free hit counter code New X-Men by Grant Morrison: Ultimate Collection, Book 2 - GoBooks - Download Free Book
Ads Banner
Hot Best Seller

New X-Men by Grant Morrison: Ultimate Collection, Book 2

Availability: Ready to download

Morrison ("All-Star Superman, Batman") propelled the "X-Men" into the 21st century, masterminding a challenging new direction for Marvel's mutant heroes. Now, his entire Eisner Award-nominated run is collected across three trade paperbacks. Collects #127-141.


Compare
Ads Banner

Morrison ("All-Star Superman, Batman") propelled the "X-Men" into the 21st century, masterminding a challenging new direction for Marvel's mutant heroes. Now, his entire Eisner Award-nominated run is collected across three trade paperbacks. Collects #127-141.

30 review for New X-Men by Grant Morrison: Ultimate Collection, Book 2

  1. 5 out of 5

    Dan Schwent

    Living and Dying: Cerebra guides Xorn to a mutant living with his mother. Unfortunately, the mutant looks like a monster and has been accused of eating a dog. If I hadn't already had the truth behind Xorn spoiled for me, this would have been a touching story for a superhero comic. New Worlds: Professor X and Jean Grey try to learn the extent of her power boost, Fantomex demands sanctuary from the X-Corporation, and Cyclops asks Emma Frost for help. I like what Morrison is doing with the X-Men durin Living and Dying: Cerebra guides Xorn to a mutant living with his mother. Unfortunately, the mutant looks like a monster and has been accused of eating a dog. If I hadn't already had the truth behind Xorn spoiled for me, this would have been a touching story for a superhero comic. New Worlds: Professor X and Jean Grey try to learn the extent of her power boost, Fantomex demands sanctuary from the X-Corporation, and Cyclops asks Emma Frost for help. I like what Morrison is doing with the X-Men during his run on the book but I can't help feeling a little sad that they're going to start undoing everything the instant his run is over. Fantomex: Weapon 12 is unleashed and Fantomex enlists the aid of Professor X and Jean to help him. This one was a bit slow paced but jumpy at the same time, kind of like Final Crisis would be years later. Weapon 12: Weapon 12 is running amok and Fantomex and the X-Men try to bring him down. Fantomex's identity is somewhat revealed and a team member dies. Again, slow paced but good. Some Angels Falling: The X-Men attended (view spoiler)[Darkstar's funeral (hide spoiler)] and Emma Frost begins "helping" Cyclops with his marriage. This was mostly setup for future tales. The most memorable part was actually Angel kissing Beak. Ambient Magnetic Fields: The X-Men go to Genosha and find a deranged Polaris and several mutants building a monument to Magneto. It was cool to see Quicksilver acknowledged as Magneto's son and Sabra as a mutant. Other than that, not a whole lot happened. #133: Wolverine meets Phantomex and someone tries to kill Professor X. Good stuff. It was cool to see old members of X-Force and Sunfire again. I like how Morrison always brings back lesser known characters, like Sunfire, Warpath, and Feral in this issue. Kid Omega: Mutant fashion designer Jumbo Carnation is murdered. Quentin Quire starts having big ideas. Beast and Cyclops chat. This was a setup issue. I think Quentin Quire is going to do big things in the future. Also, I haven't said it before but I love the Stepford Cuckoos, Morrison's homage to John Wyndham's Midwich Cuckoos. Teaching Children about Fractals: Quentin Quire starts organizing the other young mutants and the drug Kick starts appearing in the school for gifted youngsters. I like what's happening with Quire and his comrades. I think things will come to a head in another issue or two. When X is not X: Quentin Quire and his gang wander farther from Xavier's dream. The U-Men disrupt Xorn's camping trip with the remedial class. Cyclops and Emma Frost share a telepathic moment. Yep, things are coming to a head. Emma Frost is one of my favorite mutants these days. Riot at Xavier's: Quentin Quire and his gang start a riot on open house day. The Quentin Quire storyline comes to a head in this one. Emma Frost and the Stepford Cuckoos take center stage. The Prime of Miss Emma Frost: The Xavier school mourns the death of Sophie in the aftermath of Quentin Quire's riot, Angel is allegedly pregnant with Beak's child, and Jean Grey catches Cyclops and Emma Frost in the act. The aftermath of the Quentin Quire story was well done, as was the telepathic affair between Emma Frost and Cyclops. Murder at the Mansion: Jean confronts Emma Frost about what she and Cyclops have been doing. The alleged affair between Cyclops and Emma Frost is brought to the forefront. The last panel is a shocker and leads nicely into the next issue. Whodunnit?: Emma Frost has been killed by an assailant with a diamond bullet and Bishop is on the case. So who killed Emma Frost? I'm still not completely sure. Morrison did a good job using Bishop as the lead in a murder mystery. Beak and Angel's kids were an odd brood. Esme leaving the school was a nice touch, as was hinting that Cyclops was the murderer on the last page. Looks like I'll be tracking down the next volume after all.

