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A no-holds-barred look into the remarkable life and career of the prolific musician, songwriter, and producer behind Eurythmics and dozens of pop hits.   Dave Stewart’s life has been a wild ride—one filled with music, constant reinvention, and the never-ending drive to create. Growing up in industrial northern England, he left home for the gritty London streets of the sev A no-holds-barred look into the remarkable life and career of the prolific musician, songwriter, and producer behind Eurythmics and dozens of pop hits.   Dave Stewart’s life has been a wild ride—one filled with music, constant reinvention, and the never-ending drive to create. Growing up in industrial northern England, he left home for the gritty London streets of the seventies, where he began collaborating and performing with various musicians, including a young waitress named Annie Lennox.   The chemistry between Stewart and Lennox was undeniable, and an intense romance developed. While their passion proved too much offstage, they thrived musically and developed their own sound. They called themselves Eurythmics and launched into global stardom with the massively popular album Sweet Dreams (Are Made of This).   For the first time, Stewart shares the incredible, high-octane stories of his life in music—the drug-fueled adventures, the A-list collaborations and relationships, and the creative process that brought us blockbusters from Eurythmics like “ Here Comes the Rain Again” and “Would I Lie to You” as well as Tom Petty’s  “Don’t Come Around Here No More,” No Doubt’s “Underneath It All,” Golden Globe winner “Old Habits Die Hard” with Mick Jagger, and many more.   From great friendships and creative partnerships including the group SuperHeavy along with Jagger, Joss Stone, Damian Marley, and A. R. Rahman, to inspired performances and intimate moments in the studio—Stewart highlights the musicians he admires and calls friends, from Bob Dylan, Stevie Nicks, Elton John, George Harrison, and Ringo Starr to Bono, Bon Jovi, and Katy Perry.   With a behind-the-scenes look at Stewart’s innovative endeavors that keep him on the cutting-edge of the music business, Sweet Dreams Are Made of This is a one-of-a-kind  portrait of the creative heart of one of its most gifted and enterprising contributors. With a Foreword by Mick Jagger! From the Hardcover edition.


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A no-holds-barred look into the remarkable life and career of the prolific musician, songwriter, and producer behind Eurythmics and dozens of pop hits.   Dave Stewart’s life has been a wild ride—one filled with music, constant reinvention, and the never-ending drive to create. Growing up in industrial northern England, he left home for the gritty London streets of the sev A no-holds-barred look into the remarkable life and career of the prolific musician, songwriter, and producer behind Eurythmics and dozens of pop hits.   Dave Stewart’s life has been a wild ride—one filled with music, constant reinvention, and the never-ending drive to create. Growing up in industrial northern England, he left home for the gritty London streets of the seventies, where he began collaborating and performing with various musicians, including a young waitress named Annie Lennox.   The chemistry between Stewart and Lennox was undeniable, and an intense romance developed. While their passion proved too much offstage, they thrived musically and developed their own sound. They called themselves Eurythmics and launched into global stardom with the massively popular album Sweet Dreams (Are Made of This).   For the first time, Stewart shares the incredible, high-octane stories of his life in music—the drug-fueled adventures, the A-list collaborations and relationships, and the creative process that brought us blockbusters from Eurythmics like “ Here Comes the Rain Again” and “Would I Lie to You” as well as Tom Petty’s  “Don’t Come Around Here No More,” No Doubt’s “Underneath It All,” Golden Globe winner “Old Habits Die Hard” with Mick Jagger, and many more.   From great friendships and creative partnerships including the group SuperHeavy along with Jagger, Joss Stone, Damian Marley, and A. R. Rahman, to inspired performances and intimate moments in the studio—Stewart highlights the musicians he admires and calls friends, from Bob Dylan, Stevie Nicks, Elton John, George Harrison, and Ringo Starr to Bono, Bon Jovi, and Katy Perry.   With a behind-the-scenes look at Stewart’s innovative endeavors that keep him on the cutting-edge of the music business, Sweet Dreams Are Made of This is a one-of-a-kind  portrait of the creative heart of one of its most gifted and enterprising contributors. With a Foreword by Mick Jagger! From the Hardcover edition.

