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A romantic comedy that sweeps you up with breezy writing and canny social commentary, set behind the scenes of the classical music world during one hot, anything-can-happen, New York City summer Ruby has always been Ruby Chertok future classical pianist, heir to the Chertok family legacy, daughter of renowned composer Martin Chertok. But after bungling her audition for the A romantic comedy that sweeps you up with breezy writing and canny social commentary, set behind the scenes of the classical music world during one hot, anything-can-happen, New York City summer Ruby has always been Ruby Chertok future classical pianist, heir to the Chertok family legacy, daughter of renowned composer Martin Chertok. But after bungling her audition for the prestigious Amberley School of Music--where her father is on faculty--Ruby is suddenly just . . . Ruby. And who is that again? All she knows is that she wants out of the orbit of her relentlessly impressive family, and away from the world of classical music for good. Yes? Yes. Oscar is a wunderkind, a musical genius. Just ask any of the 1.8 million people who've watched him conduct his own compositions on YouTube--or hey, just ask Oscar. But while he might be the type who'd name himself when asked about his favorite composer and somehow make you love him more for it, Oscar is not the type to jeopardize his chance to study under the great Martin Chertok--not for a crush. He's all too aware of how the ultra-privileged, ultra-white world of classical music might interpret a black guy like him falling for his benefactor's white daughter. Right? Right. But as the New York City summer heats up, so does the spark between Ruby and Oscar. Soon their connection crackles with the same alive, uncontainable energy as the city itself. But can two people still figuring themselves out figure out how to be together? Or will the world make the choice for them?


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A romantic comedy that sweeps you up with breezy writing and canny social commentary, set behind the scenes of the classical music world during one hot, anything-can-happen, New York City summer Ruby has always been Ruby Chertok future classical pianist, heir to the Chertok family legacy, daughter of renowned composer Martin Chertok. But after bungling her audition for the A romantic comedy that sweeps you up with breezy writing and canny social commentary, set behind the scenes of the classical music world during one hot, anything-can-happen, New York City summer Ruby has always been Ruby Chertok future classical pianist, heir to the Chertok family legacy, daughter of renowned composer Martin Chertok. But after bungling her audition for the prestigious Amberley School of Music--where her father is on faculty--Ruby is suddenly just . . . Ruby. And who is that again? All she knows is that she wants out of the orbit of her relentlessly impressive family, and away from the world of classical music for good. Yes? Yes. Oscar is a wunderkind, a musical genius. Just ask any of the 1.8 million people who've watched him conduct his own compositions on YouTube--or hey, just ask Oscar. But while he might be the type who'd name himself when asked about his favorite composer and somehow make you love him more for it, Oscar is not the type to jeopardize his chance to study under the great Martin Chertok--not for a crush. He's all too aware of how the ultra-privileged, ultra-white world of classical music might interpret a black guy like him falling for his benefactor's white daughter. Right? Right. But as the New York City summer heats up, so does the spark between Ruby and Oscar. Soon their connection crackles with the same alive, uncontainable energy as the city itself. But can two people still figuring themselves out figure out how to be together? Or will the world make the choice for them?

30 review for Night Music

  1. 5 out of 5

    Chelsea (chelseadolling reads)

    I really, really enjoyed this! It was incredibly well written and WAY more complex than I expected it to be. I thought this was just going to be a swooney summer romance, and tbh it was, but it also ended up talking a lot about privilege and racial inequality in the classic music world and I really appreciated that. This book also has A LOT of musical elements that went far over my head (similar to the sciencey bits in The Martian), but I still could not bring myself to put this down and I read I really, really enjoyed this! It was incredibly well written and WAY more complex than I expected it to be. I thought this was just going to be a swooney summer romance, and tbh it was, but it also ended up talking a lot about privilege and racial inequality in the classic music world and I really appreciated that. This book also has A LOT of musical elements that went far over my head (similar to the sciencey bits in The Martian), but I still could not bring myself to put this down and I read it in basically two sittings. Which, tbh is saying something coming from someone who's knowledge of classical music begins and ends with Edward Cullen's Clair de Lune obsession ¯\_(ツ)_/¯ TLDR: read this book!! it has the swoons and the smarts TW: racism

  2. 5 out of 5

    Madalyn (Novel Ink)

