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Fear comes in many forms. The horror genre’s greatest living practitioners drag our darkest fears kicking and screaming into the light in this collection of nineteen brand-new stories. In The Boggle Hole by Alison Littlewood an ancient folk tale leads to irrevocable loss. In Josh Malerman’s The House of the Head a dollhouse becomes the focus for an incident both violent and Fear comes in many forms. The horror genre’s greatest living practitioners drag our darkest fears kicking and screaming into the light in this collection of nineteen brand-new stories. In The Boggle Hole by Alison Littlewood an ancient folk tale leads to irrevocable loss. In Josh Malerman’s The House of the Head a dollhouse becomes the focus for an incident both violent and inexplicable. And in Speaking Still Ramsey Campbell suggests that beyond death there may be far worse things waiting than we can ever imagine... Numinous, surreal and gut wrenching, New Fears is a vibrant collection showcasing the very best fiction modern horror has to offer.


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Fear comes in many forms. The horror genre’s greatest living practitioners drag our darkest fears kicking and screaming into the light in this collection of nineteen brand-new stories. In The Boggle Hole by Alison Littlewood an ancient folk tale leads to irrevocable loss. In Josh Malerman’s The House of the Head a dollhouse becomes the focus for an incident both violent and Fear comes in many forms. The horror genre’s greatest living practitioners drag our darkest fears kicking and screaming into the light in this collection of nineteen brand-new stories. In The Boggle Hole by Alison Littlewood an ancient folk tale leads to irrevocable loss. In Josh Malerman’s The House of the Head a dollhouse becomes the focus for an incident both violent and inexplicable. And in Speaking Still Ramsey Campbell suggests that beyond death there may be far worse things waiting than we can ever imagine... Numinous, surreal and gut wrenching, New Fears is a vibrant collection showcasing the very best fiction modern horror has to offer.

30 review for New Fears: New Horror Stories by Masters of the Genre

  1. 4 out of 5

    Stephen Robert Collins

    An interesting collection but not all of the stories are that good but I still enjoy the rest which made up for less good stories & I buy vol.2. An interesting collection but not all of the stories are that good but I still enjoy the rest which made up for less good stories & I buy vol.2.

