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Apples to Oregon: Being the (Slightly) True Narrative of How a Brave Pioneer Father Brought Apples, Peaches, Pears, Plums, Grapes, and Cherries (and Children) Across the Plains

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The slightly true narrative of how a brave pioneer father brought apples, pears, plums, grapes, and cherries (and children) across the plains. Apples, ho! When Papa decides to pull up roots and move from Iowa to Oregon, he can’t bear to leave his precious apple trees behind. Or his peaches, plums, grapes, cherries, and pears. Oh, and he takes his family along too. But the t The slightly true narrative of how a brave pioneer father brought apples, pears, plums, grapes, and cherries (and children) across the plains. Apples, ho! When Papa decides to pull up roots and move from Iowa to Oregon, he can’t bear to leave his precious apple trees behind. Or his peaches, plums, grapes, cherries, and pears. Oh, and he takes his family along too. But the trail is cruel. First there’s a river to cross that’s wider than Texas, then there are hailstones as big as plums, and then there’s even a drought, sure to crisp the cherries. Luckily Delicious (the nonedible apple of Daddy’s eye) won’t let anything stop her father’s darling saps from tasting the sweet Oregon soil. A hilarious tall tale from the team that brought you Fannie in the Kitchen that’s loosely based on the life of a real fruiting pioneer.


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The slightly true narrative of how a brave pioneer father brought apples, pears, plums, grapes, and cherries (and children) across the plains. Apples, ho! When Papa decides to pull up roots and move from Iowa to Oregon, he can’t bear to leave his precious apple trees behind. Or his peaches, plums, grapes, cherries, and pears. Oh, and he takes his family along too. But the t The slightly true narrative of how a brave pioneer father brought apples, pears, plums, grapes, and cherries (and children) across the plains. Apples, ho! When Papa decides to pull up roots and move from Iowa to Oregon, he can’t bear to leave his precious apple trees behind. Or his peaches, plums, grapes, cherries, and pears. Oh, and he takes his family along too. But the trail is cruel. First there’s a river to cross that’s wider than Texas, then there are hailstones as big as plums, and then there’s even a drought, sure to crisp the cherries. Luckily Delicious (the nonedible apple of Daddy’s eye) won’t let anything stop her father’s darling saps from tasting the sweet Oregon soil. A hilarious tall tale from the team that brought you Fannie in the Kitchen that’s loosely based on the life of a real fruiting pioneer.

30 review for Apples to Oregon: Being the (Slightly) True Narrative of How a Brave Pioneer Father Brought Apples, Peaches, Pears, Plums, Grapes, and Cherries (and Children) Across the Plains

  1. 4 out of 5

    Kathryn

    A delightful "tall tale" version of the (true) story of the man who brought the first apple trees to Oregon--along with his wife and kids. At times, I felt a tad annoyed/disturbed that the father was so focused on his fruit rather than his children--of course, it is done "tall tale" fashion so one knows it's exaggerated, and the children don't seem to mind playing second-fiddle, but I couldn't help but feel that the world doesn't need another story with a neglectful parent, however tongue-in-che A delightful "tall tale" version of the (true) story of the man who brought the first apple trees to Oregon--along with his wife and kids. At times, I felt a tad annoyed/disturbed that the father was so focused on his fruit rather than his children--of course, it is done "tall tale" fashion so one knows it's exaggerated, and the children don't seem to mind playing second-fiddle, but I couldn't help but feel that the world doesn't need another story with a neglectful parent, however tongue-in-cheek. The sheer zest of the story, the great illustrations, the "historical fiction" aspect--and a touching father-daughter ending, make me rate this quite favorably overall. However, children already feeling sensitive to parents who seem to put work before parenting might feel that the tale makes light of their situation.

