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Bad Girls Throughout History: 100 Remarkable Women Who Changed the World (Women in History Book, Book of Women Who Changed the World)

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Aphra Behn, first female professional writer. Sojourner Truth, activist and abolitionist. Ada Lovelace, first computer programmer. Marie Curie, first woman to win the Nobel Prize. Joan Jett, godmother of punk. The 100 revolutionary women highlighted in this gorgeously illustrated book were bad in the best sense of the word: they challenged the status quo and changed the ru Aphra Behn, first female professional writer. Sojourner Truth, activist and abolitionist. Ada Lovelace, first computer programmer. Marie Curie, first woman to win the Nobel Prize. Joan Jett, godmother of punk. The 100 revolutionary women highlighted in this gorgeously illustrated book were bad in the best sense of the word: they challenged the status quo and changed the rules for all who followed. From pirates to artists, warriors, daredevils, scientists, activists, and spies, the accomplishments of these incredible women vary as much as the eras and places in which they effected change. Featuring bold watercolor portraits and illuminating essays by Ann Shen, Bad Girls Throughout History is a distinctive, gift-worthy tribute.


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Aphra Behn, first female professional writer. Sojourner Truth, activist and abolitionist. Ada Lovelace, first computer programmer. Marie Curie, first woman to win the Nobel Prize. Joan Jett, godmother of punk. The 100 revolutionary women highlighted in this gorgeously illustrated book were bad in the best sense of the word: they challenged the status quo and changed the ru Aphra Behn, first female professional writer. Sojourner Truth, activist and abolitionist. Ada Lovelace, first computer programmer. Marie Curie, first woman to win the Nobel Prize. Joan Jett, godmother of punk. The 100 revolutionary women highlighted in this gorgeously illustrated book were bad in the best sense of the word: they challenged the status quo and changed the rules for all who followed. From pirates to artists, warriors, daredevils, scientists, activists, and spies, the accomplishments of these incredible women vary as much as the eras and places in which they effected change. Featuring bold watercolor portraits and illuminating essays by Ann Shen, Bad Girls Throughout History is a distinctive, gift-worthy tribute.

30 review for Bad Girls Throughout History: 100 Remarkable Women Who Changed the World (Women in History Book, Book of Women Who Changed the World)

  1. 5 out of 5

    Nat

    “Everything we’ve gained has been hard-won by a woman who was willing to be bad in the best sense of the word.” This book is a noteworthy collection about 100 remarkable women who changed the world, featuring spectacular watercolours illustrations for each and everyone. I did go in a bit hesitant since I've tried my hand at similar collections to this one, such as Rejected Princesses by Jason Porath, but they untimely failed in capturing my interest because of the length of the essays that read l “Everything we’ve gained has been hard-won by a woman who was willing to be bad in the best sense of the word.” This book is a noteworthy collection about 100 remarkable women who changed the world, featuring spectacular watercolours illustrations for each and everyone. I did go in a bit hesitant since I've tried my hand at similar collections to this one, such as Rejected Princesses by Jason Porath, but they untimely failed in capturing my interest because of the length of the essays that read like Wikipedia entries i.e. with little to no life sparkled throughout. Thankfully, though, that was not the case with Bad Girls Throughout History. This was exactly the kind of book I’ve been looking for: short and concise essays on each historical figure, along with splendidly eye-catching illustrations. Presenting a broad world of women coming from all eras, countries, backgrounds, races, and ethnicities, this collection left me wanting to educate myself more and more on these spectacular women. Like the author said best, “The short essays are meant to whet your appetite for exploring more on your own.” Plus, I not only got enlightened on so many topics, but I had a lot of fun while doing so--which isn't really a common feeling for me with these kind of collections. Needless to say, Bad Girls Throughout History captured a piece of my heart. So I'd like to share next some of the badass ladies I loved to love: Billie Holiday (1915–1959): Edith Head (1897–1981): Anna May Wong (1905–1961): Coretta Scott King (1927–2006): Maya Angelou (1928–2014): Ruth Bader Ginsburg (1933–):  Dolly Parton (1946–):  Oprah Winfrey (1954–): Josephine Baker (1906–1975): Baker's life from showgirl, activist, and spy to mother of twelve adopted children left my head spinning in amazement. And my heart swelling with gratitude. Malala Yousafzai (1997–):  To conclude: If you're looking for a cohesive, impactful, and quick read about powerful women whose actions have “been both persecuted and celebrated,” I'd wholeheartedly recommend you give this collection a go. Note: I'm an Amazon Affiliate. If you're interested in buying Bad Girls Throughout History, just click on the image below to go through my link. I'll make a small commission! Support creators you love. Buy a Coffee for nat (bookspoils) with Ko-fi.com/bookspoils