  2. 5 out of 5

    Seregil of Rhiminee

    Originally published at Risingshadow. New Fears (edited by Mark Morris) is an excellent anthology of modern horror stories that showcases the talents of many authors, some of which may be a bit unknown to readers. This anthology is clearly one of the best horror anthologies of the year, because its contents are satisfyinly dark and unsettling. As a long time fan of horror fiction, dark fiction and strange fiction, I'm glad to say that I was impressed by all of the stories in this anthology. Each s Originally published at Risingshadow. New Fears (edited by Mark Morris) is an excellent anthology of modern horror stories that showcases the talents of many authors, some of which may be a bit unknown to readers. This anthology is clearly one of the best horror anthologies of the year, because its contents are satisfyinly dark and unsettling. As a long time fan of horror fiction, dark fiction and strange fiction, I'm glad to say that I was impressed by all of the stories in this anthology. Each story in this anthology is a small gem of horror fiction that will interest horror readers and those who are looking for something chilling to read. One of the best things about this anthology is that it is not a themed anthology, but a collection of frightening and atmospheric stories in the vein of classic horror anthologies. As much as I love themed anthologies, it was refreshing to read an old-fashioned yet wholly modern horror anthology in which the editor has made sure that all of the stories are fascinating and demonstrate the versatility of the genre. This collection contains the following stories: The Boggle Hole – Alison Littlewood Sherpherd's Business – Stephen Gallagher No Good Deed – Angela Slatter The Family Car – Brady Golden Four Abstracts – Nina Allan Sheltered in Place – Brian Keene The Fold in the Heart – Chaz Brenchley Departures – AK Benedict The Salter Collection – Brian Lillie Speaking Still – Ramsey Campbell The Eyes Are White and Quiet – Carole Johnstone The Embarrassment of Dead Grandmothers – Sarah Lotz Eumenides (The Benevolent Ladies) – Adam Nevill Roundabout – Muriel Gray The House of the Head – Josh Malerman Succulents – Conrad Williams Dollies – Kathryn Ptacek The Abduction Door – Christopher Golden The Swan Dive – Stephen Laws All of the above mentioned stories are excellent and strong stories. The authors have done their best to write chilling and unsettling stories that will continue to haunt readers for a long time after they've finished reading them. These stories demonstrate that fear and terror come in many forms. In them, everyday life can suddenly take a turn for the macabre and nobody is safe from the clutches of fear. Here's a bit more information about the stories and my thoughts about them: The Boggle Hole – Alison Littlewood: - A story about Tim who spends time with his grandfather. Tim hears from his granfather that a goblin lives on the beach in the boggle hole and if you take something that is his, he might take something from you. - An excellent and atmospheric story that has been written in the vein of classic horror stories. Sherpherd's Business – Stephen Gallagher: - In this story, a doctor called Munro Spence arrives on an island to replace the old doctor who's become ill. Soon he learns that something terrifying may have happened among the islanders. - This is one of the best horror stories I've read this year, because the author writes well about the islanders, their lives and their customs. No Good Deed – Angela Slatter: - A story about Isobel who wakes up, finds herself in a strange place and doesn't remember what has happened to her. She only remembers that she married Adolphus Wollstonecraft, but everything after that is blank to her. Soon she hears about what has happened to her and what is expected of her... - This story is connected to the author's previous story, "St. Dymphna's School for Poison Girls" (originally published in The Bitterwood Bible and Other Recountings), but can be read as a standalone story. - I was very impressed by this story, because it has everything that I've come expect from the author's stories. It's an atmospheric and brilliant story about poisons, justice and vengeance. The Family Car – Brady Golden: - Lindsay notices a car that looks exactly like the car her parents used to have, but she knows that it is not possible, because they had suddenly vanished along with the car. - I find the author's way of writing about Lindsay's mental health fascinating, because the loss of her parents has affected her. It was interesting to read about how she tried to move on. - A well written strange tale with emotional depth. Four Abstracts – Nina Allan: - A story about Isobel who knew an artist, Rebecca "Beck" Hathaway, whose work in oils is a kind of journal-keeping. Isobel reminisces about her friendship with Beck and remembers unsettling things that Beck told about her mother and how she said that women in her family are part-spider... - There are many things in this story that I find fascinating. First of all, the author writes excellently about Isobel's friendship with Beck and what happens to Beck. She also explores spider mythology in an engaging and fascinating way, and her decriptions of the abstracts are captivating. - The atmosphere in this story is effective, because you get a feeling that something is wrong with Beck and you won't be able to shake away this feeling of unease. - An atmospheric and beautifully written story with plenty of underlying emotion and sadness. This story is slow-burning and harrowing literary horror at its utmost best. Sheltered in Place – Brian Keene: - This is a surprisingly memorable story about what has happened at the airport when someone has begun to shoot people. - I think that this story will chill and terrify many readers, because it has elements that are slightly connected to real life shootings. The Fold in the Heart – Chaz Brenchley: - A story about a man, Rowan and Josh who face a sudden and powerful storm. - This story is something a bit different and has a literary feel to it. - I liked this story very much, because the author writes well about the characters and their relationship with each other. Departures – AK Benedict: - A woman wakes up in a pub and senses that something is wrong, because she can't remember her name or address. - This is an interesting short story, because it deals with death and afterlife in a slightly different way. - It was fascinating to read about the Hollow and what kind of a place it is. The Salter Collection – Brian Lillie: - In this story, Alice works at the library. He takes Mr. Caul to the place where the Salter Collection is and shows him something strange in the listening room... - It was fascinating to read about what Alice and Mr. Caul found and what happened afterwards. - This story has an excellent ending. Speaking Still – Ramsey Campbell: - A story about Bill whose friend, Daniel, has lost his wife. Bill witnesses how Daniel copes with the loss and how convinced he is that he gets messages from his dead wife... - This story is a testament to the fact that Ramsey Campbell is one of the best British horror authors, because he writes consistently good stories. - A well written story with a chilling ending. The Eyes Are White and Quiet – Carole Johnstone: - A story about Hannah who has problems with her eyes. Hannah has been to doctors, but nobody belives her when she tells them about her condition... - I liked this story very much, because it's intriguingly bleak. The Embarrassment of Dead Grandmothers – Sarah Lotz: - In this story, Steven has gone to the theatre with his grandmother to see Andrew Lloyd Webber's "The Phantom of the Opera". His grandmother dies during the show and he finds himself in quite a difficult situation... - This is one of the best stories in this anthology, because it's a darkly humorous story about an evening gone awry. Eumenides (The Benevolent Ladies) – Adam Nevill: - In this story, Jason works at Agri-Tech and the only light of his working life is Electra who's like a siren to him. He is bored and fears of what may become of him if he forgets who he is. When he asks Electra to go out, she agrees to meet him beside the zoo... - The authors's descriptions of Jason's life and feelings are excellent, because he paints a realistic picture of a man who think of his own life and what he should do with it. - The Victorian zoo adds a touch of macabre atmosphere to the story. - This is definitely one of the best and most compelling stories in this anthology. Roundabout – Muriel Gray: - A story about Danny and the Blowbarton roundabout. Danny decides to shift The Dark Thing on the roundabout... - I found this story especially interesting, because it's something a bit different. - An atmospheric and well written story. The House of the Head – Josh Malerman: - In the winter of 1974, Elvie May witnesses a terrifying haunting in her dollhouse. The story begins when Elvie's father buys her a dollhouse that has three people inside it, just like in their house. At first, everything is normal and Elvie enjoys playing with the dollhouse, but then things gradually change and Elvie sees something disturbing and macabre inside the dollhouse... - I like the author's writing style and the way he writes about Elvie's feelings. - An excellent and satisfyingly dark story. Succulents – Conrad Williams: - Graham and his young son, Felix, are on a bike trip with other people while his wife rests at the hotel. Their guide shows them a succulent plant called 'Mother's Tears' and asks them to try it... - I enjoyed reading about what happened to Graham and how the plant affected him. - An interesting and atmospheric strange tale. Dollies – Kathryn Ptacek: - In this story, a woman used to have dolls when she was little. She named all of them Elizabeth and they all died of smallpox. - It was intiruing and unsettling to read about what was revealed about the protagonist's birth. - A well written story with a good ending. The Abduction Door – Christopher Golden: - In this story, a man suffers from the fear of the abduction door. - The author has created quite an intriguing story about people getting snatched through the abduction doors in the middle of their elevator rides. - The ending of this story is chilling and unsettling. The Swan Dive – Stephen Laws: - In this story, the protagonist is on the bridge and intends to kill himself by doing a swan dive into the water below. As he takes the dive, something weird happens to him, because he is saved by a strange being that bursts out of the water... - An excellent and very well written weird story. - This is one of my favourite stories in this anthology, because it's satisfyingly strange. Here are a few more words about some of the stories: - Alison Littlewood's "The Boggle Hole" is an entertaining and satisfyingly chilling story about what happens when Tim's grandfather takes Tim to the beach and tells him of the goblin that lives there. The author writes excellently about how Tim feels about his grandfather's house, because he experiences a strong sense of silence there as if the silence is alive. - "Sherpherd's Business" by Stephen Gallagher's is an excellent story about a locum who arrives on an island and takes over the medical practice. The author writes realistically about what it is like to work in a new place and how people react to a new person. What has happens among the islanders is memorable, because it's something unexpected. - Angela Slatter's "No Good Deed" demonstrates perfectly why the author is one of the most talented writers of dark fantasy and horror fiction. Her literary writing style is excellent and her sense of style and atmosphere is impeccable. I think that everyone who has a taste for well written literary strange fiction and dark fantasy will love this vengeance story, because the author writes captivatingly about Isobel and her situation. - Nina Allan's "Four Abstracts" is a masterpiece of slow-burning literary horror fiction. This story is memorable and effective, because the author takes her time to build up an unsettling atmosphere and doesn't hurry with the story. To be honest, this story is one of the best stories of the year, because it's well written and the events advance at a subtle pace. The author's descriptions of the characters' feelings and behaviour are realistic and perceptive. Each of the characters feels like a real person and that's one of the things why the story works so well. - Brian Lillie's "The Salter Collection" intrigued me a lot. I found it fascinating that the author wrote about library work and concentrated on writing about what the protagonist found in the Salter Collection. Brian Lillie is unfortunately a bit unknown author to me, but I intend to take a closer look at his stories, because I enjoyed this story and its ending. - "The Embarrassment of Dead Grandmothers" by Sarah Lotz is an excellent and darkly humorous story about what happens when Steven's grandmother dies while they're at the theatre. Steven finds himself thinking of how to keep everybody from not noticing that his grandmother has died. I think that this story will especially appeal to those who love dark British humour. - Josh Malerman's "The House of the Head" is definitely one of the best horror stories of the year. I find it satisfyingly strange and unsettling. The author writes well about Elvie May and how she feels about what she witnesses happening inside her dollhouse. The dollhouse turns from a normal children's dollhouse into a hellish playground for terrifying happenings. When you begin to read this story, you'll feel Elvie's concern for the family of dolls, the Smithsmiths, because she fears what may happen to them because of the head that has suddenly appeared inside the dollhouse. This story was so original and impressive that the author made his way to my must-read list. Although I enjoyed all of the stories in this anthology and found them intriguing, the strongest story is without a doubt "Four Abstracts" by Nina Allan. It's such a haunting masterpiece of literary dark fiction that you can't help but be impressed and captivated by it. It's one of the best and most harrowing stories I've read this year. Stephen Gallagher's "Sherpherd's Business", Angela Slatter's "No Good Deed", Adam Nevill's "Eumenides (The Benevolent Ladies)", Josh Malerman's "The House of the Head" and Stephen Laws' "The Swan Dive" come as close seconds, because they're excellent and well written stories. It was a real pleasure to read this anthology, because all of the stories are good in their own ways. I found the diversity of the stories enjoyable, because it was nice to read different kinds of stories. The atmosphere in these stories impressed me and made me devour them as quickly as possible, for I've always loved unsettling stories that cause genuine feelings of unease in the reader. New Fears is a real treat to all horror readers who love atmospheric and unsettling stories, because it showcases how good, effective and original modern horror fiction can be at its best. Please, don't hesitate to read this gem of an anthology, but grab it immediately and treat yourself to a chilling and unsettling reading experience. Highly recommended!