  2. 5 out of 5

    Lisa Vegan

    Luckily, it’s made clear all along that, while this is a historical fiction story based on a real man/family, that it’s a meant to be amusing tall tale, and it’s a delightful story. The tale is based on the man who first brought fruit trees (from Iowa) to Oregon. It’s a westward pioneer story. What makes it funny, and it is funny, is that the father is consumed with care for the fruit trees, and much less so for his children, who do have a mother that sort of looks after them. Whenever the family Luckily, it’s made clear all along that, while this is a historical fiction story based on a real man/family, that it’s a meant to be amusing tall tale, and it’s a delightful story. The tale is based on the man who first brought fruit trees (from Iowa) to Oregon. It’s a westward pioneer story. What makes it funny, and it is funny, is that the father is consumed with care for the fruit trees, and much less so for his children, who do have a mother that sort of looks after them. Whenever the family encounters a dangerous challenge (crossing a river, a hailstorm, a desert, etc.) the father makes sure those fruit trees are safe and as far as the children go, other than expecting the them to help protect the fruit, they’re basically left to fend for themselves. Given these circumstances, I think children with loving and attentive parents will find this story silly, and maybe hilarious at times, and they’ll enjoy it. I personally would not knowingly read it to children who have been neglected (or abused) in any way because my thinking is that they may find it highly disturbing, and that’s a shame because it really is a clever and amusing tall tale. The illustrations really add to the fun. There is a map (hooray, a map!) showing the route from Iowa to Oregon (very near Portland) and the states are in different colors and there are some pertinent landmarks shown. So, there is a mini geography lesson, as well as a mini history lesson. The people in the pictures within the story exhibit so much verve that it’s contagious. The illustrations have a lot of variety in terms of color and level of detail, and they are sometimes very funny too. The fictional daughter, the narrator of the tale, is named Delicious; the author says she couldn’t resist, even though that variety of apple was not in existence at the time. Readers are likely to start craving apple, or peaches, pears, plums, grapes, or cherries. And given all the junk food that’s often available to kids, there are worse things to have happen. I love how both the author and illustrator, in their author’s and illustrator’s notes, share their favorite type of apples. Be sure to read the back cover because it has a short list of information about apples and closely related facts. I learned a few things from reading the list. For instance: there are more than 7,500 varieties of apples & about 2,500 of them are grown in the U.S. I try to eat a variety of foods but I had no idea there was that much variety of just apples. Also, apples are part of the rose family. Etc.! I also learned some historical information from the fictional tale itself.

  3. 5 out of 5

    Abigail

    When Delicious's father decides to head west to Oregon in this entertaining tall tale, he takes along all of his favorite apple trees (not to mention his peach, plum, cherry and pear trees, as well as his grape vines), carefully stowed away in a wagon of their own. The trail from Iowa to the west coast is an arduous one though, and Delicious must often think quickly in order to help her father get his precious cargo to its destination... The third book I have read from author/illustrator team Deb When Delicious's father decides to head west to Oregon in this entertaining tall tale, he takes along all of his favorite apple trees (not to mention his peach, plum, cherry and pear trees, as well as his grape vines), carefully stowed away in a wagon of their own. The trail from Iowa to the west coast is an arduous one though, and Delicious must often think quickly in order to help her father get his precious cargo to its destination... The third book I have read from author/illustrator team Deborah Hopkinson and Nancy Carpenter - the first two being Fannie in the Kitchen and A Letter to My Teacher - this engaging work of picture-book historical fiction is apparently based upon the real-life story of pioneer Henderson Lewelling, who established the first orchard in Oregon. That said, this is definitely a fictional tale, and is full of a folksy language and sense of humor. The accompanying artwork, done in oil paint, is full of light and color, and captures the excitement of Delicious and her family's many adventures. Recommended to children who enjoy tall tales and/or stories about the westward journey of the pioneers.

  4. 5 out of 5

    Becky

    First sentence: My daddy loved growin' apples. And when he got ready to pull up roots and leave Iowa for Oregon, he couldn't bear to leave his apple trees behind. So Daddy built two of the biggest boxes you could ever hope to see. He set them into a sturdy wagon and shoveled in good, wormy dirt. Then he filled every inch with little plants and trees. Hundreds of them! Daddy was ready for the most daring adventure in the history of fruit. Premise/plot: Apples to Oregon is a tall tale story. A girl First sentence: My daddy loved growin' apples. And when he got ready to pull up roots and leave Iowa for Oregon, he couldn't bear to leave his apple trees behind. So Daddy built two of the biggest boxes you could ever hope to see. He set them into a sturdy wagon and shoveled in good, wormy dirt. Then he filled every inch with little plants and trees. Hundreds of them! Daddy was ready for the most daring adventure in the history of fruit. Premise/plot: Apples to Oregon is a tall tale story. A girl named DELICIOUS is telling the story of how her Dad brought apples, peaches, pears, plums, grapes, and cherries with the family on their trek west on the Oregon Trail. Misadventure abounds but so do solutions to every problem. My thoughts: If you're looking for a DELICIOUSLY silly story, then this one might fill you up. It is not to be taken at all seriously. There was a man who did bring apples and other fruits to Oregon, but this isn't his story. The narrative is a tall tale. If you're looking for an example of a tall tale to share with little ones--perhaps to teach the concept of a tall tale--then this one might do well. Here's an example of the silliness: The wind began to throw around everything that wasn't lashed down--our boots, baby Albert's diapers, every pot and pan Momma had, even our own little wagon. Next, hailstones big as plums came hurtling out of the sky. "Guard the grapes! Protect the peaches!" Daddy howled. So we all started tearing off our clothes and holding them over Daddy's darlings. Bonnets, petticoats, trousers, hats--even Daddy's drawers! Text: 5 out of 5 Illustrations: 4 out of 5 Total: 9 out of 10

