free hit counter code The Business of Heaven: Daily Readings - GoBooks - Download Free Book
Ads Banner
Hot Best Seller

The Business of Heaven: Daily Readings

Availability: Ready to download

Available from HarperOne, now the exclusive publisher of all of C. S. Lewis’s adult religious books, a repackaged edition of Lewis’s classic reading collection—reminiscent of the bestselling A Year with C. S. Lewis—featuring 365 selections from his writings that explore our connection to God. C. S. Lewis, author of Mere Christianity, The Screwtape Letters, The Great Divorce Available from HarperOne, now the exclusive publisher of all of C. S. Lewis’s adult religious books, a repackaged edition of Lewis’s classic reading collection—reminiscent of the bestselling A Year with C. S. Lewis—featuring 365 selections from his writings that explore our connection to God. C. S. Lewis, author of Mere Christianity, The Screwtape Letters, The Great Divorce, The Chronicles of Narnia, and many other beloved classics, considers humankind’s spiritual journey in this collection of wise, meditative excerpts and writings. In these daily reflections, the great British writer, scholar, lay theologian, broadcaster, and Christian apologist, explores a range of connected themes, including “the serious business of heaven,” “Nearness to God,” “Heaven and Sexuality,” and “Two Kinds of Good and Bad.”


Compare
Ads Banner

Available from HarperOne, now the exclusive publisher of all of C. S. Lewis’s adult religious books, a repackaged edition of Lewis’s classic reading collection—reminiscent of the bestselling A Year with C. S. Lewis—featuring 365 selections from his writings that explore our connection to God. C. S. Lewis, author of Mere Christianity, The Screwtape Letters, The Great Divorce Available from HarperOne, now the exclusive publisher of all of C. S. Lewis’s adult religious books, a repackaged edition of Lewis’s classic reading collection—reminiscent of the bestselling A Year with C. S. Lewis—featuring 365 selections from his writings that explore our connection to God. C. S. Lewis, author of Mere Christianity, The Screwtape Letters, The Great Divorce, The Chronicles of Narnia, and many other beloved classics, considers humankind’s spiritual journey in this collection of wise, meditative excerpts and writings. In these daily reflections, the great British writer, scholar, lay theologian, broadcaster, and Christian apologist, explores a range of connected themes, including “the serious business of heaven,” “Nearness to God,” “Heaven and Sexuality,” and “Two Kinds of Good and Bad.”

30 review for The Business of Heaven: Daily Readings

  1. 4 out of 5

    Vagabond of Letters, DLitt

    ****1/2 3rd reading. Excellent. 4th reading. Still excellent. 6th reading. Still my favorite devotional. (Upgraded to 9.5/10.)

  2. 5 out of 5

    Jonathan

    While I am almost always challenged by Lewis and while I regard him as one of my premier influences in literature, philosophy and theology, I would much rather read the whole of his thought as opposed to having some bite-sized artificial daily clipping. What he says here is profound; how it is organized in random samples is not. Perhaps it serves to introduce the new reader to Lewis. For those already acquainted with him, it is more frustrating than helpful and leaves one wishing for the whole s While I am almost always challenged by Lewis and while I regard him as one of my premier influences in literature, philosophy and theology, I would much rather read the whole of his thought as opposed to having some bite-sized artificial daily clipping. What he says here is profound; how it is organized in random samples is not. Perhaps it serves to introduce the new reader to Lewis. For those already acquainted with him, it is more frustrating than helpful and leaves one wishing for the whole sermon or book.

  3. 5 out of 5

    Jeff Miller

    This is one of those 365-day books which I started in Jan 2019. Delightful with generally more than just a short paragraph each day.

  4. 5 out of 5

    Welton Barker

    I try to read this book every day, but sometimes miss a day or two. No matter where I pick it up, though, this book provides thought-provoking and inspirational guidance for the practicing (or lapsed) Christian. But this is not an easy dimestore "Make Miracles Happen Today!" kind of book. It deals with the deeper troubles that any person of faith (or would-be person of faith) confronts. It is a well-thought-out selection from Lewis' writings, and is probably a good launching point for someone no I try to read this book every day, but sometimes miss a day or two. No matter where I pick it up, though, this book provides thought-provoking and inspirational guidance for the practicing (or lapsed) Christian. But this is not an easy dimestore "Make Miracles Happen Today!" kind of book. It deals with the deeper troubles that any person of faith (or would-be person of faith) confronts. It is a well-thought-out selection from Lewis' writings, and is probably a good launching point for someone not familiar with his ouevre. As Anthony Burgess said of Lewis' "Mere Christianity," his writings are the perfect antidote for anyone who wants to believe but finds their "intellect getting in the way."