    This review originally appeared on Novel Ink. I received this book for free in exchange for an honest review. This does not affect my opinion of the book or the content of my review. ACTUAL RATING: 4.5 stars When I first heard about Night Music, I thought I must have been dreaming. A YA contemporary by one of my favorite authors in that genre, centering around teenagers pursuing classical music careers over the course of one New York City summer? This book seemed made for me. And while Night Music This review originally appeared on Novel Ink. I received this book for free in exchange for an honest review. This does not affect my opinion of the book or the content of my review. ACTUAL RATING: 4.5 stars When I first heard about Night Music, I thought I must have been dreaming. A YA contemporary by one of my favorite authors in that genre, centering around teenagers pursuing classical music careers over the course of one New York City summer? This book seemed made for me. And while Night Music was not at all what I anticipated it would be, it ended up grabbing my heart in fresh, unexpected ways. “It’s love.” Oscar peered at the ceiling again. “Most classical music is. Not all, but most. You know…” He rolled over to face me. “I can appreciate all kinds of music, I really can. I think there’s something there. But hip-hop, pop, it speaks to front, you know? It’s the face you show to the world, what you want to project. Classical speaks right to what you’re feeling. What you long for.”* Our protagonist in Night Music, Ruby Chertok, is the daughter of one of the classical music world’s most beloved conductors and composers. Though she has trained as a pianist her entire life and has grown up immersed in this world, she’s quickly realizing her future might lie outside of music. We follow Ruby both mourning the loss of music as the part of her life she always expected it to be, and her finding her footing in the “real world” outside of her family’s shadow. A teenage composer named Oscar Bell, who is the rising star of the classical music scene after a video of him conducting an original arrangement went viral on YouTube, shows up on Ruby’s doorstep at the beginning of the summer to study with her father. Ruby and Oscar bond over their shared love of (and their shared complicated feelings toward) music, and their feelings for each other grow into romantic ones pretty quickly. “Okay,” Oscar said, hopping up on the counter. “How about, Mozart nails what I want falling in love to feel like.” He let his legs swing out, back in. “If I could choose, I’d much rather have that purity, that peace, that grace to come home to than any drama, however gorgeous and sweeping and complex and… you get it.”* A huge thread in Night Music revolves around the racism, both overt and covert, in the classical music world. This is something that, as someone who has studied music all my life, has deeply bothered me. Even though I went to an incredibly diverse university, I did not see that racial diversity reflected in my School of Music, where my colleagues were disproportionately white. This could lead into further conversations about the inherent privilege it requires to study music, but we’ll save that for another day. 😉 In Night Music, we see the way the people in power on the classical music scene in New York City (donors, managers, press, etc.) constantly manipulate Oscar’s identity as a black man and use it to further their own ends. The book really highlighted the microaggressions people of color face on a daily basis, both inside and outside of the music world. It shows how the odds are automatically stacked against POC trying to make careers for themselves in music, and it did so without feeling tokenistic or preachy. (I am white, as is the author, so take my opinion with a heaping handful of salt. I cannot speak to the quality of the racial rep.) The part of this story that struck a chord-- pun definitely intended-- with me most was Ruby’s journey of trying to find her identity outside of music. Not to get too personal, but ever since I left school and took a job outside the music field, I’ve felt intensely disconnected from this part of me that was pretty much my entire life for a decade. Reading about a character dealing with these same struggles– a character who still had such a deep love for music, and who didn’t lack talent, but whose heart just wasn’t in it anymore, no matter how much she wanted it to be– meant more to me than I can express. It made Night Music an extremely cathartic read for me, which I totally wasn’t expecting. We also get discussion of Ruby trying to forge her own identity outside the looming shadows of her parents and her older siblings, all of whom are classical celebrities. “I mourned belonging to this. I probably always would.”* I loved Oscar and Ruby’s romance so very much. Seeing them navigate the challenges in their individual lives together was a joy to read, and their relationship felt very true-to-life. They make mistakes, they apologize, they communicate– all very refreshing in YA romance. There is no shortage of witty banter between the two MCs– who, by the way, are both SO FUNNY on their own, too. Plus, I mean, come on: can you think of a better backdrop for a teenage love story than a summer studying music amongst the elite of New York City? Of course, I also loved all the music talk. Every time a piece was name-dropped, anytime Ruby and Oscar got into a discussion about Mozart, whenever there was talk of pedagogy– all of the little things that only people whose lives have revolved around music would catch– it made my heart soar. Night Music feels like such a love letter to the classical music world (but also acknowledges that the things we love are not without flaws). Reading this book gave me a sense of home and comfort that I hadn’t realized I’d been missing since music school ended. Also, the last paragraph of the acknowledgements made me cry. Overall, I felt an intensely personal connection to this book, but it’s also just a cute YA contemporary with excellent social commentary I think so many readers will fall for. I highly recommend picking this one up this spring! *all quotations are taken from an uncorrected proof and are subject to change in the final copy

  3. 5 out of 5

    Mackenzi

    hello adorable classical music rom com of my dreams.

  4. 4 out of 5

    Anna Luce

    ★★★★✰ 4.25 stars A delightful and thoughtful summer romance meets the classical music world in Jenn Marie Thorne's criminally underrated Night Music. Ruby, the seventeen-year-old daughter of the renowned composer Martin Chertok, has always felt the pressure of her name. However, unlike her older siblings, who have all embarked on successful musical careers, Ruby messes up her audition for Amberley School of Music. Having dedicated the last ten years of her life to her piano, Ruby struggles to en ★★★★✰ 4.25 stars A delightful and thoughtful summer romance meets the classical music world in Jenn Marie Thorne's criminally underrated Night Music. Ruby, the seventeen-year-old daughter of the renowned composer Martin Chertok, has always felt the pressure of her name. However, unlike her older siblings, who have all embarked on successful musical careers, Ruby messes up her audition for Amberley School of Music. Having dedicated the last ten years of her life to her piano, Ruby struggles to envision a future outside of the music world. Her mother, a famous piano player, is far more concerned with her tours than Ruby. Her father, who is on Amberley's faculty, is also far too devoted to his work. Ruby decides to figure out who she is and what she wants to do over the course of the summer...and then she walks in on her father's new protégé playing her piano. After a viral YouTube video Oscar gained the attention of Martin and Amberley. While Ruby certainly feels somewhat envious of Oscar's musical genius, she soon developed feelings for him, and their bond is solidified by their love for music. Oscar, who is black, knows all too well that his relationship with Ruby might jeopardise this one in a lifetime opportunity. Regardless, the two find themselves falling for each other. Their relationship struck me as refreshingly 'grown-up'. There is no 'will they, won't they'. Ruby is immediately drawn to Oscar, and their close-living quarters allows them to spend a lot of time together. In many ways Night Music is a coming of age. Both Ruby and Oscar struggles against social and familial pressures: Ruby's name may be 'prestigious' but it is very much a burden, while Oscar has to reconcile his love for classical music with its institutional racial bias. I simply love the realistic way in which Thorne interrogates themes of privilege and failure. Being branded a genius or a prodigy is not all its cracked up to be. One of my favourite shows is Mozart in the Jungle and Night Music provides us with a similar take on the classical music world. Thorne's setting (New York) too is also wonderfully rendered. The romance between Ruby and Oscar is incredibly sweet. Ruby's relationship with her parents was complicated and believable. More than anything I appreciated Ruby's self-growth, her self-awareness, and her willingness to recognise and call her self out for her own privileged background or for the presumptions she makes about others. I've read this twice and I look forward to reading it a third time. Read more reviews on my blog / / / View all my reviews on Goodreads