  2. 5 out of 5

    Lindsay

    Readable? Yes. Ground-breaking? No. The title should really read something more like, Bad Girls Throughout History Mostly Since the 19th Century and Who Are Mostly White, and More Frequently American or Western European. I liked the concept, but I found some of the information a little off. And as my alternate title suggests, this is by no means even close to a comprehensive or inclusive collective biography. About 80% of it covers the last 200-ish years. And at first glance, Shen's artistic style Readable? Yes. Ground-breaking? No. The title should really read something more like, Bad Girls Throughout History Mostly Since the 19th Century and Who Are Mostly White, and More Frequently American or Western European. I liked the concept, but I found some of the information a little off. And as my alternate title suggests, this is by no means even close to a comprehensive or inclusive collective biography. About 80% of it covers the last 200-ish years. And at first glance, Shen's artistic style is pleasing in that twee sort of way, but as the book progressed and I was seeing illustrations of women whose portraits I already knew, I found the style grating. Are we really helped by depicting strong women in a twee sort of way? Are women with harder brows, regular ol' eyelashes, or rounder faces more respectable if we lighten them up a bit? I'm also reading this coming off the same weekend where I read Rad Women Worldwide: Artists and Athletes, Pirates and Punks, and Other Revolutionaries Who Shaped History, which I think does a better job at what this book aims to do.

  3. 4 out of 5

    Marta :}

    Nothing makes me happier than seeing more and more feminist books being released, books that have the purpose of educating ladies about our legacy, about the fact that we can too. I loved this book because it was powerful, I had these 100 indeed remarkable ladies who did great stuff, some of these women I've already known of, others were unknown to me. The illustrations were very beautiful and added a lot to this book. Why I gave it 3 stars considering all this praise? Because it's very short an Nothing makes me happier than seeing more and more feminist books being released, books that have the purpose of educating ladies about our legacy, about the fact that we can too. I loved this book because it was powerful, I had these 100 indeed remarkable ladies who did great stuff, some of these women I've already known of, others were unknown to me. The illustrations were very beautiful and added a lot to this book. Why I gave it 3 stars considering all this praise? Because it's very short and the book tries to cover a lot in a small length, which makes the author only give brief summaries of the ladies' lives. In conclusion, I wanted more, but I'll make sure to do my own research and find out more about these women.

  4. 5 out of 5

    Maja (The Nocturnal Library)

    Bad Girls Throughout History: 100 Remarkable Women Who Changed the World is an absolute must-have in every home library, and not just those owned by girls. It’s an essential read that helps bring to light the incredible impact women have on humanity as a whole, as well as the innate strength and capacity for greatness each woman possesses. Ann Shen is the writer and illustrator behind this interesting book. Each of the one hundred short articles is accompanied by watercolor illustrations, and ea Bad Girls Throughout History: 100 Remarkable Women Who Changed the World is an absolute must-have in every home library, and not just those owned by girls. It’s an essential read that helps bring to light the incredible impact women have on humanity as a whole, as well as the innate strength and capacity for greatness each woman possesses. Ann Shen is the writer and illustrator behind this interesting book. Each of the one hundred short articles is accompanied by watercolor illustrations, and each illustration by a brief, handwritten comment or quote. You can see some of them on the cover, but the true magic happens within. Each watercolor portrait is designed to emphasize the strengths of these women and each includes a small detail that helps us understand how they lived their lives. From Lilith and Cleopatra to Oprah and Malala, the book features 100 truly extraordinary women. Some of them are already familiar, and some, like the surrealist fashion designer Elsa Schiaparelli, perhaps a bit less so. Each of these stories is worth reading, each of the women worth knowing about. The selection is, perhaps, a bit America-oriented, but each of the chosen women undeniably deserves to be included. I would only object to the absence of Ellen DeGeneres, when women like Nora Ephron, Oprah or Tina Fey were already included. Ellen has done so much for lesbians and LGBT community as a whole and her courage, as well as all it had cost her, earned her a place among these amazing individuals. The book came with something called the Feminist Journal, a fabulous memo book (or well, a journal) filled with inspiring quotes about what it means to be a feminist, all from famous and extraordinary women. The book and the journal aren’t only things you yourself must have, it also makes an excellent gift for mothers, sisters and friends.