  5. 5 out of 5

    Connie

    I’ll be the first to admit that while some of the writings of C S Lewis make such an extreme impact on me, I feel as if I have invisible lightbulbs over my head like a cartoon character would. At other times, my eyes will glaze over and thoughts start to wander because I can’t understand what he is trying to say. It all goes over my head. I stuck with this book for the entire year. Through thick and thin. There are sections that I’ve underlined, with giant stars at the top of the page, and then d I’ll be the first to admit that while some of the writings of C S Lewis make such an extreme impact on me, I feel as if I have invisible lightbulbs over my head like a cartoon character would. At other times, my eyes will glaze over and thoughts start to wander because I can’t understand what he is trying to say. It all goes over my head. I stuck with this book for the entire year. Through thick and thin. There are sections that I’ve underlined, with giant stars at the top of the page, and then days will go by with no marks at all. Still, I’m giving this book 5 stars because of all the insights that so profoundly affected my life.

  6. 4 out of 5

    Nancy Livingstone

    Excellent book that summarizes man and his quest for understanding, acceptance and love. C S Lewis is a deep thinking, introspective, and logical writer. He doesn't preach to the reader, but rather guides the reader through the matter of Christianity in a way that helps the reader to better understand God's work in man and man's need for God. Further, he reasons that there is considerable evidence of not only His existence, but also of His intricate workings in man's life. A perfect book for anyo Excellent book that summarizes man and his quest for understanding, acceptance and love. C S Lewis is a deep thinking, introspective, and logical writer. He doesn't preach to the reader, but rather guides the reader through the matter of Christianity in a way that helps the reader to better understand God's work in man and man's need for God. Further, he reasons that there is considerable evidence of not only His existence, but also of His intricate workings in man's life. A perfect book for anyone who is not sure what to believe about God, or His desire for a personal relationship with each person in Earth.

  7. 4 out of 5

    Greg

    In the opening of this book, Hooper employs a quote from The Allegory of Love - “Humanity does not pass through phases as a train passes through stations: being alive, it has the privilege of always moving yet never leaving anything behind. Whatever we have been, in some sort we are still.” This introduces a collection of Lewis’s writing meant to be consumed in small doses daily, as a quote of the day from a desktop calendar would be. To be sure, Lewis has plenty of wisdom to share. Some of my f In the opening of this book, Hooper employs a quote from The Allegory of Love - “Humanity does not pass through phases as a train passes through stations: being alive, it has the privilege of always moving yet never leaving anything behind. Whatever we have been, in some sort we are still.” This introduces a collection of Lewis’s writing meant to be consumed in small doses daily, as a quote of the day from a desktop calendar would be. To be sure, Lewis has plenty of wisdom to share. Some of my favorites are: “We love and reason because God Loves and reasons and holds our hand while we do it.” (56) “Nature is only the image, the symbol; but it is the symbol Scripture invites me to use. We are summoned to pass in through Nature, beyond her, into that splendour which she fitfully reflects.” (21) “I suspect there is something in our very mode of thought which makes it inevitable that we should always be baffled by actual existence, whatever character actual existence may have.” (44) “To be a Christian means to forgive the inexcusable, because God has forgiven the inexcusable in you.” (63) Quote by Samuel Johnson – “People need to be reminded more often than they need to be instructed.” (66) “Women sometimes have the problem of trying to judge by artificial light how a dress will look by daylight. That is very like the problem of all of us: to dress our souls not for the electric lights of the present world but for the daylight of the next. The good dress is the one that will face that light. For that light will last longer.” (132) “There are only two kinds of people in the end: those who say to God, ‘Thy will be done’, and those to whom God says, in the end, ‘Thy will be done.’ All that are in Hell, choose it. Without that self-choice there could be no Hell. No soul that seriously and constantly desires joy will ever miss it. Those who seek find. To those who knock it is opened.” (142) “There is always hope if we keep an unsolved problem fairly in view; there’s none if we pretend it’s not there.” (190) “No doubt Pain as God’s megaphone is a terrible instrument; it may lead to final and unrepented rebellion. But it gives the only opportunity the bad man can have for amendment. It removes the veil; it plans the flag of truth within the fortress of a rebel soul.” (243) Beautiful lines, all of the them, and worthy of reflection. While Lewis rates as one of my favorite authors, however, this collection of his writings left me hoping for the end of the book. Lewis, above all else for me, is a wonderful example of a supremely talented and educated man’s reasoned approach to faith. While there is wisdom in the words of this collection, what is missing is the logic the built them. This logic is overwhelming and, for me, convincing in his other books. This book is like a highlights tour, missing the relevance behind many of the places. It is certainly worth reading, but as a reminder of the glory of Lewis’s other work, not before or in replacement of reading that work. See my other reviews here!