  5. 5 out of 5

    Eilonwy

    3-1/2 stars Ruby learned the truth at 17: In a family of musical geniuses (world-renowned conductors, composers, instrument players), she's a talentless squib whose abilities are merely passable. Without the future she's spent her whole life anticipating, she's at a big, lost, very loose end. But things look up a little when she reconnects with the former best friend she dumped to get serious about her music, and when Oscar, a verifiable musical genius if ever there was one, moves into her fam 3-1/2 stars Ruby learned the truth at 17: In a family of musical geniuses (world-renowned conductors, composers, instrument players), she's a talentless squib whose abilities are merely passable. Without the future she's spent her whole life anticipating, she's at a big, lost, very loose end. But things look up a little when she reconnects with the former best friend she dumped to get serious about her music, and when Oscar, a verifiable musical genius if ever there was one, moves into her family's basement apartment to spend the summer studying at the prestigious musical academy Ruby thought she'd be attending. Oscar is surprisingly handsome, and sexy, and funny. And surprisingly interested in Ruby, boring though she may be finding herself at the moment. This was a very sweet YA romance/finding yourself story. Ruby grew on me as the story progressed and it became clear what a void she's facing now that she understands that she isn't going to be playing the piano for a living, and worse, that the nice things people said to her about her playing over the years were just kindnesses, never genuine praise. I actually wish this had all been revealed in its entirety a lot earlier in the book than it was, because this part of the story is metered out pretty slowly, and I spent the first quarter of the book thinking Ruby was suffering from general depression rather than grieving a specific loss. Once I knew what was actually going on, I understood her much better and found her far more relatable. I nearly chucked the book aside after the first 50 pages because her scatteredness wasn't very compelling. I am glad I read to the end. The subplot around Oscar's presence at the music academy and the story being spun around him as a talented black teenager was really well done and made great social/media commentary. (Although I almost wish that part of the book had been written from his POV -- the punches would have been harder.) The story of Ruby reconnecting with Jules, the friend she ditched because she "wasn't serious about anything" (Jules: "We were ten! Ten-year-olds aren't supposed to be serious!") was actually my favorite relationship in this book. The combination of awkwardness and warmth as they build a new friendship felt really true-to-life, and had some of the best lines of dialogue in the book. If Jenn Marie Thorne would like to write a book about Jules, I will be glad to read it. There's also some family drama and recognition of healthy versus unhealthy relationships, so this book had well-rounded depth. The musical background is really well done, too. It fills out the story without requiring the reader to be too much of a music person (although I did feel a little under-educated as Ruby and Oscar kept name-checking classical musicians and pieces I've never heard of, despite growing up next door to the director of the local college's school of music and being exposed to all his knowledge right along with his own kids). Definitely an enjoyable read.

  6. 5 out of 5

    Jane (It'sJaneLindsey)

    This is a must-read for anyone who’s a musician or just fiercely loves music. As I’m neither of those things, I had some trouble connecting to this story. The discussions of privilege and inequality in exclusive institutions like classical music were necessary and well done, and I’m intrigued to read more from this author.

  7. 4 out of 5

    Jenn

    I like it. Full review to come. ;)

  8. 5 out of 5

    Lauren

    Beautiful, heartfelt, aware, and raw, NIGHT MUSIC is a melody I never want to leave my head.

  9. 4 out of 5

    Reyes

    Actual rating: 3.5 stars I picked up this book because I was promised "To all the boys I've loved before"-levels of cuteness, and it did deliver, but in my opinion this lacked the charm of Lara Jean & co. I loved Ruby's struggle to find her own path outside her family and outside her relationship with Oscar, but everything regarding her dysfunctional and astonishingly talented family was way too much, and the racial issues promised in the blurb (that were the other reason why I was interested in Actual rating: 3.5 stars I picked up this book because I was promised "To all the boys I've loved before"-levels of cuteness, and it did deliver, but in my opinion this lacked the charm of Lara Jean & co. I loved Ruby's struggle to find her own path outside her family and outside her relationship with Oscar, but everything regarding her dysfunctional and astonishingly talented family was way too much, and the racial issues promised in the blurb (that were the other reason why I was interested in this book) were barely touched - they were mentioned, but never discussed or analysed, which for me rested depth to the story. There's insta-love and there's a bit of relationship drama but Oscar and Ruby's banter and dynamics were adorable and beyond cute, so in that way I did get what I was looking for in this story. Very recommendable for a quick, uplifting read.

  10. 5 out of 5

    Lee Kelly

    I am a huge fan of Jenn Marie Thorne's books, and her latest is stunning. Our MCs Ruby and Oscar are positively swoon worthy (my favorite ships are full of heart AND humor, and these two have both in spades). And the world they inhabit - the classical music circle of New York - gives this book a lush, sensorial layer of summer dreaminess. Part romance, part coming-of-age, NIGHT MUSIC seamlessly blends the two into a moving, honest look at what it means to love someone else, and what it ultimatel I am a huge fan of Jenn Marie Thorne's books, and her latest is stunning. Our MCs Ruby and Oscar are positively swoon worthy (my favorite ships are full of heart AND humor, and these two have both in spades). And the world they inhabit - the classical music circle of New York - gives this book a lush, sensorial layer of summer dreaminess. Part romance, part coming-of-age, NIGHT MUSIC seamlessly blends the two into a moving, honest look at what it means to love someone else, and what it ultimately takes to love yourself. For as much as I fell head-over-heels with Oscar and Ruby together, Ruby's hard-won road to self-discovery and acceptance is just as compelling. Highly recommended.

  11. 5 out of 5

    thi

    ok I don’t know where to begin the blurb is a little wordy and that’s also reflected in the rest of the book’s writing, imo it’s not dragging per se just very informative but still enjoyable, it just took me a lot longer to get through than normally essentially ruby feels talentless and unmotivated in her family of stars and is constantly surrounded by people expected more from her, and I think that’s something everyone can relate to, to some degree and I personally felt so much for her especial ok I don’t know where to begin the blurb is a little wordy and that’s also reflected in the rest of the book’s writing, imo it’s not dragging per se just very informative but still enjoyable, it just took me a lot longer to get through than normally essentially ruby feels talentless and unmotivated in her family of stars and is constantly surrounded by people expected more from her, and I think that’s something everyone can relate to, to some degree and I personally felt so much for her especially when dealing with her difficult relationship with her parents (I cried ily ruby) Oscar is bright eyed and trying to navigate his talents in an exclusionary setting and constant micro-aggressions their relationship was so inviting and every little hurdle felt like a stab to my heart they’re so sweet This also wasn’t entirely romance as it touched on racism in “elite” schooling and media portrayal of talented POC 4.25/5

  12. 5 out of 5

    Kali Cole

    This novel was a huge hassle to get through, but the experience was worth it. It is amazing when music is represented vividly in a novel to the point where you can visualize it without hearing it. This definitely shined bright on diversity and the distinction between stereotypes and reality. I hope everyone looks into the book if they are musical lovers or feel misrepresented by the people around them.

  13. 5 out of 5

    Danielle (Life of a Literary Nerd)

    3.5 Stars This was not the fluffy, happy contemporary I was expecting. Don't get me wrong, there's a lot of happy moments and an adorable romance but the characters are dealing with some weightier topics like classism, racism, anxiety, privilege. It was an enexpected, yet enjoyable read.