  3. 5 out of 5

    Blair

    Nina Allan's story 'Four Abstracts': W O W. 'Four Abstracts' is told through, or around, four significant works from the career of artist Rebecca Hathaway. The narrator is her friend Isobel, who is reflecting on their complicated relationship in the aftermath of Rebecca's death, at just 49, from 'complications following a diagnosis of early-onset Alzheimer's'. The two first became friends when they were students, and 'not long after I first met her,' says Isobel, 'Beck told me a strange story'. I Nina Allan's story 'Four Abstracts': W O W. 'Four Abstracts' is told through, or around, four significant works from the career of artist Rebecca Hathaway. The narrator is her friend Isobel, who is reflecting on their complicated relationship in the aftermath of Rebecca's death, at just 49, from 'complications following a diagnosis of early-onset Alzheimer's'. The two first became friends when they were students, and 'not long after I first met her,' says Isobel, 'Beck told me a strange story'. It's about the time her mother Jennie – herself a renowned photographer – told the then ten-year-old Rebecca that 'the women in our family are all part-spider'. Isobel doesn't believe this, of course, but she's never quite able to forget it. The story charts the friendship between the two women, Rebecca's career as an artist, and Isobel's feelings of guilt and grief about her friend's physical decline and eventual death, all while keeping the spider theme uncomfortably in view. Everything about it – tone, characterisation, settings, descriptions of artworks – is so expertly detailed that, ultimately, it hardly seems to matter whether this is a horror story or not. I've come to believe that being haunted is actually just belated understanding. 'Four Abstracts' is so good that I'm kind of reluctant to read the rest of the anthology. How could anything else compare? I did make an exception for Sarah Lotz's 'The Embarrassment of Dead Grandmothers', which wasn't really worth bothering with but was at least very short. I might come back to this at some point, but for now I just want to luxuriate in the brilliance of 'Four Abstracts'.

  4. 4 out of 5

    Alan

    This seemed like it would be a much better than average collection, considering the pedigree of several of the authors. While it was a little better than many of the run-of-the-mill anthologies that get churned out, it never did reach the status of being much better than "good". The best tales are by several of the more famous/accomplished authors. Ramsey Campbell's story "Speaking Still" is the best writing I've read of his in years, and was arguably the best contribution to the book. Josh Male This seemed like it would be a much better than average collection, considering the pedigree of several of the authors. While it was a little better than many of the run-of-the-mill anthologies that get churned out, it never did reach the status of being much better than "good". The best tales are by several of the more famous/accomplished authors. Ramsey Campbell's story "Speaking Still" is the best writing I've read of his in years, and was arguably the best contribution to the book. Josh Malerman and Christopher Golden each had one of the better tales, while Stephen Laws and Brian Keene produced decent enough stories. Nina Allan was the one lesser know author who's story was arguably in the top 2-3. For most of the remaining hodgepodge of mainly British authors, they ranged from mediocre to just average, while two or three, such as Adam Nevill and Brady Golden, wrote very intriguing and exciting stories that completely fizzled with hurried, unsatisfactory endings. An overall decent anthology, but not a spectacular one.

