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The Stranger: The Graphic Novel

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A visually stunning adaptation of Albert Camus’ masterpiece that offers an exciting new graphic interpretation while retaining the book’s unique atmosphere. The day his mother dies, Meursault notices that it is very hot on the bus that is taking him from Algiers to the retirement home where his mother lived; so hot that he falls asleep. Later, while waiting for the wake to b A visually stunning adaptation of Albert Camus’ masterpiece that offers an exciting new graphic interpretation while retaining the book’s unique atmosphere. The day his mother dies, Meursault notices that it is very hot on the bus that is taking him from Algiers to the retirement home where his mother lived; so hot that he falls asleep. Later, while waiting for the wake to begin, the harsh electric lights in the room make him extremely uncomfortable, so he gratefully accepts the coffee the caretaker offers him and smokes a cigarette. The same burning sun that so oppresses him during the funeral walk will once again blind the calm, reserved Meursault as he walks along a deserted beach a few days later—leading him to commit an irreparable act. This new illustrated edition of Camus's classic novel The Stranger portrays an enigmatic man who commits a senseless crime and then calmly, and apparently indifferently, sits through his trial and hears himself condemned to death. 


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A visually stunning adaptation of Albert Camus’ masterpiece that offers an exciting new graphic interpretation while retaining the book’s unique atmosphere. The day his mother dies, Meursault notices that it is very hot on the bus that is taking him from Algiers to the retirement home where his mother lived; so hot that he falls asleep. Later, while waiting for the wake to b A visually stunning adaptation of Albert Camus’ masterpiece that offers an exciting new graphic interpretation while retaining the book’s unique atmosphere. The day his mother dies, Meursault notices that it is very hot on the bus that is taking him from Algiers to the retirement home where his mother lived; so hot that he falls asleep. Later, while waiting for the wake to begin, the harsh electric lights in the room make him extremely uncomfortable, so he gratefully accepts the coffee the caretaker offers him and smokes a cigarette. The same burning sun that so oppresses him during the funeral walk will once again blind the calm, reserved Meursault as he walks along a deserted beach a few days later—leading him to commit an irreparable act. This new illustrated edition of Camus's classic novel The Stranger portrays an enigmatic man who commits a senseless crime and then calmly, and apparently indifferently, sits through his trial and hears himself condemned to death. 

30 review for The Stranger: The Graphic Novel

  1. 4 out of 5

    Calista

    I do plan on reading this book someday to see the writing Albert Camus did. I have not read the original. Wow, this is not my cup of tea. I had a hard time with this story. Meursault never draws me in. He is so distant, it leaves the reader in the cold. He is also an enigma. Is he heartless, or does he care on some level? It seems to me he really has no feelings. I guess back in the 30s or when this was written, an atheist was a shocking character, but now days it’s just another person’s beliefs I do plan on reading this book someday to see the writing Albert Camus did. I have not read the original. Wow, this is not my cup of tea. I had a hard time with this story. Meursault never draws me in. He is so distant, it leaves the reader in the cold. He is also an enigma. Is he heartless, or does he care on some level? It seems to me he really has no feelings. I guess back in the 30s or when this was written, an atheist was a shocking character, but now days it’s just another person’s beliefs. It’s not shocking at all. I have met several atheist and the few I know are actually really good people. They believe you are good because you’re human and that’s how humans act. This heartless beast in this story is not a type of atheist I have been around before. The art does it’s job. It is bright and hot and seems to be the only thing you can feel as a reader. I need to read the book and see how the fuss is about. This graphic novel did not make me a fan of this work. It is like anti heart. Blah.

  2. 4 out of 5

    Melissa Chung

    This was my first time reading this classic. This graphic novel has made me interested in reading the original in hopes of finding more meaning in the text. 3 stars because I'm royally confused. This story is about a man named Meursault who lives in France. One day his mother dies and he goes to her funeral. He is emotionless. He returns home and reacquaints himself with a lady by the name of Marie. They go on a date. Meursault has a neighbor, Raymond who may or may not be a former boxer, but now This was my first time reading this classic. This graphic novel has made me interested in reading the original in hopes of finding more meaning in the text. 3 stars because I'm royally confused. This story is about a man named Meursault who lives in France. One day his mother dies and he goes to her funeral. He is emotionless. He returns home and reacquaints himself with a lady by the name of Marie. They go on a date. Meursault has a neighbor, Raymond who may or may not be a former boxer, but now works in a warehouse. Raymond has a mistress that he likes to beat up. Meursault ends up getting involved with Raymond's drama and kills a man. Meursault is convicted of murder and faces the guillotine. During the entirety of the book Meursault shows little emotion until the very end. In which he says, "Everyone is privileged and everyone is guilty! Don't you understand that you're also condemned to death." Meursault is a stoic person. A man of little words and so he takes his sentence without a fight. It bothers me that he isn't effected more than he is. I mean he is hoping he will be set free, but not in a extremely fearful way. Most people would be in complete hysterics to learn that they were about to die. But Meursault takes it in stride almost philosophically. Like in the above quote, Meurault doesn't fear death because it happens to everyone. He will miss the birds, the sky and the sea. The last sentence really confused me, "I only hope there will be many, many spectators on the day of my execution...and that they will greet me with cries of hatred." What does this mean? Like I said above, I am interested in reading the original, in hopes of finding more to the story. Overall I enjoyed the illustrations in this graphic novel and the story was interesting.