  2. 4 out of 5

    Rory Wilding

    Following the first volume which opened with a bang – not least with the destruction of Genosha that killed sixteen million mutants – this second volume takes Grant Morrison’s New X-Men into the middle chapter syndrome with multiple plot strands and an overly extensive cast, which tends to be an issue when creators tackle the X-Men who have their own universe outside of their Marvel co-stars. The book opens with #127 which solely showcases the newest X-Man Xorn, the Chinese mutant with a "star fo Following the first volume which opened with a bang – not least with the destruction of Genosha that killed sixteen million mutants – this second volume takes Grant Morrison’s New X-Men into the middle chapter syndrome with multiple plot strands and an overly extensive cast, which tends to be an issue when creators tackle the X-Men who have their own universe outside of their Marvel co-stars. The book opens with #127 which solely showcases the newest X-Man Xorn, the Chinese mutant with a "star for a brain" who tries to philosophically understand the world he wants to protect despite humanity’s fear and paranoia over mutant kind. This is a simple and touching tale about a mutant trying to save another that is roughly drawn by the blend of John Paul Leon’s pencilling and Bill Sienkiewicz’s inking. Once we get to the third story arc “New Worlds”, things get baggy and confusing. With plot threads including the foundation of Xavier’s X-Corporation, the introduction of Europe’s most wanted super-thief Fantomex and Weapon X being retconned into the Weapon Plus Program, it becomes a confusing read which again tries to tie into Chris Claremont’s mythology. It also doesn’t help that Igor Kordey is doing the artwork as perfectly established in the final splash page in #128 showing an ugly drawn Emma Frost posing like Sharon Stone in Basic Instinct. However when you strip away the multiple storylines that are heavily invested in sci-fi action from human versus mutant wargames to intergalactic grandeur and simplify the X-Men with relatable themes such as prejudice, self-acceptance and teenage rebellion, you get an intimate soap opera that happens to feature superheroes. In the book’s best arc “Riot at Xavier’s”, a mutant celebrity is killed by anti-mutant racists, which upsets the super-intelligent young Quentin Quire who begins to mock Xavier's pacifistic teachings and assembles a gang of militant classmates to kill humans in retaliation. This story very much evokes everyone within the school as it sets up the Cyclops/Emma Frost relationship as well as his growing estrangement from his wife Jean Grey, a funny side-plot about the ugly students including Angel Salvadore and Beak under the lectureship of Xorn (who seems to have some other agenda), and Quire's Omega Gang who are under the influence of a mutant-enhanced drug “Kick”. Another big benefit is Frank Quitely who does his best work here on the title with wide detailed panels that have enough visual impact to tell the story without the usage of words. Although the frequent changing from one artist to artist is still an issue whilst Morrison struggles in tying all the multiple plotlines to form the bigger picture, New X-Men works best in its own odd way of subtle storytelling as this volume concludes with a compelling cliff-hanger that creates enough excitement for the final volume.

  3. 4 out of 5

    RG

    4.5* Theres some really cool story lines in here. The Quentin story, and the love triangle story are awesome. The start with Weapon XII was a little confusing and I was worried it wasnt going anywhere. The artwork was cool but didnt blow me away. I dont know why but Wolverine just looks weird in this series. Will definitely read Book 3.

  4. 4 out of 5

    James DeSantis

    Another Grant Morrison book I really enjoyed! The book opens up with a stand alone issue of Xorn trying to help figure out a crime. It's both horrifying, sad, and beautifully done by the end. Then we jump into a main story with some crazy X13 stuff. This is more typical morrison as we get into some weird shit going on here. Last storyline revolves around the young kids, calling themselves the "new x-men" making a stand against their teachers. Magneto might have taught them TOO much. Then we get Another Grant Morrison book I really enjoyed! The book opens up with a stand alone issue of Xorn trying to help figure out a crime. It's both horrifying, sad, and beautifully done by the end. Then we jump into a main story with some crazy X13 stuff. This is more typical morrison as we get into some weird shit going on here. Last storyline revolves around the young kids, calling themselves the "new x-men" making a stand against their teachers. Magneto might have taught them TOO much. Then we get some drama here and there, the biggest being Scott and Emma affair! This is Morrison honestly firing on all cylinders. I fucking LOVED the stuff with Xorn here in the first issue plus all his stuff with the special X-Men kids. I also dug the hell out of the rebel kids storyline and shows how powerful the X-Men really are. Oh and the Emma and Scott stuff? Amazing. The only negative is the X13 stuff was just okay. Overall, great stuff. No wonder this series is held in such high regard. A 4.5 out of 5.

  5. 5 out of 5

    Sesana

    There's still some really good stuff here, but it isn't as uniformly good as the previous volume. Quentin Quire and his hipster Brotherhood wannabes dragged the whole volume down for me. I didn't find him or his storyline particularly interesting. If that was all to this collection, I probably wouldn't have liked it much. But there are some really good things here. Angel and Beak. Xorn and the twelve year old mutant. The Emma/Scott/Jean love triangle. Very much worth reading, to say the least.

  6. 4 out of 5

    Anne

    There's a lot of great stuff in this volume, but my favorite story line is the Cyclops/Jean/Emma triangle. Emma Frost is such an great character. You have to admire anyone who can manage to do the right thing and be an evil bitch at the same time. Unfortunately, the Jumbo Carnation story felt goofy and flat to me. Ditto with Quentin and his gang of dorky rebels. Seems to me it's been done before. However, there is a great cliffhanger at the end that had me snatching up the next volume as fast as There's a lot of great stuff in this volume, but my favorite story line is the Cyclops/Jean/Emma triangle. Emma Frost is such an great character. You have to admire anyone who can manage to do the right thing and be an evil bitch at the same time. Unfortunately, the Jumbo Carnation story felt goofy and flat to me. Ditto with Quentin and his gang of dorky rebels. Seems to me it's been done before. However, there is a great cliffhanger at the end that had me snatching up the next volume as fast as I could. So, while this might not be quite as good as New X-Men Omnibus, it's still pretty awesome!