  5. 5 out of 5

    Laura Mauro

    Okay. So I actually only managed to finish one non-university related book in October. But – what a book. There are nineteen stories in total, all of them good, some of them incredibly good. The book opens with a strong offering from Alison Littlewood, whose story ‘The Boggle Hole’ is unexpectedly melancholy – to great effect. ‘The Fold In The Heart’ by Chaz Brenchley (who I had not previously heard of, and whose work I will be actively seeking out) is an eerie and beautiful story about abuse, an Okay. So I actually only managed to finish one non-university related book in October. But – what a book. There are nineteen stories in total, all of them good, some of them incredibly good. The book opens with a strong offering from Alison Littlewood, whose story ‘The Boggle Hole’ is unexpectedly melancholy – to great effect. ‘The Fold In The Heart’ by Chaz Brenchley (who I had not previously heard of, and whose work I will be actively seeking out) is an eerie and beautiful story about abuse, and about love. ‘Departures’ by A.K. Benedict is clever and imaginative, and totally believable even in its surrealness. Kathryn Ptacek’s ‘Dollies’ is skin-crawlingly weird, while Christopher Golden’s ‘The Abduction Door’ masterfully evokes the breathless panic of a parent in search of their lost child, though the story takes a bizarre turn you might not expect – so much the better, in my opinion. Stephen Laws (who I still credit as giving the most incredible reading I’ve ever heard – his story, ‘The Slista’, read aloud at the Best British Horror 2015 launch, was utterly captivating) once again proves his formidable ability with ‘The Swan Dive’. But, to my three favourites: Carole Johnstone, who is fast becoming one of my favourite writers, knocks it out of the park with her tense, suffocating tale ‘The Eyes Are White And Quiet’, which leads you sightless and bewildered on a strange, dark journey. ‘The House Of The Head’ by Josh Malerman is weird in all the right ways – a haunted doll-house sounds almost trite but I couldn’t stop reading until the very end. And ‘Four Abstracts’ by Nina Allan, who I believe is a true master of the genre, and whose ability to evoke authentic, tangible emotion even as she weaves uncanny strands into her narrative is unparalleled.

  6. 5 out of 5

    Jessie (Zombie_likes_cake)

    So, this was disappointing. It is an anthology, so it was not a complete wash (that would be really hard to accomplish). Mostly it failed on its own target of inducing fear, I did not find that in this collection. Mildly creepy, yes, but nothing I would throw the word "fear" at. But I guess "New Mildly Creepy" didn't make for such a great title. Among the few stories I did enjoy I didn't even find anything outstanding (the highest rating I would give a story in here is 4*), I am not sure that in So, this was disappointing. It is an anthology, so it was not a complete wash (that would be really hard to accomplish). Mostly it failed on its own target of inducing fear, I did not find that in this collection. Mildly creepy, yes, but nothing I would throw the word "fear" at. But I guess "New Mildly Creepy" didn't make for such a great title. Among the few stories I did enjoy I didn't even find anything outstanding (the highest rating I would give a story in here is 4*), I am not sure that in a year from now I can recall even a single piece from this. Funny enough, I am nonetheless thinking about Volume 2 which is sitting on my library's new books shelf, it just has several writers I like or am interested in and the stories have such good names... I don't know, I might really regret that move once I pick that one up. You will find 2 stories about dolls in some form in here, both were among the ones that I liked which might be due to the fact that dolls are just that scary. I also found a few confusing stories where I wasn't quite sure what exactly was going on, that didn't help the rating. Some stories had really interesting concepts ("Four Abstracts" or "Sheltered in Place") but I thought failed in going to that scary place, you know the one where I actually feel something in the ballpark near fear. 2.5* Here are my five favorites: 5) "Boggle Hole" by Alison Littlewood 4) "The Eyes are White and Quiet" by Carol Johnstone 3) "Dollies" by Kathryn Ptacek 2) "The House of the Head" by Josh Malerman 1) "The Swan Dive" by Stephen Laws The One to skip: "Succulents" by Conrad Williams

