wilde's proclaimed prelude thought - "There is no such thing as a moral or immoral book. Books are well written, or badly written. That is all'

  4. 4 out of 5

    Doreen Petersen

    Very interesting collection of Oscar Wilde's writings. If you like classics you'll love this one!

  5. 5 out of 5

    Dumitru Iulian

    "All art is quite useless" It is hard to judge a writer by the entirety of his writings, especially when one such as Oscar Wilde has written novels, short novels, long and short stories, plays, all array of poems and essays. He is regarded as a classical writer, one of the greats, but as a matter of fact the value of his writings is not constant. Sure the ideas behind almost all of his literary endeavors range from interesting to fascinating ("The Picture of Dorian Gray", "Lord Arthur Savile's Cr "All art is quite useless" It is hard to judge a writer by the entirety of his writings, especially when one such as Oscar Wilde has written novels, short novels, long and short stories, plays, all array of poems and essays. He is regarded as a classical writer, one of the greats, but as a matter of fact the value of his writings is not constant. Sure the ideas behind almost all of his literary endeavors range from interesting to fascinating ("The Picture of Dorian Gray", "Lord Arthur Savile's Crime" -about self fulfilling prophecy, "The Canterville Ghost", "The Portrait of Mr W.H." - an excellent study in falsifiability, "The Fisherman and his Soul" to name some), but there are some low points in their execution. One such point seems to be an inability in creating a complex character. They are either unidimensional or two dimensional, whom seem to fluctuate between their dichotomous states by the simple utterance of an interjection. This worriment highlights the puppeteer and establishes a semblance of artificiality. His plays are quite ruined by this fact being quite forgettable, apart from "An Ideal Husband"(in which resides Wilde's most complex character, Lord Goring - clearly based on Wilde himself) and the thoroughly funny "The Importance of Being Earnest". On the other side of the coin, everything is masterfully - if not exuberantly - written, with an absolute control of the written language. This "Lord of the language" painted his worlds in crimson; filled them with contradictions ,paradoxes, aphorisms, anthropomorphisms and pomegranates; scattered in them erudition, wittiness and a somewhat duplicitous affectation of the tiresome character of intelligence. Although he regarded himself as a true artist, you get the distinct impression that his writing is as a result of intellectual exertion and not of native talent. I think Wilde was himself conscious of this fact, for which I venture to make a hypothesis, that "The Critic as Artist' was in part a means of justifying himself and alleviating his cognitive dissonance. This subsidiarity of native talent is most manifest in his poems. Their capacity to evoke empathy and stir sensations is lacking, especially when comparing to such as Keats', which is of particular relevance, since Wilde is mimicking Keats' techniques, a clear permanence in the entire body of his poems (based, if not by anything else, on Wilde's repeated references of him and reverences to him). A particular exception seems, to me, to be "The Ballad of Reading Gaol", where drawing on his own experience he wrote with his soul's blood. Where he truly shines is in essays. When given the time and space to elaborate on matters of life and art, either through Socratic dialogue or in a more direct fashion, Wilde bewilders with capacity for argumentative display, seemingly endless arsenal of literary references and depth of thinking. Even when not agreeing with the matters presented, one still feels a sort of reverence to the aesthetical and intellectual qualities of the display. If not for the essays I would have marked this as a 3 star, but who am I to appreciate on art?! I am no artist so I can't be a critic. I'm merely "Bunburying" as one. And while all art is quite useless, his is painted in pretty crimson, filled with beautiful pomegranates and quite interesting.

  6. 5 out of 5

    Holly

    Firat off, I want to come out and say that I skipped over a few of the essays and The Importance of Being Earnest in this book. I skipped over the play because it's the three act version and I'd rather read the whole thing. I skipped over a few of the essays not because they weren't good and insightful, but because I was having a hard time rapping my head around them. I hope to be able to one day go back to them, but for now I'm done with this book. I will say that I really enjoyed the stories an Firat off, I want to come out and say that I skipped over a few of the essays and The Importance of Being Earnest in this book. I skipped over the play because it's the three act version and I'd rather read the whole thing. I skipped over a few of the essays not because they weren't good and insightful, but because I was having a hard time rapping my head around them. I hope to be able to one day go back to them, but for now I'm done with this book. I will say that I really enjoyed the stories and poems though. I'm glad that I got through them. Hopefully I'll one day e able to appreciate the whole book. I still gave it 5 stars because it was no fault of the author's that I skipped some of his work. The fault of that lies solely with me.