  3. 5 out of 5

    James

    The artwork is outstanding, the use of watercolors mixed with the more traditional pen work helps set the tone. The characters emotions can be seen flashing in their faces and the dream sequences are unreal. The artist's work in this and other GNs is often displayed in galleries, I can see why. Too bad the actual story is such a downer, but I wasn't expecting happiness from a Camus story.

  4. 5 out of 5

    David Schaafsma

    “Mama died today. Or maybe yesterday; I can't be sure.” --Meursault I mainly read this illustrated version of Camus’s classic text because I saw it on the new Graphic Novels shelf yesterday, but I have always said it was one of the best books I ever read. Not that I have ever “loved” it as one loves family and the great outdoors. I read much of the works of Camus in my youth in the sixties, as I did the work of other existentialist authors, post-WWII works that questioned the meaning of existenc “Mama died today. Or maybe yesterday; I can't be sure.” --Meursault I mainly read this illustrated version of Camus’s classic text because I saw it on the new Graphic Novels shelf yesterday, but I have always said it was one of the best books I ever read. Not that I have ever “loved” it as one loves family and the great outdoors. I read much of the works of Camus in my youth in the sixties, as I did the work of other existentialist authors, post-WWII works that questioned the meaning of existence in the face of millions of lives lost in that war. With that background, Camus once said that the only significant philosophical question was suicide. In Camus’s The Myth of Sisyphus, too, he questions the nature of striving for meaning, which seems to him inherent in mankind. The Stranger portrays an enigmatic man who, days after his mother’s funeral, begins a relationship with a woman, Marie, but soon after commits a senseless crime. The focus of the action of half of the book is Meursault’s calmly, and seemingly indifferently, sitting through his trial only to hear himself condemned to death. His last human interaction is with a priest who tries to “save” his soul, about which the atheist Meursault says, “I had only a little time left and I didn't want to waste it on God.” Facing death, having confronted the priest angrily, he considers: “It was as if that great rush of anger had washed me clean, emptied me of hope, and, gazing up at the dark sky spangled with its signs and stars, for the first time, the first, I laid my heart open to the benign indifference of the universe. To feel it so like myself, indeed, so brotherly, made me realize that I'd been happy, and that I was happy still. For all to be accomplished, for me to feel less lonely, all that remained to hope was that on the day of my execution there should be a huge crowd of spectators and that they should greet me with howls of execration.” I haven’t read The Stranger for decades. I am not exactly sure how I think of it now based on this illustrated version, (though I can say the artwork is well done, and the excerpts Ferrandez chose seem to me apt for the purpose of getting at the heart of the book). I’m not an atheist; I think I might best be described as an agnostic who tries to live an ethical existence in the search for meaning. I don't feel a kinship with Meursault. But this reading has encouraged me to re-read the entire trilogy—The Stranger, The Plague, and The Fall. As I recall, while The Stranger is compelling, The Plague is the best of his work, moving and inspiring. We’ll see.

  5. 5 out of 5

    Erin

    The artwork did such a fantastic job of extending the narrative. The scenes that covered the murder were especially effective. One of my favorite stories of all time. Leaves me feeling so satisfyingly futile.

  6. 5 out of 5

    Anthony

    This is a gorgeous and perfectly executed work of art. Ferrandez truly understands Camus' L'étranger and expresses it in his illustrations. Fantastic.

  7. 5 out of 5

    Alex

    I picked this up from the library on a whim; the name Albert Camus rang a bell but I could not place it. I loved the artwork in this, it was beautiful. It also carried the story very well and helped mold the narrative in a more concise way. I'm still not too sure about the message of the plot, but I have a couple theories. I know this is a graphic novel based off of an original story by Albert Camus, so upon finishing it I looked it up. This graphic story has made me want to pick up Camus' origi I picked this up from the library on a whim; the name Albert Camus rang a bell but I could not place it. I loved the artwork in this, it was beautiful. It also carried the story very well and helped mold the narrative in a more concise way. I'm still not too sure about the message of the plot, but I have a couple theories. I know this is a graphic novel based off of an original story by Albert Camus, so upon finishing it I looked it up. This graphic story has made me want to pick up Camus' original and see what I can make of it, and just learn more about Camus in general. Really enjoyed this and would recommend; go in with an open mind and see what you can interpret.