  8. 4 out of 5

    Gary

    Having read, and thoroughly enjoyed The Screwtape Letters The Chronicles of Narnia and Mere Christianity I began this yearly devotional with extremely high expectations. So when my expectations were dashed, they were dashed to the extreme... thus the two star rating, which I know is way out of whack with most reviewers. This collection has some real gems. To treasure forever. But they were few and far between. The majority were of mediocre devotional content. Some were downright antiquated, either be Having read, and thoroughly enjoyed The Screwtape Letters The Chronicles of Narnia and Mere Christianity I began this yearly devotional with extremely high expectations. So when my expectations were dashed, they were dashed to the extreme... thus the two star rating, which I know is way out of whack with most reviewers. This collection has some real gems. To treasure forever. But they were few and far between. The majority were of mediocre devotional content. Some were downright antiquated, either because time has made them irrelevant since he based his reflections on [then] current events rather than scripture, or because they had no relevance to an American audience since they were based on British concerns which didn't culturally translate even though we share a common language and heritage. The final fault (and cause for a low rating) is that there is no apparent rhyme or reason to the organization of the material. So - this is a year long devotional with dated entries. Why a scatter shot approach to topical presentation? I'll just say, I am so relieved that December 31st rolled around, and I can start a fresh year with a new devotional.

  9. 4 out of 5

    David Roberts

    This was a gift from my son Rob and one of my 10 daily reading books for 2017. To be fair, I have read everything by CS Lewis and have a deep respect for his intellect and wisdom . So, of course I liked the book and it was one of my favorites for 2017. While he clearly has a Christian perspective, he writes from a point of view based on logic and common sense, rather than the authority of the Church ior the Bible, which appeals to me. The book is very well edited, seasonal, and has a wonderful fl This was a gift from my son Rob and one of my 10 daily reading books for 2017. To be fair, I have read everything by CS Lewis and have a deep respect for his intellect and wisdom . So, of course I liked the book and it was one of my favorites for 2017. While he clearly has a Christian perspective, he writes from a point of view based on logic and common sense, rather than the authority of the Church ior the Bible, which appeals to me. The book is very well edited, seasonal, and has a wonderful flow to it. I highlighted and cut and pasted at least 30 great quotes into my daily journal over the course of the year. There is even a section at the end for major Christian holidays (which I just found today, unfortunately) but the selected readings fit very well with both the Church and the calendar year. One wonders what else this brilliant man might have written had he not died at the age of 65...

  10. 4 out of 5

    Melissa

    I've recently realized one of the greatest gifts given me in my youth was the time and ability to think deeply on any one topic, without constant mental or physical interruptions. Some of that time I spent reading C.S. Lewis. This book, a daily reader with excerpts from his works, allowed a quick dive back into that mindset for me -- quicker and shallower, but a dip into those thoughts that are greater than ourselves nonetheless. I read the book (meant to be paced over a full year) in about four I've recently realized one of the greatest gifts given me in my youth was the time and ability to think deeply on any one topic, without constant mental or physical interruptions. Some of that time I spent reading C.S. Lewis. This book, a daily reader with excerpts from his works, allowed a quick dive back into that mindset for me -- quicker and shallower, but a dip into those thoughts that are greater than ourselves nonetheless. I read the book (meant to be paced over a full year) in about four months, simply because I wanted to and that's about as much time as I have for daily reading right now at this stage in my life. As expected (in part because I've read some of these insights previously), it was refreshing, thought-provoking, and -- most necessary for me at this time -- it quieted my soul.