  5. 4 out of 5

    Liz Janet

    Ann Shen gives us a list of some of the most well-known women for the contributions they made to humanity, from their work on abolitionism to improvement in medicine, to ruling whole countries, to their advancement of the arts. Small snippets describing their lives accompanied by beautiful drawings of the characters, sort of a Rejected Princesses for those with no internet. The book is quite simplistic in its description, barely giving us any detailed information, which may be useful for people t Ann Shen gives us a list of some of the most well-known women for the contributions they made to humanity, from their work on abolitionism to improvement in medicine, to ruling whole countries, to their advancement of the arts. Small snippets describing their lives accompanied by beautiful drawings of the characters, sort of a Rejected Princesses for those with no internet. The book is quite simplistic in its description, barely giving us any detailed information, which may be useful for people that have not heard of these people before. As someone that reads a lot of history books and sees many documentaries, most of what was narrated were things already known, so it seemed like repetition rather than anything new and innovative. But, to those that do not know of these women, and would love to get a small introduction to see if they are interested in learning more, it seems like a perfect option. The art was quite beautiful. Shen used watercolours to draw each woman individually, having their hair and skin tone match their clothes in a beautiful manner. There were some instances where the appearance of some women was slightly odd, mostly in shading, but it was barely noticeable. The art looked like something I might want to post on my wall to give me inspiration. (Malala, Cleopatra, Ada Lovelace, Amelia Earhart, Joan of Arc) Some of my favourite people shown in the book: Cleopatra, the last pharaoh of Egypt (her son doesn't really count) whose intelligence knew no bounds; Boudica, who fought against the Romans that raped her daughters and tried to take over her people's land; Empress Wu Zetian, who led Chinese expansion and increase in education; Khutulun, who fought men that wanted to marry her and was her father's most trusted adviser and a brilliant soldier in her own right; Nellie Bly, who launched what came to be as "investigative journalism"; Joan of Arc, who fought for the French in the name of God during the Hundred Years' War; Queen Elizabeth I, who led one of the greatest victories of England; Catherine The Great, who led to improvement and expansion of all the Russias; Jane Austen, one of the greatest writers of all time; Ada Lovelace, the first programmer; Marie Currie, the first woman to win the Nobel Prize; Hedy Lamarr, whose fantastic work led to Wi-Fi; Malala Yousafzai, who stood up for education rights for everyone and was shot by the Taliban, and then continued her work after her recovery; Tomyris, who fought against Cyrus the Great and might have been the one to kill him; Ching Shih, the only pirate known to retire; Ruth Bader Ginsberg, who has advocated for women's rights and who sits on the Supreme Court. I did have some issues over who was in the book and who wasn't. Not only where there some women who were quite controversial (and yes, some I like too), from abusing power to keep their rule or that of the governing class, to advocating for certain people's rights and stepping over others, but many women were ignored over these counterparts. Now, I know the list was subjective and that there are differing opinions, however, I cannot simply let it slide that people like Tina Fey were added, while other women simply seemed the better choice. Women like Michelle Obama, Beyonce, Sonia Gandhi, Yoani Sanchez, Aung San Suu Kyi, Lisa Randall, and even Amy Poehler. All of which seem more influential than Fey. Yes, she has done great things for the advancement of women and will continue to lead us towards betterment, but it seemed out of place these other women were passed over, particularly when the book is mostly centered on the West. Some of my favourite not included: Hatshepsut, Nefertiti, Shajar al-Durr, Queen Seondeok of Silla, Margrethe I, Æthelflæd of Mercia, Eleanor of Aquitaine, Catherine de Medici, Mary Wollstonecraft, Anne Frank, Benazir Bhutto J.K. Rowling, Ellen Johnson Sirleaf, Sirimavo Bandaranaike, and many, many, more. I encourage you to look into all of the ones in the book and the ones I've mentioned below, and any others that Goggle can take you to. History can be interesting if you know where to look, hopefully, this book will guide you there.

