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A celebration of a legendary Finnish author, with several novels, stories, and appreciations. For readers of Ursula K. Le Guin, Milan Kundera, Virginia Woolf, Tove Jansson, and Italo Calvino. Over 800 pages covering Leena Krohn's entire career. “One of the most important books published in the U.S. this year. [Leena Krohn’s Collected Fiction] is as important a publishing A celebration of a legendary Finnish author, with several novels, stories, and appreciations. For readers of Ursula K. Le Guin, Milan Kundera, Virginia Woolf, Tove Jansson, and Italo Calvino. Over 800 pages covering Leena Krohn's entire career. “One of the most important books published in the U.S. this year. [Leena Krohn’s Collected Fiction] is as important a publishing event in its own way as New Directions’ release... of Clarice Lispector’s Complete Stories.” - The Mumpsimus “An extraordinary writer who deserves to be better known to readers in English—which, thanks to this excellent collection, is now possible. Reminiscent of Calvino, Borges, and Lem.” - STARRED REVIEW, Kirkus Translations by: Eva Buckwald, Bethany Fox, Hildi Hawkins, Anselm Hollo, Vivii Hyvönen, Leena Likitalo, Herbert Lomas, J. Robert Tupasela, and Anna Volmari. Nonfiction by Minna Jerrman, Desirina Boskovich, Matthew Cheney. From cities of giant insects to a mysterious woman claiming to be the female Don Quixote, Leena Krohn’s fiction has fascinated and intrigued readers for over forty years. Within these covers you will discover a pelican that can talk and a city of gold. You will find yourself exploring a future of intelligence both artificial and biotech, along with a mysterious plant that induces strange visions. Krohn writes eloquently, passionately, about the nature of reality, the nature of Nature, and what it means to be human. One of Finland’s most iconic writers, translated into many languages, and winner of the prestigious Finlandia Prize, Krohn has had an incredibly distinguished career. Collected Fiction provides readers with a rich, thick omnibus of the best of her work. This collection includes several previously unpublished English translations, foremost among them the novels Pereat Mundus and The Pelican's New Clothes. Other novels included are: Tainaron, Dona Quixote, Ophir City of Gold, and Datura.


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A celebration of a legendary Finnish author, with several novels, stories, and appreciations. For readers of Ursula K. Le Guin, Milan Kundera, Virginia Woolf, Tove Jansson, and Italo Calvino. Over 800 pages covering Leena Krohn's entire career. “One of the most important books published in the U.S. this year. [Leena Krohn’s Collected Fiction] is as important a publishing A celebration of a legendary Finnish author, with several novels, stories, and appreciations. For readers of Ursula K. Le Guin, Milan Kundera, Virginia Woolf, Tove Jansson, and Italo Calvino. Over 800 pages covering Leena Krohn's entire career. “One of the most important books published in the U.S. this year. [Leena Krohn’s Collected Fiction] is as important a publishing event in its own way as New Directions’ release... of Clarice Lispector’s Complete Stories.” - The Mumpsimus “An extraordinary writer who deserves to be better known to readers in English—which, thanks to this excellent collection, is now possible. Reminiscent of Calvino, Borges, and Lem.” - STARRED REVIEW, Kirkus Translations by: Eva Buckwald, Bethany Fox, Hildi Hawkins, Anselm Hollo, Vivii Hyvönen, Leena Likitalo, Herbert Lomas, J. Robert Tupasela, and Anna Volmari. Nonfiction by Minna Jerrman, Desirina Boskovich, Matthew Cheney. From cities of giant insects to a mysterious woman claiming to be the female Don Quixote, Leena Krohn’s fiction has fascinated and intrigued readers for over forty years. Within these covers you will discover a pelican that can talk and a city of gold. You will find yourself exploring a future of intelligence both artificial and biotech, along with a mysterious plant that induces strange visions. Krohn writes eloquently, passionately, about the nature of reality, the nature of Nature, and what it means to be human. One of Finland’s most iconic writers, translated into many languages, and winner of the prestigious Finlandia Prize, Krohn has had an incredibly distinguished career. Collected Fiction provides readers with a rich, thick omnibus of the best of her work. This collection includes several previously unpublished English translations, foremost among them the novels Pereat Mundus and The Pelican's New Clothes. Other novels included are: Tainaron, Dona Quixote, Ophir City of Gold, and Datura.