30 review for Sweet Dreams Are Made of This: A Life In Music

  1. 5 out of 5

    Todd

    I never thought stories about meeting some of my musical idols would be boring, but Dave Stewart's misshapen, run-on "Sweet Dreams Are Made of This" managed to make a creative, celebrity life tedious. There's no question Stewart is talented. He also thinks in unusual ways, which is what has attracted so many other notables -- including Mick Jagger, George Harrison, Bob Dylan and U2 -- to work with him. But his book, after the initial more interesting chapters about his childhood and early profess I never thought stories about meeting some of my musical idols would be boring, but Dave Stewart's misshapen, run-on "Sweet Dreams Are Made of This" managed to make a creative, celebrity life tedious. There's no question Stewart is talented. He also thinks in unusual ways, which is what has attracted so many other notables -- including Mick Jagger, George Harrison, Bob Dylan and U2 -- to work with him. But his book, after the initial more interesting chapters about his childhood and early professional days, turns into "and then I worked with" or "and then we did." Meanwhile, the guy is coming down with almost-fatal illnesses or inhaling enough mind-altering substances to knock lesser mortals off this planet -- but there's virtually no introspection, no curiosity about how this all comes to be. Nor are there shrewd short takes on his famous colleagues besides how much he admires them. He simply takes it for granted that, say, when he gets sick he calls his friend Paul Allen (as in Microsoft's co-founder), who offers him a plane and access to the finest doctors in Los Angeles. Now, Stewart seems like a nice guy. Certainly the kind of guy you'd love to meet at a party, jam with or even have a drink with (if you can keep up with his intake). He'd also be a great friend to have in a jam -- he comes across as upbeat and generous. That's all well and good. But it doesn't make for a very good memoir. Most aggravating: He talks about how one event for Nelson Mandela changed the life of his former partner, Annie Lennox, who is as introverted and perhaps withdrawn as Stewart is extroverted and ecstatic. "I've found my whole meaning and purpose," she tells Stewart afterwards. And that's that. I guess we'll have to read Lennox's memoir to find out the details. Also: After going into the hospital for diverticulitis and a growth on his adrenal gland, he talks about how what followed as "a really bad year." Given all the incredibly active years that came before and after, what's a "bad year" for Stewart? He doesn't say. Man, Philip Roth has written whole books about these kinds of things. Anyway, I'll hold on to some bits -- a sentence here about Ringo Starr, a passage there about England in the mid-'80s, a recounting the creation of "Sweet Dreams" (an accident). But there's a reason it took me a month to get through a book that should take an afternoon. Dave, you're amazingly creative, but next time, get an editor.

  2. 5 out of 5

    Tobin Elliott

    As others have mentioned, this book could have gone into greater depth, or a little more detail when it came to the thousands of stories Dave has to tell. That being said, he's a hyperkinetic soul, so I can't imagine what it took for him to even get himself to a place where he could even related the stories with the level of detail he managed. And, what he managed was a fascinating glimpse into the creative mind. His stories are crazy, interesting, and funny as hell at times. And I think his grea As others have mentioned, this book could have gone into greater depth, or a little more detail when it came to the thousands of stories Dave has to tell. That being said, he's a hyperkinetic soul, so I can't imagine what it took for him to even get himself to a place where he could even related the stories with the level of detail he managed. And, what he managed was a fascinating glimpse into the creative mind. His stories are crazy, interesting, and funny as hell at times. And I think his great success comes from three things. The first is, he never falls too much in love with anything he's creating. If it's not working, he tosses it and begins something else. The second is, he's open to anything, the crazier the idea, the better. And finally, you can't even say fear has ever held him back, I think it's more a case of simply not caring if he fails. Because there's so many things to create, he knows he will fail, and it's no big deal. It's a really cool path to success.

  3. 5 out of 5

    Lisa

    This was a book you must read with a music app. I listened to the songs as he described the making of them. The book was one long litany of dropped names, but I was surprised by how many musical collaborations he was part of. His writing is a racing free form without cohesion, stories spilling in rapid succession providing a insight into his positive, always looking to shock for a laugh, frenetic personality. His kitchen is truly a revolving door of celebrities. I rated the book a four as I enjo This was a book you must read with a music app. I listened to the songs as he described the making of them. The book was one long litany of dropped names, but I was surprised by how many musical collaborations he was part of. His writing is a racing free form without cohesion, stories spilling in rapid succession providing a insight into his positive, always looking to shock for a laugh, frenetic personality. His kitchen is truly a revolving door of celebrities. I rated the book a four as I enjoyed learning about the strange musical inspirations that created so many songs I grew up hearing on the radio. I also had to smile at his musical mind and experimentations with sound reminding me of my own son who is a young music producer (thankfully without the party all the time life style Dave Stewart lives).