  7. 4 out of 5

    Shannon Appelcline

    Living & Dying (#127). A story about Xorn. He really seems to care about other mutants as his persecuted people! This story is small scale, with some emotional impact [4/5]. New Worlds (#128-130). A very innovative story, introducing Fantomex and the whole idea of the Weapon Plus program creating lots of killers. Both the new character and the new look at Weapon X are terrific, though the story itself drags a bit as everyone fights a zombie horde. This is also the story that pushes hard on the id Living & Dying (#127). A story about Xorn. He really seems to care about other mutants as his persecuted people! This story is small scale, with some emotional impact [4/5]. New Worlds (#128-130). A very innovative story, introducing Fantomex and the whole idea of the Weapon Plus program creating lots of killers. Both the new character and the new look at Weapon X are terrific, though the story itself drags a bit as everyone fights a zombie horde. This is also the story that pushes hard on the idea of X-Men: X-Corps, which means that we lose most of our regular characters for this storyline [4/5]. Some Angels Falling (#131). A love story in two parts. On the one hand we get Beak and Angel, who continue to be well-developed new New Mutants. And on the other hand we get the story that really kindles the Scott & Emma romance and makes it totally believable, as they engage in some telepathic therapy. I think this story made me love Emma too [5+/5] Ambient Magnetic Fields (#132). Great continuity in returning to Genosha and a beautiful look at the last words of its citizens. (And wow, is that the little remembered Neal Shaara Thunderbird? Morrison is certainly touring the world of X-Men) [5/5]. X-Corps Finale (#133). And what an oddly scattered finale to this oddly scattered set of stories. It's a coda to "Imperial" and also to "New Worlds", as Lilandra and Fantomex both make their returns ... and an intro to another new New Mutant. It's all good enough if unfocused [4/5]. Riot at Xavier's (#134-138). In his second year, Morrison tried to expand the scope of the X-Men. His work with the X-Corps in the previous arc wasn't entirely successful, because they were just too scattered, but his depiction here of the new students at Xavier's is magnificent. That's in large part thanks to Quintin Quire, one of the best characters to originate in the New X-Men, who first appears here as a young rebel without a cause. But, the Specials, the Cuckoos, and Quintin's gang all get great attention here, any many would recur for years afterward (though the Cuckoos and Glob Herman are the only other two to make a real impact). Beyond all that, this is a great story about the conservative old fighting the rebellious young that feels like it really goes to the core of what the X-Men are about [5/5]. Shattered (#139). A spectacular look at who Emma and Jean are (and who Scott is, following his recent "death"). This is a beautiful character piece, and another example of how Grant did such a great job writing Emma [5+/5]. Murder at the Mansion (#140-141). Bringing Bishop and Sage in for a mystery is a lot of fun, and it's a mystery with some good twists and turns. It gets a little weird at times, and I find the mutant baby-eggs really squicky, but I guess that's Morrison doing a good job of making the mutants ... strange [5/5]

  8. 5 out of 5

    The Sapphic Nerd

    I liked this better than book one! I don't recall as many funny moments, but some of the stories are more engaging, and the overall art is better too. The story of Xorn and the monster-boy is sad but held my attention. John Paul Leon's art is pretty good, with lines kind of similar to what you'd see in Gotham Central. It's the most distinguishable from the rest of the art in this book, and makes for a nice refresher (especially after all the Frank Quitely stuff from before). I didn't care for the I liked this better than book one! I don't recall as many funny moments, but some of the stories are more engaging, and the overall art is better too. The story of Xorn and the monster-boy is sad but held my attention. John Paul Leon's art is pretty good, with lines kind of similar to what you'd see in Gotham Central. It's the most distinguishable from the rest of the art in this book, and makes for a nice refresher (especially after all the Frank Quitely stuff from before). I didn't care for the "New Worlds" story where Jean and Professor X deal with a mutant-thief (Fantomex) and these X-Men-I've-never-heard-of deal with a related out-of-control mutant loose in the subway. It feels like filler and it's long. "Some Angels Falling" focuses on Beak and Angel, which is nice. It also includes a kinky telepath thing that starts the Jean/Scott/Emma love triangle, heh. To be honest, I don't understand what happens in "Ambient Magnetic Fields" or what its significance is, other than being somehow related to Magneto recording his last words. That's probably due to my lack of X-Men historical knowledge. Phil Jimenez's art makes the X-Men (and everyone else) look really good. He gave me some, "Oh, Jean's hot" moments in all his sections. But really, the characters look a whole lot better when he's drawing them. I haven't looked at book three yet, but I'm hoping he does more of the art in it. Later, Quentin Quire goes on a big, long rebellion against Prof. X and the Xavier Institutde, causing a lot of damage and the death of a student. Afterwards, in what (for me) is one of the best parts of the book, the Jean/Scott/Emma love triangle comes to a fiery confrontation. Next thing you know, Emma Frost's been "murdered" and the school's on lockdown until a couple of special detectives figure out what's going on. This is actually pretty interesting, with a Jean/Emma thing and the way the book concludes. So. What to take away from this? It's a good book, though the pieces feel separate from each other rather than being one smooth story. The love triangle deserves the most attention, mostly because of the way Jean and Emma interact and work through it. Scott is passive and could be anyone else in the Marvel universe with his lack of personality. I've never understood what the fuss was about him.