  7. 5 out of 5

    Gavin

    Brand new horror stories by masters of the genre The horror genre's leading living practitioners drag our darkest fears kicking and screaming into the light in this collection of nineteen brand-new stories. The impressive line-up includes stories from: Ramsey Campbell, Adam Nevill, Sarah Lotz, Stephen Gallagher, Angela Slatter, A.K. Benedict, Josh Malerman, Muriel Gray, Christopher Golden, Nina Allen, Stephen Laws, Carole Johnstone, Brian Keene, Kathryn Ptacek, Conrad Williams, Alison Littlewood, B Brand new horror stories by masters of the genre The horror genre's leading living practitioners drag our darkest fears kicking and screaming into the light in this collection of nineteen brand-new stories. The impressive line-up includes stories from: Ramsey Campbell, Adam Nevill, Sarah Lotz, Stephen Gallagher, Angela Slatter, A.K. Benedict, Josh Malerman, Muriel Gray, Christopher Golden, Nina Allen, Stephen Laws, Carole Johnstone, Brian Keene, Kathryn Ptacek, Conrad Williams, Alison Littlewood, Brady Golden, Chaz Brenchley, and Brian Lillie. New Fears invites readers on a ride through a world of human fears in a vibrant collection of numinous, surreal, gut wrenching and terrifying stories that showcase the very best that modern horror fiction has to offer. Curated by leading horror author and editor Mark Morris, the collection proves that fear truly does come in many forms... Fear comes in many forms The moment I saw the remarkable list of contributors Mark Morris had gathered, expectations were raised, this was an immediate 'must read', so I was delighted that Titan Books sent me this anthology in advance of its September 19th release date to review. I've already been lucky enough to of read some superb collections this year, so how will New Fears stand up to some very stiff competition? I'm not going to write a story by story review of New Fears, what I'd prefer to do is cherry pick a few of my favourites. Now that's not as easy a task as you may think. Near Fears is an incredibly well written collection of stories. Hardly a surprise due to the authors involved, but it's the sheer variety and diversity of each tale that makes things difficult. These are not gory filled, violent tales of monsters on the rampage, I was pleasantly surprised how a lot of these tales were so cerebral, they didn't hold the readers hand and mollycoddle.  Out of the 19 stories in New Fears, I can safely say that 11 of them were outstanding to read, easily falling into the best shorts I've read this year. Of the remaining 8 the standard was very high, with only a couple of the tales dipping in quality, I'm already looking forward to rereading this collection later in the year and re-evaluating my review. So, onto my favourites, and in no particular order I'll start with Kathryn Ptacek's Dollies. Ptacek manages to pull shock after shock in this incredibly dark and heart wrenching tale about a girl and a secret harboured by her parents. I was unaware of Kathryn Ptacek prior to reading Dollies, I'll certainly be looking for more of her work in the future. Next would be Shepherds' Business by Stephen Gallagher, this had a distinct Hammer Horror vibe going on with a new Doctor taking over the rounds on a remote island. I loved how alive the island felt with its close-knit community and their obvious distrust of this stranger among them. I was utterly engrossed in this tale and it's decidedly dark conclusion. The last story I'm going to mention will be Eumenides (The Benevolant Ladies) by Adam Nevill. Adam has a writing style that just embraces you, words flow and the horrors he unleashes are truly terrifying. I was in this story, I was standing alongside protagonist Jason as he made his steady climb to complete insanity at the summit of Pentree Zoological Gardens. OK, maybe this was my favourite story in the collection. In my opinion, nobody is writing as consistently as Adam Nevill, who along with Josh Malerman (who also features in this collection with an incredibly effective haunted dolls house story) have the future of modern horror sewn up. New Fears is a stunning collection of 19 tales that will both terrify and delight you. The quality of writing is brilliant with every contributor, and the editor, Mark Morris, deserving congratulations. This is a special anthology that I hope to see run and run. The bar has been set very high.

  8. 4 out of 5

    Dawn Livingston

    I'm of two minds regarding this book. On one hand I found myself indifferent to most stories in this book, they just made no impact whatsoever. I just read them, shrugged and went on to the new one. I did not read this book all in one sitting. To me short stories shouldn't be treated that way, it's best to read a few and let them possibly sink in a bit if they will. Mull them over a little. The pages went by quickly but there were so many of them it seemed to take forever to finish it. My first I'm of two minds regarding this book. On one hand I found myself indifferent to most stories in this book, they just made no impact whatsoever. I just read them, shrugged and went on to the new one. I did not read this book all in one sitting. To me short stories shouldn't be treated that way, it's best to read a few and let them possibly sink in a bit if they will. Mull them over a little. The pages went by quickly but there were so many of them it seemed to take forever to finish it. My first impression is to say it was okay, no big deal, read it or don't. One story stood out, The House of the Head by Josh Malerman but considering how many stories there were you'd think more than one would have stood out. Nope. I felt as if I was just numb to it all, not much really clicked for me. Horror anthology burnout? I think so. Time to put my horror anthologies aside (I think I have three more) and read a few other books at least to give myself a break before I dive back in. On the other hand, I feel this was a refreshing change to the usual horror stories, a nice break from a Stephen King or a Lovecraft. I think the horror was more subtle which is why I feel I didn't get a lot of what was implied. I felt that a lot of stuff just went over my head. Not a good feeling, very disappointing. Still this was a nice collection of horror that wasn't samey, wasn't carbon copy horror of something else. It just wasn't for me. I think if you're a fan of horror you should definitely read this book and possibly add it to your collection along with Stephen King's "Just After Sunset" and "American Fantastic Tales: Terror and the Uncanny from Poe to the Pulps."

  9. 5 out of 5

    Neil McRobert

    This is a very mixed bag of stories. The editor mentions in his prologue that it is intended to be a homage to the miscellaneous Pan collections from his youth - and the lack of unifying theme is one of the most interesting things about the collection. It really is a series of stories linked only by their efforts to unnerve, fascinate or horrify. As with all short fiction collections, there are hits and misses. New Fears, I think, has a few more of the latter than the former, unfortunately. I don This is a very mixed bag of stories. The editor mentions in his prologue that it is intended to be a homage to the miscellaneous Pan collections from his youth - and the lack of unifying theme is one of the most interesting things about the collection. It really is a series of stories linked only by their efforts to unnerve, fascinate or horrify. As with all short fiction collections, there are hits and misses. New Fears, I think, has a few more of the latter than the former, unfortunately. I don't intend to be harsh; all but one of the stories in the collection is well-written and contains something interesting (i'm not saying which the loser is). There is just one too many stories that peters out, or that is too obtuse, for my liking. I love cerebral horror, I love the Weird. I enjoy ambiguity. I just like a short story to follow through on it's premise and give the notion of trajectory. A few here meander and stutter rather than cutting clean. But in the pursuit of positivity - here are the top five stories in New Fears. (and 5 good stories is a great ratio for ANY collection as far as i'm concerned). Oh, and this is very much in order of good (1) to great (5) 1) The Boggle Hole - Alison Littlewood - This opens the collection. An eerie little folktale with plenty of pathos in the central relationship between a young boy and his grandfather. It plays very much on the sense of immediate locale, and is highly reminiscent of Andrew Hurley's The Loney, in tone and setting, if not plot. It is beautifully and subtly written - so subtle that it hardly falls into the horror category, until it does. 2) Dollies Perhaps the bleakest tale in the collection. This is a nasty little portrait of a young girl's beleaguered live and the mortality of her dolls. It covers a lot of ground in a few pages yet never feels hurried. The 'punchline' (for want of a better word) choked a cruel laugh out of me. Grim but wholly enthralling. 3) Shepherds Business - I'm a sucker for horror stories set in the recent past. This short portrait of island tradition goes for the throat more than most tales in New Fears. It's visceral and nasty but also deeply sad. There are no villains here, only ignorant people who mean well but commit atrocities. Mark it under the folk tradition and hope they never make a movie of this. It's haunting and elegiac. 4) The Embarrassment of Dead Grandmothers - Sarah Lotz - A genuinely laugh out loud horror joke that doens't overplay it's hand or overstay it's welcome. Having read some of Sarah Lotz's novels I wouldn't have believed she had such a turn of pace in her arsenal. It reads like an urban legend that happened to a friend of your ex's cousin - the tale of a young man and his grandmother who visit the theatre, only for death and humility to come calling. It reads very much like an episode of the TV show Inside Number 9 which, from me, is the highest praise. 5) The Abduction Door - Christopher Golden - The best story in the collection. A young boy becomes obsessed with a small door in an elevator that may lead . . . elsewhere. The story is about what happens when he grows up and that door reappears to play havoc with his own family. This is pure Twilight Zone stuff - short, sharp and with a sting in the tail. Whereas Rod Serling would have offered hope, however, Golden only brings despair. It riffs a little on an old Harlan Ellison story about elevators to hell, but the pace, humanity and the balancing of the mundane with the miraculous makes this firmly my favourite tale of the bunch.