  8. 4 out of 5

    Jon Nakapalau

    Camus classic novel is illustrated by the beautiful art of Jacques Ferrandez. The images remind one of fading watercolors from a dream of summers past; perhaps the last images that came to Meursault as he contemplated: “I realized then that a man who had lived only one day could easily live for a hundred years in prison. He would have enough memories to keep him from being bored.”

  9. 5 out of 5

    Shaun

    Wonderful little edition of a complex book. The illustrator, Jacques Ferrandez, hails from Algiers and he puts his heart and soul in this book about a "soulless" man. Truly great illustrations that track Camus' classic. Well worth the time.

  10. 5 out of 5

    Kenny

    Nothing like reading the prose but this bande dessines version is fine.

  11. 5 out of 5

    Robyn

    Woe is me.... I feel inadequate in that, despite a wide education, I seemed to have missed the original version of THE STRANGER. But having read this version twice, I am going to reach out and say that I superficially understand what happened, but as I had to I read this twice I am not really interested in even attempting to read Albert Camus' original version to even see if I could grasp the deeper meaning that I am sure intended. To review this version... I found it beautifully illustrated. Th Woe is me.... I feel inadequate in that, despite a wide education, I seemed to have missed the original version of THE STRANGER. But having read this version twice, I am going to reach out and say that I superficially understand what happened, but as I had to I read this twice I am not really interested in even attempting to read Albert Camus' original version to even see if I could grasp the deeper meaning that I am sure intended. To review this version... I found it beautifully illustrated. The use of color to show the heat makes it relative and believable... and it is clear that each illustration is critically considered for what emotion is supposed to be shown. Sadly, I see why Meursault is a stranger and lonely. His ability to empathize with those around him is lacking greatly. I did have trouble understanding the repeated mention of the heat... it was mentioned over and over and was indicated in the illustrations. So I assume in the original book the heat is more of a factor in the actions taken or not taken by Meursault. Perhaps he was suffering from heatstroke when he killed the man? After all the illustrations rather indicate this is to be assumed... The book is what it is.. and my review is based only upon my level of enjoyment... 3 stars Happy Reading!

  12. 5 out of 5

    Ryan Jankowski

    I first read The Stranger in 2001. I enjoyed it then, but have much more appreciation for it the second time around. The young Monsieur Meursault is the main character. In all things, he is very intentional in his indifference. The story begins with the death of his mother. Her death is mostly an inconvenience. When his girlfriend proposes marriage, he consents only because it makes no difference either way. His employer offers a promotion in Paris in which he replies, "I told him I was quite pr I first read The Stranger in 2001. I enjoyed it then, but have much more appreciation for it the second time around. The young Monsieur Meursault is the main character. In all things, he is very intentional in his indifference. The story begins with the death of his mother. Her death is mostly an inconvenience. When his girlfriend proposes marriage, he consents only because it makes no difference either way. His employer offers a promotion in Paris in which he replies, "I told him I was quite prepared to go; but really I didn’t care much one way or the other." The recurrent theme throughout the story is that nothing matters. That is, until we reach the end where Monsieur Meursault is sentenced to death. There is no indifference in death. The confrontation between the Priest and Meursault in his cell was revealing. There are some great themes for discussion which this short little book draws out.

  13. 4 out of 5

    Ben

    I love the original text. I think that illustrating the story imposed too much visual sympathy on Meursault, blunting the almost nihilistic apathy that Camus so deftly established within the character. If you want a simplification of the story this will work, but the underlying psychology of the novel is missing.

  14. 4 out of 5

    John

    The art in this book is just lovely.

  15. 5 out of 5

    Ara

    This has definitely arrived in a moment when I need it the most.