  6. 5 out of 5

    Shreya

    If you will read none of my other reviews, I beg you to read the entirety of this one. Read, comment, share, like, whatever. Just see this and take a moment to think about it. Thank you. This book, while important in our world today, still leaves a lot to be desired. "Throughout History" should mean featuring women from all parts of the world and all walks of life, yet the overwhelming majority of the women featured here were white. European and American women dominated the scene, and POC were o If you will read none of my other reviews, I beg you to read the entirety of this one. Read, comment, share, like, whatever. Just see this and take a moment to think about it. Thank you. This book, while important in our world today, still leaves a lot to be desired. "Throughout History" should mean featuring women from all parts of the world and all walks of life, yet the overwhelming majority of the women featured here were white. European and American women dominated the scene, and POC were only featured occasionally and even then, decidedly not from all places and times available for the choosing. There was also a lack of women in LGBT history. Christine Jorgensen is the only LGBT woman featured in this book and I am really very disappointed. How about Audre Lorde, Alice Walker, Laverne Cox, Frida Kahlo... I could go on. Even Ellen DeGeneres was missing from this book, which featured women like Oprah Winfrey and Tina Fey! A personal complaint: I am getting really tired of the lack of Indian women, and just Indian people in general, in the media I consume. Especially in this book, which outwardly seems to provide a diverse acknowledgement of women's contributions to history, there are no Indian women. Where are the powerful girls like Vijaya Lakshmi Pandit, Savitribai Phule, Indira Gandhi, Captain Prem Mathur, Rani Lakshmibhai, Aruna Roy?????? Why aren't their stories being told and their victories acknowledged?

  7. 5 out of 5

    Marie the Librarian

    A million stars and everyone should read this!! The illustrations are gorgeous and these women are soooo badass!!!

  8. 4 out of 5

    Kazia

    This is a fun coffee table book, but a bunch of relatively small things added up to bother me. No First/Native Nations women were featured, which is especially troubling in such a US-focused book. The author also uses outdated terminology when describing a trans woman (specifically, "transsexual"), and it doesn't feel like it's being used as a historical term. It's also super entertainment-focused, and a lot of the entries could barely be considered skimming the surface (not that anything more t This is a fun coffee table book, but a bunch of relatively small things added up to bother me. No First/Native Nations women were featured, which is especially troubling in such a US-focused book. The author also uses outdated terminology when describing a trans woman (specifically, "transsexual"), and it doesn't feel like it's being used as a historical term. It's also super entertainment-focused, and a lot of the entries could barely be considered skimming the surface (not that anything more than a page is expected for this type of book), even when there was space on the page for more information--or at least a "fun fact" or two, like many similar books have. Not bad, but the bar has been set higher elsewhere.

  9. 5 out of 5

    Katie

    A powerful book which sheds light on inspiring yet unknown women. Very worth reading, indeed.

  10. 4 out of 5

    Emily

    This is a book about those who came before us, who knocked up against that glass ceiling and made a tiny fissure or a full-on crack. This was a quick, inspiring read about women who accomplished great things in their lives and challenged societal norms through their success and/or actions. I knew a lot about several of them going in, like my favorite person Dolly Parton, and some I'd barely heard of before, like Aphra Behn, who I had just learned about in A Room of One's Own. Reading this made me This is a book about those who came before us, who knocked up against that glass ceiling and made a tiny fissure or a full-on crack. This was a quick, inspiring read about women who accomplished great things in their lives and challenged societal norms through their success and/or actions. I knew a lot about several of them going in, like my favorite person Dolly Parton, and some I'd barely heard of before, like Aphra Behn, who I had just learned about in A Room of One's Own. Reading this made me want to learn more about some of these women, so much so that I just finished reading Mom & Me & Mom and am eyeing a book about Eleanor Roosevelt next.

  11. 5 out of 5

    Katie

    I read this in a couple hours on my commute home. What a fun book!! Chapters are short, maybe one or two pages detailing the major accomplishments of 100 badass ladies throughout history. Each chapter is also followed by an illustration, some including an inspiring quote from the woman it depicts. This is an eye-opening, entertaining, and ultimately triumphant book for all women. I wish this had been around when I was a teenager.

  12. 4 out of 5

    kory.