  9. 5 out of 5

    Sam Quixote

    I found this second volume to be a bit disappointing following the big ideas and grand over-arching storyline of the first book. There seems to be different strands of story going on but none of it is really connected and some of them are downright dull. The book starts off with the X-Men with new member Xorn (he who has a star for a brain and the mask of a movie serial killer) as they deal with trouble in the Channel Tunnel, something called Weapon XII, and an evil mutant espionage thief called I found this second volume to be a bit disappointing following the big ideas and grand over-arching storyline of the first book. There seems to be different strands of story going on but none of it is really connected and some of them are downright dull. The book starts off with the X-Men with new member Xorn (he who has a star for a brain and the mask of a movie serial killer) as they deal with trouble in the Channel Tunnel, something called Weapon XII, and an evil mutant espionage thief called Fantomex. Grant Morrison throws in a sub-plot about Cyclops having marital troubles with Jean Gray and the sympathetic ear to hear him out is attached to the exquisite Emma Frost, the White Queen. There's a trip to Genosha where Magneto's legacy is being enacted via his dubiously motivated offspring and Quentin Quire, one of Xavier's students and an Omega level (read "super-powerful") mutant decides to go all punk rock, starting a riot in the Westchester school leading to an Agatha Christie-esque murder mystery of one of the X-Men being killed leaving Inspector Bishop to solve the case. There is a lot going on but little of it feels very interesting with the stories running their course before starting on the next one. I enjoyed the confrontation between Jean and Emma if only for the secret origin of Emma being revealed (plastic surgery for a diamond woman, who knew?) and the murder mystery was funny in its way, but it felt too small for such a large book. Considering Morrison began the series by blowing up Genosha, killing 16 million mutants, and having Xavier go on a rampage involving the Shi'Ar, the minor stories in Book 2 feel like a collection of B-sides. Morrison's writing is fine but the artwork fluctuates from poor and unlikeable (Igor Kordey - ergh!) to the high standard of Frank Quitely's art - it's a shame he doesn't do the entire series instead of every now and then. Book 2 in this Ultimate Collection isn't bad but I expected it to be better than it turned out to be. Hopefully the final book will live up to the promises of the first one by going for that big storyline rather than several small ones.

  10. 4 out of 5

    Gavin

    Well...there was good and bad stuff about this collection, and some of the most disappointing stuff was actually some of the artwork... I also got overwhelmed with too many mutants at some points. Wolverine does not feature heavily in this book, though there is a fair bit of Beast, which is a nice change. Some of the stuff is silly, some of it good, Xorn is a very interesting character, and it was great seeing lesser used characters/old ones like Arcangel, Storm, Quicksilver, Polaris, and some of Well...there was good and bad stuff about this collection, and some of the most disappointing stuff was actually some of the artwork... I also got overwhelmed with too many mutants at some points. Wolverine does not feature heavily in this book, though there is a fair bit of Beast, which is a nice change. Some of the stuff is silly, some of it good, Xorn is a very interesting character, and it was great seeing lesser used characters/old ones like Arcangel, Storm, Quicksilver, Polaris, and some of the first New Mutants (X-Force I suppose now?) Also appearances of Weapon XII and XIII, like to see where that goes...Not as fond of the school parts, but I suppose they have to set up new younger characters to move forward sometimes. It's for sure got a lot going, and a ton of people showing up even for a little bit, which is what Morrison does well. Definitely worth a read, and I'll check out Vol 3 for sure.

  11. 4 out of 5

    Max

    Getting the Kordey art out of the way early was definitely good. After the Fantomex story ended, it was all good art for the rest of the volume. We even got the longest stretch of Quitely art probably in the entire series. And that Quitely art just happened to cover the best story arc of the entire run thus far, and potentially my favorite X-Men story: the Quentin Quire-centered Riot At Xavier's. It took me too long to finally get around to reading this and I'm loving it even more than I expected. Getting the Kordey art out of the way early was definitely good. After the Fantomex story ended, it was all good art for the rest of the volume. We even got the longest stretch of Quitely art probably in the entire series. And that Quitely art just happened to cover the best story arc of the entire run thus far, and potentially my favorite X-Men story: the Quentin Quire-centered Riot At Xavier's. It took me too long to finally get around to reading this and I'm loving it even more than I expected. It's saddening to know that all of these great themes and ideas that have reinvigorated the X-men and what makes them interesting to me...are completely thrown out immediately after Morrison leaves, and his run is followed by the apparently awful Chuck Austen. That's got to be the all time biggest drop in quality on a book.

  12. 4 out of 5

    Jordan Lahn

    Continues to have the same strengths and weaknesses as the previous volume. I did enjoy Emma Frost's increased role in the last few arcs of this volume, and it was interesting to see the first appearance (?) of some familiar characters from later X-Men stories, such as Quentin Quire and Glob Herman. Still, I'm looking forward to finishing the 3rd volume so I can say I've read the series, but I don't expect it to come together in a way that makes this a favourite.

  13. 4 out of 5

    Amal El-Mohtar

    I was totally engaged by this, irked by the cliffhanger, pleased that I had the third volume to hand, and then everything went wrong.

