free hit counter code Why Women Should Rule the World - GoBooks - Download Free Book
Ads Banner
Hot Best Seller

Why Women Should Rule the World

Availability: Ready to download

What would happen if women ruled the world? Everything could change, according to former White House press secretary Dee Dee Myers. Politics would be more collegial. Businesses would be more productive. And communities would be healthier. Empowering women would make the world a better place—not because women are the same as men, but precisely because they are different. Blen What would happen if women ruled the world? Everything could change, according to former White House press secretary Dee Dee Myers. Politics would be more collegial. Businesses would be more productive. And communities would be healthier. Empowering women would make the world a better place—not because women are the same as men, but precisely because they are different. Blending memoir, social history, and a call to action, Dee Dee Myers challenges us to imagine a not-too-distant future in which increasing numbers of women reach the top ranks of politics, business, science, and academia. Reflecting on her own tenure in the Clinton administration and her work as a political analyst, media commentator, and former consultant to NBC's The West Wing, Myers assesses the crucial but long-ignored strengths that female leaders bring to the table. "Women tend to be better communicators, better listeners, better at forming consensus," Myers argues. In a highly competitive and increasingly fractious world, women possess the kind of critical problem-solving skills that are urgently needed to break down barriers, build understanding, and create the best conditions for peace. Myers knows firsthand the responsibilities and rewards of taking on leadership roles traditionally occupied by men. At thirty-one, she was appointed White House press secretary to President Bill Clinton—the first woman ever to hold the job. In a candid look at her years in Washington's political spotlight, she recalls the day-to-day challenge of confronting a press corps obsessed with more than just the president's policies. "Virtually every story written about me included observations about my earrings, my makeup, my clothes, my shoes. And then there was my hair." Recalling the pressures—both invited and imposed—of her West Wing years, Myers offers a hard-hitting look at the challenges women must overcome and the traps they must avoid as they travel the path toward success. From pioneering research in the laboratory, to innovations in business, entertainment, and media, to friendships that transcend partisanship in the U.S. Senate, she describes how female participation in public life has already transformed the world in which we live.


Compare
Ads Banner

What would happen if women ruled the world? Everything could change, according to former White House press secretary Dee Dee Myers. Politics would be more collegial. Businesses would be more productive. And communities would be healthier. Empowering women would make the world a better place—not because women are the same as men, but precisely because they are different. Blen What would happen if women ruled the world? Everything could change, according to former White House press secretary Dee Dee Myers. Politics would be more collegial. Businesses would be more productive. And communities would be healthier. Empowering women would make the world a better place—not because women are the same as men, but precisely because they are different. Blending memoir, social history, and a call to action, Dee Dee Myers challenges us to imagine a not-too-distant future in which increasing numbers of women reach the top ranks of politics, business, science, and academia. Reflecting on her own tenure in the Clinton administration and her work as a political analyst, media commentator, and former consultant to NBC's The West Wing, Myers assesses the crucial but long-ignored strengths that female leaders bring to the table. "Women tend to be better communicators, better listeners, better at forming consensus," Myers argues. In a highly competitive and increasingly fractious world, women possess the kind of critical problem-solving skills that are urgently needed to break down barriers, build understanding, and create the best conditions for peace. Myers knows firsthand the responsibilities and rewards of taking on leadership roles traditionally occupied by men. At thirty-one, she was appointed White House press secretary to President Bill Clinton—the first woman ever to hold the job. In a candid look at her years in Washington's political spotlight, she recalls the day-to-day challenge of confronting a press corps obsessed with more than just the president's policies. "Virtually every story written about me included observations about my earrings, my makeup, my clothes, my shoes. And then there was my hair." Recalling the pressures—both invited and imposed—of her West Wing years, Myers offers a hard-hitting look at the challenges women must overcome and the traps they must avoid as they travel the path toward success. From pioneering research in the laboratory, to innovations in business, entertainment, and media, to friendships that transcend partisanship in the U.S. Senate, she describes how female participation in public life has already transformed the world in which we live.

