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UNeducation, Vol 1: A Residential School Graphic Novel (PG)

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The chilling chronicles of a family's exploitation in the North American residential/boarding school systems. What began as a grassroots fundraiser, "UNeducation, Vol 1: A Residential School Graphic Novel" is now used in school curriculum, university syllabus', treatment/corrections centre resources, healing initiatives, government agencies and educational trainings world The chilling chronicles of a family's exploitation in the North American residential/boarding school systems. What began as a grassroots fundraiser, "UNeducation, Vol 1: A Residential School Graphic Novel" is now used in school curriculum, university syllabus', treatment/corrections centre resources, healing initiatives, government agencies and educational trainings worldwide. Now available to the public, in softcover and ebook form, for the first time. Gain a full and proper education about a dark episode in North American history. The highly anticipated next chapter in the series, "UNeducation, Vol 2: The Side of Society You Don't See On TV" is coming soon.


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The chilling chronicles of a family's exploitation in the North American residential/boarding school systems. What began as a grassroots fundraiser, "UNeducation, Vol 1: A Residential School Graphic Novel" is now used in school curriculum, university syllabus', treatment/corrections centre resources, healing initiatives, government agencies and educational trainings world The chilling chronicles of a family's exploitation in the North American residential/boarding school systems. What began as a grassroots fundraiser, "UNeducation, Vol 1: A Residential School Graphic Novel" is now used in school curriculum, university syllabus', treatment/corrections centre resources, healing initiatives, government agencies and educational trainings worldwide. Now available to the public, in softcover and ebook form, for the first time. Gain a full and proper education about a dark episode in North American history. The highly anticipated next chapter in the series, "UNeducation, Vol 2: The Side of Society You Don't See On TV" is coming soon.

30 review for UNeducation, Vol 1: A Residential School Graphic Novel (PG)

  1. 5 out of 5

    Kimberley

    As a Social Studies 10 teacher I’d like to have a copy of this for my classroom. The PG version may be more appropriate, though I wonder how much it edits out. It was a tough read (anything regarding genocide is) but also accessible in the format. I liked the use of primary sources and personal accounts from multiple perspectives. I’m glad my library had this.

  2. 4 out of 5

    Wei-Wei

    This is a perfect introduction to the horrors of the residential/boarding school mandates in North America that resulted in the collective abuse of Native American children and the generations beyond. From identity erasure, language limitation, physical and mental abuse, to sexual abuse, the graphic novel touches on the various ways boarding schools cut off children from their cultures and took them from their families. This created repercussions in their developmental course and in their own pa This is a perfect introduction to the horrors of the residential/boarding school mandates in North America that resulted in the collective abuse of Native American children and the generations beyond. From identity erasure, language limitation, physical and mental abuse, to sexual abuse, the graphic novel touches on the various ways boarding schools cut off children from their cultures and took them from their families. This created repercussions in their developmental course and in their own parenting abilities later on. Many of those experiences created capacity for alcoholism, abuse, and culture negation. It's important to understand the history of what our governments did to Indigenous peoples. It's important to understand the type of genocide that occurred even up until 1996 in Canada.

  3. 5 out of 5

    Victoria France

    Amazing message in an easy to read format A good introduction to some of the many hardships the Native Americans/ First Nations people have experienced and continue to experience. I've read other histories in more "formal" formats and often found myself skimming over sections of "fluff" or "filler" to get back to the original message of the book and this graphic novel had none of that. The author did not beat around the bush to make facts less painful to read and I really liked that. My family ha Amazing message in an easy to read format A good introduction to some of the many hardships the Native Americans/ First Nations people have experienced and continue to experience. I've read other histories in more "formal" formats and often found myself skimming over sections of "fluff" or "filler" to get back to the original message of the book and this graphic novel had none of that. The author did not beat around the bush to make facts less painful to read and I really liked that. My family had gone through similar situations with government schools so I felt a connection while reading this. Good read, looking forward to the next volume.

  4. 4 out of 5

    Kathy

    There are few books that can express the horror of residential schools in a way that can be easily understood by young and old, native and non-native alike. This is able to capture past and present through brilliant use of colour and black and white panels. it conveys tragic emotion as well as a feeling of helplessness. I want to have my students study this book as I believe everyone should read it.

  5. 4 out of 5

    Rachel Mans McKenny

    Wow. A mixture of interview, hypothetical question, and cartoon exploring Canada's residential school era and the horrible, long lasting side effects. Worth checking out, and worth considering if looking for a way to bring that history to the high school classroom.

