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Earth Children Collection 6 Books Set Pack (The Land of Printed Caves, The Clan of the Cave Bear, The Valley of Horses, The Mammoth Hunters, The Plains of Passage)

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Earth's Children Collection Jean M Auel 6 Books Pack Brand New Titles in This Set The Clan of the Cave Bear The Valley of Horses The Mammoth Hunters The Plains of Passage The Shelters of Stone The Land of Printed Caves


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Earth's Children Collection Jean M Auel 6 Books Pack Brand New Titles in This Set The Clan of the Cave Bear The Valley of Horses The Mammoth Hunters The Plains of Passage The Shelters of Stone The Land of Printed Caves

30 review for Earth Children Collection 6 Books Set Pack (The Land of Printed Caves, The Clan of the Cave Bear, The Valley of Horses, The Mammoth Hunters, The Plains of Passage)

  1. 5 out of 5

    lil

    The story is about Ayla, a little girl who wakes up after a tragedy among people that doesn’t quite look like her. Her parents are nowhere to be seen and Ayla finds this woman Iza taking care of her. Ayla adapts to the way of life Izas’ people have and even though she is ugly and grew to be taller than everyone else and different in so many ways, the clan adopts this orphan child. Born with the curiosity that is unique for Aylas people, soon the life in the clan was to restricted. There were so m The story is about Ayla, a little girl who wakes up after a tragedy among people that doesn’t quite look like her. Her parents are nowhere to be seen and Ayla finds this woman Iza taking care of her. Ayla adapts to the way of life Izas’ people have and even though she is ugly and grew to be taller than everyone else and different in so many ways, the clan adopts this orphan child. Born with the curiosity that is unique for Aylas people, soon the life in the clan was to restricted. There were so many things that she couldn’t do, even though she as Izas daughter had the education of healing with certain exceptions none of the other women had. One day Ayla had to leave the clan, the new leader hated her and had been planning in finding a way to get rid of her. With the death curse on her, she was dead to her loved ones and she had to leave to find other people, people like her from the far north. On her journey to the north Ayla had no company till the day she saved the little filly, who became her first animal friends. Living through the winter in the little valley Ayla found Winney as she named the filly a great comfort and company. One day Ayla hears voices she never heard before. It was the voice of a man, of the people like herself! But the man is badly hurt, Ayla has to try out new ways of healing trying to save the man. Luckily he does. Before long Jondalar realizes that this beautiful woman doesn’t understand him and more than once he mistakes her signals for nonsense. He tries to teach her his language and slowly they learn to communicate and fall in love. Jondalar never thought he would be able to love again and couldn’t believe he literally had to travel half the world to find her. They live happily in the valley for a while but Jondalar longs for company from other people and persuades Ayla to follow him home to his people and mate with him there. It is a long journey and they meet lots of people and problems, not to mention the problems a young couple often has. But they also bring the people they meet new techniques and ideas. How about treating horses as friends and not just food? And the wolf as a friend, who loves Ayla so dearly he does whatever she wants him to? This series I actually started about ten years ago to read and I remember I was fascinated by the healing medicine and the mysterious world we call ancient history. How did people start to use needles for sewing? How did people start taming animals? And how did people get to understand where babies come from? This is the authors take on the happenings and even though I wouldn’t call it facts I like the way it is explained to me. Overall a really good series even though some of the books where a little slow paced, like when they were travelling alone but hey…then they were totally alone, so what could one expect.

  2. 5 out of 5

    M.M. Strawberry Library & Reviews

    How is it that a series that started out with one of the most incredible, memorable books in literature ended up like THIS? Clan of the Cave Bear was fantastic. Valley of Horses introduced Ayla to another member of her kind, and Mammoth Hunters and Plains of Passage explored prehistoric society, mainly from Cro-Magnons, but there is also an encounter with other Neanderthals. Plains of Passage plodded on somewhat, and Ayla was becoming a Mary Sue, something that would make Shelters of Stone a huge How is it that a series that started out with one of the most incredible, memorable books in literature ended up like THIS? Clan of the Cave Bear was fantastic. Valley of Horses introduced Ayla to another member of her kind, and Mammoth Hunters and Plains of Passage explored prehistoric society, mainly from Cro-Magnons, but there is also an encounter with other Neanderthals. Plains of Passage plodded on somewhat, and Ayla was becoming a Mary Sue, something that would make Shelters of Stone a huge disappointment when I finally had the chance to read it after reading the cliffhanger at the end of Plains of Passage. It got so tiring to read about how everyone thought Ayla was so hot/smart/sexy/talented/etc etc etc. Authors invest so much into this character or that that they don't want anything bad to happen or for that character to have real flaws, which is what happened to Ayla. Land of Painted Caves only exacerbated that Mary Sue-ness with Ayla developing her shamanic powers and figuring out the secret to where babies really come from. This might have been seen as groundbreaking back then but all Ayla did was lay the foundation for a system that would only come to oppress women as men sought to ensure that their child really was theirs. The descriptive writing in the final book also got really repetitive. In earlier books, the descriptions of the landscape/surroundings could drag on some but generally served a purpose, but in the Painted Caves, there was only so much I could read about painted caves before I wanted to throw the book against the wall. It's sad that something that started out with the groundbreaking Clan of the Cave Bear should end up like this.