  4. 4 out of 5

    Greg

    I had no idea..... Really....I had no clue that Dave Stewart has essentially been everywhere in popular music over the last 30 years. His list of friends are incredible. My though of Dave was that he was tagging along with Annie Lennox in Eurthymics. I was wrong. According to this, it was a true partnership. Others have commented that Stewart is a bit of a loon. This book doesn't dissuade you from that observation. But he is a creative loon, and an entertaining loon. And the book reflects all that I had no idea..... Really....I had no clue that Dave Stewart has essentially been everywhere in popular music over the last 30 years. His list of friends are incredible. My though of Dave was that he was tagging along with Annie Lennox in Eurthymics. I was wrong. According to this, it was a true partnership. Others have commented that Stewart is a bit of a loon. This book doesn't dissuade you from that observation. But he is a creative loon, and an entertaining loon. And the book reflects all that. I went into this with zero expectations. I was pleasantly surprised. It does run out of steam at the end, and there is a WHOLE LOT of name dropping. But it's a fun read. Worth picking up. Frankly, get the Audible version.....Dave does the narration and it's a hoot.

  5. 5 out of 5

    Esther

    Picked up at the library thinking it might be interesting. I loved the early Eurythmics stuff in the 80s. But gosh what a tedious egotistical pile of shit this was. The endless name dropping and oh let me just find a random sentence to give you an idea -' when she arrived, Bryan Ferry and I were playing tennis with Tony Blair, who was soon to become the prime minister of England..' Oh really Dave, I didn't know that....wanker. Alan Partridge of pop.

  6. 5 out of 5

    Julie Feighery

    Dave Stewart had led a pretty remarkable life. He has created some outstanding songs, both as a songwriter and as a producer, and he comes across in this memoir as a guy who is easy to get along with and always up for a bit of fun. It is also pretty apparent that he wrote this work without the aid of a ghostwriter. I think it would have been a stronger work if he had. There were so many insane stories in this book--his time working on the score for Showgirls, an accidental vacation at a Yugoslav Dave Stewart had led a pretty remarkable life. He has created some outstanding songs, both as a songwriter and as a producer, and he comes across in this memoir as a guy who is easy to get along with and always up for a bit of fun. It is also pretty apparent that he wrote this work without the aid of a ghostwriter. I think it would have been a stronger work if he had. There were so many insane stories in this book--his time working on the score for Showgirls, an accidental vacation at a Yugoslavian nudist colony while he was still dating Annie Lennox, and the stories behind the composition and recording of Tom Petty's "Don't Come Around Here No More," to just name a few. In each instance, however, he either is way too brief, or ends the anecdote a few paragraphs later than he should have. Even with that complaint, I did enjoy this book quite a bit. If you're a music fan, even if you're not a Eurythmics fan, you will find a lot to like in this book, as it seems Stewart has worked with just about everybody in not just pop and rock music, but country and soul as well. I found myself hunting down songs on youtube regularly while reading.

  7. 4 out of 5

    Lee Ann

    I've always enjoyed Eurythmics music. After reading this, I went back to the CDs to listen to some of the layers Dave Stewart and Annie Lennox added under the melody, which in some cases is more complex than I realized. Dave is an interesting storyteller without embarrassing any of the big stars with whom he's worked. There's drugs, but no preaching or horror stories. Dave seems like an interesting guy who knows music, works hard for his success, is a good father, and doesn't have too many excess I've always enjoyed Eurythmics music. After reading this, I went back to the CDs to listen to some of the layers Dave Stewart and Annie Lennox added under the melody, which in some cases is more complex than I realized. Dave is an interesting storyteller without embarrassing any of the big stars with whom he's worked. There's drugs, but no preaching or horror stories. Dave seems like an interesting guy who knows music, works hard for his success, is a good father, and doesn't have too many excesses (except for all those houses).

  8. 5 out of 5

    Monical

    started out with great promise, but then degenerated into a mash up of drug use, name dropping and disjointed narrative. very disappointed because there is a great story in there.... he's a very creative guy, has done a lot. very sad to say that "Life" by Keith Richards was much better (drug use notwithstanding!).