  6. 4 out of 5

    Siobhán

    Today is Columbus day (really hope it will be Indigenous Peoples' Day in 2020 -.-) and what better day than to read about the genocide in Canada, more specifically about Residential Schools. If you do not know Residential Schools, you should look it up. Until the early 1960s, Native Children were seperated from their parents, forced into these so-called schools in order for the "child to be saved" (supposedly) and to "kill the Indian". And they did just that: they cut the children's hair, they w Today is Columbus day (really hope it will be Indigenous Peoples' Day in 2020 -.-) and what better day than to read about the genocide in Canada, more specifically about Residential Schools. If you do not know Residential Schools, you should look it up. Until the early 1960s, Native Children were seperated from their parents, forced into these so-called schools in order for the "child to be saved" (supposedly) and to "kill the Indian". And they did just that: they cut the children's hair, they were forbidden to speak their Native languages, meet their parents and connect with their cultures. This trauma persists until this very day and will for a long time. The comic combines newspaper snippets, information and explaination, plus very personal accounts on how it felt to come from a breathing, living culture (coloured panels) into the grey residential schools where that part of yourself was taken away from you (panels only in grey). Emotionally hard to read, but necessary. Especially as a white person you should learn about this gruesome part of American history (boarding schools in America they were called) and try to be aware of specific Indigenous issues, starting with the genocide that Columbus began. Not only Colombus Day persists but many more problems that are not covered in this comic, but which will be covered by the next one. 5 Stars even though its mixture of info first, comic story line after that, confused me a bit.

  7. 5 out of 5

    Jon

    Native American author - although in Canada they use the words "aboriginal" or "indigenous", is Blackfoot and Duwamish from Calgary. (His folks called him "that little half-buffalo half-salmon.). "Uneducation". It is graphic in more ways than one. He writes about being forcibly removed from his parents as a child, and sent to a Residential School until his teen years. Families were not allowed to visit. In those days this was Canadian law. Later changed, thank God. But the exact same thing happe Native American author - although in Canada they use the words "aboriginal" or "indigenous", is Blackfoot and Duwamish from Calgary. (His folks called him "that little half-buffalo half-salmon.). "Uneducation". It is graphic in more ways than one. He writes about being forcibly removed from his parents as a child, and sent to a Residential School until his teen years. Families were not allowed to visit. In those days this was Canadian law. Later changed, thank God. But the exact same thing happened here, often in "Mission Schools" run by churches. The children's hair was cut - long hair was evil. Their clothes were taken away, and any sign of being Indian. They were not allowed to speak their native language. Punishment for any of these infractions was harsh. The stated goal was to "kill the Indian in the child." The cartoonish graphics of the book barely take the edge off the reality. How many people really know all the things done to Native Americans? In the US, they were made citizens in 1924, but in some states couldn't vote until 1957. And many of the mission schools in the USA were as brutal as the Canadian system in this book. I grew up on the edge of the Navajo reservation in New Mexico, so I've heard these tales for years. The author gives us a first-hand account.

  8. 5 out of 5

    Eli

    Powerful and informative. I was aware of all the facts the author presents but the medium allows visuals where photos are not reasonable and text however descriptive would have a hard time revealing the truth. The last story “the cycle” is as horrifying as anything I’ve ever read and reminded me of Art Speigelman’s “Maus” in its power to so simply and effectively convey the worst humanity has to offer.

  9. 5 out of 5

    Kris

    Wow. This is really well done. A mixture of news articles, interviews, photographs, and sequential art make for a powerful way to learn about the residential schools in Canada. I got the PG version because that was what my library had available, and I will need to see about ordering volume 2 because this is something that people need to read.

  10. 5 out of 5

    Inga Kruse

    Unyielding exposure of residential schools. This book should be in history classes in every school in Canada. It is such an important story and feels close up and personal to the reader. The author doesn’t blink, so his readers shouldn’t either. “When will the cycle ever end?” When indeed. Highly recommend.

  11. 4 out of 5

    Brooke

    Newspaper clippings, pictures, and graphic novel combine to make a powerful education on the Canadian residential school system. This was a hard read, but because I did not know about this part of Canadian history, a very educational read.

  12. 5 out of 5

    Mary

    Made me aware that families were not able to opt out of residential school. source of the frustration.

  13. 5 out of 5

    Shawna

    This book is an important part of our history told in unique and vulnerable way.

  14. 5 out of 5

    Meagan

  15. 4 out of 5

    Shannon Grant

  16. 5 out of 5

    Katy

  17. 4 out of 5

    Ash

  18. 5 out of 5

    Anne

  19. 4 out of 5

    Kristen Clark

  20. 5 out of 5

    Yvon

  21. 5 out of 5

    Charis Falardeau

  22. 5 out of 5

    Taylor Daigneault

  23. 4 out of 5

    Jordo

  24. 5 out of 5

    Dawn

  25. 5 out of 5

    Sopear

  26. 5 out of 5

    Amanda

  27. 5 out of 5

    Anna

  28. 5 out of 5

    Taylor Mølstad

  29. 4 out of 5

    Samantha Mielke

  30. 4 out of 5

    Paula Cyrus

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