    I'm not sure why I expected this to not be a white feminist mess. It just feels like all these women, and their histories, struggles, and especially their problematic actions or beliefs, are being romanticized for the sake of a quick, simplified aesthetic feminist book. There are women included in this who are racists, anti-abortion, eugenicists, ableist, have problematic political views, are just horrible people, and have those erased or polished to make the controversy around them seem like it w I'm not sure why I expected this to not be a white feminist mess. It just feels like all these women, and their histories, struggles, and especially their problematic actions or beliefs, are being romanticized for the sake of a quick, simplified aesthetic feminist book. There are women included in this who are racists, anti-abortion, eugenicists, ableist, have problematic political views, are just horrible people, and have those erased or polished to make the controversy around them seem like it was actually because people just hate badass women, and not because people had every right to criticize their bullshit. Some women have their true motives erased to make it seem like they did what they did to be feminists or "pave the way" for women. This collection isn't meant to be an exhaustive list, I get that, but the women chosen are overwhelmingly white, american, western, abled, and non-queer. Where are the Native women? Where are the Indian women? Why are there so many actresses? Where are the queer women? There are TWO explicitly stated queer women in this; a trans woman who has outdated/problematic language used in their "essay" and an unlabeled queer women whose queerness is basically a footnote at the end. There are so many women better suited to be in a collection like this, and some I 100% expected to be in it and was like, "what???" when I realized they were excluded. The idea of these being essays is ridiculous to me. Some of them are merely a few sentences. The very short style of this book doesn't leave room for depth or criticism or even historical accuracy in some cases. I think it would have been better as just a picture book, that way more women who should've been included could've been included, or with less women and more information about them. It's also a little............telling that some of the sources listed in the bibliography are gossip magazine/pop culture sites. It's like the author didn't want to put Wikipedia for each source, so they just put all the links Wikipedia cites as sources. Disabled people are referred to as "people with disabilities" and "the disabled" a couple times, which actual disabled people don't like. A disabled woman is described as being "disabled, yet", in the sense that she was disabled, yet still did great things. To think that disabled people are inherently excluded from greatness, that when talking about a disabled person who did great things, you have to frame it as being great because it was "in spite of her disability" is ableist as hell. Constant insistence that "women got the vote in 1920" which erases how it was white women, and women of color waited even longer to truly be able to vote. Asian-American women couldn't vote until 1952, Native women in 1957, Black women in 1965, and Latinx women in 1975, disabled women in the 1984-1990. And there are still many barriers that prevent women who are not white and abled from voting. It's especially frustrating and........iffy when "women got the vote in 1920" is first mentioned specifically in relation to the death of a historical Black woman activist. Having "gave you choice" on the picture of an anti-abortion eugenicist is laughably - wait for it - bad. I was initially thinking two stars for this, but after writing all that, I realize there isn't anything I particularly like about this. It didn't fill me with rage, so it's not getting the "nope nope nope" tag, though.

  13. 5 out of 5

    Monica Kim: Reader in Emerald City

    mini review of “Bad Girls Throughout History: 100 Remarkable Women Who Changed the World” and “Legendary Ladies: 50 Goddesses to Empower and Inspire You” by Ann Shen. . Great, beautifully illustrated books celebrating some of the incredible women & goddesses. Definitely not an exhaustive list, but each book contains gorgeous illustrations & illuminating essays that’ll make a great gift. I don’t know if these books are for kids or adults, but I think it’s more geared towards adults because some of mini review of “Bad Girls Throughout History: 100 Remarkable Women Who Changed the World” and “Legendary Ladies: 50 Goddesses to Empower and Inspire You” by Ann Shen. . Great, beautifully illustrated books celebrating some of the incredible women & goddesses. Definitely not an exhaustive list, but each book contains gorgeous illustrations & illuminating essays that’ll make a great gift. I don’t know if these books are for kids or adults, but I think it’s more geared towards adults because some of the essays contain adult content. I think it’s a great way to learn or re-learn some of the inspirational women we might’ve not known or forgotten about. I like the “Legendary Ladies” more because it features goddesses from all over the world, and I like mythology. Adults need picture books, too! As I get older, I don’t read much about mythology as I used to when I was in school, so it’s very refreshing. I want to know, do you have a favorite goddess? 🤓✌️📖

  14. 4 out of 5

    Melki

    I'll go three stars for this one only because I think the author accomplished what she set out to do - provide thumbnail sketches of important women. It's up to you the reader to dig deeper if any of these brief biographies catch your fancy. I really had no quibbles with the women chosen for the book except that there were a few too many movie stars, and that the author's "caricatures" were a little too pretty and unrealistic. I'll go three stars for this one only because I think the author accomplished what she set out to do - provide thumbnail sketches of important women. It's up to you the reader to dig deeper if any of these brief biographies catch your fancy. I really had no quibbles with the women chosen for the book except that there were a few too many movie stars, and that the author's "caricatures" were a little too pretty and unrealistic.