  14. 5 out of 5

    Tony Laplume

    This collection might as well represent what Marvel wished Grant Morrison's New X-Men had ended up as, and nothing more. Years later there was a mini-series riff on it called E for Extinction (the name of the first arc and collection, at the beginning of the run, not included here), and it was based on material found here. Then of course, after this material, Morrison revealed that Xorn was Magneto all along, and then Marvel tried its hardest to pretend none of this ever happened. Which is of cou This collection might as well represent what Marvel wished Grant Morrison's New X-Men had ended up as, and nothing more. Years later there was a mini-series riff on it called E for Extinction (the name of the first arc and collection, at the beginning of the run, not included here), and it was based on material found here. Then of course, after this material, Morrison revealed that Xorn was Magneto all along, and then Marvel tried its hardest to pretend none of this ever happened. Which is of course insanity, but I can see where the company would've been disappointed. Morrison, at the point he was hired to write X-Men comics, was best known for his star-studded Justice League revival known as JLA. It doesn't particularly matter that his longest-running comic at that point was The Invisibles (which might still be the case, actually), or that he'd made his name on the equally quirky Animal Man and Doom Patrol. Marvel saw the success of JLA, and wanted more of that, with added mutant flavoring. But that's not what it got. Instead, Morrison set about to advance the X-Men saga. In a way, he was doing exactly what he'd done with the Justice League. With them, he brought them back to their glory by putting aside the b-players and making their stories as iconic as possible, in all the ways he understood (and the guy tends to do his homework). So with the X-Men, he would've naturally gravitated to their best-known and best-remembered version, the Claremont era that still dominates fan memories. And so he did the Morrison version of that. Anyway, this collection is past the point where Magneto "died," the mutant island of Genosha was exterminated, and Xorn was introduced. And, again, before Xorn is revealed as Magneto. The general perception that Morrison screwed over a brilliant new creation like Xorn is funny, and seems contrary to his...entire publishing history. Morrison tends to open boxes when he begins a new story, and then closing them when he finishes. The most famous example, now, is Damian Wayne, Batman's son, whom he killed off in the pages of Batman Incorporated. If this had been a Marvel story, apparently, that would've been that and fans would still be disappointed to this day. But it was a DC story, and another writer (Peter Tomasi) brought Damian back almost immediately. And anyway, the seeds of Xorn's fate are right here in this collection, and they're named Fantomax, billed as "Europe's most notorious mutant." But he apparently is making it all up, and ultimately he's really just a way to expand Wolverine's saga, something that bore fruit later as we finally learn his full origin, something Morrison teases elsewhere in the run (again, not in this collection). Then there's the perception that nothing Morrison did left a lasting impression, and again, that's just not true, not merely with the above example, but in the character of Angel, featured prominently in this collection, who later appears in the film X-Men: First Class. This is all material I'm reading for the first time. I've been a fan of Morrison's for years. Like Marvel (apparently), I discovered him in the pages of JLA, and used that as his gold standard until coming back to him in the pages of the Seven Soldiers of Victory saga. To be fair, much of New X-Men unfolded when I wasn't actively reading comics, but it was concluding just as I was coming back. Finally getting around to reading what he achieved is to wonder what might've been if Marvel hadn't decided it was better off pretending he hadn't achieved anything at all. It wasn't until Whedon's Astonishing X-Men, which was that kind of high gloss reboot Marvel had expected, and then the Hope saga that things got back on track, but then...Well, a story for another day, perhaps. Anyway, this is in fact prime material for unlocking the whole thing. But it isn't the whole thing, and there's no reason to pretend otherwise.

  15. 5 out of 5

    Brandt

    I knew this moment was coming. I've been a big fan of Grant Morrison ever since his run on Doom Patrol. I know that The Invisibles isn't for everyone, but I like it. And I've gone back and really enjoyed his work on Animal Man and to some extent the different Batman titles he wrote. (I'm also forgetting JLA and All-Star Superman--those were good too.) I also enjoyed the first volume of Morrison's run on New X-Men. While I didn't think it was as good as his work on Doom Patrol (which is always goi I knew this moment was coming. I've been a big fan of Grant Morrison ever since his run on Doom Patrol. I know that The Invisibles isn't for everyone, but I like it. And I've gone back and really enjoyed his work on Animal Man and to some extent the different Batman titles he wrote. (I'm also forgetting JLA and All-Star Superman--those were good too.) I also enjoyed the first volume of Morrison's run on New X-Men. While I didn't think it was as good as his work on Doom Patrol (which is always going to be Morrison's gold standard for me), his work on on New X-Men in the first volume was reminiscent of his work on JLA--the arc of the volume, featuring a "twin" of Charles Xavier named Cassandra Nova and also nano-Sentinels (an excellent version of the Sentinels to be sure) was tightly plotted and had just the sort of take on Marvel's mutants that I would come to expect from Morrison (a mutant with a star in their brain? Classic Morrison.) However, being familiar with Morrison's work on JLA is also a detriment here--everything in that book (and other books, like Aztek) lead to the "Maggedon" story arc that would close his run on the book. I know there is one more volume of New X-Men that finishes off his run on the book. So just where is he heading? The problem when you get used to a writer being a certain way in comics is that when you know their rhythms and what makes them good story tellers, you tend to be disappointed when they don't follow their own script. I know Morrison has some over-arching plan here. Of course he does. The problem with this second volume of New X-Men is that if I know that is what is going to happen, then the collection of stories here feel like he's biding time waiting to get to the end. Perhaps I was spoiled with Volume One and the Cassandra Nova story arc. It consumed the entire volume and so it didn't feel like it was a collection of odds and ends, like Volume Two unfortunately feels like to me. For other writers, I would probably let this slide, but this is Grant Morrison, and I just expect so much more.