30 review for Why Women Should Rule the World

  1. 5 out of 5

    Gina

    A former member of the Clinton administration and a political analysist sets forth her reasoning about why women should rule the world. This book is not written to put men down in any way, shape, or form. It is simply a well thought out reasoning of why most (not all) women posess better inate skills than most men (again, not all) when it comes to matters of interpersonal relationships, leadership, and in working with others as a whole. It is a very interesting read. Men reading this will need to A former member of the Clinton administration and a political analysist sets forth her reasoning about why women should rule the world. This book is not written to put men down in any way, shape, or form. It is simply a well thought out reasoning of why most (not all) women posess better inate skills than most men (again, not all) when it comes to matters of interpersonal relationships, leadership, and in working with others as a whole. It is a very interesting read. Men reading this will need to keep their minds open to the possibility, because, although great strides have been made, there are more than a few glass ceilings that need to break for women to become the world leaders they can be.

  2. 4 out of 5

    Roger

    This book is conveniently divided into 3 sections: why they don't rule the world, why they should, and how they can. When it comes to conversations, women are seen as more nuanced. That is to say, while a man's motivations may be linear, a woman's are polynomial. This can either be taken as "men are less treacherous for they're more obvious" or "women are less treacherous because they can fit a curve better and resolve conflicts". That is wholly a framing issue. Nature vs. Nurture - Which wins out This book is conveniently divided into 3 sections: why they don't rule the world, why they should, and how they can. When it comes to conversations, women are seen as more nuanced. That is to say, while a man's motivations may be linear, a woman's are polynomial. This can either be taken as "men are less treacherous for they're more obvious" or "women are less treacherous because they can fit a curve better and resolve conflicts". That is wholly a framing issue. Nature vs. Nurture - Which wins out? Predictably, Myers takes the more nuanced approach and says "both!" The book is strewn with anecdotes of how women can really accomplish things on the same scope as men. This is not to say that women must be like men. That's like saying that in order to advance your country, you must choose between the military, diplomacy, or economy, and that is not the case at all. Women have tools at their disposal which can also get the job done. Her tone is remarkably upbeat. She laments the barriers to women, but also recognizes that women also have personal issues that hold them back. It's not just a conspiracy that is shafting them. However, she does not dwell too much on these things, preferring to speak about how women can advance further, not how they're being kept back.

  3. 5 out of 5

    LizG

    We can see how the linear, logic and non-emotional approach to the world and business haven't worked. How about we try another approach. One that respects others and their wisdom, and taps into the inexplicable power of intuition. Here are my thoughts in a nutshell: "In many business circles, listening to a gut feeling is laughed off as “being too emotional” which, in a culture that respects logic over the senses, is frowned upon. I mean, who wants people to think they’re a flake? It has to make We can see how the linear, logic and non-emotional approach to the world and business haven't worked. How about we try another approach. One that respects others and their wisdom, and taps into the inexplicable power of intuition. Here are my thoughts in a nutshell: "In many business circles, listening to a gut feeling is laughed off as “being too emotional” which, in a culture that respects logic over the senses, is frowned upon. I mean, who wants people to think they’re a flake? It has to make sense to my mind to be valid. Doesn’t it? In reality, no. Science is showing that those gut feelings you get are more accurate and powerful than mere logical thinking because they come from information that your brain picks up so quickly and subtly that it bypasses the more cumbersome logic processing system, and shows up immediately on a physical level. That’s pretty darn cool." - From http://tinyurl.com/yzu5o9h

  4. 4 out of 5

    Kirsten

    An amazing look at the challenges of being a woman, primarily in American politics (Myers' realm). She provides the research to what many women know intuitively: that women are still paid significantly less, rise within companies less, in many situations aren't given the same kind of respect as men. She looks at women's successes in other countries (Northern Ireland, South Africa) and highlights American women like Kathleen Sebelius and Kay Bailey Hutchinson. She also presents the biological differ An amazing look at the challenges of being a woman, primarily in American politics (Myers' realm). She provides the research to what many women know intuitively: that women are still paid significantly less, rise within companies less, in many situations aren't given the same kind of respect as men. She looks at women's successes in other countries (Northern Ireland, South Africa) and highlights American women like Kathleen Sebelius and Kay Bailey Hutchinson. She also presents the biological differences between male and female brains. Throughout the book she weaves her own challenges as the first female White House press secretary (at the age of 31). I really enjoyed this book and I think it's an important piece for women, men, parents and those who manage others to read. I think it will open some men's eyes and reinforce many women's feelings.