  5. 4 out of 5

    Vy Ma

    This book really allows readers an insight of what life could’ve been like to migrate across the county. Although it isn’t relatable to a lot of people in present day, it’s still important to be informed.

  6. 5 out of 5

    Phil

    This book was really cute and in the manner of a tall tale like Paul Bunyan. A little wordy for my two year olds but has great pictures, too.

  7. 5 out of 5

    N_kellie

    An apple core trail from Salem, Iowa to Walla Walla, Washington is the map the reader sees first as the book is opened. The story that follows is a creative, silly, heartwarming tale about a journey to move not only apple trees, but also a family, half way across the country. This story is (slightly) based on a real fruiting pioneer. The first full page illustration shows two wagons, the first is 3 times as large as the second. One wagon is pulling apple, peach, pear, plum, grape, and cherry tre An apple core trail from Salem, Iowa to Walla Walla, Washington is the map the reader sees first as the book is opened. The story that follows is a creative, silly, heartwarming tale about a journey to move not only apple trees, but also a family, half way across the country. This story is (slightly) based on a real fruiting pioneer. The first full page illustration shows two wagons, the first is 3 times as large as the second. One wagon is pulling apple, peach, pear, plum, grape, and cherry trees, and the other wagon is pulling six children and a mother. There is a girl chasing the wagons and a man standing tall at the front with his hat in his hand, reaching out. To the reader’s surprise, the larger wagon is the one holding the fruit trees, and the family is squeezed in the small covered wagon trailing behind. The many adventures begin right away. First, the family has to cross the Platte River, and the folks on the other side of the riverbank don’t have much confidence in the family making across. The narrator young girl, Delicious, is the apple of her daddy’s eye and she helps the family make it across. A horrible wind storm and hailstones as big as plums are the families next challenge, but daddy’s concern are his grapes and plums. So the family takes off their clothes to cover the trees. Delicious steps up and makes the trip a success as she is able to solve the many problems her father faces on their journey. When they finally arrive to Oregon she explains how gold was discovered not long after, but the family already had their fortune, the fruit had made them rich. The author’s note on the last page helps fill in the details the reader may not be aware of. It explains that a family with 8 children actually did carry seven hundred plants and young fruit trees from Iowa to Oregon, and fruit orchards remain an important part of Oregon’s economy. Bright, colorful painted illustrations make this book a delight to read, and details included in each illustration lend to discussions of their own. The figurative language in this book makes this a prefect text for a variety of grade levels. While the silly story may be enjoyed as a read aloud for a primary classroom, intermediate students may benefit from taking a closer look at what the author means through the use of simile and metaphor. It would be useful to discuss vocabulary throughout the story. Because the story is about a journey west, geography lessons can be based on what is read, and the history of the apple and how orchards came in to existence in the west is not just a fluke.