  10. 4 out of 5

    Theresa Derwin

    New Fears (Ed) Mark Morris Publisher: Titan Books Page count: 408pp Release date: 19th September 2017 Reviewer: Theresa Derwin Mark Morris, from the start of his career with his novel Toady, has cemented a reputation as an exemplar of everything notable in the Horror genre. Now, after many years working on a variety of projects, Morris has hit the jackpot; the resurgence of the modern day 'Pan Book of Horror stories'. Recalling his childhood and a New Years Eve in 1975 spent devouring a well known horro New Fears (Ed) Mark Morris Publisher: Titan Books Page count: 408pp Release date: 19th September 2017 Reviewer: Theresa Derwin Mark Morris, from the start of his career with his novel Toady, has cemented a reputation as an exemplar of everything notable in the Horror genre. Now, after many years working on a variety of projects, Morris has hit the jackpot; the resurgence of the modern day 'Pan Book of Horror stories'. Recalling his childhood and a New Years Eve in 1975 spent devouring a well known horror anthology, Morris has captured the spirit of discovery. The discovery of gripping, creepy, shudder-worthy horror stories that create shadows in dark bedrooms. In 'New Fears', he reinvigorates the Horror genre by collecting nineteen new tales written by the masters of horror (and I include female writers in that description). Firstly, as I opened the book, I cursed Mr Morris and those imps and Titan Books. A white cover riddled with images of Crawling flies. Yeah, thanks for that. And just in time for blue bottle Season as well. Once I'd recovered from the creepy crawlies and read the wonderful introduction, I started the first story. 'The Boggle Hole' by Alison Littlewood. Reminiscing childhood, young Tim is staying with his grandad whilst Mum and new chap are sitting on a beach in the Bahamas. Intent on Tim having fun, grandad takes him to the local, black beach near Ravenscar. The visit comes with one warning; there's a boggle there (a type of malevolent fae) and once something is taken from his 'boggle hole', something is taken back. In parts creepy, in parts a lyric to childhood and loss, 'The Boggle Hole',if it can be described as such, is a beautiful and frightening story with an ending which gives a lightening bolt of realisation and emotion. A great way to start what I suspect will be an award winning series. Stephen Gallagher, well known for TV writing as well as his novels and stories, offers the next gem; Shepherd's Business. 1947 and a young doctor on a supply boat is on his way to his new practice, taking over from the regular GP who is badly ailing. There's a lot to say about this piece; from the atmospheric scenery, to the compassion the new doctor shows his patients and his understanding of how depression was ignored during that time, it is both poignant and heart warming. Then suddenly- eww, argh. From a critical point of view, the historical accuracy and Doctor Spencer's 'voice' were spot on. As for the denouement- I literally gasped. And reread that last page twice. The next story comes from Angela Slatter. I know her work through the brilliant Verity Fassbinder series. Her story 'No Good Deed' is an interesting period piece with a character name familiar to many readers. A good solid, enjoyable and humorous story with a lovely ending. Now, it's getting to the point that this review will be very long if I disect every story, so I'm going to pick some hi lights. Next is my first experience of Brady Golden, and wow - The Family Car is a helluva story - and I found myself likening it to Stephen King, not just because it features the King Family. Very creepy. Nice creation in the 'antagonist'. It has convinced me to check out more of his work. The standout story of the anthology is the longer piece by Nina Allan. 'Four Abstracts' Nina Allan - four words: Holy Crap! Holy Hell! The abstracts refer to the work of the artist Hathaway and a short piece written, chronicling the art. Rebecca Hathaway (Beck) is a character in the story - her story is woven through the narrative - strands of silk between the tale of Hathaway's daughter Beck and our narrator, Isobel. And I found I could seriously relate to some of Isobel's attitudes and beliefs. Amidst the bleak, disturbing imagery and words, are some really humorous bits. It's a stand out piece in the book, and the reader is left wondering just how much is real. There is so much I want to say here, but, 'spoilers darling'. All I can say, is read it! The change in tone with the next story by Brian Keene is a welcome reprieve. It’s a down to earth, gritty kind of horror story that starts with a ‘terrorist’ incident, but Keene’s Voice is a perfect switch over to allow the reader time to recover from Allan’s story, and of course, it’s a great story in its own right. I discovered Keene many years ago with his fantastic alt-zombie series which started with the much praised ‘The Rising’. Fans of Keene will be pleased to know a movie adaptation of his novel ‘The Ghoul’ has now been released on DVD in the U.K. In his piece ‘Sheltered in Place’ I did wonder if Keene’s was having a joke poking fun at his writer buddy Maberry by putting in a ‘guy in a Hawaiian shirt’ - saying nothing guys! It’s a nice little story but unfortunately relevant in our current times. Some excellent stories follow; I really enjoyed AK Benedict’a slant on - hmm, an interesting pub, shall we say? One of my personal favourites was ‘The Salter Collection’ by Brian Lillie, a writer I’ve never encountered before, which always delights me. I’m a sucker for a Supernatural mystery and this felt almost cinematic. Ramsey Campbell’s ‘ghost’ story embedding modern technology, reflecting on grief, was an excellent and painful read. This anthology came out not long after my partner passed away, which is part of the reason I couldn’t carry on with it at that time. If that’s not a measure of getting it bang on, I don’t know what is. Loved ‘Eumenides’ by Adam Nevill, zoos are one of my favourite places in the world and I love animals, whilst a ‘familial’ story by Sarah Lotz made me howl with laughter. Terrible, but I got the character’s dilemma. So, I’ve now read Muriel Gray - heard great things about her, but never read her until now. Again, I’m avoiding spoilers, but a nice, fun, dark story with working class protagonists and I really liked it. Nicely done. Which brings me to the next ‘heard a lot of’ writer, ‘never read’. ‘Bird Box’ is on my TBR list, especially as I’m watching his pics from the forthcoming film co e out on Facebook starring Sandra Bullock, on of my favourite actors. Yes, I said ‘actor’, not actress; deal with it. Anyway, here’s his story ‘The Hiuse of the Head’. Typo? Supposed to be ‘Dead’? Not sure, but, watch this space ... “ ... there was an independence to the dollhouse from the very beginning.” Yeah, a haunted dollhouse- Oh. Crap. As a little girl, I had a few dollhouses- Holly Hobby, Fisher Price - and the open front, old, wallpapered kind that spooked the crap out of me. As a kid, I thought the dolls moved about at night. So, well done Josh! Creepy. Now, anyone who knows me, knows I like stories that deal with certain senses, and stories that are also honest about it. So, I loved Conrad Williams’ ‘Succulents’, funny, dark, bleurgh, and a great twist on an old monster. Speaking of dolls again - ‘Dollies’ by Kathryn Ptacek is quite a disturbingly familiar piece; at least if you were a girl raised with dolls. To this day I still owe my sis Tish an apology for cutting Alice’s hair off and giving her ‘chicken pox’ with a permanent marker. Chris Golden’s ‘The Abduction Door’ like many of the stories here, play on children’s fears in regular situations- this time, it’s a lift/elevator and bit does the punchline deliver. All of the stories are exceptional and unique, but when you get to the last one ‘The Swan Dive’ by Stephen Laws, I suspect you’ll be in awe. I don’t want to say too much about this, other than the imagery is stunning, the denouement is spot on and it’s a perfect way to finish the anthology that won the BFS Award in the anthology category in 2018.