  5. 4 out of 5

    Sam

    Myers weaves her own biography and her theory on gender in society together in an interesting read. The main complaint of this book that I have read is that her discussion of gender is neither scientific nor academic enough, which is true; however, that is not the purpose of the book. Having read many scholarly works on gender from biological, psychological, and sociological perspectives, I felt Myers' discussion is quite readable by the layperson while maintaining the accuracy of some of the wo Myers weaves her own biography and her theory on gender in society together in an interesting read. The main complaint of this book that I have read is that her discussion of gender is neither scientific nor academic enough, which is true; however, that is not the purpose of the book. Having read many scholarly works on gender from biological, psychological, and sociological perspectives, I felt Myers' discussion is quite readable by the layperson while maintaining the accuracy of some of the words that she no doubt draws from. Why Women Should Rule the World is an accessible, concise treatise on gender in today's society. Clearly, her ability to communicate with her audience has been severely undervalued by her previous employers.

  6. 4 out of 5

    Heather

    This book is making me re-think how I communicate as a woman and as a member of our global society. It's also making me re-evaluate my level of responsibility as a woman, meaning I now think I have a far greater responsibility to communicate better and to own my woman-ness. I found myself wanting to hide the bold title of this book when I read it in public places. The clearest take-aways from this book, for me: (a) Women need to support women more often and more profoundly. Period. (b) We, as a This book is making me re-think how I communicate as a woman and as a member of our global society. It's also making me re-evaluate my level of responsibility as a woman, meaning I now think I have a far greater responsibility to communicate better and to own my woman-ness. I found myself wanting to hide the bold title of this book when I read it in public places. The clearest take-aways from this book, for me: (a) Women need to support women more often and more profoundly. Period. (b) We, as a global community, need to find ways to value things associated with women on the same level as we do those associated with men.

  7. 4 out of 5

    Suzanne

    Interesting...especially what went on with her her in job Clinton administration. All young women entering the workforce should read this. Actually, it was good for me too, as I am in such a male-dominated work setting.

  8. 4 out of 5

    Nichola

    There's some good parts, but I found the mix of memoir, self reflection, and quote gathering a bit too unfocussed, and would have preferred more reasoned argument about the ways women differ in roles of power. Still a good addition to the dialogue.

  9. 5 out of 5

    Barry Martin Vass

    This is an interesting look at the role gender bias plays in politics, business, and society in general. When Bill Clinton announced his run for the presidency in 1992, he was considered the longest of long-shots. He was a virtually unknown governor of a small Southern state, and it was thought he wouldn't have a chance against Bush senior after his victory in Kuwait. But a funny thing happened on the way to the ballot box: the economy tanked, which led Clinton strategist James Carville to craft This is an interesting look at the role gender bias plays in politics, business, and society in general. When Bill Clinton announced his run for the presidency in 1992, he was considered the longest of long-shots. He was a virtually unknown governor of a small Southern state, and it was thought he wouldn't have a chance against Bush senior after his victory in Kuwait. But a funny thing happened on the way to the ballot box: the economy tanked, which led Clinton strategist James Carville to craft the famous line: "It's the Economy, Stupid!" Clinton swept into office, but was immediately faced with a problem of his own making: during his campaign he had promised that more minorities and women would take part in his administration, and his transition team was scrambling to find qualified staff (Zoe Baird. his choice for attorney general, went down in flames over a nanny scandal). Which brings us to this book. Dee Dee Myers was Clinton's press secretary during his campaign, but when he was elected it was thought by some in his team that she wouldn't have the chops to deal with the scrum that is the White House press corps. So a compromise of sorts was reached: Myers would be named White House press secretary, but communications director George Stephanopoulos would initially handle the daily briefings until she got her feet wet. Myers thought about this for a while and kept wondering: was it because she was a woman (she was the first woman press secretary), or because she was so young ( at thirty-one, she was the second-youngest press secretary ever). Over time her thoughts grew into this book. Were women always treated differently than men in the same positions? Here's a sample of the writing: "I know that neither Bill Clinton nor other members of the transition team foresaw the problems they would create with my compromised appointment. Maybe they should have, but they didn't. It wasn't in the president's interest any more than it was in mine. But they were trying to solve a different set of problems: problems of campaign promises and political correctness. Clinton needed visible women. And he wanted credit for appointing women to important posts, including the first to serve as the president's press secretary. But when all was said and done, some of those women, including me, didn't have the tools we needed to be effective in our jobs. And that made for some very difficult days." Why Women Should Rule the World is a comprehensive look at how the role of women in society is slowly changing. A few years after she left the White House, Ms. Myers became a consultant on the Peabody Award-winning television series The West Wing, and was the inspiration for Allison Janney's Emmy award-winning role as White House press secretary C.J. Cregg.