30 review for Leena Krohn: Collected Fiction

  1. 4 out of 5

    Tom Lichtenberg

    If it were possible for a writer to be a major influence in your life in reverse chronological order, then I would say without a doubt that Leena Krohn is now one of my major influences, though I never heard of or read her before this past week. I think she would be 0kay with the concept. Her writing is a bright piece of a puzzle that's been forming in my mind like a personal mandala over a period of decades, sitting alongside the Stanislaw Lem of Memoirs Found in a Bathtub, the Italo Calvino of If it were possible for a writer to be a major influence in your life in reverse chronological order, then I would say without a doubt that Leena Krohn is now one of my major influences, though I never heard of or read her before this past week. I think she would be 0kay with the concept. Her writing is a bright piece of a puzzle that's been forming in my mind like a personal mandala over a period of decades, sitting alongside the Stanislaw Lem of Memoirs Found in a Bathtub, the Italo Calvino of Cosmicomics, the Macedonio Fernandez of The Novel of Eterna, the Cesar Aira of How I Became a Nun, the Julio Cortazar of Cronopios and Famas,and on down the line of the great absurdist/existentialist/philosophical/sci-fi-ish/masterful fiction writers that have every now and then burst upon my imaginary world and dazzled it with all-new impeccable fireworks. All of them I feel would be comfortable inside each others' pages. The Collection Fiction is packed full of treasures, novels and stories all in small byte-size pieces that add up to a polynomial of their wordcount. You could easily mistake it for one work altogether written over many years that's sole intent is to open a window into a fascinating soul. A book is like a mirror, Georg Christoph once said, but some books are more translucent than others, and allow a depth perception in more dimensions than the visible. In 'Hakan and the x-creatures', one of my favorite bits, Krohn describes how creatures in higher-dimensional spaces (say five, seven or even thirty-five dimensions) can know everything about those in the lower orders, but we lower ones can not even imagine them, yet they are certainly there, always present, never perceived. Throughout this particular novel (Pereat Mundis) an online advice counselor interacts with a man suffering from "eschatophobia" - the fear of the end of the world. The client's communications are full of the possible end-time scenarios, while the counselor responds with trite advice about attending to one's love life or perhaps volunteering in some do-gooder organization. They talk right past each other and neither takes notice of the other. It's as infuriating and hilarious as any online comments section. I'm especially enjoying how she uses the same character (Hakan) for multiple characters - now he's a hybrid human/chimp/wolf/goat, now he's suffering from rapid aging syndrome, now he's the eschatophobic client, now he's a customer service rep for a cryogenics company - and why not? All the Hakans are wonderful! These stories, along with their inventive playfulness and serious insights, are also beautifully written, charming and disarming. They make me happy and at the same time make me wish 'if only I could do something like this', wouldn't that be great?

  2. 4 out of 5

    Shasta8sisyphus

    Actually I'm just 30 something pages in, but I am in love!

  3. 5 out of 5

    Uttiya Roy

    Perhaps the greatest fantasy/science fiction collection that I have read in a long long time

  4. 5 out of 5

    Theresa

    I picked up this book because the author, Leena Krohn, was cited in another book I was reading about science fiction, who was someone whose work was in collage form, who write individual pieces that together formed a novel or narrative. I really enjoyed seeing the semi-experimental form her work takes, although it was slightly more non-understandable to me than I like. Which means, I admire her work, and it helped me think more about my own writing and how I'll want to structure my writing bette I picked up this book because the author, Leena Krohn, was cited in another book I was reading about science fiction, who was someone whose work was in collage form, who write individual pieces that together formed a novel or narrative. I really enjoyed seeing the semi-experimental form her work takes, although it was slightly more non-understandable to me than I like. Which means, I admire her work, and it helped me think more about my own writing and how I'll want to structure my writing better. I would prefer a bit more clues to the reader about what's going on than Krohn does. For instance, her novel Doña Quixote and Other Citizens was composed of a number of short narrative scenes and reflections, mostly disjoint-seeming from one another. In a very relevant review of a different book by Krohn, Peter Berbergal wrote in The New Yorker: Plot is hard to come by. Instead, Krohn offers up the narrated inner lives of characters trying to make sense of their environments, and of the other people whom they encounter. It was enlightening to see this approach, and to think about what I could borrow from Krohn's structure. The book I saw her work in was Jeff and Ann Vandermeer's Jeff and Ann Vandermeer's The Big Book of Science Fiction. By the way, pick up a copy of the Vandermeers' collection of science fiction if you want a wide-ranging anthology of international and significant SF; their history and context of an author's work beside each story is worth it alone!