  8. 5 out of 5

    Susan Mortimer

    This is the (“slightly true”) story of Delicious – yes, she’s named after an apple – and her family as they move from Salem, Iowa clear out to Milwaukie, Oregon sometime in the mid-19th century. Delicious tells us about their adventure-filled journey, one with a personal dream as tall as this tale: that of Papa getting his precious fruit trees, carried in boxes set to wagons, across the western plains and mountains, and ultimately planted in good Oregon dirt. “Along with apples, my daddy took pe This is the (“slightly true”) story of Delicious – yes, she’s named after an apple – and her family as they move from Salem, Iowa clear out to Milwaukie, Oregon sometime in the mid-19th century. Delicious tells us about their adventure-filled journey, one with a personal dream as tall as this tale: that of Papa getting his precious fruit trees, carried in boxes set to wagons, across the western plains and mountains, and ultimately planted in good Oregon dirt. “Along with apples, my daddy took peaches, pears, plums, grapes, and cherries. Oh, and by the way, he took us along too.” And oh, yes, it’s a good thing too, because Delicious saves the day time and time again for her family (and especially for her Papa and his dream) during their journey. While a tall-tale, this story also serves as an accurate portrayal in other regards for the pioneer experience. In fact, Hopkinson provides an interesting and informative Author’s Note, allowing the reader to see the fact behind the fiction. Carpenter’s illustrations are beautiful, as they capture equally well the hardship (and humor) of pioneer life, and the loving relationship between father and daughter. And, as a bonus, if you’re the kind of parent that likes to read aloud, Apples to Oregon is a dream come true. The text is pitch-perfect, and it allows for a fun personal interpretation. This book serves equally well for younger listeners for the sheer entertainment value of this racous tall-tale, as well as for older readers enjoying a humorous look at history (while learning a thing or two to boot!).

  9. 5 out of 5

    Marissa Raimondi

    Apples to Oregon is a fantastic historical fiction book for children! In this “slightly true” story, a father and his family travel from Iowa all the way to Oregon on a wagon pulled by cattle. The journey they make has many hardships and obstacles. But despite all the obstacles they face, the family accomplishes their goal and are as happy as can be. This story really had my students and I so captivated! Students were so involved in Papa and Delicious’ journey, they just could not wait to see ea Apples to Oregon is a fantastic historical fiction book for children! In this “slightly true” story, a father and his family travel from Iowa all the way to Oregon on a wagon pulled by cattle. The journey they make has many hardships and obstacles. But despite all the obstacles they face, the family accomplishes their goal and are as happy as can be. This story really had my students and I so captivated! Students were so involved in Papa and Delicious’ journey, they just could not wait to see each page turn. After listening to the story, our class discussed the importance of determination. Delicious portrayed a positive example to students, showing the importance of perseverance and hard work. Students were also eager to learn more about the history of apple trees in America and geography, allowing Apples to Oregon to lead into a great social studies lesson as well. The illustrations in this book really capture the reader’s attention! They are so vivid and detailed. Apples to Oregon was a great book to use to really help my students understand why illustrations are so important while reading. I would recommend Apples to Oregon to all elementary grades (a read aloud to the lower grades). This book leads to great discussion after perseverance and the importance of illustrations. After reading this story, students could also write their own tall tale.

  10. 5 out of 5

    Cammym

    This tall tale of a pioneer who brings a wagon full of apple, peach, pear, plum, grape, and cherry saplings (oh, and his eight children) over the Oregon Trail is fun and engaging for kids, especially here in Oregon. The father is humorously depicted as a distracted eccentric who cares more for the plants than he does for his family. They protect the saplings at all costs through river crossings and tornadoes, finally reaching their destination having successfully transported their precious cargo This tall tale of a pioneer who brings a wagon full of apple, peach, pear, plum, grape, and cherry saplings (oh, and his eight children) over the Oregon Trail is fun and engaging for kids, especially here in Oregon. The father is humorously depicted as a distracted eccentric who cares more for the plants than he does for his family. They protect the saplings at all costs through river crossings and tornadoes, finally reaching their destination having successfully transported their precious cargo. The book is actually based on a true story, and the original pioneer who brought these trees over became a very successful purveyor of fresh fruit to the people of the west coast. Picture book, tall tale, Oregon Trail.

  11. 4 out of 5

    Luann

    The author says this is "mostly a tall tale" and subtitled it a "(slightly) true narrative." I think it's an entirely fun take on how apple trees made it to Oregon with a spectacularly strong narrator, a young girl named Delicious. This could be used in classrooms and library storytimes on apples, Oregon, pioneers, tall tales, and figurative language. Nancy Carpenter's quirky illustrations highlight the personalities of the characters, especially Delicious, perfectly. She seems to have something The author says this is "mostly a tall tale" and subtitled it a "(slightly) true narrative." I think it's an entirely fun take on how apple trees made it to Oregon with a spectacularly strong narrator, a young girl named Delicious. This could be used in classrooms and library storytimes on apples, Oregon, pioneers, tall tales, and figurative language. Nancy Carpenter's quirky illustrations highlight the personalities of the characters, especially Delicious, perfectly. She seems to have something of a thing for feet - especially bare feet. Fun! The author's note at the end helps to sort out the truth from the "tall" parts of the tale. I also loved the map on the endpapers, which had apple cores along the route to Oregon, and the apple facts on the back cover.