  10. 5 out of 5

    Ayesha Soni

    This book was a very empowering story about Dede Myers who becomes the first woman to hold a position in the White House. It explores her challenges due to gender and shows the progress we've made in accepting women in politics. As someone who's always been intrigued by politics, I find this book to be powerful in conveying its overall message that women can in fact rule the world. Enjoyed it!

  11. 4 out of 5

    Joshua Lawson

    Although I agree with Dee Dee Myers’ premise in Why Women Should Rule the World, the book itself isn’t very engaging. Overall, it reads like a smattering of personal anecdotes with a few studies and historical examples thrown in for good measure. Three stars instead of two because I still think her message needs to be heard.

  12. 5 out of 5

    Karen

    A very interesting book. I recognized some of the things I did in my career that were simply because of how women look at things differently. But I'm retired now and that's all behind me.

  13. 5 out of 5

    Jamie

    I decided to read this book after seeing Ms. Myers speak here at the University a few weeks ago. Her talk was interesting, but rather vague, as many book tour talks seem to be. Much like her talk, I found the book to be a rather unorganized grouping of observations with the occasional *extremely brief* reference to research. I think the book really tries to accomplish too much, and as a result, feels directionless. The author tries to blend her own experiences as Press Secretary for President Cli I decided to read this book after seeing Ms. Myers speak here at the University a few weeks ago. Her talk was interesting, but rather vague, as many book tour talks seem to be. Much like her talk, I found the book to be a rather unorganized grouping of observations with the occasional *extremely brief* reference to research. I think the book really tries to accomplish too much, and as a result, feels directionless. The author tries to blend her own experiences as Press Secretary for President Clinton, and experiences of other powerful women, with extremely brief summaries (more like references, really) of research that supports the claims she makes--that women's strengths are underappreciated in today's workplace, basically. I think the structure of the book would have worked better if it had been more segregated, allowing her to fully develop each part, or alternatively she could have written two (or three) different books. It was frustrating to have the author continually pique your interest in her experience, only to switch over to one-paragraph summaries of other womens' experiences, punctuated by the occasional one-line reference to a researcher whose work supports what the women are saying. It would have been much more interesting to read all about Myers' experiences, or read all about other womens' experiences ,with substantially more depth, followed by a review of research. The references to research are ridiculous (to the point of being insulting to our intelligence) in their brevity. It would be like saying "Deborah Tannen says women and men communicate differently." Well, no kidding. These fly-by references weren't specific or detailed enough to substantially support any of Myers' points. And I felt like many of them were dumbed down to the point of uselessness. Still, I enjoyed what brief details she shared about her White House experience. Perhaps she is saving the real depth for another book? And I really enjoyed reading about other powerful women. I wanted to read more about them than one simple paragraph.

  14. 4 out of 5

    Lauren Wiseman

    "The bottom line is: The more women succeed, the more women succeed." That, in a nutshell, is Dee Dee Myers' book. As she tackles this provocative assertion--women should rule the world--all of her examples stop as soon as the woman is appointed, elected, or hired. Citing tremendous female politicians is fantastic, but if you fail to demonstrate how said women changed their nation, province, or city, you lose credibility. Ah, yes! Indira Gandhi...but we won't discuss her accomplishments. Yes, of c "The bottom line is: The more women succeed, the more women succeed." That, in a nutshell, is Dee Dee Myers' book. As she tackles this provocative assertion--women should rule the world--all of her examples stop as soon as the woman is appointed, elected, or hired. Citing tremendous female politicians is fantastic, but if you fail to demonstrate how said women changed their nation, province, or city, you lose credibility. Ah, yes! Indira Gandhi...but we won't discuss her accomplishments. Yes, of course, Margaret Thatcher...but I digress. How can we forget Hillary Clinton?...but it is only enough that she is who she is, not what she did in any of her offices. I am all for raising the status of women, and I am all for letting women accomplish what they want to accomplish in the name of feminism and what have you. But if you are going to propose a serious thesis--women should rule the world--support that thesis. And for the love of Victoria Woodhull, don't include the phrase, "And that's not to say..." We understand there are exceptions. We understand there are rule-breakers, but we don't need them addressed every other paragraph. To be honest, I didn't think I would like this book. I thought it would be kitschy, composed mostly of "Grrrrl!" arguments, but there were some good points Myers' made. However, her main argument was women should rule the world because some women have already. She did some great research into transformational leadership vs. transactional leadership, and her biological section was fantastic, but the ultimate payoff was lacking. Please, if you're going to praise the accomplishments of women, actually talk about those accomplishments. I wanted more than tales of women overcoming sexism just to end it after the election.