  7. 5 out of 5

    Geeta

    listening to audio book - (1)A woman of no importance (2)An ideal husband (3)Lady Windermere's fan (4)The importance of being Earnest (5)The picture of Dorian Gray Oscar Wilde writing always wins best rating. Witty, entertaining...and the audio book was very well read.

  8. 5 out of 5

    Kristena

    Excellent full-cast audio performances of An Ideal Husband, A Woman of No Importance, Lady Windermere's Fan, and The Importance of Being Earnest. I skipped the dramatization of The Picture of Dorian Gray, though.

  9. 5 out of 5

    Mizumi

    I took a while to think about it, and I've come to the conclusion I'm definitely going to need to reread this volume. I'm giving four stars for now, though I might get back to that and give it five. So, I read everything in this volume, from The Picture of Dorian Gray all the way to De Profundis, the final entry in the book. At first I kind of wondered about it, since it's not the final writing by Wilde exactly, but it made a lot of sense to put it in last. Wilde himself ties in almost everything I took a while to think about it, and I've come to the conclusion I'm definitely going to need to reread this volume. I'm giving four stars for now, though I might get back to that and give it five. So, I read everything in this volume, from The Picture of Dorian Gray all the way to De Profundis, the final entry in the book. At first I kind of wondered about it, since it's not the final writing by Wilde exactly, but it made a lot of sense to put it in last. Wilde himself ties in almost everything he's written so far, reflecting on himself and on what he wants to pursue after getting out of jail. That was a rather painful but understandable entry to end the volume on. I took a break after The Picture of Dorian Gray, which is definitely first on my reread list. It's rather lengthy at points, but Wilde's prose drew me along with the story, allowing me to still be shocked by the sudden twist, even though I knew it was coming. As for the short stories, I still really like The Canterville Ghost, because it's rather hilarious, though with a poignant twist in the end. I read it first in a compilation of Victorian ghost stories, and it was one of the two things that convinced me I had to read more by Oscar Wilde. I really liked the rest of the short stories as well, and most of them read as twisted or even morbid fairy tales in a way. The Nightingale and the Rose comes to mind. Then we continue with the plays, and out of those, I still prefer The Importance of Being Earnest, perhaps because it's much lighter in tone than the plays preceding it, and definitely lighter than those succeeding it in the volume. However, I'd already read it before (this being the second thing that convinced me to buy this volume), so maybe a reread is in its place for the other plays as well. I liked how very diverse they all were. I still have trouble reading poetry, but it's telling I read all of Wilde's poetical work in one day. Some spoke to me more than others, and I must admit I took a certain delight in catching pretty much all of the Greek/Roman mythology references immediately. That being said, this is where I felt the volume could have been helped with footnotes here and there. Sure, I've had French in high school and I can still read the Greek alphabet, but I'm not fluent enough to understand complex French sentences or even a short sentence written in Greek. As the reader is expected to understand it, especially the French, maybe a translation at the bottom would have helped. (Wordsworth editions seem to take the all-or-nothing approach on footnotes. For example, there was an honest footnote in Dracula on the British Museum, saying it's a museum. In Great Britain. You don't say. I mean, it's nice to know Stoker studied a bit there, but not relevant to the text. But okay, I digress. Point being, the Library Collection doesn't seem to have footnotes at all, even though at points I think they'd be nice.) Finally, we have the essays and De Profundis, the latter I already touched upon above. As for the essays, they were interesting, but took me a while to get into. I did really like The Truth of Masks, which talks about Shakespeare's plays and his emphasis on costumes, and how important it is to keep true to the place and period of his plays. This kind of made me regret not having taken up my big volume with Shakespeare's work before this one, considering the huge number of Shakespearean references throughout the volume, but I could have expected that I suppose. Oh well. My loss, I'll fix it before rereading. Talking about the volume as a whole, I think this is a great collection (aside from the lack of footnotes here and there, but okay, this is the digital age where dictionaries in any language are a mouse click away). I really love looking at the cover (the printing being in gold), the binding is solid, and most importantly, it's pretty easy to handle for such a big and heavy book. I've already experienced this with my Sherlock Holmes collection, hence my choice here. So, kudos to the Wordsworth Library Collection quality! This has been a lengthy and not at all insightful review, but ssh.

