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Nanban: Japanese Soul Food: A Cookbook

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Ramen, gyoza, fried chicken, udon, pork belly buns, and other boldly flavored, stick-to-your ribs dishes comprise Southern Japanese soul food. The antidote to typical refined restaurant fare, this hearty comfort food has become popular in the US as street food and in ramen bars. In a unique package that includes a cool exposed binding, Nanban brings home cooks the best of Ramen, gyoza, fried chicken, udon, pork belly buns, and other boldly flavored, stick-to-your ribs dishes comprise Southern Japanese soul food. The antidote to typical refined restaurant fare, this hearty comfort food has become popular in the US as street food and in ramen bars. In a unique package that includes a cool exposed binding, Nanban brings home cooks the best of these crave-inducing treats. From pungent kimchi to three types of Japanese fried chicken, and with a primer on Japanese ingredients and substitutions, Nanban is the perfect cookbook for any lover of Asian food.


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Ramen, gyoza, fried chicken, udon, pork belly buns, and other boldly flavored, stick-to-your ribs dishes comprise Southern Japanese soul food. The antidote to typical refined restaurant fare, this hearty comfort food has become popular in the US as street food and in ramen bars. In a unique package that includes a cool exposed binding, Nanban brings home cooks the best of Ramen, gyoza, fried chicken, udon, pork belly buns, and other boldly flavored, stick-to-your ribs dishes comprise Southern Japanese soul food. The antidote to typical refined restaurant fare, this hearty comfort food has become popular in the US as street food and in ramen bars. In a unique package that includes a cool exposed binding, Nanban brings home cooks the best of these crave-inducing treats. From pungent kimchi to three types of Japanese fried chicken, and with a primer on Japanese ingredients and substitutions, Nanban is the perfect cookbook for any lover of Asian food.

30 review for Nanban: Japanese Soul Food: A Cookbook

  1. 5 out of 5

    Brittany

    I received a free copy of this in exchange for a review, thank you Goodreads and the publisher for sending it to me! I was really excited about this for two reasons- I love cooking and am always looking for new recipes and it's full of fantastic opportunities to try new, delicious recipes from another culture. The appearance of the book stands out, the binding is unique and it's tall and thin which is immediately eye catching because it isn't the normal short fat cookbooks I have piled in my kitch I received a free copy of this in exchange for a review, thank you Goodreads and the publisher for sending it to me! I was really excited about this for two reasons- I love cooking and am always looking for new recipes and it's full of fantastic opportunities to try new, delicious recipes from another culture. The appearance of the book stands out, the binding is unique and it's tall and thin which is immediately eye catching because it isn't the normal short fat cookbooks I have piled in my kitchen. The layout and flow is absolutely perfect, couldn't have been an easier read. It starts with the author's history and love for Japanese food so we get an understanding that this is passion project, not just a compiled list of recipes, which makes the cooking so much more fun when you know someone put this together with a wonderful type of obsession. Cooking can be an art form and this story beautifully demonstrates the care and devotion into each recipe. The basics help introduce non-Japanese familiar cooks with different sauces and essentially definitions. THANK YOU FOR THIS. Nothing is worse than a snobby, pretentious chef who assumes the average cook (I consider myself in this second category) assumes we know what the heck an unpronounceable ingredient is or where to even find it or why it's necessary. Having this was essentially the hook for me- I knew the recipes to follow would be fantastic and there would be a reason I needed some of the ingredients I was not familiar with. *Disclaimer, I haven't made any recipes yet but I have one on my list for later this week and will continue to update* Another thing I absolutely loved about this- THERE ARE PICTURES FOR EVERY SINGLE RECIPE. Yes, this makes me like it way more but this should be required. ESPECIALLY when the dish is foreign to me and I've never seen it or heard of it, give me a picture to tell me if it looks like something I can take on. Just browsing through and noticing this gave the book immediate bonus points. My favorite part and the part that I think will make this a huge hit- THERE IS AN ENTIRE SECTION ON RAMEN NOODLES. I, as almost all my friends did, went to college on a Ramen budget where that would be the primary meal, because it was cheap and didn't go bad and delicious. I think I still regard it with the disdain of when I was so broke that was all I could afford, but Ramen is making a comeback. Instagram has reminded us that Ramen can be mixed with Asian cuisine in a wonderful new way to reinvent an old favorite and this book tells you exactly how to do that. Not only are there special seasonings but the author puts together a mouth-watering array of clever, unique uses for it that is carefully considered for maximum deliciousness. Anyone who likes Ramen (everyone I know) and who likes to cook should but this for the Ramen recipes alone! I'm serious, they are that amazing. What a fantastic, exciting, and unique culinary experience that I cannot wait to experience in the many months to come.