  15. 4 out of 5

    Katie Miller

    This was an interesting book for me to read because I definitely noticed that working in PR is probably sheltering me from what a lot of women go through in corporate America. The book addresses issues and obstacles that women have to overcome in male-dominated fields, however PR tends to be saturated with women, so I haven't had the same experience that many other women have. From our client, to vendors and my bosses, the majority of the people I work with are women. That being said, while PR t This was an interesting book for me to read because I definitely noticed that working in PR is probably sheltering me from what a lot of women go through in corporate America. The book addresses issues and obstacles that women have to overcome in male-dominated fields, however PR tends to be saturated with women, so I haven't had the same experience that many other women have. From our client, to vendors and my bosses, the majority of the people I work with are women. That being said, while PR tends to be mostly women, I recgonized that our field could potentially benefit from having more men. The book focused on how women could (and should) rule the world, and I agreed with the majority of Dee Dee's points. However, I think that for optimal success, companies should recruit both men and women, since both genders can bring a lot to the table. This book does a good job of pointing out what women can bring to the table and how we can "bring it" with confidence. The best lesson I learned from this book is that women need to get better at asking for what they want and proving why they deserve it!

  16. 4 out of 5

    Laura

    Like a train wreck, I could not look away. There is data indicating that professional women will make up to $500,000 or even a cool million less over the course of their lifetimes... NOT due to discrimination or maternity leave or any of the usual culprits, but because they are something like 6 times less likely to negotiate their starting salaries. Frequently due to [legitimate] fear of being viewed as a bitch for the same behavior that garners men reputations of astuteness and business savvy. Like a train wreck, I could not look away. There is data indicating that professional women will make up to $500,000 or even a cool million less over the course of their lifetimes... NOT due to discrimination or maternity leave or any of the usual culprits, but because they are something like 6 times less likely to negotiate their starting salaries. Frequently due to [legitimate] fear of being viewed as a bitch for the same behavior that garners men reputations of astuteness and business savvy. With raises typically being based on a percentage of current salary, the problem propagates throughout an entire career in a horrifying lesson on compound interest. The number of ways in which women who want a meaningful career are rather fundamentally screwed is saddening, and in my opinion not much mitigated by the fact that things are slowly improving. In the end, you can not have it all and I'm not sure I'll ever get over being a little jealous of dudes. I made my choices and I made them with fairly open eyes, but in the end I'll always wonder "what if?"

  17. 4 out of 5

    Stephanie

    OH. MY. GOD. Leon, how could you? This book affected my heretofore positive feelings about Leon Panetta, going back to the days when he was our congressional representative and he used my office in the Monterey County Library branch to meet with constituents. Everyone loved him, and I'll never forget how he dealt with a wonderful young woman who was supporting her family by working part-time at the library (at the age of 16). Wow, I loved him. And a couple of weeks after he was there, he saw me o OH. MY. GOD. Leon, how could you? This book affected my heretofore positive feelings about Leon Panetta, going back to the days when he was our congressional representative and he used my office in the Monterey County Library branch to meet with constituents. Everyone loved him, and I'll never forget how he dealt with a wonderful young woman who was supporting her family by working part-time at the library (at the age of 16). Wow, I loved him. And a couple of weeks after he was there, he saw me on the sidewalk in Moss Landing and said "Hello, Stephanie." And then he tells Dee Dee Myers she can't have a raise to make her salary equal to that of a man at the same level (with less respnsibility than she had)and a reason is because HE HAS A FAMILY????? WTF? I did, however, enjoy her musings on Hillary. The book comes across as honest and open and I love her, even if she has ruined my onesided relationship with Leon :)