  16. 4 out of 5

    George

    I have very mixed feelings about this one. Leon, Quitely, and Jimenez all do great on the art side. There's a lot of really good character stuff and concepts explored throughout the volume. Fantomex is a great creation, and Morrison's conception of the Phoenix is really cool, even if that arc is poorly paced and constructed. Riot at Xavier's and Murder at the Mansion are really really good and potent still. However, there's a lot of questionable politics and a lot of shit that doesn't hold up un I have very mixed feelings about this one. Leon, Quitely, and Jimenez all do great on the art side. There's a lot of really good character stuff and concepts explored throughout the volume. Fantomex is a great creation, and Morrison's conception of the Phoenix is really cool, even if that arc is poorly paced and constructed. Riot at Xavier's and Murder at the Mansion are really really good and potent still. However, there's a lot of questionable politics and a lot of shit that doesn't hold up under scrutiny 2020, with Morrison's examination of radicalization being questionable on its own, with a lot of power but a lot of nagging inconsistencies, including with regards race and mutant identity; the reveal that (view spoiler)[ Jumbo Carnation died from an overdose and not mutant violence REALLY doesn't hold up and weakens the central thrust of the book, that there are genuine reasons to act out and protest and rebel? so that's kinda fucked up (hide spoiler)] ; and there's a lot of gross stuff early on with the presentation of "terrorists" and whatnot. Additionally, I've heard criticisms that Emma's portrayal has a loooot of baked-in misogyny, that I can definitely see in some parts; I really love and feel for her in this book, and I think she gets a lot of really powerful stuff in here, but I also think that part of that is because later writers really expand on and work with the foundations here, allowing me to look back on it favorably for what it started, and her portrayal definitely has problems here. This is a very messy book, with a lot to unpack and reevaluate in a contemporary context, and should absolutely not be emulated or uncritically consumed - there's a lot of excellent work here, a lot of good energy and character stuff, and a lot of important new ideas to found the 21st century X-Men. I think it deserves appreciation for that and that there are great takeaways and experiences to be had with this book. However, there are an absolute boatload of problems that cannot and should not be ignored in discussion of this book, and I completely understand any one of them being dealbreakers for somebody because they almost are for me.

  17. 4 out of 5

    Nate

    Lots of great stuff here. Unlike the first collection, this one doesn’t have a single overarching storyline, but the arcs are all entertaining. And there are lots of small plotlines Morrison weaves throughout that I really like. Fantomex, the Scott-Jean-Emma love triangle, Phoenix, Beak and Angel, plus Xorn’s class. The only thing I’m not big on is the Quentin Quire stuff. He’s fine I guess, but also sort of annoying. Still, this is another thoroughly enjoyable book with great ideas and great ch Lots of great stuff here. Unlike the first collection, this one doesn’t have a single overarching storyline, but the arcs are all entertaining. And there are lots of small plotlines Morrison weaves throughout that I really like. Fantomex, the Scott-Jean-Emma love triangle, Phoenix, Beak and Angel, plus Xorn’s class. The only thing I’m not big on is the Quentin Quire stuff. He’s fine I guess, but also sort of annoying. Still, this is another thoroughly enjoyable book with great ideas and great characterization.

  18. 5 out of 5

    James Hyman

    Same issues as the volume before it to be honest.

  19. 5 out of 5

    Ian

    This and other Grant Morrison books reviewed here: https://fsfh-book-review2.webnode.com... This and other Grant Morrison books reviewed here: https://fsfh-book-review2.webnode.com...

  20. 5 out of 5

    Katrina Charles

    This review has been hidden because it contains spoilers. To view it, click here. Awesome. Development of The Phoenix is so good and Emma and Scott are breaking my heart.

  21. 5 out of 5

    Samantha

    This review has been hidden because it contains spoilers. To view it, click here. What in the world is with the "Here's Johnny." look Wolverine has on this cover? This collection wasn't as tense as the first, but I still really enjoyed most of the stories here. Highlights -Jean...again. Still really loving her character and she had several awesome moments in this volume. I only wish that when she finally found out about what was going on between Emma and Scott that she hadn't focused all her rage/blame onto Emma. (Even though I understood why she did.) -The whole Who shot Emma F What in the world is with the "Here's Johnny." look Wolverine has on this cover? This collection wasn't as tense as the first, but I still really enjoyed most of the stories here. Highlights -Jean...again. Still really loving her character and she had several awesome moments in this volume. I only wish that when she finally found out about what was going on between Emma and Scott that she hadn't focused all her rage/blame onto Emma. (Even though I understood why she did.) -The whole Who shot Emma Frost storyline. It had some odd moments. Like the insertion of Beak and Angel's pupa babies. But overall I really enjoyed that entire storyline. Emma's character development has also been fairly engaging. I like that Morrison shows glimpses of who she is once you get past the unaffected wasp queen persona. Like how shaken up she is over the death of one of her students and the Stepford Cuckoos' hostility towards her. -The Hank is gay running gag. This really amused me. How everyone kept bringing it up to him. How Emma was reading a magazine where the cover was a picture of his face with the headline "I'm as gay as it gets." I also liked that was used very subtly to show the emotional turmoil he was going through after a break-up. The Annoying Things: -Bringing back Polaris. Polaris is discovered alive among the ruins of Genosha....that's about it. It was a "well that's something that happened" moment. This is the only part we see her in for the rest of the Morrison run. Was this supposed to be a hint to the readers that Magneto is still alive? Because if it was, it was a bad one. -The entire Kick storyline The whole mutant steroid drug was rather "meh" for me. I don't think it especially added anything to the story. In fact, I think it would've been more interesting if the group of teenagers had decided to cause the riot and got as far as they did without the aid of the drug. It could've brought up some interesting questions and conflicts amid the X-men instead of just verging dangerously close into a PSA comic.