  10. 5 out of 5

    Mariam Abood

    Lovely affordable book and I adore Oscar Wilde. Check out my review of: The Picture of Dorian Gray https://www.goodreads.com/review/show... The Importance of Being Earnest https://www.goodreads.com/review/show... Vera https://www.goodreads.com/review/show... Salome https://www.goodreads.com/review/show... Fairy Tales of Oscar Wilde: The Devoted Friend/The Nightingale and the Rose https://www.goodreads.com/review/show... The Happy Prince https://www.goodreads.com/review/show... Lovely affordable book and I adore Oscar Wilde. Check out my review of: The Picture of Dorian Gray https://www.goodreads.com/review/show... The Importance of Being Earnest https://www.goodreads.com/review/show... Vera https://www.goodreads.com/review/show... Salome https://www.goodreads.com/review/show... Fairy Tales of Oscar Wilde: The Devoted Friend/The Nightingale and the Rose https://www.goodreads.com/review/show... The Happy Prince https://www.goodreads.com/review/show...

  11. 4 out of 5

    Amanda

    If you are a Wilde fan, this is a must-read! Some of the essays were a little hard for me to get into, just because of all the references he makes to the time period, but there are definitely some gems. "The Importance of Being Ernest" is a wonderful and hilarious play, "The Soul of a Man Under Socialism" is incredibly intelligent and thought-provoking, and many of his short stories are thoroughly entertaining. There is al so a section devoted to some of his popular quotes, which is fun.

  12. 5 out of 5

    Jean

    This was a great audio book. It was done by LA Theater Works. I had never read any Oscar Wilde before so all of the stories were new to me. I really enjoyed Lady Windemere's Fan, An Ideal Husband and The Importance of Being Earnest. The best part was that it was a play in my car. Each character was a different actor/actress! I loved it!! Great audio book if you like theater style productions.

  13. 4 out of 5

    Jeanne

    I enjoyed this collection. With the 5 plays together it was obvious to me that rather than being a misogynist, as Wilde is so often accused, he had a keen eye for the society 19th Century women had to deal with. His wit and his portrayal of the era displayed his deep insight.

  14. 5 out of 5

    Bcoghill Coghill

    At this time, I am just reading Salome. I read the English translation and am now reading the French which is so beautiful. I do not speak French, so this is a bit of a handicap fut not fatal. More that can be said for the Baptist.

  15. 5 out of 5

    Reminiscentia

    A very profound, realistic yet dreamy collection of works. I would love to meet the author if I ever get a chance, and have a conversation with him about almost everything. I didn't finish all of his works, but read the short stories, several plays and poems, and an essay. They will probably be left for later because... it would be depressing to know that I've read everything he's written.

  16. 5 out of 5

    Emma

    This review has been hidden because it contains spoilers. To view it, click here. The writing in this book was extremely poetic. It was an exciting and dramatic read about how susceptible people are to hedonism and corruption. Beautifully written.

  17. 5 out of 5

    Griselda

    Oscar Wilde is full of wit and moral questions. I love the drama on some of the stories...but not in all, hence the three stars. An Ideal Husband was dramatic in a sense that shows the dangers of perfectionism, but the story still contains enough humor as to not make it so depressing. A Woman of No Importance was the most dramatic in my opinion. So much self-sacrificing; but a lot of insight on the nature of humanity, and the affect of judgement. Lady Windermere's Fan placed me in a very romanti Oscar Wilde is full of wit and moral questions. I love the drama on some of the stories...but not in all, hence the three stars. An Ideal Husband was dramatic in a sense that shows the dangers of perfectionism, but the story still contains enough humor as to not make it so depressing. A Woman of No Importance was the most dramatic in my opinion. So much self-sacrificing; but a lot of insight on the nature of humanity, and the affect of judgement. Lady Windermere's Fan placed me in a very romantic mood. I hated it and loved it all at once. I wanted to speak poetically for the rest of that day. The Importance of Being Earnest was perhaps my favorite of this collection. It was the funniest. It had the most lovable characters. The jokes were hilarious. I'd personally rate this story alone 5 stars. The Picture of Dorian Gray was a rather disappointing end to a wonderful collection. I suppose if it were the first story, I probably wouldn't have continued. Out of all the stories, it's the one with the least humor and the least heart...but perhaps that was the point. After all, this story was about the dangers of vanity.