  18. 4 out of 5

    Catherine

    Dee Dee's approach is similar to Malcolm Gladwell's, which I love. She finds all the things written on the subject, pulls it together and makes it a coherent whole. The basic conclusion is that the world would be a better place if women would allow themselves to be in more positions of authority, and we hurt ourselves by being self-effacing. When women are in positions of power, we improve profitability in corporations, the health of countries in government, and the status and happiness of our e Dee Dee's approach is similar to Malcolm Gladwell's, which I love. She finds all the things written on the subject, pulls it together and makes it a coherent whole. The basic conclusion is that the world would be a better place if women would allow themselves to be in more positions of authority, and we hurt ourselves by being self-effacing. When women are in positions of power, we improve profitability in corporations, the health of countries in government, and the status and happiness of our employees in our own businesses. I have to admit, it made me realize that always staying in the background isn't very responsible. Its important to be a role model that gives young women permission to be self-confident, to take credit for work and experience accomplishments, to be ourselves. The differences between men and women are real, documented, researched, and we should be proud of who we really are.

  19. 5 out of 5

    Amber

    This book was not good as I had hoped. While I really liked the snippets about her experience in the White House and her writing on other notable female political figures I was bored with much of the rest. Women should rule the world because we are different then men. Because biologically men are more aggressive and we are better equipped to read emotion and are really drawn towards cooperation so women can bring things to the table that men have not been capable of before... I've always been mo This book was not good as I had hoped. While I really liked the snippets about her experience in the White House and her writing on other notable female political figures I was bored with much of the rest. Women should rule the world because we are different then men. Because biologically men are more aggressive and we are better equipped to read emotion and are really drawn towards cooperation so women can bring things to the table that men have not been capable of before... I've always been more of a nurture gal myself so I don't buy most of that. Even if women ARE better at cooperation then men and even if it IS because of our biology why is that an excuse for men to get away without cooperating and women to be forced to always have to get along with others? I was hoping for something more and didn't get it. BUT if she wrote something her career working campaigns and her years as press secretary I'd read it up!

  20. 5 out of 5

    Morgan

    "Why Women Should Rule the World" is a part memoir, part social science treatise by the first female White House Press Secretary, Dee Dee Myers, who served under President Clinton and later became a pundit and a consultant for one of my favorite TV shows, "The West Wing." I enjoyed the book, which is a very quick read, but I wish she had left the research on women "ruling the world" to the experts (see my review on Anne Kornblut's "Notes from the Cracked Ceiling") and dedicated more real estate "Why Women Should Rule the World" is a part memoir, part social science treatise by the first female White House Press Secretary, Dee Dee Myers, who served under President Clinton and later became a pundit and a consultant for one of my favorite TV shows, "The West Wing." I enjoyed the book, which is a very quick read, but I wish she had left the research on women "ruling the world" to the experts (see my review on Anne Kornblut's "Notes from the Cracked Ceiling") and dedicated more real estate to her White House role, how it compared to what we saw through C.J. Cregg, her alter ego on the show, and her experience as the first woman in that role. I suppose that is pundit's prerogative--when you're in a position like hers, you've built up the cred to get paid to say and write what you want--but it seemed a wasted opportunity not to hear more about an experience and perspective as unique and interesting as hers.

  21. 4 out of 5

    Marjanne

    The title of this book is a bit of a misnomer. The author isn't really advocating only having women rule (and therefore no men), but that women have more power, position, and influence in our government and business. She talked a lot about the historical reasons why women have less power, the reasons why women need more power, and how we can achieve that. A lot of the book discussed the author's experiences being the press secretary at the White House in the early 1990's. I do agree with the aut The title of this book is a bit of a misnomer. The author isn't really advocating only having women rule (and therefore no men), but that women have more power, position, and influence in our government and business. She talked a lot about the historical reasons why women have less power, the reasons why women need more power, and how we can achieve that. A lot of the book discussed the author's experiences being the press secretary at the White House in the early 1990's. I do agree with the author that women need to have more power in this country. While I don't really support Hilary, I do think it's about time that a woman were in the office of president, as well as, a larger female representation in congress (both nationally and statewide). Anyone want to start a new political party with me?