  22. 5 out of 5

    Jeff Lanter

    While this volume maybe isn't quite as good as the last, I still really enjoyed volume two of New X-Men. There are many smaller storylines this time and my favorites were the ones with Emma, Jean, and Scott and the ones with Special Class, particularly Beakie and Angel. These characters are so strong that they carry the book on their own. I liked seeing the introduction of Fantomex, even if the villain in that arc is not very interesting. I also liked seeing Quentin Quire get his start even thou While this volume maybe isn't quite as good as the last, I still really enjoyed volume two of New X-Men. There are many smaller storylines this time and my favorites were the ones with Emma, Jean, and Scott and the ones with Special Class, particularly Beakie and Angel. These characters are so strong that they carry the book on their own. I liked seeing the introduction of Fantomex, even if the villain in that arc is not very interesting. I also liked seeing Quentin Quire get his start even though I think other readers may find him annoying, because he is so youthful and serious at the same time. The final story about a murder is perhaps the strongest and ends on a nice cliffhanger. What amazes me is how so many of the ideas Grant Morrison has used here are basically still the status quo in the X-Men books. Emma is the same character more or less. She is in a relationship with Scott which starts here. Fantomex is a great character in Uncanny X-Force. Morrison deserves a lot of credit for what's he done in New X-Men and I hope that a new writer will come and shake things up like this again in the future. The art levels out after a bad start. Kordey's art just was not my cup of tea. Everybody else though is pretty good and Quietely does a decent number of issues here which is great to see. I didn't talk about the covers much in my last review, but I think that many in these issues are very good, especially compared to the ones in the first collection. The more I read of this series, the more I feel like it is a must read for X-Men fans. I can't wait to read the last collection.

  23. 4 out of 5

    Judah Radd

    ********second reading******** Yeah, this is the fucking shit. It really does elevate the genre. The socio-political messages in this volume feel like they were written for 2019, even though this is about 15 years old. That’s a sign of brilliant literature. I will definitely read this again. *********original review********* Wooooooooow!!!!!! Once again, Grant Morrison proves that his run of New X Men is the best! I loved the entire thing. It was awesome. The writing, dialogue and “beats” are so int ********second reading******** Yeah, this is the fucking shit. It really does elevate the genre. The socio-political messages in this volume feel like they were written for 2019, even though this is about 15 years old. That’s a sign of brilliant literature. I will definitely read this again. *********original review********* Wooooooooow!!!!!! Once again, Grant Morrison proves that his run of New X Men is the best! I loved the entire thing. It was awesome. The writing, dialogue and “beats” are so intelligent and on point. It might seem weird to say about a superhero comic, but this really is an X Men book for grownups. The characters, man. So fascinating. Emma Frost is so complicated, and I want to hate her but I find myself loving her. She’s identifiable. She’s real. Morrison manages to make her selfish, manipulative, pretentious, douchey and mean... but also vulnerable, heroic, lonely, kind and sympathetic. It’s so well done. Beast, Cyke, Jean, Charles... they’re all so well fleshed out. I also enjoyed some of the more peripheral characters. The Beak/Angel relationship was interesting and I found myself looking forward to parts that featured them. The mutant punk terrorist gang was interesting and dark. There was a lot going on across the board, and it really worked. The art was from a variety of artists, and they were all spectacular. I’m talking frames that wowed me and caused my eye to linger. Great coloring... everything. This fucking rules. I can’t wait to get the next volume.

  24. 5 out of 5

    Abe

    some great ideas here, but grant starts to go off the rails on character-building, and that's where he starts to lose his edge in general. the two exceptions are the depictions of phoenix (which, while gripping, are all too brief) and the introduction of fantomex (a divisive character, but i've always liked him). the biggest problem here is the central story--"riot at xavier's." i'm still not sure what the damn story is supposed to add up to. kids hate their elders? youngsters don't like the idea some great ideas here, but grant starts to go off the rails on character-building, and that's where he starts to lose his edge in general. the two exceptions are the depictions of phoenix (which, while gripping, are all too brief) and the introduction of fantomex (a divisive character, but i've always liked him). the biggest problem here is the central story--"riot at xavier's." i'm still not sure what the damn story is supposed to add up to. kids hate their elders? youngsters don't like the idea of peace and harmony? it ends up being a wasted opportunity--we get a potentially interesting character (the pissed off super-brain known as quentin quire) and an interesting idea (what if xavier's students didn't like xavier's dream anymore?), but end up with the x-men fighting wimps with ideas no different from magneto's. soooo, in short it's the old PROFESSOR X'S DREAM VS. MAGNETO'S DREAM story that we've seen a bajillion times, except this time with a young kid in a mohawk. also, the first story doesn't make sense, given the events that take place at the end of morrison's run. still, the action is page-turning, and for what it is, the book is still better than most comics out there.