  14. 4 out of 5

    Vee

    One of the best (and sometimes worst) qualities of a good book is that they make you feel things. And, oh boy, this book made me feel angry, upset and hopeful in so many different levels. Ruby is a seventeen-year-old driven by her family's legacy to succeed in the world of classical music. Her last name is a brand that people use to define her. I could not understand why she let people treat her like she did not matter (especially her mother) or like someone who was only there to serve or help th One of the best (and sometimes worst) qualities of a good book is that they make you feel things. And, oh boy, this book made me feel angry, upset and hopeful in so many different levels. Ruby is a seventeen-year-old driven by her family's legacy to succeed in the world of classical music. Her last name is a brand that people use to define her. I could not understand why she let people treat her like she did not matter (especially her mother) or like someone who was only there to serve or help them. It made me SO angry. How could she justify her mom's actions (who I sincerely think was a piece of shit), her dad's lack of interest in her or Nora's manipulation to try to control her life for her own benefit. I was waiting for the moment for her to rebel and realize that it was enough. And when that moment arrived I was filled with pride. I guess it is so easy to judge someone's situation from the outside. It is hard to accept that not everyone would act the same way we would, that we might act differently if we were born in that environment. The romance was very cute! Not perfect though. It was very intense, it could have gone slower. But all in all, it was a beautiful supportive relationship. Oscar Bell is such a wonderful character, we need more people like him in this world. I did not expect this book to talk as much about racism as it did, which made me like it even more. It showed how the little things (most of the times not so little) matter so much. I think the best part was Ruby and Jules's growing friendship. Jules's appearance was one of the best things that happened to Ruby that summer. She put her out of her comfort zone, introduced her to new people and showed her that there was a world outside of music. Ruby, at last, also helped her pursue her passions. This book was wonderful, I totally recommend it if you are looking for a contemporary to get invested in. PS: This is the second book I've read by this author. You should also check out The Wrong Side of Right.

  15. 4 out of 5

    Lauren R.

    Phew, that was such a surprise and kind of a rollercoaster? I'm not a music-themed book kind of gal usually but wanted to push myself out of the comfort zone for another Jenn Marie Thorne book. I haven't read anything by her since loving THE WRONG SIDE OF RIGHT. In any case, this was wonderful! I felt thrown into it a little bit and it took some getting used to. However, I loved dropping in on this summer, with no knowledge of classical music or any references they made, and just following Ruby Phew, that was such a surprise and kind of a rollercoaster? I'm not a music-themed book kind of gal usually but wanted to push myself out of the comfort zone for another Jenn Marie Thorne book. I haven't read anything by her since loving THE WRONG SIDE OF RIGHT. In any case, this was wonderful! I felt thrown into it a little bit and it took some getting used to. However, I loved dropping in on this summer, with no knowledge of classical music or any references they made, and just following Ruby and Oscar along as they figured themselves (and each other) out. The ending made me tear up and then cheer for Ruby. Thorne's writing really was breezy and summery, which made the book so atmospheric. Not something I expected from this kind of story and yet another pleasant surprise for me. Overall, such a great book.

  16. 4 out of 5

    Nasty Lady MJ

    To see full review click here. I haven’t written a lot of (full) reviews for a lot of reasons this year. I ultimately want to redo this blog. I haven’t done an overhaul in years and the site looks dated and clunky and I sort of want to rebrand. However, I did want to read Night Music, primarily because it’s a book I have complicated feelings for especially for a DNF. I stopped when I read about 200 pages of the book. Thorne writes fairly long contemporaries so that was roughly 50% of this book. I To see full review click here. I haven’t written a lot of (full) reviews for a lot of reasons this year. I ultimately want to redo this blog. I haven’t done an overhaul in years and the site looks dated and clunky and I sort of want to rebrand. However, I did want to read Night Music, primarily because it’s a book I have complicated feelings for especially for a DNF. I stopped when I read about 200 pages of the book. Thorne writes fairly long contemporaries so that was roughly 50% of this book. I wasn’t feeling at this point and I’ve gotten to the point with books if they’re not gelling I’m tossing them-this one actually lasted longer than I thought it would. Going into this book I knew I would either love it or hate it. Let’s just put it this way, everybody in my family but me majored in music. My sister is even a professional orchestral player who went to a top conservatory, so I am a little familiar with this word and Ruby…oh, Ruby annoyed the hell out of me. To be fair, Ruby mentioned a shirt within five pages of the book that I hated because I know the person whose company created that shirt and they are NTN. A weird reason to hate a book for sure, but hey….it wasn’t just that though. Ruby is just the epitome of what I hate about the world of classical music and what I have watched my sister deal with throughout most of her professionalism: elitism and cronyism. Buy wait, MJ, Ruby didn’t get into Wannabe Julliard (yeah, I can’t even remember the school’s name but it was essentially a stand in for Julliard). She might’ve not have gotten into it, but its really an oversight more or less. Okay, but annoyed the hell out of me. She is the epitome why its so difficult to get a decent job in the world of classical music because of elitism and cronyism. I thought most of this book would be about her finding herself, but other than showing Oscar around time and haphazardly running, I knew nothing about her. I really didn’t care for Oscar much either. Even though I think his character’s background was suppose to show contrast to Ruby’s-he comes from a working class background, is a POC, and is actually talented without nepotism. On paper he’s great and should be swoon worthy, but I didn’t really get what drove his interest for Ruby. And I hate the fact he was discovered via Youtube. Cue the pandering to the booktubers…just saying. Okay, that was mean. But it’s my review and so yeah…going to tell it how I see it. I doubt any annoying booktuber would read this anyway so whatever… It’s just a pet peeve on mine the pandering thing, and I know from what my sister has told me conservatories will often laugh their ass off if you submit a Youtube links to you playing (FYI, if you do there probably will be snark watch). Also, it annoyed the hell out of me how lavish these characters lived. Classical musicians don’t make enough to live in Manhattan. Even if you play with one of the big orchestras and are tenured at a university you’re not going to be socialite rich in NYC with that salary. I could’ve maybe have bought the lifestyle more if it would’ve been a smaller city. Again, maybe these pet peeves wouldn’t have been as visible if I wouldn’t have had some connection to this world but whatever. I think the fact that Ruby was just sort of a blah character made the experience even duller for me, especially since the book seemed to lack plot. And I think that’s what Thorne wanted was a book about the MC discovering herself but I think it was more or less about Ruby making out with Oscar in random parts of the city. I wouldn’t say skip this one. I didn’t like it at all which sort of surprised me because one of my favorite books is written by Thorne, but I can’t exactly recommend it either. At the end of the day, I think my dislike for this one was just more or less driven from personal experience than anything else. Maybe if I kept reading some of the issues I had with the book would be touched on or dealt with, but honestly was bored (the book was putting me to sleep) and I really couldn’t stand Ruby.

