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Whether writing a poem to a crush, writing to express your deepest thoughts, or just having fun with words, this book shows you how poems can be constructed and gives you tips to improve your writing From getting started to the finished product, How to Write Poetry is an essential book for every young poet to own. Paul B. Janeczko, an award-winning poet and compiler of best Whether writing a poem to a crush, writing to express your deepest thoughts, or just having fun with words, this book shows you how poems can be constructed and gives you tips to improve your writing From getting started to the finished product, How to Write Poetry is an essential book for every young poet to own. Paul B. Janeczko, an award-winning poet and compiler of best-selling poetry anthologies for young people, shares his very thorough tips on the art of writing poetry. Where do you get ideas? What are simple poems to write? How do you find just the right word? What pitfalls should you watch out for? These and many other questions are answered by the author, in example poems, and through quotes from other famous poets.


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Whether writing a poem to a crush, writing to express your deepest thoughts, or just having fun with words, this book shows you how poems can be constructed and gives you tips to improve your writing From getting started to the finished product, How to Write Poetry is an essential book for every young poet to own. Paul B. Janeczko, an award-winning poet and compiler of best Whether writing a poem to a crush, writing to express your deepest thoughts, or just having fun with words, this book shows you how poems can be constructed and gives you tips to improve your writing From getting started to the finished product, How to Write Poetry is an essential book for every young poet to own. Paul B. Janeczko, an award-winning poet and compiler of best-selling poetry anthologies for young people, shares his very thorough tips on the art of writing poetry. Where do you get ideas? What are simple poems to write? How do you find just the right word? What pitfalls should you watch out for? These and many other questions are answered by the author, in example poems, and through quotes from other famous poets.

30 review for How to Write Poetry

  1. 4 out of 5

    David Pilon

    A very straightforward, easy to follow book on how to write poetry. A useful guide for any teacher in juniour and intermediate grades or anyone who is interested in expression through poetry but doesn’t know where to start. Janeczko provides small sections called “Poetcraft” that look at specific poetic techniques such as figurative language, line breaks, etc., as well as many opportunities for you to implement what you’ve learned through small activities in sections called “Try This...”. There a A very straightforward, easy to follow book on how to write poetry. A useful guide for any teacher in juniour and intermediate grades or anyone who is interested in expression through poetry but doesn’t know where to start. Janeczko provides small sections called “Poetcraft” that look at specific poetic techniques such as figurative language, line breaks, etc., as well as many opportunities for you to implement what you’ve learned through small activities in sections called “Try This...”. There are many example poems to inspire, as well as writing tips from other poets beside the author. A great resource to own!

  2. 5 out of 5

    The Reading Countess

    How To Write Poetry by Paul B. Janeczko I bought this book through Scholastic book orders using my bonus points. It came with a pack of other books geared toward teachers attempting to teach their students the tricks of what can be a tricky genre for kids: poetry. I have been pleasantly surprised by the comprehensive nature of Janeczko’s poetry books, as this is not my first book by him. His writing has a conversational tone to it, and he takes his readers on a step-by-step approach through a wid How To Write Poetry by Paul B. Janeczko I bought this book through Scholastic book orders using my bonus points. It came with a pack of other books geared toward teachers attempting to teach their students the tricks of what can be a tricky genre for kids: poetry. I have been pleasantly surprised by the comprehensive nature of Janeczko’s poetry books, as this is not my first book by him. His writing has a conversational tone to it, and he takes his readers on a step-by-step approach through a wide variety of poetry. The book begins with what should be the staple of any writer: the writer’s journal. Careful to dilineate the difference between a journal and a diary, Janeczko encourages the reader to carry one at all times. Lined or unlined, fancy or simple, he asserts (as most teachers do, too), that a writer should have a safe place to stash ideas. How To Write Poetry then shares wonderful examples of many different kinds of poetry complete with sample poems and easy to follow examples of how a teacher can immediately and explicitly teach a certain kind of poem: acrostic, synonym/antonym poems, clerihews, list poems, history and how-to poems, and finally narrative poetry. My favorites were the list poems the included history and how-to poetry. “A History of the Faulty Shoes” by Amanda Granum Tiny white lacy slippers that I kicked off when I was a baby Sweet little pink jellies that I wore on the swing set and broke the strap Soft leather moccasins that had beads that fell off Bright pink sneakers that were hard to lace up Little purple velcro tennis shoes that had a hole in the heel Shiny black party shoes that got scratched on the sidewalk White leather sandals that got wet in the sprinkler and shrank Green All-Stars that rubbed at the toes Black Mary-Janes that I still wear today But who knows? (pgs. 48-49) “How To Get Out of Homework” by Jared Conrad-Bradshaw I’m feeling sick Look at what the dog’s doing Five more minutes That’s a beautiful necklace Oh, just a little longer But, I just reached dark castle and I can’t stop now There’s a bomb in my bedroom There’s a killer outside The baby’s sick But this book is stretching my mind in ways homework can’t I’m feeling sleepy I might wake the baby I just heard a gunshot Was that the phone? After dinner? The cat’s outside So is the dog I’m hungry I don’t feel like it. (pgs. 49-50) *Need some ideas for your students to springboard list poems into? Here is a rather long list of poem subjects: Things that never die, things that annoy me, achievements, things that stink, things that are gross, siblings, my grandmother’s house, bad cooks, irritating sounds, what money can do, things I can’t do and why, what cats do, lucky things, what to do it…, things that come in handy, things that are quiet, things I like about my friends, memories I’d forgotten, make-believe places, the perfect friend, what to do in study hall, nighttime, lies I’ve told, embarrassing moments, my mistakes, what my teachers do at home, attic, when I’m alone I… Not only does Paul Janeczko write in a clear and teacher friendly manner about how to teach a specific type of poetry, he also shares how poetry is made brilliant through the art of word play, strong use of verbs and adjectives, the importance of metaphors, line breaks, collecting “interesting” words, and why young readers and writers should listen to audio versions of poetry by published authors. These poetic devices were peppered throughout the book with ready to try ideas for busy teachers, and I plan on borrowing some of them myself next week. Placed throughout the book are also quotes from poets that I am envisioning putting in a PowerPoint and have looping on my computer and television screens as I teach. I especially liked the comprehensive list of poetry books at the end of the book, the glossary of poetic terminology useful for novice writers (or teachers), and the biographical notes. How To Write Poetry by Paul B. Janeczko is a wonderful resource for busy teachers hungry to place poetry in front of their students in a meaningful and explicit manner. Don’t miss this one!