  3. 4 out of 5

    Jerel

    The rating is misleading because I put this in as a set for the first book Clan of the Cave Bear is 100% my overall favorite book of all time! Ayla is the most incredible character I've had the pleasure of getting to know and my idol in many ways from the moment I read the book in 6th grade when it was released. My love of her persona carried me easily through the remaining books that were good but steadily decreased in quality until the last one that I wish had never been released as it was the The rating is misleading because I put this in as a set for the first book Clan of the Cave Bear is 100% my overall favorite book of all time! Ayla is the most incredible character I've had the pleasure of getting to know and my idol in many ways from the moment I read the book in 6th grade when it was released. My love of her persona carried me easily through the remaining books that were good but steadily decreased in quality until the last one that I wish had never been released as it was the most awful book I've ever forced myself to finish. I kept waiting for something, anything interesting to happen but it really just about the painted caves. If that's all you want to read about it might be good. When something interesting does finally happen within the last 5 pages of the overlarge book, it's cliche and lacks any real imagination. The good news is that the first book can be read as a stand alone and I unequivocalably recommend it, if you find Ayla interesting then read the others....but pretend the last one doesn't exist.

  4. 4 out of 5

    Angela Catri

    I have loved this series for a long time, but I find as the series progresses, it becomes more repetitive and predictable. The last book, The Land Of the Painted Caves, is by FAR the worst book in the series. It seems to me the author just kind of gave up, wrote a few paragraphs, and copied and pasted them over and over. And over. Take out the repetition (and all the descriptions of plants and caves) and you'll be left with about twenty pages of actual storyline, which is mediocre at best. There I have loved this series for a long time, but I find as the series progresses, it becomes more repetitive and predictable. The last book, The Land Of the Painted Caves, is by FAR the worst book in the series. It seems to me the author just kind of gave up, wrote a few paragraphs, and copied and pasted them over and over. And over. Take out the repetition (and all the descriptions of plants and caves) and you'll be left with about twenty pages of actual storyline, which is mediocre at best. There were SO many things Jean Auel could have done with this last book, and I'm terribly disappointed that she took the route she did. That being said, the first four books are still my favorites (Plains of Passage was a bit monotonous to me as well) and are books I will continue to keep in my library, as well as encourage my kids to read.

  5. 4 out of 5

    Yeshua

    This is definitely a woman series. Ayla, an orphan Child (of the others)is raised by the "Clan of the Cave bear" and becomes the "woman who hunts". Forced to leave, (in the series) she discovers her destiny with "The Mother" of all. The Plains of Passage describes the journey of Ayla and Jondalar west along the Great Mother River (the Danube), from the home of The Mammoth Hunters (roughly modern Ukraine) to Jondalar's homeland (close to Les Eyzies,Dordogne, France). During this journey, Ayla meets This is definitely a woman series. Ayla, an orphan Child (of the others)is raised by the "Clan of the Cave bear" and becomes the "woman who hunts". Forced to leave, (in the series) she discovers her destiny with "The Mother" of all. The Plains of Passage describes the journey of Ayla and Jondalar west along the Great Mother River (the Danube), from the home of The Mammoth Hunters (roughly modern Ukraine) to Jondalar's homeland (close to Les Eyzies,Dordogne, France). During this journey, Ayla meets the various peoples who live along their line of march. The Shelters of Stone: Central to this book is the tension created by Ayla's healing art, her pregnancy, and the acceptance of her by Jondalar's people, the Zelandonii. Ayla was raised by Clan Neanderthals, known as "flatheads" to the Zelandonii and viewed as no better than animals. For the Zelandonii to accept Ayla they must first overcome their prejudice against the Neanderthals. Luckily for Ayla and Jondalar, some of the higher-ranking Zelandonii already have doubts of this misjudgment. Two of their number, Echozar and Brukeval, are of partial Neanderthal ancestry and are ashamed of it. Echozar at least is pacified by Ayla's own story and by his (Echozar's) own marriage to Joplaya, Jondalar's close-cousin (half-sister). Brukeval, on the other hand, rejects his heritage utterly and refuses to listen to reason. In "Land of Painted Caves", Ayla begins her training as an acolyte. Discovers an act of deception and is betrayed by her husband. The rules of procreation are redefind.