  17. 5 out of 5

    Samantha (WLABB)

    Rating: 4.5 Stars This wasn't quite the rom-com I expected, but it was a beautiful story about music, first love, and discovering and nurturing your passion. Oscar found himself thrust into the spotlight, when his musical talent was discovered and he was rewarded with a scholarship to the Amberley School. He was a bit of a fish out of water, but he worked hard to "fit" into this world, even sometimes at his own expense. This made me sad, because I adored him! Oscar was everything one would want in Rating: 4.5 Stars This wasn't quite the rom-com I expected, but it was a beautiful story about music, first love, and discovering and nurturing your passion. Oscar found himself thrust into the spotlight, when his musical talent was discovered and he was rewarded with a scholarship to the Amberley School. He was a bit of a fish out of water, but he worked hard to "fit" into this world, even sometimes at his own expense. This made me sad, because I adored him! Oscar was everything one would want in a YA character. He witty, amusing, charming, and music personified. He had this energy that drew me in and a personality that made him jump off the page. It was hard watching his situation suck the life-force from him, because Oscar was something special, and he burned so brightly. While Oscar was my sunshine, Ruby was my rain cloud. Being the youngest family member of a veritable musical dynasty was not easy. Ruby was more than willing to assume her seat at the table, and had put in the time, with endless hours of practice over the past seven years. However, she now had to face the grim reality that she didn't possess the talent necessary to excel in the world she had always lived in. Wow! That had to be a tough pill to swallow, and this was a big loss for her. Thorne did an amazing job helping me understand the impact of this on Ruby, and my heart ached for her. This, coupled with a few other big realizations could cripple a girl, but luckily, Ruby had her ooey-gooey romance with Oscar to distract her from that. Gosh! These two were beyond precious together. It started with great banter, and gradually moved to some really tooth-achingly-sweet tender moments. I would give almost anything to get some sort of epilogue or short story catching up with these two, because I thought they were perfection together. Though their circumstances were so different, they connected through a mutual love of music, as well as, a shared hurt from being used as pawns in the Amberley world. I previously lamented the need for an epilogue, but even without that, I was satisfied with the way Throne tied up those loose ends. Some of the conclusions left me disappointed for our characters, but other made me warm and fuzzy. This was a fun, beautiful, and thoughtful romance with the bonus of a classical music soundtrack. BLOG | INSTAGRAM |TWITTER | BLOGLOVIN | FRIEND ME ON GOODREADS

  18. 5 out of 5

    Suad Shamma

    OK. OK OK OK. Where do I begin? When I first started the book, I was immediately drawn into the characters' lives. Ruby and Oscar are two very interesting characters and their differences and similarities bring them together in a crash and burn kind of thing. It starts out really well, I loved their chemistry, their dynamic, their conversation, the threads of serious issues being conveyed but never truly discussed, like racism and how people treat them differently. Their romance was super sweet, a OK. OK OK OK. Where do I begin? When I first started the book, I was immediately drawn into the characters' lives. Ruby and Oscar are two very interesting characters and their differences and similarities bring them together in a crash and burn kind of thing. It starts out really well, I loved their chemistry, their dynamic, their conversation, the threads of serious issues being conveyed but never truly discussed, like racism and how people treat them differently. Their romance was super sweet, and exactly the kind of thing I look for in these books. I enjoyed it so much, but then things start to take a turn to the bizarre. Oscar is being manipulated by her dad and by the school board, he is being put on display as this poor black kid from the block that is being saved by these rich white people. Ruby won't stand for it, but Oscar is going along with it. However, it starts to suck his soul, and his music is dying a slow and painful death. Ruby is his inspiration, his muse, but she is also jealous of his talent, his gift. There's so much drama, so much going on, and it becomes a little too much. It all starts to blend together into one big mess. I didn't like to see Oscar beaten down like that, it made me really sad and angry. Ruby pissed me off because she just wouldn't speak up, even though she knew what was going on, and it took her forever to do something about it. That being said, I still enjoyed it. I wasn't a fan of the drama or the way things ended, but I loved Oscar and Ruby, when it was just about Oscar and Ruby. The one thing that did put me off though, was when I came to review the book and scrolled through the reviews and found the author herself had reviewed it by giving it 5 stars and saying "I like it, full review to come", I found that really strange and it really put me off. It's one thing to like your own book and rate it 5 stars because you are really proud of your work, but to write something like that, making it sound like some generic review by some random reader seemed wrong. Just my two cents.

  19. 4 out of 5

    ariel

    solid 3* so...i have a lot of thoughts about this book. overall, if you want a cute, romantic YA book that has a little family drama and comments on elitism sprinkled on top - i think just about anyone would enjoy this. it was full of emotion, regret, aspiration, and romance. a young girl trying to navigate her life after everything she knows is being twisted up and turned upside down makes for a really good read. it definitely talks about things on race that i haven't seen explored in YA very mu solid 3* so...i have a lot of thoughts about this book. overall, if you want a cute, romantic YA book that has a little family drama and comments on elitism sprinkled on top - i think just about anyone would enjoy this. it was full of emotion, regret, aspiration, and romance. a young girl trying to navigate her life after everything she knows is being twisted up and turned upside down makes for a really good read. it definitely talks about things on race that i haven't seen explored in YA very much at all. the best, and i mean the BEST parts of this book that I wish Thorne had focused on more, was the personal growth Ruby experienced. the unique plot of this book being the youngest of a family full of world-famous classical musicians working out how to move on and figure herself out while a young, talented black man is being used as a check-marked "diversity" box are both equally as compelling story lines that i think work together beautifully. two people from completely different walks of life, not quite meeting in the middle, but finding solace in their shared, uncertain futures. and for Ruby, it's made even less clear because even by the end, as Ruby tries and fails to find another "calling" big enough to fill the void left behind, we never find out what, or even if, she finds it. that's also what makes this book so great - the fact that it doesn't end all neat, wrapped up in a bow. it felt real, raw, and questioning. that it's okay to be unsure, to not know. however, the romance felt...forced (at least in the beginning). i honestly think that if the romance was put on the back burner, it would be more compelling to read about two kids figuring themselves out and flirting with each other - maybe even ending the book with a kiss! - while not totally wrapping their complete identity around each other. i mean, yeah, a hormonal, teenage boy calling a girl he has a crush on his "muse" is kind of sweet, but when Ruby brought it up as kind of weird but ultimately brushed it off was a little...odd. i don't know, i might just be looking too much into it, but the fact that Ruby finally, FINALLY, took a stand for herself and said "i don't want to be your housekeeper, your plus one, your muse," only for her to run back to him like he's her knight in shining armor... :/ idk, maybe i'm hard-hearted lol, but i think them making up was just a little too cheesy. also, can i PLEASE get some more Jules. honestly, i felt more chemistry between Jules and Ruby, especially when Jules said that Ruby wasn't Oscar's prop/muse and that Ruby is her own person that doesn't need to be Oscar's prized possession....!! like GIRL! on god, i wanted them to be together. WHY THORNE, WHY DID YOU LET THIS OPPORTUNITY PASS!! over all, i liked it. i just personally wish there was less romance and more figuring-life-out.