  11. 4 out of 5

    Ginger ~ Pages from Wonderland

    Even though I am a diehard CS Lewis fan, this book left something to be desired. I find I much prefer reading his full works rather than an excerpt collection like this. CS Lewis is at times so complex and abstruse, that taken out of context, an excerpt can seem to be saying something that it decidedly was not. Multiple times I felt Lewis was being made to seem as though he was saying something or condoning views that I know he was not, from reading the full essay or work it was taken from. Howe Even though I am a diehard CS Lewis fan, this book left something to be desired. I find I much prefer reading his full works rather than an excerpt collection like this. CS Lewis is at times so complex and abstruse, that taken out of context, an excerpt can seem to be saying something that it decidedly was not. Multiple times I felt Lewis was being made to seem as though he was saying something or condoning views that I know he was not, from reading the full essay or work it was taken from. However a casual reader or someone who doesn't know Lewis as well could struggle with or misinterpret things.

  12. 4 out of 5

    Kathy England

    I used this as a daily devotional, although I read more than one day's reading at a time. The readings are taken from many of C. S. Lewis' writings. My favorites were always from "Mere Christianity", which I highly recommend to everyone. Although C. S. Lewis is one of my favorite writers, I prefer reading his writings in their entirety to reading bits and pieces of them.

  13. 5 out of 5

    Steve Campbell

    This is an excellent sampler of C. S. Lewis's thoughts. Each daily reading in culled from Lewis's published works and offers a profound nugget to ponder throughout the day. This book is good for those who have read Lewis's works and would like a little refresher, but it is also a good introduction to Lewis for those who have read few or none of his writings.

  14. 4 out of 5

    Julie Davis

    This is a really excellent devotional. Carefully selected excerpts of C.S. Lewis's work are organized around the liturgical year. A little C.S. Lewis every day is a great way to stay focused on the realities of Christian life.

  15. 5 out of 5

    Jason Pike

    I would recommend this as an intro to Lewis or a fun daily reminder (as it’s written) of what he’s said. Some sections get a little loose outside their context in the original book. But overall fun read.

  16. 4 out of 5

    Maxine Cockerill

    I am taking this slowly as I have not read many of his books and am taking notes as I go for future reference. I will be enjoying the mind opening experience for some time. Agree or not, he is an education all by himself. And I am fascinate.d

  17. 4 out of 5

    Derek Christman

    I should have read the description better. Each passage is an excerpt from his books and letters, many which I have already read and not in context.

  18. 4 out of 5

    Frank Lunn

    A wonderful compilation of his grandest thoghts.

  19. 5 out of 5

    Noula

    Great book!

  20. 5 out of 5

    Paul Dubuc

    This is a very good sampling of C.S. Lewis' writings on many different topics, from various previously published sources, broken up into digestible pieces. If you've read most of Lewis' work and want to refresh your memory and meditate variously on their insights, this book might be helpful. It might also be helpful for those who have very little exposure to Lewis and want to start with a shallow sampling before deciding where to dive in deeper. Each selection has its source listed in the back. This is a very good sampling of C.S. Lewis' writings on many different topics, from various previously published sources, broken up into digestible pieces. If you've read most of Lewis' work and want to refresh your memory and meditate variously on their insights, this book might be helpful. It might also be helpful for those who have very little exposure to Lewis and want to start with a shallow sampling before deciding where to dive in deeper. Each selection has its source listed in the back. Please do go on to read some of the original sources. A sampling like this doesn't really do them justice. The only criticism I have of this book is about its format. It's intended to be a devotional calendar with a reading for each specific date of a year with appropriate readings for special days in the church year. I don't think it succeeds very well in this format. For one thing the selections for the special days don't always seem relevant. The feast of St. Andrew, for example, on November 30 doesn't have anything to do with that particular Apostle. But the main reason it doesn't seem to work well as a devotional calendar is that long passages are often broken up into a sequence of separate sequential readings that span several days. If you stick to reading each selection one day at a time, you could easily lose the train of thought and have to pick it up again each day. There is no hint as to where one broken up passage ends and another begins unless you look at the list of sources in the back. I think the book would work much better if it were simply organized by topic into series of passages of varying lengths without trying to fit them in a daily calendar template.