  6. 5 out of 5

    Lucy

    This review has been hidden because it contains spoilers. To view it, click here. That sure didn't feel like the no-really-this-is-final ending to a giant, sweeping series; there were too many ends left untied, and it feels like Jondalar taking responsibility for the drunk's family was the setup for the conflict for the next book. I assume the infidelity thing was added to strengthen Ayla and Jondalar's relationship or some such, but it just felt contrived and trite. I wasn't too impressed with the "Jondalar's always had very strong emotions so he just couldn't help himself so That sure didn't feel like the no-really-this-is-final ending to a giant, sweeping series; there were too many ends left untied, and it feels like Jondalar taking responsibility for the drunk's family was the setup for the conflict for the next book. I assume the infidelity thing was added to strengthen Ayla and Jondalar's relationship or some such, but it just felt contrived and trite. I wasn't too impressed with the "Jondalar's always had very strong emotions so he just couldn't help himself so it's okay" undertone, either. I had kind of assumed that with all this traveling maybe Ayla was going to find the tribe she was born to, but instead she spent the book pretty much just turning Zelandonii society inside out. The Gift of Knowledge feels like a pretty transparent equivalent of the biblical apple. I don't think it was bad enough to be one star, but not more than two.

  7. 5 out of 5

    Chichi Kim

    Best series ever read

  8. 5 out of 5

    Bonnie Feldman

    Gripping reading Amazing novel based on the beginnings of time. Although I'm not an evolutionist I do find this book very hard to put down. It is a great work of historical fiction.

  9. 4 out of 5

    James C. Athanas

    Fascinating Journey I have taken this journey three times now. It is a look into the beginnings of civilization. I have watched Ayla grow to an amazing woman who was wise beyond her years. I have trouble putting her books down once I begin reading them. I read the individual books first and I just finished the six book series. The book I found at times a little, was the Plains of Passage. In places, the descriptions of all the grasses they encounter, page after page of grasses, just got to be a b Fascinating Journey I have taken this journey three times now. It is a look into the beginnings of civilization. I have watched Ayla grow to an amazing woman who was wise beyond her years. I have trouble putting her books down once I begin reading them. I read the individual books first and I just finished the six book series. The book I found at times a little, was the Plains of Passage. In places, the descriptions of all the grasses they encounter, page after page of grasses, just got to be a bit much. Although it seemed forever, it was only a short period until we got out of the grasses. I would recommend this series to anyone. It is intriguing as you walk along with Jondular, Ayla, Whinny, Baby, Racer and Wolf, her immediate family. I give the entire series a rating of 5 on a scale of 1 (worst) and 5 best.

  10. 4 out of 5

    Sandi Potterton

    Years in the Making Years in the Making I have read and re-read this series since its inception in 1980. Each time I have become immersed in Ayla's world and found it hard to put the books down and return to the modern world. The detail is incredible, the characters memorable and the story fascinating. The Kindle bundle is even more amazing, simply because it is so much easier to take along versus the 6 huge books!

  11. 4 out of 5

    Awilson

    These are some of my all time favorites!

  12. 4 out of 5

    Dominique

    I love this series with one caveat: Caveman porn, lots of it. These books are so long. I have to skip over those sections.