  18. 5 out of 5

    Sora

    Sometimes, you read, hear, or see the same story line over and over again that you start to recognize the predictability in the plot line and its ending. But, then, you read the original and it is wonderful. Oscar Wilde's stories are repeated through out time by different authors, movie producers, and television producers, but his original stories remain works of art. The first couple of plays can be portrayed a comedy of errors (i.e. The Importance of Being Earnest) where it all works out in th Sometimes, you read, hear, or see the same story line over and over again that you start to recognize the predictability in the plot line and its ending. But, then, you read the original and it is wonderful. Oscar Wilde's stories are repeated through out time by different authors, movie producers, and television producers, but his original stories remain works of art. The first couple of plays can be portrayed a comedy of errors (i.e. The Importance of Being Earnest) where it all works out in the end. But the other plays are a social commentary on high society (Lady Windemere's Fan and A Woman of No Importance) that portray strong messages. Finally, the Picture of Dorian Gray is something I had always heard people talk about and now I finally understand why people make such a big deal about it.

  19. 4 out of 5

    Ron W.

    It's funny how apt some people's names are when looking at their life. Wilde was such a character. Although I've not read every book in this collection (yet), I can sincerely say this man was a literary genius and certainly misunderstood for his time. With a passionate contempt for the British aristocracy, Wilde writes his emotions and whimsical ideologies into just about all his characters. The Importance of Being Earnest, as a play, and A Picture of Dorian Grey as a novel will live on into ete It's funny how apt some people's names are when looking at their life. Wilde was such a character. Although I've not read every book in this collection (yet), I can sincerely say this man was a literary genius and certainly misunderstood for his time. With a passionate contempt for the British aristocracy, Wilde writes his emotions and whimsical ideologies into just about all his characters. The Importance of Being Earnest, as a play, and A Picture of Dorian Grey as a novel will live on into eternity. The Ballad of Reading Gaol is a serious reflection of a man who experienced the pendulum swing from pride through humility. Wilde is...well, as his name suggests. This is serious literature which should still be taught in schools!

  20. 4 out of 5

    Heather

    Having only experienced Oscar Wilde through the movie Wilde with Stephen Fry and the movie The Importance of Being Ernest with Colin Firth, I thought I should actually read some of his plays. This audio collection was really great. It includes LA TheaterWorks productions of A Woman of No Importance, An Ideal Husband, The Importance of Being Ernest, Lady Windermere's Fan and a rather strange dramatization of The Picture of Dorian Gray. The first four were wonderful, with Ernest being my favorite, Having only experienced Oscar Wilde through the movie Wilde with Stephen Fry and the movie The Importance of Being Ernest with Colin Firth, I thought I should actually read some of his plays. This audio collection was really great. It includes LA TheaterWorks productions of A Woman of No Importance, An Ideal Husband, The Importance of Being Ernest, Lady Windermere's Fan and a rather strange dramatization of The Picture of Dorian Gray. The first four were wonderful, with Ernest being my favorite, but I would rather have heard Dorian Gray the novel, not the play. Guess I'll have to find that one on its own.

  21. 5 out of 5

    Elaine

    Since this volume has everything he ever published, it is a mixed bag, but nothing is really not worth reading. Of course, the great stuff endures: Dorian Gray, Importance of Being Earnest, Lady Windemere's Fan, but I also read for the first time his quasi-story about Shakespeare's Sonnets and the identity of who they were written to and about. Very innovative and clever interpretation, based on an extremely close reading of each sonnet (although I don't know what the Shakespeare scholars think Since this volume has everything he ever published, it is a mixed bag, but nothing is really not worth reading. Of course, the great stuff endures: Dorian Gray, Importance of Being Earnest, Lady Windemere's Fan, but I also read for the first time his quasi-story about Shakespeare's Sonnets and the identity of who they were written to and about. Very innovative and clever interpretation, based on an extremely close reading of each sonnet (although I don't know what the Shakespeare scholars think of this.) Another book to own to dip into periodically.