  21. 4 out of 5

    MC

    As part of my time with God each day, I have a spiritual diet of Bible reading, memorization, and then books on theology/sermons/biographies of men of God, etc. I also like to do small daily snippets of devotionals, quotes, readings, so on and so forth. The book that I have used for this section of my devotionals the past year is The Business of Heaven, by C. S. Lewis. Now, to be clear on this, Lewis never wrote this book as such. The book is a collection of the man's writings, one for each day o As part of my time with God each day, I have a spiritual diet of Bible reading, memorization, and then books on theology/sermons/biographies of men of God, etc. I also like to do small daily snippets of devotionals, quotes, readings, so on and so forth. The book that I have used for this section of my devotionals the past year is The Business of Heaven, by C. S. Lewis. Now, to be clear on this, Lewis never wrote this book as such. The book is a collection of the man's writings, one for each day of the year, plus a small separate group of selections for the special “movable feasts and fasts” of the Episcopal Calendar. This way, every day and most special religious observances, have such a reading to commemorate them. Really, these selections are more like “thoughts of the day” that are taken from Lewis' writings. To their credit, the editors put real work into the book. Each reading really does encapsulate a thought or an idea that is Scripturally-based. While it is true that I found myself disagreeing once or twice with Lewis' perspective, it was on an issue that pertained to doctrinal or historical interpretation. In other words, an issue that Christians have debated for the past two millennia, and will debate until Our Lord returns, in all likelihood. Lewis was known for some more wacky views upon salvation, though they became increasingly orthodox as he studied the Scriptures more. None of the more wacky ones are here. This is not a “study” in Lewis, or a book drawing attention to Lewis, but a book of Lewis' quotes designed to do what he himself wanted done with his works, to draw attention to Our Wondrous God. Highly Recommended.

  22. 4 out of 5

    Matthew

    4.5 stars. First I should mention that I didn't read this book as it's meant to be read, one daily passage at a time. But I get the sense that would have been an even more impactful reading experience because the thoughts in this book are meant to be pondered. Many of the daily readings end with a line or two that is widely quoted. So it's fun to be reminded of the arguments that lead up to those well-known lines. Occasionally a reading would come from Screwtape Letters and it would take a second 4.5 stars. First I should mention that I didn't read this book as it's meant to be read, one daily passage at a time. But I get the sense that would have been an even more impactful reading experience because the thoughts in this book are meant to be pondered. Many of the daily readings end with a line or two that is widely quoted. So it's fun to be reminded of the arguments that lead up to those well-known lines. Occasionally a reading would come from Screwtape Letters and it would take a second to realize the change in voice. I wonder if the format would have been improved if the headings shared where the selected reading was taken from? Hmm. Good read. I'm counting this as "a book by C.S. Lewis or J.R.R. Tolkien" for 2016 #vtReadingChallenge

  23. 5 out of 5

    Laura

    C.S. Lewis is arguably one of the best Christian writers. It has a reading for everyday of the year. I tend to read 3 days at a time because there are so many insightful things. It helped me deal with friendship issues that I have been dealing with for years.

  24. 4 out of 5

    Bob

    Going to use this as a quick morning devotion or 'day-starter' after my workout for the next year. Hoping it lasts the full year. Pretty good book, but gets a little old when you've read most of Lewis' other works, since this is just snippets from everything else.

  25. 5 out of 5

    Debbie

    I read through this every other year or so. Jack never fails to challenge, spur and inspire me. The excerpts are taken in bits and pieces, out of context, which only makes me want to reread all the original texts again.

  26. 4 out of 5

    Michaeld

    A great day-by-day philosophical interpretation of life. From learning about C.S Lewis, his history truly peaks out through his work. All the struggles he has experienced are amplified in his literature.

  27. 4 out of 5

    Rob

    This book is simply a collection of excerpts from Lewis' writings, organized as a daily reading for a year. If you're familiar with Lewis, many of the excerpts will be things you've read. But it is still a nice way to pick up a deep or encouraging thought each day in a minute or two reading.

  28. 5 out of 5

    Emily

    I read a little bit everyday. Wakes up my mind.

  29. 4 out of 5

    Brian

    nice set of daily readings

  30. 5 out of 5

    Douglas Wilson

    Good.

Add a review

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Loading...
We use cookies to give you the best online experience. By using our website you agree to our use of cookies in accordance with our cookie policy.