  22. 4 out of 5

    PaddedPaws

    The title of this book might make you think that it is going to be a misandrist view on the superiority of women, but that's not what it's about at all. The author talks about her personal experience as a minority gender in her field of work. She describes the differences between male styles of communication and female styles, and she makes an excellent case for the importance of balance. Stories like these are important to read. A lot of women these days believe in their ability to have any job The title of this book might make you think that it is going to be a misandrist view on the superiority of women, but that's not what it's about at all. The author talks about her personal experience as a minority gender in her field of work. She describes the differences between male styles of communication and female styles, and she makes an excellent case for the importance of balance. Stories like these are important to read. A lot of women these days believe in their ability to have any job they want. (And good for them!) I think it is also important to acknowledge the challenges that some women will face when first entering an all male culture. Men are not bad. They're not the enemy. But, on average, men and women do have differences. Having an awareness of these differences - and of how people will react to those differences - can make life easier.

  23. 4 out of 5

    Alisa

    This book was better than I expected or at least more scholarly. I thought it would be a light hearted view of the issue of women in the workplace but it was much more insightful and well researched. The author used experiences from her time in public service and incorporated those of other women as well. She drew on studies and other evidence of the impact of gender differences in a variety of settings to highlight her point that with more diversity among those in power the world could be a bet This book was better than I expected or at least more scholarly. I thought it would be a light hearted view of the issue of women in the workplace but it was much more insightful and well researched. The author used experiences from her time in public service and incorporated those of other women as well. She drew on studies and other evidence of the impact of gender differences in a variety of settings to highlight her point that with more diversity among those in power the world could be a better place and one that takes into account a variety of perspectives. The title might suggest a thesis that women alone should rule the world. That is not her view, but it is no question that things would be different. And Leon Panetta, hmm, I expected a little more out of him but oh well. Better than 3 star not quite 4 star but very good.

  24. 5 out of 5

    Amy

    Don't be put off by the title; however, some may look askance at you when you carry a copy to your kid's gymnastics lesson! Even my 5-year-old, who is learning to read, asked me to answer the title's question. Very helpful for me to hear her experiences and the stories of some of her mentors. I understand better what women can bring to leadership when we aren't trying to do it like a man and when we stop downplaying our abilities. What I keep thinking about from this book is the distinction betwe Don't be put off by the title; however, some may look askance at you when you carry a copy to your kid's gymnastics lesson! Even my 5-year-old, who is learning to read, asked me to answer the title's question. Very helpful for me to hear her experiences and the stories of some of her mentors. I understand better what women can bring to leadership when we aren't trying to do it like a man and when we stop downplaying our abilities. What I keep thinking about from this book is the distinction between responsibility and authority in a woman's job. She refers to Hillary Clinton's presidential campaign and, while not endorsing her, the author makes me even more disappointed that it looks like she will not be the Democratic candidate.

  25. 4 out of 5

    Kirsten

    I really enjoyed this book. Even though the title would make you think it is going to be a big "bash men" kind of book, it does not do that at all. Rather, it discusses the strengths that women can bring to leadership positions, the differences from men that women have that would bring a new perspective and new methods of doing things that would be a benefit to everyone. It also shows the struggle women face to get into these positions of power, because of past and present societal expectations I really enjoyed this book. Even though the title would make you think it is going to be a big "bash men" kind of book, it does not do that at all. Rather, it discusses the strengths that women can bring to leadership positions, the differences from men that women have that would bring a new perspective and new methods of doing things that would be a benefit to everyone. It also shows the struggle women face to get into these positions of power, because of past and present societal expectations of how a woman should be. It was very exciting to read a book that was so positive about women and their abilities and how we are starting to, and someday will, rule the world with our fellow man.

  26. 5 out of 5

    ErinK

    A good starter book on the demonstrable differences between women and men in how they think, approach problems, and work with others. The tone is conversational and it's relatively engaging. However, Myers doesn't use footnotes to back up her arguments and anecdotes with facts. Apparently there are notes, but you have to look them up by page number. So I didn't notice until I was writing this review. It's not neutral, as you might expect from the title. I'll try to say more after I finish reading A good starter book on the demonstrable differences between women and men in how they think, approach problems, and work with others. The tone is conversational and it's relatively engaging. However, Myers doesn't use footnotes to back up her arguments and anecdotes with facts. Apparently there are notes, but you have to look them up by page number. So I didn't notice until I was writing this review. It's not neutral, as you might expect from the title. I'll try to say more after I finish reading; I bogged down about half way (not unusual for me). It's not new territory for me; for a more scientific examination of similar topics (and without the political angle) I recommend Brain Sex by Dr. Anne Moir and David Jessel.