  25. 4 out of 5

    Jordan

    I hate to do it, but Vol. 1 only earned 2 stars and I disliked this one even more. Hence... 1 pathetic little star. There just wasn't anything here I liked. None of the 50 new mutants wondering around the school were remotely interesting, and all the old favorites acted so out-of-character (except Wolverine, of course) that they may as well have been new additions. Fantomex felt like the creation of a junior high kid trying to write an awesome spy movie and the drugged-up mutant rebels in the mat I hate to do it, but Vol. 1 only earned 2 stars and I disliked this one even more. Hence... 1 pathetic little star. There just wasn't anything here I liked. None of the 50 new mutants wondering around the school were remotely interesting, and all the old favorites acted so out-of-character (except Wolverine, of course) that they may as well have been new additions. Fantomex felt like the creation of a junior high kid trying to write an awesome spy movie and the drugged-up mutant rebels in the matching striped shirts were just... tiresome. The Scott / Emma romance developed more organically and believably than I assumed it would, but that doesn't mean I have to like it. And I do appreciate Morrison making the team actually feel global. He adds more authentic multicultural touches than the occasional "boszhe moi!" we're used to. Still. I stick by my 1 star and am in absolutely no hurry waiting for the arrival of the third volume.

  26. 4 out of 5

    Lissa

    Well, this trade was rather a mixed bag in my opinion. There were some really good parts (Jean finding out what Scott and Emma have been up to, pretty much everything with Xorn in it, Beast's "labor of love" at the end), but there were just as many, if not more, not so good parts. The whole Scott/Emma relationship skeeves me out to no end. Yes, it was just "mental," but even Scott realized that he was "cheating" on Jean with Emma. I'm not invested in Scott and Jean's relationship, but I can't sta Well, this trade was rather a mixed bag in my opinion. There were some really good parts (Jean finding out what Scott and Emma have been up to, pretty much everything with Xorn in it, Beast's "labor of love" at the end), but there were just as many, if not more, not so good parts. The whole Scott/Emma relationship skeeves me out to no end. Yes, it was just "mental," but even Scott realized that he was "cheating" on Jean with Emma. I'm not invested in Scott and Jean's relationship, but I can't stand Scott and Emma. They slobber all over one another - TO THIS DAY, ten years later! - like puppies whenever they are in the same scene together. I can only take so many "dear"s and "darling"s before I start gagging.

  27. 5 out of 5

    Don

    The second act of Grant Morrison's seismic X-Men run is quite possibly the high point of the series. After using the first act to set up all the new concepts, relationships and themes, this is where Grant really starts to develop them and flesh those ideas out. Notably, I recall that this part of the arc is where the story started to get so complex (especially the "Riot at Xavier's" story being immediately followed by a complicated murder mystery) that it could no longer be followed quite as eas The second act of Grant Morrison's seismic X-Men run is quite possibly the high point of the series. After using the first act to set up all the new concepts, relationships and themes, this is where Grant really starts to develop them and flesh those ideas out. Notably, I recall that this part of the arc is where the story started to get so complex (especially the "Riot at Xavier's" story being immediately followed by a complicated murder mystery) that it could no longer be followed quite as easily in the monthly issues; fortunately, as I expected it, it holds together far more in the collected edition. As is true for much of Grant Morrison's work.

  28. 5 out of 5

    Kevin Fanning

    Probably my favorite volume of the Grant Morrison run. Introduces some of my all-time favorite characters, including Fantomex and Dust and the Stepford Cuckoos (who were technically introduced in the previous volume but get better time here). The drug thing wasn't my favorite? But it was fine. And anyway I liked the focus on younger mutants, still trying to figure out who they were, and I like the way it all builds up to shatter Xavier's mission, send Cyclops away, etc. All the fun stuff that st Probably my favorite volume of the Grant Morrison run. Introduces some of my all-time favorite characters, including Fantomex and Dust and the Stepford Cuckoos (who were technically introduced in the previous volume but get better time here). The drug thing wasn't my favorite? But it was fine. And anyway I liked the focus on younger mutants, still trying to figure out who they were, and I like the way it all builds up to shatter Xavier's mission, send Cyclops away, etc. All the fun stuff that still echoes through the X-Men universe. Also this volume focused less on the universe and more on the relationships, esp Jean & Emma, so I liked that. To sum up, I really enjoy Fantomex.

  29. 4 out of 5

    Zach Danielson

    Grant Morrison's run on New X-Men continues, but I'm getting bored. Convoluted stories are fine, but I don't really care about most of the characters and the art feels uneven. Faces, in particular, look hastily drawn. I keep trudging through so I can get to Joss Whedon's run, beginning with Astonishing X-Men Vol. 1: Gifted. I hope I'm not disappointed. Grant Morrison's run on New X-Men continues, but I'm getting bored. Convoluted stories are fine, but I don't really care about most of the characters and the art feels uneven. Faces, in particular, look hastily drawn. I keep trudging through so I can get to Joss Whedon's run, beginning with Astonishing X-Men Vol. 1: Gifted. I hope I'm not disappointed.

  30. 5 out of 5

    Stephen

    Morrison's take on the X-Men is pretty solid. After playing around with the nanosentinels early on, he goes into more traditional territory and I think it works a lot better. Lots of mutants with the levels of outlandishness you'd expect from Morrison; very nice angsty teens; some really great moments of humour. After an interesting, quirky but self-indulgent begining to his run, it feels like Morrison is getting into a decent (albeit slightly more traditional) stride and is really enjoying it. Morrison's take on the X-Men is pretty solid. After playing around with the nanosentinels early on, he goes into more traditional territory and I think it works a lot better. Lots of mutants with the levels of outlandishness you'd expect from Morrison; very nice angsty teens; some really great moments of humour. After an interesting, quirky but self-indulgent begining to his run, it feels like Morrison is getting into a decent (albeit slightly more traditional) stride and is really enjoying it. Quality mutant fair.

Add a review

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Loading...
We use cookies to give you the best online experience. By using our website you agree to our use of cookies in accordance with our cookie policy.