  20. 5 out of 5

    Andrew

    I was enraptured in this delightful novel, and although it's realistic fiction, it felt magical-- love and music bloom beautifully together. Over the course of a New York summer, Ruby tries to navigate her place in her music-oriented family, where not only is she the youngest, but doesn't feel like she can match up to their abilities. Enter Oscar, her father's handsome & charming protégé; his upbeat attitude and brilliance in writing full symphonies encourages her to explore her career options. I was enraptured in this delightful novel, and although it's realistic fiction, it felt magical-- love and music bloom beautifully together. Over the course of a New York summer, Ruby tries to navigate her place in her music-oriented family, where not only is she the youngest, but doesn't feel like she can match up to their abilities. Enter Oscar, her father's handsome & charming protégé; his upbeat attitude and brilliance in writing full symphonies encourages her to explore her career options. While sweeping me away in the romantic plot, this book also tackles racial microaggressions, something essential that must be addressed. Fans of Morgan Matson and Jenny Han will devour this book!

  21. 5 out of 5

    Christina (A Reader of Fictions)

    Night Music grabbed me from start to finish, despite being pretty understated as novels go. One thing I do want to warn you guys about is that, despite what the description of the book says, I would not call Night Music a romantic comedy. This book is great and it is a romance, but it's not a comedy. It's definitely a drama, so set your expectations accordingly. What I fell for first was Ruby's voice. She's a bit cold and judgmental and angry, and I'm all about that energy. Ruby's probably going Night Music grabbed me from start to finish, despite being pretty understated as novels go. One thing I do want to warn you guys about is that, despite what the description of the book says, I would not call Night Music a romantic comedy. This book is great and it is a romance, but it's not a comedy. It's definitely a drama, so set your expectations accordingly. What I fell for first was Ruby's voice. She's a bit cold and judgmental and angry, and I'm all about that energy. Ruby's probably going to be a hard character for a lot of readers, because she's super privileged and spends most of the book moping. I mean, one of the futures she considers is philanthropy, the kind where you attend fabulous expensive parties as a career. It's not relatable for me, and it won't be for most. That said, what spoke to me in Ruby was her desire to feel like she matters or is special in some way. Most people struggle with this, and that emotional arc really spoke to me. Ruby's father is a renowned classical composer, her mother is a renowned pianist on a world tour, one brother is an up-and-coming conductor, her sister is a first chair viola in a New York City orchestra, and her other brother does something else fancy in music (so sue me, I forgot because he was in it the least). Ruby, on the other hand, has grown up with high expectations of her musical talent (her own and from everyone else because she's a legacy), but despite working as hard as she could at the piano she's finally accepted she'll never be great. She's struggling with the loss of that dream and with the fact that she feels like the only failure in the family. Adults often tell kids that they can do anything they set their mind to, but that's just not true, and the fallout can be painful. Add to the emotional complications for Ruby her father's new protege, a 17-year-old from D.C., a prodigy in composition, staying with them for the summer to write a symphony. He and Ruby click right away, but the last thing she needs is yet another musical genius in her orbit making her feel inferior. It's both flattering and awful to feel like someone's muse while knowing you could never create something like that yourself. Night Music really delves into the emotional arcs, and I think it does a great job of tackling tough subjects without resorting to anything that felt over-the-top dramatic, which I love. (No hate on melodrama since I know some readers love that, but it's not my thing.) Some themes covered well here are: media spin on diversity, anxiety, identity, communicating more effectively with family, and toxic relationships. I'd had high hopes for this book and, though it wasn't the fluff I expected from the cover, I was not disappointed. The characterization is wonderful from the MCs to the family members. I'm not sure if this is one I'll reread, but I absolutely would recommend it to fans of contemporary novels with strong emotional arcs, especially if they want an emotional arc that is not done as often.

  22. 5 out of 5

    Mah Marino | Happy Reading Co.

    The magic of this book is how music not just a prop to connect the characters, it is a character and it has its own magic besides everything. The fact that I’m in no way musically inclined made this experience unique for me. “It’s love.” Oscar peered at the ceiling again. “Most classical music is. Not all, but most. You know…” He rolled over to face me. “I can appreciate all kinds of music, I really can. I think there’s something there. But hip-hop, pop, it speaks to front, you know? It’s the fac The magic of this book is how music not just a prop to connect the characters, it is a character and it has its own magic besides everything. The fact that I’m in no way musically inclined made this experience unique for me. “It’s love.” Oscar peered at the ceiling again. “Most classical music is. Not all, but most. You know…” He rolled over to face me. “I can appreciate all kinds of music, I really can. I think there’s something there. But hip-hop, pop, it speaks to front, you know? It’s the face you show to the world, what you want to project. Classical speaks right to what you’re feeling. What you long for.” Ruby is a very unique character and her journey of finding herself is very relatable – well… except the music part! She was born and raised in an musical environment and everyone in her family is a musician… except her. She’s not gifted and her whole journey in this story is to find her place in the world. Oscar, on the other hand, breathes music. He is music. And the way that is described in the book is beautiful. His relationship with Ruby is as complicated as understanding a melody, and once you get it… oh it’s beautiful. This book also talks about the racism in the world, but mostly in the music environment. We can see that most, if not all, musicians are white or north asians – and the donors and those in high hierarchy are always using Oscar’s race as a form of manipulation. The book shows the struggles of POC navigating through the music world and finding their place without being manipulated or used as a prop, and it does in a way that is no tacky. I’m a white person (although latina, my family is mostly from Italians that emigrated to Brazil… so I’m very “european” looking) and in no way I can understand the struggles POC, but I could understand what was presented and I felt very sad about the whole thing… Overall this book was an amazing read. I recommend this for everyone – musically inclined or not.