  27. 4 out of 5

    Sarah

    I liked the information presented in this book and how it made me more aware of how far women have come, but how far we still have to go to have our voices heard. I always knew that women struggled to be move beyond the glass ceiling and yet when she shared information on who the ceo's are in companies such as revlon, p&g, and other companies, I found myself thinking "wow those are female dominated industries with men calling the shots...seems contradictory and ironic" What would it look like if I liked the information presented in this book and how it made me more aware of how far women have come, but how far we still have to go to have our voices heard. I always knew that women struggled to be move beyond the glass ceiling and yet when she shared information on who the ceo's are in companies such as revlon, p&g, and other companies, I found myself thinking "wow those are female dominated industries with men calling the shots...seems contradictory and ironic" What would it look like if women were in charge of those or if we had a stronger voice and supported one another's efforts. Women have so much to offer companies, politics, universities and given the opportunity we can balance the masculine perspective and open the doors to a new way of viewing the world.

  28. 4 out of 5

    Holly Noel

    Truthfully I wanted to read this book because I had heard that they had based C.J. Cregg's (The West Wing) on Dee Dee Myers. I actually enjoyed the book a lot more than I thought I would have. An excellent book that integrated a lot of other books and research on the topic into one book. While I will admit that there were some parts that were really boring to read, overall I did enjoy the book. Myers explains her time in the West Wing and how difficult it was to be a press secretary who did not Truthfully I wanted to read this book because I had heard that they had based C.J. Cregg's (The West Wing) on Dee Dee Myers. I actually enjoyed the book a lot more than I thought I would have. An excellent book that integrated a lot of other books and research on the topic into one book. While I will admit that there were some parts that were really boring to read, overall I did enjoy the book. Myers explains her time in the West Wing and how difficult it was to be a press secretary who did not have all the tools she needed for her job because she was a woman. She went on to explain how woman and men are different whether young or old. And to giving the reader other women's work experience in a male-dominated field. An enjoyable read that I would recommend to any woman and even a man!

  29. 5 out of 5

    Chris Antenen

    Because I admired DeeDee Myers when she was press secretary for President Clinton, I wanted to read the book she had just written and published. This is a well-researched and thoughtful book about women's roles in today's world. It is not limited to women in the political world, nor is it a tell-all book about the administration she served. She is matter-of-fact about her perspective towards that administration, and seems to have honest insight into her achievements and disappointments as the fi Because I admired DeeDee Myers when she was press secretary for President Clinton, I wanted to read the book she had just written and published. This is a well-researched and thoughtful book about women's roles in today's world. It is not limited to women in the political world, nor is it a tell-all book about the administration she served. She is matter-of-fact about her perspective towards that administration, and seems to have honest insight into her achievements and disappointments as the first woman in that role in any administration. I found it to be a positive book about the accomplishments and possibilities for women today and highly recommend it.

  30. 5 out of 5

    Rebecca

    I enjoyed reading about Myers' work in political campaigns and as President Clinton's press secretary. She is a very smart, creative and assertive person; and I think it's cool how she has managed to combine work and family in her life. The agree with the whole "sequencing" thing and was inspired by the many different stories and quotations from successful women. She also includes some pretty interesting studies of the differences in the ways of men's and women's leadership and styles of communi I enjoyed reading about Myers' work in political campaigns and as President Clinton's press secretary. She is a very smart, creative and assertive person; and I think it's cool how she has managed to combine work and family in her life. The agree with the whole "sequencing" thing and was inspired by the many different stories and quotations from successful women. She also includes some pretty interesting studies of the differences in the ways of men's and women's leadership and styles of communication (and brains!)--the whole nature/nurture debate. I liked the book, and I have new respect for Sen. Kay Bailey Hutchison!

Add a review

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Loading...
We use cookies to give you the best online experience. By using our website you agree to our use of cookies in accordance with our cookie policy.