  13. 4 out of 5

    Larysa

    OK, so, I LOVED the story - Disliked the telling of it. I loved the story and was invested enough in it to read all the books, but, I admit, after about book three, I started skimming through parts. It is extremely evident Mrs. Auel knows her history. She's been there, visited that. She's visited all the regions discussed in the books, and visited all the painted caves in the later books. At times, the caves were described in minute detail. Like - MINUTE - detail. So much that it detracted from th OK, so, I LOVED the story - Disliked the telling of it. I loved the story and was invested enough in it to read all the books, but, I admit, after about book three, I started skimming through parts. It is extremely evident Mrs. Auel knows her history. She's been there, visited that. She's visited all the regions discussed in the books, and visited all the painted caves in the later books. At times, the caves were described in minute detail. Like - MINUTE - detail. So much that it detracted from the story. There were two things that caused me to simply skim through all the encyclopaedic information about periglacial regions etc. I mean, at times pages and pages of information about what the glacier was doing, what the weather patterns were doing, what the ground was doing etc... The second was the sex. OMG the sex. The first book had sex discussed in a perfunctory manner. Second book had almost no sex in it either. Starting from the third book, it's as if these turned into a 'how-to' manual for sex. Honestly, I could have simply done with 'they fucked', or 'they made love'. I can imagine the rest. Promise ;) I did NOT need a blow-by-blow description of where hands and tongues and 'male members' were being put and how that felt, etc. Seriously. I could just get a porn novel and be done with it. People read books like these for the STORY. I have no idea who edited these books, but, whomever it was should have done their jobs properly and the books could have been cut down by about a third. Finally, the one thing that absolutely drove me nuts was (view spoiler)[ the utterly missed opportunity of bringing Ayla full circle with the Clan. When she got to Jondalar's people and they heard her description of people they had previously thought of as 'animals' they started to become concerned that the clan would want their caves back. WHY OH WHY did the author not take the opportunity of having Ayla, along with the leaders from the Zeladonii people, meet with the local clans and have a 'discussion', such that they could all go forward living in peace and knowing that each other is not a threat. I mean, perhaps they could have even hunted together? (maybe that's a step too far... dunno). Anyway, I was anticipating Ayla meeting up with the Clan again and seeing what happened. That's the main reason I read the last book. I just wanted to see her story go full circle - BUT IT NEVER DID. **smh** (hide spoiler)] Anyway, the books are OK. Not brilliant, but, as I said, it's a good story, poorly edited. I think it would immeasurably enhance the books if a new editor was brought in and the books were drastically cut down. Perhaps Mrs Auel could then compile a companion tome from all the descriptions of geography, geology, meteorology and history. Take these out as they don't add to the story at all and create a good companion for anyone who's interested in such. Also, kill about 90% of the sex descriptions, it's not necessary (and, I'm definitely not a prude. I have no issue whatsoever with sex or anyone having sex, I just don't believe that five pages of describing in meticulous detail what's going where advances the story at all). Anyway, that's my $0.02c. I'd be interested to know what anyone else thinks of my opinion on this series.

  14. 4 out of 5

    Brian McPhee

    Interesting, though-provoking but badly in need of an editor. This is a well-researched series on pre-history with an engaging heroine and colourful support cast of characters. The author creates an imaginary world that is idyllic but has interesting ideas woven into the extended saga. Unfortunately Ms Auel has an obsession with lists and with oral sex and is determined to convert us to her passions by extensive repetition. Having learned the uses of hundred of wildflowers and herbs, she is determ Interesting, though-provoking but badly in need of an editor. This is a well-researched series on pre-history with an engaging heroine and colourful support cast of characters. The author creates an imaginary world that is idyllic but has interesting ideas woven into the extended saga. Unfortunately Ms Auel has an obsession with lists and with oral sex and is determined to convert us to her passions by extensive repetition. Having learned the uses of hundred of wildflowers and herbs, she is determine to give us this information over, and over, and over again. Similarly, she persists in treating each book as a standalone volume and thus repeats dozens of incidents time and again. She could have opened each volume with a 'the story so far' intro for those that need it, but instead we get to read the exact same events in the exact same words, 3, 4 or 20 times in the course of the series. And did I mention that she likes oral sex. Repeatedly? This could have been a wonderful 4-volume series, but at 6 it is a good, but deeply frustrating read. It would be a terrific idea if Ms Auel would authorise just such a new edit. On the other hand, it does have a very strong, capable female lead character, complete with her himbo sidekick, a nice exception to general stereotypes.