  12. 4 out of 5

    Analissa Cox

    This book talks about the Oregon Trail when the settlers began moving west of their homes to find new ones. This story reveals all the hardships that many went through on this trail with the weather and traveling. Though there was much more this could still show a child how hard it was to travel back then. It was aa somewhat contemporaneity story when the girl begins to talk to the reader about her missing left boot which was interesting to add in. Finally it talked a bit about the California go This book talks about the Oregon Trail when the settlers began moving west of their homes to find new ones. This story reveals all the hardships that many went through on this trail with the weather and traveling. Though there was much more this could still show a child how hard it was to travel back then. It was aa somewhat contemporaneity story when the girl begins to talk to the reader about her missing left boot which was interesting to add in. Finally it talked a bit about the California gold rush, but not too much because the girl and her family were already rich from the fruits the carried on the trail.

  13. 4 out of 5

    Casandria

    This book was a hoot! It's a tall tale based on a few facts about the first orchard planted in Oregon, and how they got the fruit trees there. I'm thinking about adapting it for story time... Apples

  14. 5 out of 5

    Ashlie

    Apples to Oregon is a story about a family who is traveling West during America’s Westward Expansion. The family leaves their home in Iowa to restart their life in Oregon. However, their journey is not easy. They face difficult weather patterns and a lack of resources, but they stick together and continue on to make their new life. I came across this book about a year ago. This book, although not exactly accurate shoes how treacherous the journey was for people heading West. This book does a goo Apples to Oregon is a story about a family who is traveling West during America’s Westward Expansion. The family leaves their home in Iowa to restart their life in Oregon. However, their journey is not easy. They face difficult weather patterns and a lack of resources, but they stick together and continue on to make their new life. I came across this book about a year ago. This book, although not exactly accurate shoes how treacherous the journey was for people heading West. This book does a good job at depicting possible hazards as they cross different regions. I definitely recommend reading this book to a class, I also suggest that you give the main character, Delicious, a fun voice as you read! (Also a side note the book has some puns like the above, the daughters name is Delicious and she wears a red dress, red delicious). Other books I could connect with this one would be “Daily Life in a Covered Wagon” by Paul Erickson, “You wouldn’t Want to Be an American Pioneer” by Jacqueline Morley, “Westward Expansion: An Interactive History Adventure” by Allison Lassieur, and if I were to expand the look of expansion I would connect with “Discovery of the Americas” by Betsy Maestro, and the Magic School Bus lost in the Solar System by Joanna Cole. A writing assignment that could be done using this as a mentor text would be to have students brainstorm about one of the different difficulties that the family faced, or another condition that may have occurred during the journey and draw/write their own version of events.

  15. 5 out of 5

    Alison Waara

    This tall tale story of a man who brought the first apple trees to Oregon, with his family, is a great way for children to see the trek pioneers endured way back when. This book is a great way to show the story of how a farmer made it his goal to move his apple trees to Oregon. This book uses great illustrations and figurative language which makes this book a great one for various grade levels to read. Of course students have and will learn about people like Johnny Appleseed, who introduced appl This tall tale story of a man who brought the first apple trees to Oregon, with his family, is a great way for children to see the trek pioneers endured way back when. This book is a great way to show the story of how a farmer made it his goal to move his apple trees to Oregon. This book uses great illustrations and figurative language which makes this book a great one for various grade levels to read. Of course students have and will learn about people like Johnny Appleseed, who introduced apple trees to much of eastern America, so it is fun to read and learn about someone else’s journey in introducing apple trees elsewhere. As the book follows this family as they move, something that I did not particularly like was how the father was much more worried about his fruit compared to his children - who worked very hard the whole journey to help their father - but this book is exaggerated to fit the fashion of “tall tale” so it makes sense. I would be apprehensive to share this book seeing as children who may be sensitive to parents putting their work before their children might feel this story makes their situation seem less serious. Overall it does a great job at using more exaggerated storytelling, but is not something I would reach for to show students.