  9. 4 out of 5

    Jamie Lyon

    Okay. I think I would have enjoyed it more if he had told more of the stories in depth and spent less time name-dropping. Enjoyable, just not as interesting as it could have been.

  10. 5 out of 5

    Peter Myers

    Excellent audio book...well narrated by the author Some interesting stories and anecdotes

  11. 4 out of 5

    Beverly

    Some great stories, but at times the writing was really hard to follow. If you're looking for a good read with smooth writing, this is not for you. That said, Dave Stewart has led an amazing life.

  12. 5 out of 5

    Steve Jones

    I Started off looking forward to reading more but kind of got turned off by all the name dropping. He seems like a nice guy and I love the Eurythmics but it was a bit much for me.

  13. 4 out of 5

    Wendy Sice

    I recently started listening to the Eurythmics again after being a fan back in the 80s, so I thought I would have a read of Dave Stewart’s memoir. I suspected he was a quirky fellow, but I was not even close to how truly eccentric he really is! And a musical genius. The first few chapters of the book are pretty low key as he describes a fairly typical British upbringing playing footy and then getting into music in the 70s. Drugs play a huge part in his life and we read about many of his misadven I recently started listening to the Eurythmics again after being a fan back in the 80s, so I thought I would have a read of Dave Stewart’s memoir. I suspected he was a quirky fellow, but I was not even close to how truly eccentric he really is! And a musical genius. The first few chapters of the book are pretty low key as he describes a fairly typical British upbringing playing footy and then getting into music in the 70s. Drugs play a huge part in his life and we read about many of his misadventures while under the influence, especially of hallucinogenics. As we know, he meets Annie and here he describes their beautiful friendship. After a couple of attempts at building a band, they realise that just the two of them make a successful pair of songwriters and dynamic duo on stage. This is where the book gets really exciting. They are catapulted into stardom as the Eurythmics, and sell millions of records around the world. Dave is interested in collaborating with other musicians too, which he does prolifically as the momentum of the Eurythmics wanes. We read of his creations with Bob Geldof, Bob Dylan, Katy Perry, Candy Dulfer, Bono, Stevie Nicks, Tom Petty and a cast of thousands who are inspired by Stewart’s laidback, welcoming way. He is everybody’s best friend and muse. I was quite surprised just how much he has contributed to the music industry, and even though it sometimes read like name-dropping, well, how else can you really say you worked with someone famous? This is a fun, interesting and eye-opening read especially if you are into music. I have been buzzing all around YouTube since, reminding myself or seeing for the first time the many hit songs he made with his many famous friends. A cool read.

  14. 5 out of 5

    Janet

    I picked this up to check off the "A book with song title lyrics in it" category on the 2018 PopSugaer Reading Challenge after realizing the library didn't have (in any version) my original selection (which was 'Would I Lie to You?'). WOW! This was crazy and wild and fantastical and totally nuts! All I knew about Dave was that is was part of the Eurythmics, but not that he'd worn all these other hats over the decades. While reading this I was thinking 'he's either the best story-teller ever and t I picked this up to check off the "A book with song title lyrics in it" category on the 2018 PopSugaer Reading Challenge after realizing the library didn't have (in any version) my original selection (which was 'Would I Lie to You?'). WOW! This was crazy and wild and fantastical and totally nuts! All I knew about Dave was that is was part of the Eurythmics, but not that he'd worn all these other hats over the decades. While reading this I was thinking 'he's either the best story-teller ever and this is a work of fiction or this is all so crazy that it might actually be true'. He also made me think of him like the Mad Hatter on speed! He was freaking all over the place, all the time. I got exhausted just reading this and he did it all. I know a handful of musicians that live here in Austin and none of them (with the possible exception of Chad Cisneros from Tritonal) are that wired on a regular basis. There was an enormous amount of name dropping (some I knew, some I didn't), but the music industry is like the film/tv or book industry. Once you've been in it long enough, you probably DO know everyone and have stories with most of them. Personally, I enjoyed most of the stories although I did get lost on the musician jargon. Given that I didn't know what I was getting into when I started this, I ended up really liking it and laughing out loud a lot.