  2. 4 out of 5

    Selena

    Fascinating, but most of the recipes are... fancier than I'd expect for a "Japanese Soul Food" cookbook. I guess when I think "Soul Food," I think home country cooking, family recipes that have been made for generations. Comfort food. And in this case, southern Japan rather than southern US. Maybe I just don't understand Japanese home cooking as well as I think I do, but there are some complicated recipes and cases of, "Well I'm a chef, and I'd do it this way even though they do it differently." Fascinating, but most of the recipes are... fancier than I'd expect for a "Japanese Soul Food" cookbook. I guess when I think "Soul Food," I think home country cooking, family recipes that have been made for generations. Comfort food. And in this case, southern Japan rather than southern US. Maybe I just don't understand Japanese home cooking as well as I think I do, but there are some complicated recipes and cases of, "Well I'm a chef, and I'd do it this way even though they do it differently." For example, in the commentary for the Hiyajiru (Chilled Miso Soup) recipe, he says that "In Miyazaki this is dished up with a few ice cubes to keep it cold. I don't like this... To add flavor where it would otherwise be lost, I use cucumber-chili ice cubes..." Not that this is a bad thing (I think that adjustment sounds tasty), but that does lead me to believe some of these recipes have been "fancied up" and are more complex than they need to be. There are also some recipes that I honestly don't think any American would make, like the Basashi (Horse Sashimi). Americans in general are still a little iffy about any meat that isn't cooked to death, and horse meat is not exactly something sold in every grocery store here for a reason. This recipe looks pretty accurate to how they'd do it in Japan and I'd be willing to try eating it, but much like regular sashimi, I don't think I'd want to try making it myself. Some recipes are things you might make at home, but I think that most of these are for die-hard cooks of Japanese cuisine or people who cook Japanese food fairly often rather than the average home cook who likes the occasional Japanese curry or doesn't know anything about Japanese cooking. While there are a lot of general Japanese ingredients (like mirin and soy sauce), there are also some you might not have or use otherwise (tobanjian, gochujang). For the most part, the instructions aren't hard to follow, though in some cases the ingredients lists can get a little long. Do the recipes look tasty? Heck yes. I just don't think I'd be able to make the recipes in this book.

  3. 4 out of 5

    תניה

    A nice selection recipes with personalised intros. Dessert section is mostly made up of variations of soft serve ice cream flavours. Includes a drinks section. Still really want to visit the Nanban restaurant in Brixton to try out their ramen.

  4. 5 out of 5

    Casey Davidson

    I should probably give this 5 stars based on the amount of times I've made taco rice. I didn't find his story super compelling, but it's got interesting and delicious recipes with a focus on those from southern Japan including some of his own adjustments. Most are accessible once you've stocked your kitchen with the basics, but some are slightly labor intensive. I should probably give this 5 stars based on the amount of times I've made taco rice. I didn't find his story super compelling, but it's got interesting and delicious recipes with a focus on those from southern Japan including some of his own adjustments. Most are accessible once you've stocked your kitchen with the basics, but some are slightly labor intensive.

  5. 4 out of 5

    Megan

    Very nicely bound edition, and great recipes. A complete guide to Japanese comfort food.

  6. 4 out of 5

    Avi

    Some interesting recipes and anecdotes with a decent writing style. Worth checking out. And try that motsunabe!

  7. 4 out of 5

    Jayme Cochrane

    This book finally unlocked Japanese cuisine for me. Some complicated recipes but the flavours are amazing.

  8. 4 out of 5

    Dawn Obrien

    Beautifully illustrated! Super easy to read and follow. Amazing recipes. I have had lots of fun using this book to create delicious meals. An absolute work of art.

  9. 4 out of 5

    Dave Hodgkinson

    Disappointed. It’s not the book I wanted it to be. Some good ideas but nothing we’ve translated into day to day yet.

  10. 5 out of 5

    Kristine

    Nanban: Japanese Soul Food by Tim Anderson is a free Goodreads FirstReads advance reader copy of a beautiful, horizontal, barebound hardcover book that I read in late June during my summer semester at school. Where Nanban got me was in its studied simplicity with matted pages, looking-down-at-my-plate photography, and modern-aligned recipe format. Where it lost me is in its cohesion, easy made complicated instruction, and not-so-beginner-friendly technique. Sure, it was great to learn about acces Nanban: Japanese Soul Food by Tim Anderson is a free Goodreads FirstReads advance reader copy of a beautiful, horizontal, barebound hardcover book that I read in late June during my summer semester at school. Where Nanban got me was in its studied simplicity with matted pages, looking-down-at-my-plate photography, and modern-aligned recipe format. Where it lost me is in its cohesion, easy made complicated instruction, and not-so-beginner-friendly technique. Sure, it was great to learn about accessorizing your ramen with 'flavor bombs' and the concept of Whippy-San, but even a moderate-level cook like me couldn't quite mete out how to turn Japanese-sourced ingredients that I see everyday into, well, 58% of the finished products featured in the book.

  11. 4 out of 5

    Anne Urban

    I liked the detail on the recipes, however I did not realize that Japanese cooking was so labor intensive. I do intend to try a few of the simpler recipes, and i would recommend this book to anyone wanting to try learning how to cook Japanese food. This book was a win from GoodReads.

  12. 5 out of 5

    Andrew

    Received this book as a Goodreads giveaway. The recipes are written such that they can be used by either American or European readers, which is a nice touch. Anderson's introduction does a good job exploring his love of the cuisine, and his recipes are easy enough to follow. Received this book as a Goodreads giveaway. The recipes are written such that they can be used by either American or European readers, which is a nice touch. Anderson's introduction does a good job exploring his love of the cuisine, and his recipes are easy enough to follow.

  13. 4 out of 5

    Janet

    This book is very interesting. The photos are tempting and delightful looking. The great information on how to obtain the ingredients are helpful. This book is a learning experience in Japanese cooking. Very thankful to have received this from the Goodreads giveaway.

  14. 4 out of 5

    Yvonne

    I loooooove this book! Many enjoyable weekend meals.

  15. 4 out of 5

    jamie steel

  16. 5 out of 5

    Jon Stanway

  17. 4 out of 5

    Giacomo

  18. 4 out of 5

    Shannon

  19. 4 out of 5

    Alexandria

  20. 4 out of 5

    Dava Guthmiller

  21. 5 out of 5

    Midori

  22. 4 out of 5

    Rebecca Stacey

  23. 5 out of 5

    Sophie Peacock

  24. 5 out of 5

    Ernesto Diaz

  25. 5 out of 5

    Plum

  26. 4 out of 5

    Amanda Loka

  27. 5 out of 5

    Gretchen

  28. 4 out of 5

    susana

  29. 5 out of 5

    Lee Rowlands

  30. 5 out of 5

    Mr K A Hardie

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