  16. 5 out of 5

    Jeremy Schaefer

    "Traditional literature can be defined as all forms of narrative, written or oral, which have come to be handed down through the years. The time period of traditional literature is not defined, but it occurs in the past. All forms have plots and problems, often with a clear conflict between good and evil. The tales and stories usually have happy endings." Apples to Oregon falls under Traditional literature because it has been handed down throughout the years and is popular still today. Apples to "Traditional literature can be defined as all forms of narrative, written or oral, which have come to be handed down through the years. The time period of traditional literature is not defined, but it occurs in the past. All forms have plots and problems, often with a clear conflict between good and evil. The tales and stories usually have happy endings." Apples to Oregon falls under Traditional literature because it has been handed down throughout the years and is popular still today. Apples to Oregon is a tall tale that tells the story of young Delicious and her family, who have set off on the Oregon Trail to build a new life for themselves out west. Since her daddy can't bear to leave behind his beloved fruit trees, they build a special wagon to hold hundreds of fruit trees in addition to their other belongings. This book shows the hard times of the Oregon trial and shows how important perseverance, survival, and hardship are all part of life but in the end you can still achieve something great. This book would be great for introducing a history lesson and should be geared towards 2nd-5th grade. Also, the fact that this is loosely based off of real events makes it fun and relatable.

  17. 4 out of 5

    Kiley DeBruyne

    I really enjoyed this tall tale and felt like it included many good literary aspects. The author incorporated a lot of historical accuracy about traveling across the United States to the West coast. They crossed rivers, braved storms, made it through deserts, and beat the cold nights to get to Oregon. The story would be perfect for teaching the historical aspect of manifest destiny and Americans traveling West. The story is a tall tale because Delicious tells the story of her family traveling We I really enjoyed this tall tale and felt like it included many good literary aspects. The author incorporated a lot of historical accuracy about traveling across the United States to the West coast. They crossed rivers, braved storms, made it through deserts, and beat the cold nights to get to Oregon. The story would be perfect for teaching the historical aspect of manifest destiny and Americans traveling West. The story is a tall tale because Delicious tells the story of her family traveling West with their fruit trees and they are "larger than life." They make it through many difficulties and all the trees survive. I think that kids would enjoy reading this story as it does tell what a child may have experienced traveling West with their family, even though it is exaggerated and simplified a little. The author paints a good picture of what is included in traveling West and how many families were able to start a new life and succeed. Overall, I enjoyed this book and feel that the exaggeration of crossing the river and other events in the story made it much more enjoyable to read.

  18. 5 out of 5

    eb

    This book is bizarre. Yes, it's a tall tale, but it has some really itchy patriarchal subtexts happening in it that make it a no-go for me. The narrator is a girl whose dad decides to uproot the family and take them (and his precious fruit trees) to Oregon, and the story follows the trials they face on their way and the girl's faith in her father's vision, even in the face of terrible hardship and danger to her family (who are, tellingly, never once referred to with worry or care the way the app This book is bizarre. Yes, it's a tall tale, but it has some really itchy patriarchal subtexts happening in it that make it a no-go for me. The narrator is a girl whose dad decides to uproot the family and take them (and his precious fruit trees) to Oregon, and the story follows the trials they face on their way and the girl's faith in her father's vision, even in the face of terrible hardship and danger to her family (who are, tellingly, never once referred to with worry or care the way the apples are). It's a fable and highly stylized, but the way the father's character is portrayed-- as zealous to the point of delusion regarding his quest to get to the west coast with fruit trees he refers to as his "babies" intact-- smacks of, frankly, the kind of dangerous survivalist patriarchal family dynamics we see in nonfiction like Educated. It's insidious and damaging.

  19. 5 out of 5

    Kaitlin

    Apples to Oregon is a work of historical fiction. This story is about how a family with eight children traveled from Iowa to Oregon with their many fruit trees. These fruit trees went through a lot on the journey west as the protagonist, Delicious, describes throughout this story. This entertaining story is made mostly of folktale but apple trees coming to the west with a wagon is a true story. This story offers a way for readers to see some of the struggles of the trail out west in an upbeat wa Apples to Oregon is a work of historical fiction. This story is about how a family with eight children traveled from Iowa to Oregon with their many fruit trees. These fruit trees went through a lot on the journey west as the protagonist, Delicious, describes throughout this story. This entertaining story is made mostly of folktale but apple trees coming to the west with a wagon is a true story. This story offers a way for readers to see some of the struggles of the trail out west in an upbeat way without learning the brutal truths of the journey that many faced. I enjoyed how the writing style reflected that of a young girl. I could picture a young girl, such as Delicious, saying those things in real life. I also enjoyed how Delicious was the hero for the plants at multiple times throughout the book.