  22. 5 out of 5

    Diana

    Oscar Wilde indeed rightfully deserves being one of the most celebrated writers of his time. I was particularly amazed by his dialogues and his wit. Lord Henry Wotton from the Picture of Dorian Gray probably would be the most enchanting dandy the world of fiction has ever known, it's just so sad Wilde's career had to end in such haste. Even his poetry was beautiful. This one he wrote in prison; "Yet each man kills the thing he loves, By each let this be heard Some do it with a bitter look, Some with Oscar Wilde indeed rightfully deserves being one of the most celebrated writers of his time. I was particularly amazed by his dialogues and his wit. Lord Henry Wotton from the Picture of Dorian Gray probably would be the most enchanting dandy the world of fiction has ever known, it's just so sad Wilde's career had to end in such haste. Even his poetry was beautiful. This one he wrote in prison; "Yet each man kills the thing he loves, By each let this be heard Some do it with a bitter look, Some with a flattering word The coward does it with a kiss, The brave man with a sword"

  23. 4 out of 5

    Amy

    If this collection just contained Wilde's four plays this would be a 4-star listen. However, the inclusion of a stage adaptation of The Picture of Dorian Gray greatly reduced the overall enjoyability. It's been a while since I've read TPDG, this staging was not nearly as enjoyable as I recall of reading the book. Wilde's stage characters interact with wit and humor. While these may be morality plays, the moral is so simple that the story is never bogged down by it. “When good Americans die, they g If this collection just contained Wilde's four plays this would be a 4-star listen. However, the inclusion of a stage adaptation of The Picture of Dorian Gray greatly reduced the overall enjoyability. It's been a while since I've read TPDG, this staging was not nearly as enjoyable as I recall of reading the book. Wilde's stage characters interact with wit and humor. While these may be morality plays, the moral is so simple that the story is never bogged down by it. “When good Americans die, they go to Paris" "Where do bad Americans go?" "They stay in America”

  24. 4 out of 5

    Rian Durant

    "The Picture of Dorian Gray" must be the book I've read about 5 times during my teen years and I still think it is an outstanding work of art. The same goes for the plays with all their wit and the spell-bounding fairy-tales. One can't choose but wonder what this man might have achieved if he lived in better times. Or maybe then he might have lost his edge. The only thing I'm sure about is that all his works are worth reading more than once to go beyond the beauty of style to the real depth.

  25. 4 out of 5

    Yvonne Mendez

    I read this collection as an audiobook, it contains four plays plus the novel The Portrait of Dorian Grey adopted as a play. The stories are funny due to the absurdity of the situations, so many memorable quotes come from those dialogues and the shrill aristocratic tone of voice makes this a great audiobook. After listening this book I am very interested in reading the plays and novel as well as learning more about the life of Oscar Wilde.

  26. 4 out of 5

    Eduard Gafton

    The Model Millionaire The Star-Child The Fisherman and His Soul The Happy Prince The Portrait of Dorian Gray The Model Millionaire The Star-Child The Fisherman and His Soul The Happy Prince The Portrait of Dorian Gray

  27. 5 out of 5

    Owain

    Behold! The second of the two cheap tomes I have carried from shelf to shelf via five different places I have lived in the years since I bought it from Waterstones. I like Wilde's poetry and short stories. I love the Portrait of Dorian Gray. Inspiration for one of my favourite Warhammer-themed Sci-fi novels. However I can't read plays. At least not Wilde's. .....And his gravestones encased in a plastic fence so the vandals that haunt Père-Lachaise can't damage it any further.

  28. 5 out of 5

    Jerry Smith

    There is so much to enjoy about Wilde's writing that it is always worth seeking them out. This is an eclectic mix of essays, fiction, poems and also the script of "The Importance of being Earnest" which is probably my favorite play of his. I didn't read this from cover to cover and the book lends itself to jumping around. I still have some of the major works to go back to, and some to read again but it is always a delight.

  29. 4 out of 5

    Zack B.

    The only thing I'd ever read by Oscar Wilde previously was The Picture of Dorian Gray. This was years ago and at the time it was a little over my head. Now reading his essays and short stories I have a profound respect for Wilde as a writer. In fact, his views on Art, as expressed in "The Critic As Artist" are the best expression of my own views on Art that I've ever read.

  30. 4 out of 5

    Ramie

    Love this style of audio book. Actual plays made it feel more like you were listening to old radio shows than listening to a monotonous reader. The only downside is the repeated lines between plays but having never read Oscar Wilde I have no clue if that's his style or just the way the plays were adapted.

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