  15. 5 out of 5

    Nicole aka FromReading2Dreaming

    ***Actually 3.5 Stars*** This book was good, but it felt a bit repetitive and the writing style was boring at times. I must say though that the art in the book was beautiful. One thing I do wish the author had included was more remarkable women from countries other than the United States. I also still don't know if this is a children's book or not, since, in my opinion, it reads more like a ya book. Someone, please let me know! But, overall this book was just okay.

  16. 5 out of 5

    Lis Carey

    This is a great little collection of short, one- or two-page bios of "bad girls," women who did what they needed to do rather than what they were expected to do. There are warrior queens and pirate queens, actors and writers, inventors, actors who became inventors, politicians, doctors, nurses, notorious criminals, and spies. It's light, lively, with fun, colorful art showing the women described. It is, sadly, quite oversimplified, probably inevitable given the limited space. We don't know if the This is a great little collection of short, one- or two-page bios of "bad girls," women who did what they needed to do rather than what they were expected to do. There are warrior queens and pirate queens, actors and writers, inventors, actors who became inventors, politicians, doctors, nurses, notorious criminals, and spies. It's light, lively, with fun, colorful art showing the women described. It is, sadly, quite oversimplified, probably inevitable given the limited space. We don't know if the story of Cleopatra and the asp is true. Major events in Eva Peron's career are dropped out entirely. And in some places, it's just completely, inexcusably, unnecessarily wrong. The Constitution under which George Washington and then John Adams became President was not even adopted until years after the Revolution. So, no, while John and Abigail Adams were the first Presidential couple to live in the Presidential Mansion in Washington, they didn't live there during the Revolution. Exactly zero thought had been given to a possible future capital for the new United States of America during the war, when the working capital was Philadelphia. Now, Abigail was John's full partner and a vital part of his career, but muddling the history like that just subtracts from the whole. There are other factual errors like that, and you will likely have your own "favorites." That said, though, this is interesting, entertaining, and really doesn't pretend to be anything other than a brief introduction to the women. They're all potentially fascinating, and this is a great starting point if you're looking for a direction to go off in for further reading about trouble-making women in history. I got this from Kindle Unlimited.

  17. 5 out of 5

    Joanne Moyer

    A quick read of 100 not so much 'bad' girls, more like women who dared to be different and changed the world in their way. The list works it's way chronologically from women like Joan of Arc, Marie Curie, Bonnie Parker, Oprah, Joan Jett and Tina Fey. There are also nice illustrations for each woman. An interesting look at 100 interesting women.

  18. 5 out of 5

    Jessica

    These books are so important to young girls, if gives them the ability to see that they can accomplish great things and also shows the consequences of terrible choices. All, in all shows how fierce women can be. In this book beautifully illustrated by Ann Shen (I'm telling you its gorgeous) it gives a brief synopsis/facts of people like Cleopatra, Mae West and etc., tells you what they accomplished and showcase their strength as women. It also tells you how each met there fate. Some were murdered These books are so important to young girls, if gives them the ability to see that they can accomplish great things and also shows the consequences of terrible choices. All, in all shows how fierce women can be. In this book beautifully illustrated by Ann Shen (I'm telling you its gorgeous) it gives a brief synopsis/facts of people like Cleopatra, Mae West and etc., tells you what they accomplished and showcase their strength as women. It also tells you how each met there fate. Some were murdered, some had the credit for doing amazing things taken away from them. Then some led a quiet life after the initial in your face attitude. It's all uniquely different. It's written in a way that it would make it easy for young children to understand. By doing this simplistic writing it stokes the fire of curiosity to further educate themselves (kids) about the Bad Girls Throughout History.

  19. 4 out of 5

    Reyes

    Entertaining, quick and easy to read and with gorgeous illustrations, very recommendable! My only issue is that it's not very innovative in the sense that I already knew about 95% of the women included in this book, and most of the ones I didn't know about left me a bit cold. Also, a lot of the biographies were way too short to fully transmit the impact these very awesome ladies have had in our society.

  20. 4 out of 5

    ˗ˏˋ aphrodite ˊˎ˗

    this was such a fun, cute feminist read featuring a ton of kick-ass ladies with a gorgeous art style. if you are a history buff or enjoy history but find it dry, this is the book for you. it includes short biographies of so many women that made my heart happy. I do wish there were more non-western ladies in here but that does not diminish the accomplishments of those highlighted in this book.