  15. 4 out of 5

    Linda Quinn

    This review has been hidden because it contains spoilers. To view it, click here. I agree with most of the previous reviews. I LOVED the first book but felt they went gradually downhill from there. The last book was very unsatisfying for me. Maybe because some of it struck a little too close to home or maybe because it did not address things I was expecting to be revealed. Did anyone else expect to learn about the correlation between the red and black circles in all the sacred caves and the ones in Creb’s ceremony (Ayla’s body painting) with the “root drink”?? Did it seem to a I agree with most of the previous reviews. I LOVED the first book but felt they went gradually downhill from there. The last book was very unsatisfying for me. Maybe because some of it struck a little too close to home or maybe because it did not address things I was expecting to be revealed. Did anyone else expect to learn about the correlation between the red and black circles in all the sacred caves and the ones in Creb’s ceremony (Ayla’s body painting) with the “root drink”?? Did it seem to anyone else that the revelation to Ayla in her “calling” about the truth of conception (and the resulting effects on the caves) was a parallel to Adam and Eve and the discovery that, after eating the forbidden fruit, they were naked and that was a bad thing?? And did it seem to anyone else that as the books progressed, Ayla was just a little too good to be true? I did not get the part about Ayla’s fear about her sons fighting each other (in her drug induced “trips”) and Creb assuring her it would be alright. Can someone explain that for me? Having said all of that, I still rated the series as a whole as 4 stars and am glad I read it!

  16. 5 out of 5

    Susan Evans

    I loved this entire series. I have read the first two books three times, and books three and four, twice. Ayla is just a magnificent, inventive, intelligent wonder-woman. I was incredibly impressed by the amount of research Jean Auel must have done for this Earth's Children's series. I did feel that the first four books of the series: The Clan of the Cave Bear, The Valley of the Horses, The Mammoth Hunters, and The Plains of Passage, were the best of the six. The Shelters of Stone, if rated ind I loved this entire series. I have read the first two books three times, and books three and four, twice. Ayla is just a magnificent, inventive, intelligent wonder-woman. I was incredibly impressed by the amount of research Jean Auel must have done for this Earth's Children's series. I did feel that the first four books of the series: The Clan of the Cave Bear, The Valley of the Horses, The Mammoth Hunters, and The Plains of Passage, were the best of the six. The Shelters of Stone, if rated individually, I'd give 4 stars. It just wasn't quite as gripping or interesting as the first four. Then after waiting for years for the sixth and final book, The Land of Painted Caves, I was very disappointed in it. In fact, I had a hard time finishing it, it was such a let down. I'm rating the entire series as 5 stars, though, because I really think they should all be read and the first 5 were simply magnificent.

  17. 5 out of 5

    Amy

    This is a very long book series, which I love. Set in the Paleolithic era the series follows Ayla a five yo little girl that grows to be an exceptional healer and living with Neanderthals in the first book to finding Jondalar, a modern man and traveling across the continent with him. They meet people along the way, some nice and some not so nice. They cross a dangerous glacier to Jondalar's people. Ayla is accepted by his people but not without reservation. She becomes a very powerful spiritual This is a very long book series, which I love. Set in the Paleolithic era the series follows Ayla a five yo little girl that grows to be an exceptional healer and living with Neanderthals in the first book to finding Jondalar, a modern man and traveling across the continent with him. They meet people along the way, some nice and some not so nice. They cross a dangerous glacier to Jondalar's people. Ayla is accepted by his people but not without reservation. She becomes a very powerful spiritual healer. And this is their journey. This book series is loaded with homeopathic medicines and encounters with prehistoric animals. The first horse used by humans. Wolves used by humans. She even befriended a Cave Lion. There are mysteries, wonder, invention, strife, love, lust, religions of sorts. This is a fantastic book series. Heard she was writing a last book in this series...it takes her 7 - 10 years of research to write them so it should come soon...I hope.

  18. 4 out of 5

    Alice Greczyn

    I didn't want this series to end! Jean M. Auel, please please please publish another book soon!! From the first book to the last, I was utterly riveted by Ayla's story. People have been telling me to read The Clan of the Cave Bear for years. I'm so happy I finally did. Prehistoric earth came alive for me in this series, making me wonder for the first time what life must have been like when multiple human species shared the planet. Richly imaginative and captivating. I continue to feel inspired b I didn't want this series to end! Jean M. Auel, please please please publish another book soon!! From the first book to the last, I was utterly riveted by Ayla's story. People have been telling me to read The Clan of the Cave Bear for years. I'm so happy I finally did. Prehistoric earth came alive for me in this series, making me wonder for the first time what life must have been like when multiple human species shared the planet. Richly imaginative and captivating. I continue to feel inspired by this series I finished years ago, as it opened my curiosity the fields of paleoanthropology and prehistoric art. A canoe trip in the south of France to see the famously preserved caves thousands of years old is now on my bucket list!