  11. 5 out of 5

    Anne Oftedahl

    Read for my Horror Fiction module "The Embarrasment of Dead Grandmother" read for 21.01.19 - Honestly just really weird, but also crazy relatable, bc I would also not want to make a fuzz if something happened... Still, this was kinda extreme, and I don't really understand why this short story is in a horror anthology "Family Car" read for 28.01.19 - I am confused... I have no idea at all what happened at the end. Either way, the pacing is really good, and while you do (to some extent) know what is c Read for my Horror Fiction module "The Embarrasment of Dead Grandmother" read for 21.01.19 - Honestly just really weird, but also crazy relatable, bc I would also not want to make a fuzz if something happened... Still, this was kinda extreme, and I don't really understand why this short story is in a horror anthology "Family Car" read for 28.01.19 - I am confused... I have no idea at all what happened at the end. Either way, the pacing is really good, and while you do (to some extent) know what is coming, you're still invested in the characters. Also, the driver/creature/thing was creepy as hell "Roundabout" read for 11.02.19 - Wait, did he die? He died, right? I kinda like the unclear ending, but also - confusion! "Shepherds' Business" read for 18.02.19 - Okay that is just messed up. Most of the story wasn't really scary at all, but because it's in a horror anthology I kept looking for clues, and, well.. let's just say I did not expect it to go where it went "Dollies" read for 25.02.19 - I don't understand... it feels like this was edited to fit a word count and the wrong parts were cut out... Like, the whole set-up with the dots and the smallpox doesn't actually have any significance to the ending? I'm just... confused "The Salter Collection" read for 04.03.19 - This is another kinda weird one, and I don't really understand it completely, especially the end... "The Abduction Door" read for 11.03.19 - Creepy AF! I don't really have anything else to say about it... The remaining short stories were read in my own time, not as part of my curriculum.

  12. 4 out of 5

    Olivia

    Trying out a new system of ratings this year! Boiling books overall down to 1-5 stars always felt hard and not right to me, so I’ll be using this new system to hopefully create more nuanced ratings: Characters 1-5 (Are they multifaceted and complex? Compelling? Do I enjoy reading through their view? Do they inspire reactions in me?) Plot 1-5 (Exciting? Does it make me want to keep reading? Is it structured well? Does it flow logically? Does it seem inventive?) Prose 1-5 (Beautiful? Skillful? Distinct Trying out a new system of ratings this year! Boiling books overall down to 1-5 stars always felt hard and not right to me, so I’ll be using this new system to hopefully create more nuanced ratings: Characters 1-5 (Are they multifaceted and complex? Compelling? Do I enjoy reading through their view? Do they inspire reactions in me?) Plot 1-5 (Exciting? Does it make me want to keep reading? Is it structured well? Does it flow logically? Does it seem inventive?) Prose 1-5 (Beautiful? Skillful? Distinct voice?) Impact 1-5 (Does this make me think about the world? Does this make me want to do something/change something? Am I thinking about it days after reading it? ) Originality 1-5 (Pretty self explanatory, applies to all the above categories! I realized as I was creating this system that originality has a big impact on my enjoyment of a book.) .. and then I’ll convert those scores to this star rating! This is definitely subject to change as the year goes on but I’m excited to use it and force myself to rate books thoughtfully. Using this rating system on a collection of stories by different authors is actually a little tough haha but I did my best. Characters:3.5/5 Plot: 4.5/5 Prose: 4/5 Impact: 3/5 Originality:4/5 So that adds up to 3.8/5 stars!

