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A Machine Made This Book: Ten Sketches of Computer Science

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How do we decide where to put ink on a page to draw letters and pictures? How can computers represent all the world's languages and writing systems? What exactly is a computer program, what and how does it calculate, and how can we build one? Can we compress information to make it easier to store and quicker to transmit? How do newspapers print photographs with grey tones How do we decide where to put ink on a page to draw letters and pictures? How can computers represent all the world's languages and writing systems? What exactly is a computer program, what and how does it calculate, and how can we build one? Can we compress information to make it easier to store and quicker to transmit? How do newspapers print photographs with grey tones using just black ink and white paper? How are paragraphs laid out automatically on a page and split across multiple pages? In "A Machine Made this Book," using examples from the publishing industry, John Whitington introduces the fascinating discipline of Computer Science to the uninitiated. Chapters: Putting Marks on Paper Letter Forms Storing Words Looking and Finding Typing it In Saving Space Doing Sums Grey Areas Our Typeface Words to Paragraphs


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How do we decide where to put ink on a page to draw letters and pictures? How can computers represent all the world's languages and writing systems? What exactly is a computer program, what and how does it calculate, and how can we build one? Can we compress information to make it easier to store and quicker to transmit? How do newspapers print photographs with grey tones How do we decide where to put ink on a page to draw letters and pictures? How can computers represent all the world's languages and writing systems? What exactly is a computer program, what and how does it calculate, and how can we build one? Can we compress information to make it easier to store and quicker to transmit? How do newspapers print photographs with grey tones using just black ink and white paper? How are paragraphs laid out automatically on a page and split across multiple pages? In "A Machine Made this Book," using examples from the publishing industry, John Whitington introduces the fascinating discipline of Computer Science to the uninitiated. Chapters: Putting Marks on Paper Letter Forms Storing Words Looking and Finding Typing it In Saving Space Doing Sums Grey Areas Our Typeface Words to Paragraphs

37 review for A Machine Made This Book: Ten Sketches of Computer Science

  1. 5 out of 5

    Katheryn Thompson

    I entered a giveaway for this book with my dad, a computer scientist, in mind. Here is his review: I appreciated “A Machine Made this Book” for its fascinating explanation about the often baffling subject of printing and its association with many aspects of computer science. John Whittington explains the many sides of today's modern technology, such as graphic formation, typeface, communication and the human language, computer programming, the history of the machines associated with printing, com I entered a giveaway for this book with my dad, a computer scientist, in mind. Here is his review: I appreciated “A Machine Made this Book” for its fascinating explanation about the often baffling subject of printing and its association with many aspects of computer science. John Whittington explains the many sides of today's modern technology, such as graphic formation, typeface, communication and the human language, computer programming, the history of the machines associated with printing, compression of images, how letters are laid onto a page, and paragraphs. This book provides a well-rounded summary of these complicated topics without being boring or simply factual. His real world examples take us on a journey through the relevant topics of the book. Did you ever struggle in mathematics drawing straight lines on graph paper with reference to the Cartesian Plane? Not with this book; John makes it so clear. He then gives a lovely explanation of the history of drawing curves too, including reference to their application in dress making and ship building; such is his breadth of knowledge when clarifying the points. Have you ever been mystified at what programming a computer was? Not only does John entice you into the world pf programming using a simple example of searching for a word in a paragraph, but he uses a technique which I find extremely fascinating and he teaches it in such a way even a novice can follow what is being discussed. He explains using a step by step explanation what goes on internally within the machine without bogging you down in the detail. I would highly recommend this book to anyone who desires a guide not only an insight into the past of how we have always decided where to put ink on a page to draw letters and pictures, but also the future of computer science and technology. How the computer understands the world’s languages and writing systems, what exactly is a computer program, what and how does it calculate, and how we can compress information to make it easier to store and transmit information worldwide so quickly. “A Machine Made this Book” is a good read while cuddling up at night; or if you would prefer with pen and paper trying your luck at the exercises at the end of each chapter. John Thompson (HON) BSc CEng MBCS CITP

  2. 5 out of 5

    BCS

    Do you remember those school text books with a question section at the end of each chapter and a section at the back containing all the answers? John Whitington has used that format to present his “Ten Sketches of Computer Science”. However, this is no ‘idiot’s guide’ with its coverage of image presentation, whether on-screen or printed, data storage and compression, programming, and much more, all done on the basis of the technology behind how the actual book itself was produced - which I belie Do you remember those school text books with a question section at the end of each chapter and a section at the back containing all the answers? John Whitington has used that format to present his “Ten Sketches of Computer Science”. However, this is no ‘idiot’s guide’ with its coverage of image presentation, whether on-screen or printed, data storage and compression, programming, and much more, all done on the basis of the technology behind how the actual book itself was produced - which I believe is a very novel concept. Included within the ten sections is some of the history behind the technology, such as the development of typewriters and keyboards, along with engraving and typesetting, and an explanation of typefaces focusing on the Palatino one employed in the book. So, it may be seen that in a book at less than two hundred pages in total and in a readable font the author has crammed a lot of thought about computer science whilst it remains primarily a text on typographics and computing. The target audience is perhaps the interested amateur or the student (A level or higher) wanting to focus on the theoretical side of printing and presentation. With the included exercises, the book is not for skim reading and although some of the chapters might be explored individually, the sketches do support each other in a sequential manner, and so require some concentration and continuity. Having been involved in computing, without a formal background in computer science, for some forty years, I discovered fundamentals that I’d never considered, possibly never needed, but of interest all the same. Reviewed by Dr Mick Phythian MBCS, CITP Originally posted: http://www.bcs.org/content/conWebDoc/...

  3. 4 out of 5

    Gillian

    An enjoyable read.

  4. 5 out of 5

    R.K. Cowles

    a giveaway won on goodreads. it was not that interesting to me. Good book showing the science behind computers and the printing of pictures and words. For me it did not get interesting until the 5th chapter. Other chapters that followed it was half and half.

  5. 5 out of 5

    John Thompson

  6. 5 out of 5

    David

  7. 5 out of 5

    Jovany Agathe

  8. 4 out of 5

    Tom Ridge

  9. 5 out of 5

    Jeanette

  10. 5 out of 5

    V

  11. 4 out of 5

    SALLY WHITE

  12. 5 out of 5

    WilAson

  13. 5 out of 5

    Pam

  14. 5 out of 5

    Helen Horton

  15. 4 out of 5

    Betty

  16. 5 out of 5

    Laura Smith

  17. 5 out of 5

    Nicola Fantom

  18. 4 out of 5

    Dee

  19. 5 out of 5

    Claire

  20. 5 out of 5

    Emma

  21. 4 out of 5

    Olaya Siñeriz

  22. 4 out of 5

    Print Teach

  23. 5 out of 5

    Lisa Clyma

  24. 4 out of 5

    Spencer Broadley

  25. 4 out of 5

    James

  26. 5 out of 5

    Carlene

  27. 5 out of 5

    Laura Dobb

  28. 4 out of 5

    Donna Barnes

  29. 5 out of 5

    Stewart Miller

  30. 4 out of 5

    Emily

  31. 4 out of 5

    Patricia Gordon

  32. 5 out of 5

    Diane Findlay

  33. 4 out of 5

    Thomas

  34. 4 out of 5

    Camilla

  35. 5 out of 5

    Bacsa

  36. 4 out of 5

    Ben Audsley

  37. 5 out of 5

    Lee Hardy

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