  3. 4 out of 5

    Simply Arden

    4.0 out of 5 Quick Review - How to Write Poetry has good solid advice for beginner poetry writers. The text is focused on idea generation and form, and less about technical stucture. - This book covers all of the basics of getting started and continuing to write poetry, including tools, place, time, pitfalls to avoid and plenty of exercises. - There are many exercises included in each chapter for you to explore different types of poetry. These sections are preceded by explanations, examples, and tip 4.0 out of 5 Quick Review - How to Write Poetry has good solid advice for beginner poetry writers. The text is focused on idea generation and form, and less about technical stucture. - This book covers all of the basics of getting started and continuing to write poetry, including tools, place, time, pitfalls to avoid and plenty of exercises. - There are many exercises included in each chapter for you to explore different types of poetry. These sections are preceded by explanations, examples, and tips and tricks to write each type of poetry, ending with the exercise. - Janeczko gives great advice about starting a writing journal (or any journal), including ideas to get you started and keep you going. If I had to describe this book in two words: accessible and helpful. In Depth Review How to Write Poetry is a very easy to understand poetry book that clearly outlines different types of poetry, literary techniques, and gives straightforward exercises for you to practice writing yourself. The book is split into five chapters: Getting Ready, Starting To Write, Writing Poems That Rhyme, Writing Free Verse Poems and When Your Poem Is Finished. As you can see the book covers writing a poem from start to finish, including choosing your supplies to getting your poem published, and everything in between. It really is a great overview about basic poetry writing. Overall I would say this is a solid, helpful little starter guide if you’ve ever wanted to write poetry. I would highly recommend it. Book Look - The book is small, about the size of a splayed hand, and very thin at only 128 pages. - The cover is a basic old school stock art photo of a green toned lake with trees and grass (the book was published in 1999, so it fit the times). - The pages are a very nice, heavy, semi-gloss paper that is easy to grip and very sturdy. - The font is a standard, medium sized serif that is very easy to read. - How to Write Poetry has five chapters, with nice broken out and easy to follow sections. The exercises are easy to find and follow with break out “Try This” headings. Teaching sections called “Poetcraft” that are broken out with subheadings and a green background. Last there are grey block sections called “Writing Tip from a Poet” with helpful tips from other writers. - There are no illustrations or drawings. NOTE: I read a softcover copy of the book that I checked out at my local library. Favorite Quotes “Writing poetry gives you the chance to fall in love with language again and again.” “Poetry is a secret kingdom. If you engage all your senses - seeing, touching, listening, smelling, and tasting, the gates open. Seemingly unimportant things begin to speak…Details are the beginnings of poetry and the doors to your kingdom.” Musical Suggestions I enjoyed this book while listening to the playlist springtime stroll by Reilly on Spotify. View all my reviews

  4. 4 out of 5

    Sonya

    Nice short book with clear exercises and intro into writing poetry. It's a Scholastic book and I think geared toward school age kids or educators, but a good place to get started and learn about a few different types of poems and how to write them.