  20. 4 out of 5

    Millicent C

    Genre: Historical Fiction Awards: none Audience: 6-12 years old A. This book takes place in either the late 1830s or early 1840s when people began the migrate west. The family starts in Salem, Iowa and journey all the way to Milwaukie, Oregon on foot. B. The oldest daughter in the family tells her story of her and her family moving west. Since the story is told through the child's eyes the perspective is different than if it were told from the mother or father. The story is light with occasional p Genre: Historical Fiction Awards: none Audience: 6-12 years old A. This book takes place in either the late 1830s or early 1840s when people began the migrate west. The family starts in Salem, Iowa and journey all the way to Milwaukie, Oregon on foot. B. The oldest daughter in the family tells her story of her and her family moving west. Since the story is told through the child's eyes the perspective is different than if it were told from the mother or father. The story is light with occasional problems that the little girl is able to fix or come up with solutions on her own. C. What approach would you use to keep the apple trees and other plants safe while crossing the river? I would make many trips back and fourth from one side of the river to the other. Each trip I would transfer a small amount of the plants so that it would be easier to keep them safe.

  21. 4 out of 5

    Lisa

    Loved the illustrations on the end pages with the map and the apple cores. A very interesting storyline to consider how fruit trees came to be in our area. I didn't care for the main character being named for an apple and I was very disappointed in how the father was portrayed. He is seen as caring way more for his plants and trees than his family members. I can't tell if it was supposed to be funny that they were always an afterthought but I thought there was a lot of responsibility on the main Loved the illustrations on the end pages with the map and the apple cores. A very interesting storyline to consider how fruit trees came to be in our area. I didn't care for the main character being named for an apple and I was very disappointed in how the father was portrayed. He is seen as caring way more for his plants and trees than his family members. I can't tell if it was supposed to be funny that they were always an afterthought but I thought there was a lot of responsibility on the main daughter because of how her father acted. I was liking the illustrations till the wind storm blew the clothes off, I didn't find that necessary or funny. Also the page where he declares "Just a hundred miles to go," and everyone but him is helping to pull the animals and wagons up the rocky path while he just looks off in the distance.

  22. 4 out of 5

    Ashley Bunch

    I watched a read aloud of this book on youtube.com for my goodreads project. Its about a girl named Delicious who helps her daddy take apple trees and other goods across the country to Oregon via horse and wagon. Delicious helps her daddy build huge carts and planted apple trees in soil to transport out west. The tale tells about the struggles and wins they experienced along the way fighting the elements and terrain- crossing rivers and long stretches of land at a time. I think this would be a g I watched a read aloud of this book on youtube.com for my goodreads project. Its about a girl named Delicious who helps her daddy take apple trees and other goods across the country to Oregon via horse and wagon. Delicious helps her daddy build huge carts and planted apple trees in soil to transport out west. The tale tells about the struggles and wins they experienced along the way fighting the elements and terrain- crossing rivers and long stretches of land at a time. I think this would be a great book to incorporate into my read alouds during our folktale/folklore unit in my second grade classroom because it is funny, and draws in the historical element as well.

  23. 5 out of 5

    Brittney

    I liked the fun story behind this historical fiction book about moving out west. This family decides to pack up their belongings of mainly just fruit and apple trees. Along the way, they encounter trials and tribulations that make their trip not the easiest. This book was fun to read about how fruit was first planted on the west side. I didn't like however, that the father was more focused on his crops that his children had to share their little water with the plants. The illustrations in this b I liked the fun story behind this historical fiction book about moving out west. This family decides to pack up their belongings of mainly just fruit and apple trees. Along the way, they encounter trials and tribulations that make their trip not the easiest. This book was fun to read about how fruit was first planted on the west side. I didn't like however, that the father was more focused on his crops that his children had to share their little water with the plants. The illustrations in this book were vibrant and had a lot to look at. Overall, this book had a good ending and teaches the reader about what it was like to cross the Great Plains.