  16. 5 out of 5

    Deb (Readerbuzz) Nance

    Meursault learns of his mother's death, and travels to her nursing home for her funeral. Then he goes with a group to stay together for a few days, and, during the time there, he shoots and kills a man. Meursault goes to trial, and he is judged more about his perceived lack of character than for the murder itself, and he is sentenced to death. That's the plot of the story. But the profound aspect of this book is Meursault himself. He is a character like no character I've encountered in literature Meursault learns of his mother's death, and travels to her nursing home for her funeral. Then he goes with a group to stay together for a few days, and, during the time there, he shoots and kills a man. Meursault goes to trial, and he is judged more about his perceived lack of character than for the murder itself, and he is sentenced to death. That's the plot of the story. But the profound aspect of this book is Meursault himself. He is a character like no character I've encountered in literature. He seems unemotional, feeling little for his mother or his girlfriend or his friend. He appears to have no personal principles for acting or refusing to act in the world, whether it is to put his mother into a home, or to help a friend get revenge on a woman, or to get married, or, even, to kill a man. He is a stranger to the world. It was a deeply uncomfortable read. Neverthless, the character of Meursault seems deeply true, if horrifying. The Stranger will go on my shelf of Awful-But-Brilliant books. Side note: This is a graphic novel of The Stranger. The graphic novel format was perfect for this story, I think. I read it on my e-reader, which now has a way to zoom in on each panel of the graphic novel, adding to the isolation of the character.

  17. 4 out of 5

    Natasha

    Well, I got about as close as I'm gonna get to reading Camus. I feel sad now.

  18. 5 out of 5

    Dolly

    This graphic novel adaptation of the classic existentialist tale L'étranger byAlbert Camus. interesting quotes: "You can never really change your life and besdies, every life is more or less the same and my life here isn't bad at all..." (p. 49) "I wasn't happy with my wife, but in the end I got used to her..." (p. 52) "...I'm the kind of person whose physical needs often get in the way of my emotions..." (p. 75) "Well, I don't have much to say, so I keep quiet." (p. 76) "That's all for today, Monsieu This graphic novel adaptation of the classic existentialist tale L'étranger byAlbert Camus. interesting quotes: "You can never really change your life and besdies, every life is more or less the same and my life here isn't bad at all..." (p. 49) "I wasn't happy with my wife, but in the end I got used to her..." (p. 52) "...I'm the kind of person whose physical needs often get in the way of my emotions..." (p. 75) "Well, I don't have much to say, so I keep quiet." (p. 76) "That's all for today, Monsieur Antichrist..." (p. 81) "How could I have not realized that nothing is more important than a public execution and that, all in all, it's the only thing of real interest to a man!" (p. 114) "In the end, I know it doesn't really matter whether you die at 30 or 70, because in either case, other men and women will still go on living, and it will be like that for thousands of years." (p. 117) "...I don't have time to waste thinking about things that don't interest me." (p. 119) "I have very little time left and I don't want to waste them with God, Monsieur!" (p. 122) "You're so sure of yourself, aren't you? But not one of your certainties is worth a single strand of a woman's hair!!!" (p. 123) "As if standing before this symbolic night bursting with stars, I was opening myself up for the first time to the tender indifference of the world..." (p. 128)

  19. 5 out of 5

    Mai Thuong

    I read this in French. The language is very easy to follow, yet im not sure if I grasped the whole meaning. A book about the absurdity in life and how we tend ti give things meanings and get so attached to them, to my understanding. It's kind of mellow and meditative, the style of writing, so maybe not for ones who are not fan of this abstract writing.

  20. 5 out of 5

    George K. Ilsley

    An excellent adaptation of the classic novella. In fact there is so much text in the second half of this adaptation that I thought I might as well reread the original book. So I did. Camus is mercifully short, and this graphic adaptation is very faithful to the complete text. In fact, it is amazing how much was able to be included.

  21. 4 out of 5

    Anna

    Fitting artwork to go with the text, however, storywise not Camus' best.

  22. 4 out of 5

    Konstantinos Papalias

    Very nice illustration

  23. 4 out of 5

    Adrian

    A lovely adaptation of the original.

  24. 4 out of 5

    Tim Sheppard

    The illustrations contributed nicely to the story.

  25. 4 out of 5

    Renata

    2,5 stars Without most of the inner monologues, Meursault comes out simply as a douchbag. And/or a sociopath. Quite true to the original though.

  26. 5 out of 5

    Barbara

    I should read more of my favorite books as graphic novels.

  27. 4 out of 5

    Blue Cypress Books

    No slight on the illustrator, but the strength of Camus' novel comes from the visual sparseness and this graphic novel format didn't add anything for me.

  28. 4 out of 5

    Sandy Plants

    It was cool to see this as a comic/graphic novel! I love Camus’ original but adding pictures to it brought it to life with a different lens/feeling.

  29. 4 out of 5

    Claire

    Great adaptation into graphic novel format. I haven't read the original L'étranger, so I can't attest to how well it represents the original. But these illustrations are magnificent.

  30. 4 out of 5

    Henry

    Not sure the staticity of the story worked in a comic format. I don't remember the protagonist being such a wanker. I'm probably too old for existential angst.

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