  15. 5 out of 5

    Karin

    This one is worth listening to through Audible because Dave Stewart reads it himself and adds bits of music and voice mails he's received from people like Bono & Mick Jagger. It's really fun & interesting. The guy has done a ton of stuff and lead an incredible life. In the Goodreads reviews, people have complained about his name-dropping. I find myself wondering, if you've worked with certain people and become friends with many of them, are you not supposed to mention them? Are you supposed to j This one is worth listening to through Audible because Dave Stewart reads it himself and adds bits of music and voice mails he's received from people like Bono & Mick Jagger. It's really fun & interesting. The guy has done a ton of stuff and lead an incredible life. In the Goodreads reviews, people have complained about his name-dropping. I find myself wondering, if you've worked with certain people and become friends with many of them, are you not supposed to mention them? Are you supposed to just refer to them as "a friend" or "a musician that I worked with" and not get specific? I think that's sort of a ridiculous expectation in a case like this. I, myself, wanted to know who he'd worked with and was amazed at the huge variety, from so many different types of music, etc. I think if you don't like "name-dropping", maybe the biographies of famous people aren't for you.

  16. 5 out of 5

    Arlene Reinhart Johnson

    I started this book once and then went back to it recently, starting over from the beginning. The cast of characters in Dave Stewart’s life, were for me hard to keep straight! For the most part, Sweet Dreams Are Made Of This is easy to read, but I feel there were gaps in his memoir. Clearly, Dave and Annie are creative, talented people, with an interesting catalog of music. I enjoyed reading about how many of these songs were written. Dave has an adventurous life to write about and despite all th I started this book once and then went back to it recently, starting over from the beginning. The cast of characters in Dave Stewart’s life, were for me hard to keep straight! For the most part, Sweet Dreams Are Made Of This is easy to read, but I feel there were gaps in his memoir. Clearly, Dave and Annie are creative, talented people, with an interesting catalog of music. I enjoyed reading about how many of these songs were written. Dave has an adventurous life to write about and despite all the drugs he took, everything certainly seems to have turned out well for him. My favorite part was the mushrooms with Daryl Hall. I do remember hearing about that! Poor T-Bone, rest his soul, trying to keep you guys out of trouble. 😄🍄 🍄 🍄 Anyway, I would recommend this book to music lovers, especially those who like 80’s rock. 🎸 🎶

  17. 5 out of 5

    Mark Farley

    This is a great book, but probably the most gossipy and name dropping book you will ever read though. The contribution that Dave Stewart has had on the music business, aside from his work with Annie Lennox and the Eurythmics in itself is legendary, as a songwriter and producer, the author has an incredibly epic resume. The amount of stories and anecdotes in this book is golden and such a great read. From his humble upbringings to his early friendship with Lennox and his visions of punk London in This is a great book, but probably the most gossipy and name dropping book you will ever read though. The contribution that Dave Stewart has had on the music business, aside from his work with Annie Lennox and the Eurythmics in itself is legendary, as a songwriter and producer, the author has an incredibly epic resume. The amount of stories and anecdotes in this book is golden and such a great read. From his humble upbringings to his early friendship with Lennox and his visions of punk London in the late seventies, this is an essential and entertaining account of British culture that I would recommend to anyone.

  18. 4 out of 5

    Len or Len

    This is a great rock autobiography. Full of debauchery, great stories and a peek at the process of making great music. Stewart is an engaging storyteller who really seems to appreciate the wonderful life he's led. Lots of stuff about Annie Lennox and other musicians like Mick Jagger, Bob Dylan, Stevie Nicks and Joss Stone.

  19. 4 out of 5

    James Traxler

    He's done so much and with all the drug use, it's probably hard to remember details. I find it hard to remember details in my life and I've had it pretty boring, comparative to him, so that's understandable. But it would be nice if he'd delved a bit deeper. Anyway, it's still an enjoyable read, and it made me go back and listen to various tracks he's done, many of which I love anyway.

  20. 4 out of 5

    Nicholas Why

    I was just curious about the other half of Eurythmics but I was blown away by how many celebrities he came into contact with, worked with, had sex with, and nurtured. A fascinating & colourful rockstar life. I was just curious about the other half of Eurythmics but I was blown away by how many celebrities he came into contact with, worked with, had sex with, and nurtured. A fascinating & colourful rockstar life.

  21. 5 out of 5

    Angela

    Very fun book, especially for music fans and 80s fans in particular. (And there's a strange story about clam chowder that I'm still SMH about. Clearly DS has a great sense of humor!) Patiently waiting now for Annie Lennox book!