  24. 4 out of 5

    Matthew

    Easily one of the funniest books I've read with kids all year. I read this to fourth graders in my school and in every class, no matter what the group makeup, they were all laughing as the father in this story utterly neglects his family in favor of protecting his plants on the journey west. Literary devices abound in here, but whether they dissect the text afterwards or not, kids are bound to take some enjoyment from reading this book. Wonderful story-great for reading aloud and use as a mentor Easily one of the funniest books I've read with kids all year. I read this to fourth graders in my school and in every class, no matter what the group makeup, they were all laughing as the father in this story utterly neglects his family in favor of protecting his plants on the journey west. Literary devices abound in here, but whether they dissect the text afterwards or not, kids are bound to take some enjoyment from reading this book. Wonderful story-great for reading aloud and use as a mentor text in a workshop setting.

  25. 4 out of 5

    Jessica Erwin

    Grades- 3-5 Genre: Historical Realistic Fiction Apples to Oregon is a really cute and slightly humorous story that was fun to read even as an adult. I enjoyed reading how the family journeyed from Iowa to Oregon with all of their various fruits and I enjoyed reading the story when the trip began to get hard for them. I would recommend this to any young reader because the story shows how the people back then transported their families or belongings when they wanted to migrate somewhere else. I love Grades- 3-5 Genre: Historical Realistic Fiction Apples to Oregon is a really cute and slightly humorous story that was fun to read even as an adult. I enjoyed reading how the family journeyed from Iowa to Oregon with all of their various fruits and I enjoyed reading the story when the trip began to get hard for them. I would recommend this to any young reader because the story shows how the people back then transported their families or belongings when they wanted to migrate somewhere else. I love the cover of this book as well!

  26. 4 out of 5

    Paige

    This is a story about a father who loved his fruit trees. He had apples, peaches, pears, cherries, plums, and many many more! One day he decided he wanted to leave his home in Iowa and move all of his trees an bushes to Oregon, oh and his family too. The trail was rigourous and they encountered many hardships. Nothing could stop him from getting his trees in the ground acrooss the country. The family finally made it and the trees were planted. They lived happily ever after with all the fruit tha This is a story about a father who loved his fruit trees. He had apples, peaches, pears, cherries, plums, and many many more! One day he decided he wanted to leave his home in Iowa and move all of his trees an bushes to Oregon, oh and his family too. The trail was rigourous and they encountered many hardships. Nothing could stop him from getting his trees in the ground acrooss the country. The family finally made it and the trees were planted. They lived happily ever after with all the fruit that was produced.

  27. 4 out of 5

    CMReichard Family

    Our family really enjoys this story. Especially the adults that read it to the kids. This is a historical fiction story about pioneers in The Plains taking fruit trees to the West Coast. While this exact story did not happen, the things the pioneer family may have encountered are in this story. We picked up this story for our unit on reading about apples but I think this story would be great to read for our pioneer unit instead. No matter what reason that you would pick it up this story, our fam Our family really enjoys this story. Especially the adults that read it to the kids. This is a historical fiction story about pioneers in The Plains taking fruit trees to the West Coast. While this exact story did not happen, the things the pioneer family may have encountered are in this story. We picked up this story for our unit on reading about apples but I think this story would be great to read for our pioneer unit instead. No matter what reason that you would pick it up this story, our family thinks you will enjoy it.

  28. 4 out of 5

    Diana

    Clever little tall tale, but I couldn't help but be appalled at the fact that the father cared more about his plants than he did his own kids! I know, I know. It's a tall tale, and it's supposed to paint Delicious (Is it just me, or is that a kinda creepy name for a child?) as the hero. But still, it didn't resonate well with me. The story itself is fine, as are the illustrations, but I wasn't overly impressed.

  29. 5 out of 5

    Valerie

    I read this book for the ATY 2019 Reading Challenge Week 39: A strong sense of location A man from Iowa decided to move to Oregon with his wife and 8 children. Remarkably, they are going by wagon. More remarkably, they are taking many, many, many fruit trees. Most remarkably, they make it. The author researched how fruit trees and berry bushes made it to Oregon make a fun, exciting story out of it. Somehow, you feel like you experienced that trip yourself.

  30. 4 out of 5

    Nole

    I liked this fun fictional story that tells us how apples were brought to Oregon. I think that this book could be part of an Oregon trail lesson as well as a nature lesson. I think depending on the age it could also be used as a history lesson of the time period and why many families were leaving their homes and coming out west.

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