  5. 5 out of 5

    Christy

    I'm probably not its target audience, but this book might be fun for elementary and middle schoolers.

  6. 5 out of 5

    Misbah

    Read this in High school, a good simple intro to writing poetry. There was also something calming about the image on the cover and the page font.

  7. 5 out of 5

    Becca

    A good basics guide to writing poetry. Well suited for kids or people new to writing poetry.

  8. 5 out of 5

    Emily Wells

    Excellent introduction to the different types of poetry and how to begin writing your own.

  9. 4 out of 5

    Lauri Meyers

    Perfect for a middle school poet, but also excellent inspiration for an adult. Lovely poems and quotes from poets are dear.

  10. 5 out of 5

    Eden

    It may be called How To Write Poetry, but it doesn't really tell you how to write poetry. The only way to be able to write poetry or just write better, is to do it. But this book does explain the differences between free verse poems, narrative poems and more. It tells you ways that you can write better. The book even has writing exercises for you to use to help and improve your poetry writing. So while the book doesn't exactly tell you how to write poetry, it is useful and has very good advice. I It may be called How To Write Poetry, but it doesn't really tell you how to write poetry. The only way to be able to write poetry or just write better, is to do it. But this book does explain the differences between free verse poems, narrative poems and more. It tells you ways that you can write better. The book even has writing exercises for you to use to help and improve your poetry writing. So while the book doesn't exactly tell you how to write poetry, it is useful and has very good advice. I had written some poetry after reading the book and I found that my poems are better than before so I took something from reading this book. I am thankful to the author, Paul B. Janeczko, for writing this book. It has helped me into improve my poetry writing.

  11. 5 out of 5

    Yuuki Nakashima

    I don't write poems, but I have been asked to translate some poems from Japanese into English and I had a tough time then. One day, I found this book at a book store by chance and I thought it might help me to translate poetry next time. (I don't know if I'll have a chance to do it again, though.) To be honest, it didn't tell me what I expected, but it gave me many tips to improve my writing skill. I started to keep a journal that it recommended in the first chapter. English is not my mother langu I don't write poems, but I have been asked to translate some poems from Japanese into English and I had a tough time then. One day, I found this book at a book store by chance and I thought it might help me to translate poetry next time. (I don't know if I'll have a chance to do it again, though.) To be honest, it didn't tell me what I expected, but it gave me many tips to improve my writing skill. I started to keep a journal that it recommended in the first chapter. English is not my mother language, so keeping journal should be a good training to increase my vocabulary.

  12. 4 out of 5

    Samantha

    This is one of those "how-to" type books yet it's written in a style that gets your interest and you can't wait to try everything that's being discussed. :) While it was a bit elementary for me, I did pick up some poetry writing tips/styles/practice.

  13. 5 out of 5

    Lori

    This is a great book for poets who are young and young-at-heart. I learned something new from this book. For example, a two-line rhyming poem that is similiar is a synonym poem. A two-line rhyming poem that is different is called an antonym poem. Pretty neat.

  14. 5 out of 5

    Frank

    I read this a while ago but must admit I didn't learn what I had hoped to, but I'm not sure that is the author's fault. I just never could get into and I really did want to learn more about how to write poetry.

  15. 4 out of 5

    Mariah

    this book taught me a lot. it taught me how to better my poetry in everything i do

  16. 5 out of 5

    Jimmy

    An excellent book for young poets. Good advice, some nice examples, and plenty of ideas for writing.

  17. 5 out of 5

    Bryan Richard

    Great little book on writing poetry.

  18. 4 out of 5

    Scott Whitney

    Picked this book up at a used book store in order to use it in my English classes. I enjoyed the book and have found the information in it to be sound and help my students with writing.

  19. 4 out of 5

    Jenn

    Great ideas--this is a great book to have. Wanted to get out my journal and start writing poetry. Maybe I'll have time to soon.

  20. 4 out of 5

    Jules Philip Hernando

    This book can be quite useful to those who are just trying to write their first poems, i.e. students.

  21. 4 out of 5

    Natahlia

    I don't really write poetry(or read it), but I read this book to improve my free writing skills :)

  22. 4 out of 5

    Maggie

    A really useful book for kids on how to write poetry, with some fun hands-on exercises. Would be great for teachers, too.

  23. 4 out of 5

    Melanie

    I am teaching my children a little about writing poetry this summer and I'm using this book as my guide.

  24. 5 out of 5

    Rbsveter

  25. 5 out of 5

    Melissa

  26. 5 out of 5

    Laura

  27. 4 out of 5

    Elaine Fultz

  28. 4 out of 5

    Bruce Black

  29. 5 out of 5

    Rio

  30. 4 out of 5

    Priscila

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