  21. 4 out of 5

    Grace Stafford

    Just lame. These were all copy and pasted from Wikipedia, and the women chosen are predominantly white, heterosexual, and cisgender. Only two women are listed as LGBT when there are countless others within the book that are documented as gay women, for example Eleanor Roosevelt and Josephine Baker. I learned more from googling the names of unfamiliar to me women than I did from this book.

  22. 5 out of 5

    Rec-It Rachel

    Not enough WOC and some who I was like "really?" (*cough* Edith Wharton)

  23. 4 out of 5

    Brave

    From actresses and artists to aviators, and strippers to scientists, there is truly a little taste of everything in here. I thoroughly enjoyed this read, and even though it included some (perhaps) questionable entries, I still enjoyed reading through the "Bad Girls" in History, and found it funny to see which women were included. This book follows a format of an entry for each of the 100 women which includes a few paragraphs about the lives of these women and why they were included here. It also From actresses and artists to aviators, and strippers to scientists, there is truly a little taste of everything in here. I thoroughly enjoyed this read, and even though it included some (perhaps) questionable entries, I still enjoyed reading through the "Bad Girls" in History, and found it funny to see which women were included. This book follows a format of an entry for each of the 100 women which includes a few paragraphs about the lives of these women and why they were included here. It also includes a beautiful portrait of the women done by the author with either a quote or a few words about who the woman is/was. Many famous women you might expect are in here: Anaïs Nin and Madonna to name a few, but the author has picked women from just about everywhere, and I was pleasantly surprised to learn about some women I've never heard of before, but am now ready to learn even more about. Special mentions to my joy in the inclusions of Tina Fey, Billie Holiday, and Selena. I'm not sure exactly which age this is targeted for. It's honestly and, in my opinion, simply written, but there are mentions to things like rape, masturbation, and sex/sexuality that might make this book, at least to some parents or related people caring for/about younger girls hesitate to gift this book to them. So there's a note on that. I treated this as basically an annotated bibliography for all the biographies I hope to now read. Now for my Tennessee Girl rant about Dolly Parton's entry, which is almost a crime to me, and disappointed me greatly (basically, THIS IS A BIASED RANT): I was SO EXCITED to see my QUEEN Dolly Parton included in this book, because her story is honestly incredible, as I think many people are learning. But I spent my most formative years half an hour from her hometown and in the mountains she loves and talks about frequently. I was disappointed to see that she had one of the shortest entries of all the women in this book. It mentions an offer Dolly turned down, though it might've made her rich, because it wasn't what she wanted for herself...which is great! Sounds good! But it's even more impressive when you realize that Dolly grew up very poor in rural Appalachia in a one-room cabin with ten siblings. This book did talk about other women and their poor starts in life (like Oprah, for example), so I wouldn't have found it out of place to just MENTION that in passing when they talk about Dolly building her own empire, or whatever. It's infinitely more than just some "larger than life" "bad girl" with a "theme park named after her" and I'm more upset about this than I thought I would be. I've decided to be an adult and not knock a star off for this. (LOL)

  24. 4 out of 5

    Kari

    A delightful book! Beautiful illustrations and I learned about some fabulous women that I hadn't heard of before.

  25. 5 out of 5

    Fabienne

    Maya Angelou "You've got to go out and kick ass" (p.170)

  26. 4 out of 5

    Maja - BibliophiliaDK ✨

    When you set out to change the world people are going to think you're bad My first reaction to the title of this book was, "Really, you have to be bad to be remarkable?!" But then it dawned on me. All of these women were considered bad in their own time, because they dared to go against the grain, to push the boundaries and to break away from what was socially acceptable at their time. Their contemporaries labeled them as bad because to them, they were bad women. They didn't conform to the norm When you set out to change the world people are going to think you're bad My first reaction to the title of this book was, "Really, you have to be bad to be remarkable?!" But then it dawned on me. All of these women were considered bad in their own time, because they dared to go against the grain, to push the boundaries and to break away from what was socially acceptable at their time. Their contemporaries labeled them as bad because to them, they were bad women. They didn't conform to the norm of what was expected of them. And with that realisation out of the way I was ready to read this book. This book contains one page biographies of 100 remarkable women. Safe to say, not a whole lot can be said in just one page. But it was just enough to wet the appetite. Ther were several women that I had not heard about before but that I would now like to know more about. So it served as a good starting point for further research into remarkable women. Another thing I thouroughly enjoyed about this book was the beautiful water colour portraits of each woman. They made this book visually stunning as well as intellectually appealing. The only thing I disliked was the bias towards modern women. 3/4 about this book is about women from the 19th and 20th century. Only 1/4 is a bout premodern women and that is a shame. These women faced perhaps even harsher odds than their modern counterparts and many of them are even less known and therefore, in my mind, deserve even more exposure. Of course, I may just think so because I have a masters degree en medieval history and because I wrote my master's thesis about medieval queenship. FOLLOW MY BLOG FOR MORE BOOK GOODNESS I have a mission - to create a world of book lovers. Will you help me?