  23. 5 out of 5

    Carolyn Elaine

    Rating: 5 stars Ruby Chertok is the daughter of a classical music legend. Actually, she's the youngest sister of a family of classical music legends. Ruby herself is little bit less of a classical music legend. Ever since her disastrous audition for a summer music "camp", the same "camp" her father works at, Ruby's sworn off the piano. She can't even stand to be near it. Then, Oscar Bell enters her life. Oscar is a Black rising composer. His compositions of music are actual greatness. Oscar knows Rating: 5 stars Ruby Chertok is the daughter of a classical music legend. Actually, she's the youngest sister of a family of classical music legends. Ruby herself is little bit less of a classical music legend. Ever since her disastrous audition for a summer music "camp", the same "camp" her father works at, Ruby's sworn off the piano. She can't even stand to be near it. Then, Oscar Bell enters her life. Oscar is a Black rising composer. His compositions of music are actual greatness. Oscar knows his way around classical music. Soon, Ruby and Oscar fall in love, but they must hide it from Ruby's father, the great Martin Chertok, famous classical composer and Oscar's mentor. A beautiful piece of YA literature! I was absolutely astounded by the beauty and ingenuity of Night Music. Literally, I loved every single second of this masterpiece. Honestly, I cannot tell you how much I loved Night Music ! Just know that I did. I think what made this novel so exceptional was the complexity of the characters, and most notably, Oscar and Ruby. Ruby was the most complex character in Night Music, by far. I think it's because of all her worries and fears about not being good enough for her family or, more importantly, Oscar. I would have to say that Ruby's family was so dysfunctional and crazy that I would go insane if they were my family. I do like reading about Ruby's self-discovery of being herself. Oscar, on the other hand, was so hot that I couldn't get past it, but once I did, I found a very likable, funny, yet intensely insecure guy that it made him that much hotter. Honestly, I think Oscar is my favorite character, and I wish I had my own Oscar. I loved how passionate and intense Oscar was about his music. I recommend Night Music for fans of Sarah Dessen, Jenny Han, and Jenn Bennett. I recommend Night Music for fans of YA and romance. Happy reading!

  24. 5 out of 5

    Charlotte

    if you like YA books about young musicians, this is a must read. It's not just about music, although that is front and center. It's also a very sweet romance, about Ruby, privileged daughter of one of the premier musical families of New York, who has just realized she doesn't have the talent to join her family's musical rank, and Oscar, the brilliant young composer who is living with Ruby and her Dad for the summer (scholarship to the prestigious music where the dad teaches) . Ruby is white, and if you like YA books about young musicians, this is a must read. It's not just about music, although that is front and center. It's also a very sweet romance, about Ruby, privileged daughter of one of the premier musical families of New York, who has just realized she doesn't have the talent to join her family's musical rank, and Oscar, the brilliant young composer who is living with Ruby and her Dad for the summer (scholarship to the prestigious music where the dad teaches) . Ruby is white, and Oscar is black, and as well as coping with the musical pressure, he has to put up with being used as a fundraising poster child for diversity (which includes distorting his actual family background and playing up his blackness...). Ruby in the meantime is trying to figure out what to make of her life now that music is off the table for her. And they fall in love, a very sweet love that's sex positive and sex smart at the same time. And in the end Ruby uses her privilege to be a great ally in a way that actually makes a difference, and Oscar's symphony is a huge success.... so lots of music, lots of love, lots of growing up!

  25. 4 out of 5

    Julia

    i'm really not sure how to review this because it was definitely a book that i didn't hate but i didn't extremely like. so i think i'll split my review according to those two categories. what i liked: - how the author handled the implications of race and anti-blackness in the USA - how well written the multi racial relationship was - how the topics of privilege and race was handled with care - ruby's characterization and her constant battle with family legacy and her place in the world after realizi i'm really not sure how to review this because it was definitely a book that i didn't hate but i didn't extremely like. so i think i'll split my review according to those two categories. what i liked: - how the author handled the implications of race and anti-blackness in the USA - how well written the multi racial relationship was - how the topics of privilege and race was handled with care - ruby's characterization and her constant battle with family legacy and her place in the world after realizing she isn't qualified to live out her dreams (something we all deal with at some point and have to come to terms with) what i didn't like - for a sweet summer romance, i feel like this book fell short - i wasn't convinced in oscar and ruby's chemistry?? there wasn't much to indicate that they were really in love???? idk

  26. 4 out of 5

    Annie Oosterwyk

    And now I will go read everything else this author has written. I cared so much about these characters and their lives! This book moved off my bedside table and into my armchair for daytime reading. Thorne perfectly captures that transitional time in life when you’ve left behind what you thought would be your life and need a new plan. I loved the integration of life and music in NYC and the glimpse at a young artist’s creative process. Everyone grows in this novel and we are privileged to watch.

  27. 5 out of 5

    The Artisan Geek

    31/3/19 I won this book with a giveaway!! I'm not really that of a romance girl, but I am willing to give it a shot :D You can find me on Youtube | Instagram | Twitter | Tumblr | Website 31/3/19 I won this book with a giveaway!! I'm not really that of a romance girl, but I am willing to give it a shot :D You can find me on Youtube | Instagram | Twitter | Tumblr | Website

  28. 4 out of 5

    Mary

    i enjoyed this book a lot. I especially enjoyed the classical music connections as i'm a classical music loving violinist. this was hard for me to put down!