  5. 5 out of 5

    Amy

    This book compiles the work of a Finnish author that I was unfamiliar with, but who gets compared to Calvino, LeGuin, Woolf, Kundera, etc., so naturally I was intrigued. Not all of Krohn's novellas/stories were engaging to me, but some of the more sci-fi leaning works were very interesting. I also liked the story about a pelican who puts on clothes and passes as a human, except that kids recognize him to be a bird. I could not predict where these stories where going to end up, and would not gues This book compiles the work of a Finnish author that I was unfamiliar with, but who gets compared to Calvino, LeGuin, Woolf, Kundera, etc., so naturally I was intrigued. Not all of Krohn's novellas/stories were engaging to me, but some of the more sci-fi leaning works were very interesting. I also liked the story about a pelican who puts on clothes and passes as a human, except that kids recognize him to be a bird. I could not predict where these stories where going to end up, and would not guess all of these works to come from the same mind.

  6. 4 out of 5

    Nabil

    I've finished reading Tainaron, my first novella in this hefty collection. I compare her favourably to the weirdness of Borges and the floating, dreaminess of Dunsany. In this novella she has much to say about communication, about the other, about foreignness, and about how we are transformed by others.

  7. 5 out of 5

    Terry Pearce

    These didn't go anywhere enough for me. The prose was also not as amazing as I'd been led to believe, in my opinion. I love Calvino and others this work has been compared to, but this seemed less worthwhile.

  8. 4 out of 5

    Tom Williams

    I didn't read the novel excerpts at the end of the book, but everything up to that point was phenomenal. Pereat Mundus was exceptional, and the other mosaic novels were pure poetry. Fantastic.

  9. 5 out of 5

    Erik Wirfs-Brock

    Rolling update since this is an omnibus of multiple novels- Dona Quixote- **/unfinished Tainaron. Mail from another City **** Datura *** 1/2 Pereat Mundus: a Novel of Sorts. **** The Pelican's New Clothes *** 1/2 Gold of Ophir ** 1/2 Individual ratings might be a little superfluous since this is definitely a writer who seems to write the same book over and over. Every book is basically brief musings about a weird phenomenon or an aspect of life. A wise author, definitely worth reading.

  10. 4 out of 5

    William Walsh

    This is a surrealist series of stories that are loosely interconnected. The writing (even in translation) is gorgeous, and Ms. Krohn brings a subtle feminist rethinking to the world. There is a bit of work in getting through this book, so don't pick it up for the beach this summer or for the cabin in the winter - but read it for yourself when you have time.

  11. 4 out of 5

    Gareth

    Giving up on this. I made it through the first two novels in the collection, but the choppy, episodic nature didn't do it for me. The main characters in each didn't really seem to "do" anything, things just seemed to happen - no agency or desire. I suspect I am too stupid to work out what's really going on, to get what I am missing.

  12. 4 out of 5

    Gretel

    One of the best things I have ever read.

  13. 5 out of 5

    Drew

    review TK next week

  14. 5 out of 5

    Sten Listra

  15. 4 out of 5

    Holly Iossa

  16. 5 out of 5

    Martin Hadis

  17. 4 out of 5

    Vivienne

  18. 4 out of 5

    JWhitelaw

  19. 4 out of 5

    Clev Erson

  20. 4 out of 5

    Phil

  21. 5 out of 5

    Simon Maxwell-Stewart

  22. 4 out of 5

    Jake Stone

  23. 4 out of 5

    Ted Laderas

  24. 4 out of 5

    Richard Treat

  25. 5 out of 5

    Scullyreads

  26. 4 out of 5

    Ed

  27. 4 out of 5

    Dustin

  28. 4 out of 5

    Meghan

  29. 5 out of 5

    Richard Keys

  30. 4 out of 5

    Demi

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