  22. 4 out of 5

    Bruce

    Stopped half way through. Was somewhat interesting about his early life and the road to stardom. But just couldn’t suffer through any more stories about how many famous people he did weird boring stuff with.

  23. 4 out of 5

    Nikki

    The book starts really well and is initially very interesting; unfortunately it ultimately devolves into a list of famous people he’s worked with in one of his many houses.

  24. 4 out of 5

    Maria

    Interesting and easy to read. A true insight into the life of a rockstar.

  25. 4 out of 5

    Nick Smith

    "I've really never had a master plan all my life. I've followed little signs that pointed me in the direction of a road less traveled." And travel Dave Stewart has! From Sunderland, England to a partnership with Annie Lennox, Stewart's experimentation yielded some hits in 1983 that landed their duo Eurythmics on the cover of "Rolling Stone" and they hit number one on the charts with "Sweet Dreams (Are Made of This)." This book gives you a behind-the-scenes view both of Dave's life, and the songs "I've really never had a master plan all my life. I've followed little signs that pointed me in the direction of a road less traveled." And travel Dave Stewart has! From Sunderland, England to a partnership with Annie Lennox, Stewart's experimentation yielded some hits in 1983 that landed their duo Eurythmics on the cover of "Rolling Stone" and they hit number one on the charts with "Sweet Dreams (Are Made of This)." This book gives you a behind-the-scenes view both of Dave's life, and the songs he wrote along with Annie, Ringo Starr, George Harrison, Stevie Nicks, Mick Jagger, Sarah McLachlan, Joss Stone, Tom Petty, Bob Dylan, and many, many more. It also shows us his life at home in Covent Garden, England, a chateau in France, a house in Jamaica, one in Santa Monica on top of Mulholland, and wherever Dave Stewart went, he usually built a studio there. He eventually came to the city I live in, Nashville, Tennessee where he resides today. Recording at our local Blackbird Studios, you may also see him at the Pancake Pantry. Or somewhere else in town! He's here just like I am, and countless other songwriters, just working our jobs making music on the side, or doing it professionally. Dave has a way of putting artists and singers at ease, having fun with music (which is really what it's all about), telling them "If you don't like it, we'll throw it away!" This "no Biggie" approach has led to many, many albums and music videos. He came just at the right time to be all over MTV and in every American's living room TV set. You can hear "Sweet Dreams" pretty much any day, in the supermarket, in a store, on the radio, in the elevator, pretty much anywhere. I'm happy he lives here, and I had fun keeping up with his adventures. This is a fun read with many laughs. Four stars for readability!

  26. 5 out of 5

    Gary Myers

    This book might hold the record for the use of the word “I”. It seems as if nearly everything Stewart has done has been “amazing” (a word he uses a bit less often than “I”); he knows everyone in the music biz (they’re all “amazing” and each one is his best friend), and drugs were involved nearly every time anyone else was in the same room with him. (Could that be the reason that everything is “amazing”?). He has apparently lived his life on the spur of the moment with no preparation for anything This book might hold the record for the use of the word “I”. It seems as if nearly everything Stewart has done has been “amazing” (a word he uses a bit less often than “I”); he knows everyone in the music biz (they’re all “amazing” and each one is his best friend), and drugs were involved nearly every time anyone else was in the same room with him. (Could that be the reason that everything is “amazing”?). He has apparently lived his life on the spur of the moment with no preparation for anything, while never spending more than 20 minutes writing a song (all of which are “amazing” with no revision needed). While all this certainly sounds exaggerated, who knows? However, there were a couple of claims on which I thought I could weigh in: He states that Candy Dulfer’s “Lily Was Here,” which he produced, is one of the top 5 instrumentals of all-time. Two listings that I found of the top 50 & top 100 instrumentals do not include the song. He cites the Burt Bacharach-Hal David “Alfie” theme as having an “incredibly complex melody.” It does not. (There are only 2 notes outside the major scale, both of which occur in a logically repeated fashion in the bridge). I couldn’t keep track of how many wives he has had as the narrative leaps back and forth while he goes around the world buying homes and recording music. In a later chapter, after having already made several references to his interactions with Paul McCartney, he mentions meeting him for the first time. This seems typical of the manner in which he recalls and chooses to write about the people and places in his life of apparent excess. Despite all this, the book does have some entertainment value and some interesting, if exaggerated, stories.