  29. 4 out of 5

    WJ

    Actual rating: Closer to 3.5 stars Night Music is the second book that I've read from Jenn Marie Thomas, whose debut effort The Wrong Side of Right really wowed me because of the way that she deftly tackles how growing up in the spotlight of politics can be like - with all the privileges and pitfalls that such an upbringing can provide. With Night Music, there are some similar themes because Ruby Chertok has grown up in the spotlight too as she's the daughter of famed composer Martin Chertok. Mar Actual rating: Closer to 3.5 stars Night Music is the second book that I've read from Jenn Marie Thomas, whose debut effort The Wrong Side of Right really wowed me because of the way that she deftly tackles how growing up in the spotlight of politics can be like - with all the privileges and pitfalls that such an upbringing can provide. With Night Music, there are some similar themes because Ruby Chertok has grown up in the spotlight too as she's the daughter of famed composer Martin Chertok. Martin Chertok is on the faculty of the Amberley School of Music, one of the best classical music schools in New York and Ruby has always believed that it's her destiny to attend the same school. After all, her three older siblings all work within the same industry and they all attended Amberley School of Music. However, her audition falls flat and Ruby's summer is turned upside down as she begins to question what it means to be a Chertok, to have their family's fortunes so deeply entwined in classical music and in the Amberley School of Music and what she really wants out from her life. Aside from her personal turmoil, her father suddenly does something uncharacteristic by taking on a student, Oscar. Oscar is made famous through Youtube, as his compositions and videos of him conducting his compositions have gone viral online. But his success is no fluke as Oscar seems to really have that extra something that makes music come alive. Oscar's in awe of New York, Martin Chertok and of the Amberley School of Music, as this is an entirely different level of classical music than what Oscar has been used to. He's aware of all entirely white this world can be as well and is aware of the opportunity that has been given to him, for him to be able to study under Martin Chertok. And although he finds Ruby interesting, it's not like he intends to put everything on the line for her, right? Night Music is more than just the fluffy rom-com that it's marketed as; because it covers something pretty deep issues about self-identity and growing up. Ruby has always seen herself as one of the Chertoks and believes that her destiny is in classical music, mostly because that's what her family has always been interested in. But when things fall apart, Ruby has to learn how to develop her own set of interests and she begins to question her own self-worth and identity in her family. If everyone else is a musical genius, what exactly is Ruby and what is the role that she can now play in her family and in her society? (view spoiler)[ Part of the reason why I've marked the book down a little is because although Ruby does spend the summer exploring what kind of identity that she wants to take on, we never really get a good answer by the book's end. Instead, things are still kinda left pretty open for Ruby as she tries to figure out what she intends to do with her life. It just feels like there might not have been a ton of growth in her character, although I do appreciate she's way more assertive and outspoken but the novel's end than at the start, where she seems totally passive about whatever that's going on around her. (hide spoiler)] Meanwhile, Oscar has always seen himself one way: as a pretty damn good composer and conductor but this is an entirely different world from what he's known. It's one thing to know that you're good and viral on the internet, but it's quite another to hear it from one of your own musical heros Martin Chertok. But as the pressure mounts on Oscar, he begins to question whether he's truly able to live up to everyone's expectations of him and how much he's willing to put on the line to make it big. (view spoiler)[ In some ways I kinda felt like Oscar might've been more of an interesting character to center the book around. (hide spoiler)] Furthermore, we also deal with the issues of race and how predominantly white the classical music world is. Ruby and Oscar are both aware of their differences but the micro-aggressions that Oscar faces and the pressure that he faces to market himself in a way that's inauthentic to who he really is was kinda tough to read about. Both of them have to navigate what it means for their relationship to be in such a world. There are also some twists in the book, which really kicked it up a notch for me as my original rating might just have been a 3 stars. (view spoiler)[ Like the financial fraud that was actually happening in the Amberley School of Music and how Ruby's father had discovered everything and was trying to figure out how to navigate through all that. I also appreciated that Ruby finally grow a backbone when it came to handling this. (hide spoiler)]

  30. 5 out of 5

    Artah Yamin

    From the very first page of this book, I knew it was going to be an instant hit for me. I remember first picking it up and thinking it was going to be one of those quick and cute love stories, but MAN, was I wrong! This book was so intense (of the good kind!) and made my heart race so fast that I just couldn’t stop reading it! This book follows the protagonist, Ruby Chertok, struggling, coming to terms with the fact that her first love, music/ piano, doesn’t “love” her as much as she does. Ruby’ From the very first page of this book, I knew it was going to be an instant hit for me. I remember first picking it up and thinking it was going to be one of those quick and cute love stories, but MAN, was I wrong! This book was so intense (of the good kind!) and made my heart race so fast that I just couldn’t stop reading it! This book follows the protagonist, Ruby Chertok, struggling, coming to terms with the fact that her first love, music/ piano, doesn’t “love” her as much as she does. Ruby’s lack of musical talent and skills, which all her famous family members have been gifted with, leaves her feeling useless and not worthy of love. She starts to go on a journey of self discovery, and who she is as a person, in her world of gifted musicians. I loved how there was so much character development in almost all of the characters introduced and I was all for that! Especially with Ruby, where she grew so much, thanks to help from the people she involved herself with, her surroundings, and by learning to love and respect herself. There were many instances in which I felt like I could relate to Ruby in so many aspects– from finding yourself, all the way to accepting that you can’t always make people like you, when it shouldn’t even be important to do so! Ruby wasn’t a perfect character by any means and that’s what made her so fun to read about because she was relatable! She got jealous, she got mad, and probably said some things where she was better off not saying, but she was real! We’ve all been there, done that. I enjoyed reading those struggles in a different perspective. Learning about the ways she solved her problems in a way I wouldn’t have done. Oh, and how can I forget about the wonderful, charming, pianist and composer, Oscar Bell! Reading the love that blossomed between Ruby and Oscar was so beautiful to read about and it makes me heart warm up just thinking about it. Honestly, Oscar was just such a blast to read about and I loved the type of person HE was. How he didn’t try to sugar-coat things to Ruby or try to make her feel better through lying! He was as real as her and I think that’s why they clicked so well, to be honest. They both encouraged each other, let the other grow, but weren’t afraid of letting each other know when they were in the wrong about something. I also love how the author, Jenn Marie Throne, delved into topics like privilege, diversity, and racial inequality that can come with the world of classical music. I wasn’t ever aware of these problems that occurred for people involved in classical music before reading this book. Although, having learned it now, it made me realize how real and true of a problem that is today in this world. All things considered, Thorne did an exceptional job delivering a story about the beauty of love between two people and their connection with music. Do yourself a favor and get your hands on this book! You definitely won’t regret it;) :)

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