  27. 5 out of 5

    Andrea

    4.5 stars really - maybe 4.75. I really, really did enjoy this book. I thought the women chosen were great, the summaries succinct and the illustrations so wonderful. Being a stickler as I am though, I still wish there had been more lesser known, perhaps even more diverse, selections -- though all of these women are definitely bad girls. Plus there were some that I know the more troubling aspects of their history (I'm looking at you Susan B. Anthony) that were glossed over in the descriptions. B 4.5 stars really - maybe 4.75. I really, really did enjoy this book. I thought the women chosen were great, the summaries succinct and the illustrations so wonderful. Being a stickler as I am though, I still wish there had been more lesser known, perhaps even more diverse, selections -- though all of these women are definitely bad girls. Plus there were some that I know the more troubling aspects of their history (I'm looking at you Susan B. Anthony) that were glossed over in the descriptions. But as the author indicated in her preface, those briefs are meant to make readers interested in learning more, thus reading for themselves more of the good, and the bad too. I hope there's a volume 2 someday! Such a unique approach to a book. Last thing, my one really squinty eye moment: Coretta Scott King's description. Having done extensive research on her, I think her description in the book is really lacking. Yes, she was Martin Luther King Jr.'s wife, but so much more!! I don't care that she rejected him initially because of his height; I care that after he died, she continued spreading his inclusive, important practices through her involvement with the women's rights movement; being a fierce advocate for LGBTQ+ rights; her opposition to apartheid and the Iraq war; starting the King Center to further her and her husband's teachings, to help preserve his memory and legacy; and fighting tirelessly to make Martin Luther King Jr. Day a national holiday. Those last two do involve her husband, but were rooted in her always-consistent beliefs and her relentless spirit. Basically, she's incredible and hers was the one description that really felt like it was lacking and off-center in that it focused too heavily on her husband and not her as an individual bad girl activist.

  28. 4 out of 5

    Sheila

    Short biographies of 100 unique women who did amazing things for their time. My daughter loves these biographies, so we read these aloud together.

  29. 5 out of 5

    Kait

    100 short, but certainly not sweet, synopses of seriously badass women throughout history. If you are looking for a quick and fun read, complete with killer illustrations, then I highly recommend.

  30. 5 out of 5

    Melissa

    I really enjoyed these short profiles on ‘Bad Girls’ and I’m pretty sure I’ll be gifting this one a few times in the future. Many I knew, Ruth Bade Ginsburg, Sally Ride, and Malala Yousafzai...some were new to me like Junko Tabei... but I found myself pausing to look up a few and read more, google their artwork, add their books, etc. Just an FYI...it also includes grown up bad Girls from Gypsy Lee Rose to Bettie Page, as well as leaders of the feminist movements, and icons like Oprah and Maya Ang I really enjoyed these short profiles on ‘Bad Girls’ and I’m pretty sure I’ll be gifting this one a few times in the future. Many I knew, Ruth Bade Ginsburg, Sally Ride, and Malala Yousafzai...some were new to me like Junko Tabei... but I found myself pausing to look up a few and read more, google their artwork, add their books, etc. Just an FYI...it also includes grown up bad Girls from Gypsy Lee Rose to Bettie Page, as well as leaders of the feminist movements, and icons like Oprah and Maya Angelou who had less than Disney-ified childhoods. The book includes mentions of everything from burlesque to abortion, rape to drug use, not to mention shootings and burnings at the stake so you may not want to gift this too young despite the cute drawings, or at least not until you’re willing to have the serious conversations that might result in a realistic look at powerful women and some of the things they’ve had to overcome.

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