  27. 4 out of 5

    Jp

    "Everything is not an anecdote, you have to discriminate" - Neal Page, Planes Trains and Automobiles. I regard Dave Stewart as a bit of a genius; his production of Sweet Dreams (Are Made of This) on a primitive 8 track home studio is in itself remarkable. He is undoubtedly a brilliant songwriter, and from what I've seen a fantastic guitarist. He and Annie Lennox wrote many of my favourite songs that were the soundtrack to my childhood. That doesn't mean he can write a book. This rambling story sor "Everything is not an anecdote, you have to discriminate" - Neal Page, Planes Trains and Automobiles. I regard Dave Stewart as a bit of a genius; his production of Sweet Dreams (Are Made of This) on a primitive 8 track home studio is in itself remarkable. He is undoubtedly a brilliant songwriter, and from what I've seen a fantastic guitarist. He and Annie Lennox wrote many of my favourite songs that were the soundtrack to my childhood. That doesn't mean he can write a book. This rambling story sorely needed a ghostwriter or some serious editorial guidance. While the first third of this book is genuinely interesting, the remainder is simply hard work. Basically it's a repetition of: met famous person x, wrote amazing song, bought x house in y country, did some amazing stuff with famous person z. This in itself should be enough but the anecdotes are so shallow that they become tiring. He also has a habit of changing subject halfway through a story. One example is when he got very sick and needed airlifting to hospital with some unknown illness, at which point he veers off into a completely unrelated story. I thought, surely he's going to get back to that other thing, but he doesn't. Post Eurythmics massive success he just scratches at the surface of the bands subsequent work, or just not at all. I always wanted to know the story behind the Hell's Angels in the Thorn in my Side video. Nope. What was Chucho Merchan like? Dunno. What was Annie's ephiphany about her life's purpose in Africa? No idea, the chapter abruptly ends. There's a few great anecdotes, especially taking mushrooms with Darryl Hall. Actually that's about it. Not awful but very dissappointing.

  28. 4 out of 5

    Andy Lopata

    I loved this book! It's a little disjointed and raw at times but so much better than many rock biographies. Dave Stewart has had an incredible journey from drugs and Elton John's wild parties in his teens through amazing global success with Eurythmics to working across the globe with the greats of the music industry. And lots of funny stories along the way. His passion and intelligence both shine through. There is so much to learn about successful collaboration and creativity within these pages. I loved this book! It's a little disjointed and raw at times but so much better than many rock biographies. Dave Stewart has had an incredible journey from drugs and Elton John's wild parties in his teens through amazing global success with Eurythmics to working across the globe with the greats of the music industry. And lots of funny stories along the way. His passion and intelligence both shine through. There is so much to learn about successful collaboration and creativity within these pages. The only downside is that the book seems to be written for the US market and there are a number of awkward explanations of British cultural references in the early chapters. But that may just be the version I picked up. I hope so.

  29. 5 out of 5

    Celeste Peterson

    For those of us who remember the 80s as a phenomenal movement in punk rock and also coincidentally love the Eurythmics, this is a fascinating read. I still cannot fathom how Dave Stewart (the author) escaped death so very many times, but his tale winds around and through the music of my teen and young adult life. He is far more of gifted musician and entrepreneur than I had imagined and I book marked numerous pages to add songs to my digital collection. Take time at lunch to watch some of the ma For those of us who remember the 80s as a phenomenal movement in punk rock and also coincidentally love the Eurythmics, this is a fascinating read. I still cannot fathom how Dave Stewart (the author) escaped death so very many times, but his tale winds around and through the music of my teen and young adult life. He is far more of gifted musician and entrepreneur than I had imagined and I book marked numerous pages to add songs to my digital collection. Take time at lunch to watch some of the many videos he listed - so cool! It's a guidebook to famous rockers, artists and characters of my generation. The only drawback of the book is its meandering... and clearly you can tell he didn't quite finish school. We are all the better for it though.

  30. 4 out of 5

    Jim Stevens

    Starts as straight biography, becomes a more rambling and free-form collection of stories and experiences towards the end. I was obsessed with Eurythmics in the 80's (and with Annie Lennox to this day) and the book proves how little I knew about Dave. He's had his hands in so many different things and as he relates them, it's less patting himself on the back than pride and genuine surprise at what's he's been able to accomplish.

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