  19. 4 out of 5

    Susan E

    I liked this book a lot. It was a lot of information at times and reading was slow, but as it got into the story line, it was very interesting. Ayla was a young child who experienced an earthquake and lost her family. A beautiful white girl found almost dead. A clan who looked nothing like her, found her and one of the Clan, a Medicine Woman wanted to keep her, and save her from death. They looked entirely different than her and thought she was homely. This book gives you quite an insight into t I liked this book a lot. It was a lot of information at times and reading was slow, but as it got into the story line, it was very interesting. Ayla was a young child who experienced an earthquake and lost her family. A beautiful white girl found almost dead. A clan who looked nothing like her, found her and one of the Clan, a Medicine Woman wanted to keep her, and save her from death. They looked entirely different than her and thought she was homely. This book gives you quite an insight into the beginnings of people on earth. I would recommend this book.

  20. 4 out of 5

    Katherine

    I read the first book and gave up during the second. I wasn’t interested in the detailed anthropology of prehistoric everything - tools, clothes, plant medicine, hunting techniques, etc. - and I was creeped out by the Neanderthal shaman ceremonies. I can see how this was a ground-breaking, ambitious epic when it was published in the eighties, but I often found myself skimming, skimming, skimming from boredom. Do not recommend unless you want to immerse yourself in detailed descriptions of Neande I read the first book and gave up during the second. I wasn’t interested in the detailed anthropology of prehistoric everything - tools, clothes, plant medicine, hunting techniques, etc. - and I was creeped out by the Neanderthal shaman ceremonies. I can see how this was a ground-breaking, ambitious epic when it was published in the eighties, but I often found myself skimming, skimming, skimming from boredom. Do not recommend unless you want to immerse yourself in detailed descriptions of Neanderthal and Cro Magnon living.

  21. 5 out of 5

    Jb

    Interesting reading about a heroine who did everything. The description of the geography, the animals, the lifestyle of the human communities, and the problems of daily living were vivid and believable. I was aware from the beginning there would be a lot of conjecture and was pleasantly surprised by the level of detail woven into the stories. In many ways this is an action adventure story painted on a rich landscape of details we might otherwise ignore.

  22. 4 out of 5

    Kathleen Tyler

    A long time in coming but I finally got to finish it. I began reading the Earth' s Children Series years ago and fell in love with the story. The only book missing at the time was the last. When it was finally released I was working and taking care of my kids. I bought the 6- book series so I could re-read the first 5 books. I was not disappointed in doing so. I was able to become reacquainted with the characters before reading the 6th book, Land of Painted Caves.

  23. 4 out of 5

    Diana

    I'm rereading this series for the forth time. I am fascinated with learning how stone age man may have lived. The cultural differences of the various communities and the group dynamics possible are intriguing. It is far beyond bazar that there is now DNA proof of cross breeding of modern human and Neanderthal.

  24. 4 out of 5

    Johanna Strother

    Ancients in modern perspectives I love this series and read it every couple of years to help me remember humans are more alike than different and that everyone has unique gifts to bring to the table. Fascinating detail from a historical perspective also

  25. 4 out of 5

    Aspen

    LOVED this series. I first read it as a young girl and fell in love with the characters and their stories. Re-reading it as an adult, I would say the same. She does an amazing job creating this vivid world.

  26. 5 out of 5

    Bookjunkie Barbie

    First read the series as a teenager, then again recently (in my 40's), and it's just as good as I remembered it. Auel has a very smooth writing style. She's very descriptive, but it's never boring. I'll definitely read the series again in a couple years.

  27. 4 out of 5

    Barbara

    I’ve read these books 4 or 5 times, and I’m sure I’ll read them again. The first three books are unputdownable, and the final three are not as good, but as a series Jean Auel has captured the time and the books appeal both to my romanticism and my desire for pace and excitement in a read.

  28. 5 out of 5

    Sharon Dellinger

    I've read these books a couple of times I enjoyed them very much. I gave only 4 stars, not 5, because I like the story, not necessarily all of the history from the author's research. But I still recommend them to anyone who is interested in prehistoric fiction.

  29. 5 out of 5

    Gevera Bert

    I forgot how badly written these books are. Head jumping, info dumps galore, pointless repetition. (She has an accent! We know!) I read these books before, as they came out. I doubt I'll ever read them again.

  30. 4 out of 5

    Trina Hibberd

    Struggled .... Not an enjoyable read

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