  13. 4 out of 5

    Jonathan Oliver

    Mark has delivered a most enjoyable collection of terrors with this first volume in the New Fears anthology. The lack of a unifying theme works very much in this book's favour, offering the reader a broad range of tales. For me the highlights were 'Four Abstracts' by Nina Allan - which is gorgeous and unsettling; 'The Fold in the Heart' by Chaz Brenchley - which is moving, powerful and evocative; 'Departures' by A. K. Benedict - strangely touching; 'The Embarassment of Dead Grandmothers' by Sara Mark has delivered a most enjoyable collection of terrors with this first volume in the New Fears anthology. The lack of a unifying theme works very much in this book's favour, offering the reader a broad range of tales. For me the highlights were 'Four Abstracts' by Nina Allan - which is gorgeous and unsettling; 'The Fold in the Heart' by Chaz Brenchley - which is moving, powerful and evocative; 'Departures' by A. K. Benedict - strangely touching; 'The Embarassment of Dead Grandmothers' by Sarah Lotz - nasty and funny, and 'House of the Head' by Josh Mallerman, which is a great take on the haunted dollhouse trope. However, everthing in this collection stands on its own two feet, and there's not a dud here. It was just the tonic of fright I needed for the cold winter months.

  14. 5 out of 5

    Katie

    New Fears, edited by Mark Morris, compiles some of the best short horror stories into one book. Some of them, for me, were a lot better than the others. I'll be honest, in some of the stories I had no idea what was going on. Please excuse the lousy reviews; it's been a while since I've left one. The Boggle Hole A young boy spends time with his grandfather and gets to hear about 'The Boggle Hole'. I enjoyed this one, it was a good way to kick start the book. It was creepy and left me wanting more. New Fears, edited by Mark Morris, compiles some of the best short horror stories into one book. Some of them, for me, were a lot better than the others. I'll be honest, in some of the stories I had no idea what was going on. Please excuse the lousy reviews; it's been a while since I've left one. The Boggle Hole A young boy spends time with his grandfather and gets to hear about 'The Boggle Hole'. I enjoyed this one, it was a good way to kick start the book. It was creepy and left me wanting more. 7/10 Shepherd's Business Another fantastic story. Told from the point of view of a doctor in 1947, sent to work and live on a small island. Initially sceptical of him, the locals each have their own story. A deliciously dark ending to the story that I did not see coming. 8/10 No Good Deed A young woman finds herself enacting revenge on a former lover. I enjoyed this one, probably not as much as the others, but I do feel inclined to go and read the prequel to it. 6/10 The Family Car What used to be her family's vehicle follows a young woman around shortly after the death of her family. Enjoyable and sad story, nice twist at the end. 6/10 Four Abstracts Not going to lie to you, I had no idea what was going on in this one and didn't really rate it much. 3/10 Sheltered in Place Told from the point of view of a man stuck in the aftermath of a terrorist attack. Brilliant story. Very short but a massive twist at the end that I loved. Left me wanting more. 9/10 The Fold in the Heart A storm batters a local town and our three characters have to find shelter whilst escaping horrors of the past. This was enjoyable enough but it wasn't my favourite. 6/10 Departures A young woman wakes up to find herself in a bar with moody inhabitants. I liked this one quite a bit. It was dark but had a bittersweet ending. 7/10 The Salter Collection I started off really enjoying this story but I quickly lost interest and didn't really understand the ending too much. 4/10 Speaking Still A man, having recently lost his wife, confides in his friend about hearing her voice. A poignant story of loss with a dark twist and a cliffhanger ending. 8/10 The Eyes Are White and Quiet We're never really told what has gone on in this story but our main character, a young blind woman, is not all as she seems. This was one of the better stories within the book; I'd definitely go out and read the novel if there was ever one written. I found myself wanting to know more though. 6/10 The Embarrassment of Dead Grandmothers Dark humour encapsulates this very short story. I didn't know whether to laugh or be shocked at the actions of our main character but I thoroughly enjoyed this one. 9/10 Eumenides (The Benevolent Ladies) Our main character, what I assume is a middle-aged man, becomes almost obsessed with his female colleague. Once he plucks up the courage to ask her out, he comes to wish he hadn't. This could have been so good if I hadn't ended it with 'What the f*ck just happened?'. Another example of me apparently being too stupid to understand what had gone on. 5/10 Roundabout A mystery creature inhabits the local roundabout in town and one man takes it upon himself to rid them of this creature once and for all. Wonderfully dark and tense, I definitely wanted to read more. 9/10 The House of the Head A young girl is gifted a dollhouse that seems to have a mind of its own. I was really excited to read this one, having LOVED Josh Malerman's Bird Box and I was not disappointed. This had me hooked from start to finish. Creepy, spectacular and atmospheric I would rate this one the highest. 10/10 Succulents Our main character, a middle aged English man on holiday with his wife and son, finds himself in the midst of a hellish nightmare. This was a really good story, I didn't see the ending coming at all. 9/10 Dollies Told from the point of view of a woman who is reminiscing on her childhood, we are introduced to a traumatic life with horrific events that seems to mould her into someone you end up feeling quite shocked at her actions. This starts off relatively innocent enough but has a magnificently dark ending that I did not see coming. 8/10 The Abduction Door A man was told as a young boy the story of how a small door in elevators, known as 'The Abduction Door' is home to a mystery creature that snatches people, mainly children, and takes them forever. Now grown up, he finds himself victim to it. What a c r e e p y story this was. I really rooted for the main character. A sad twist at the end left me wanting more. 8/10 The Swan Dive Our main character, a something-aged male, intent to end his life is instead taken on a hellish nightmare that reaches a dramatic conclusion. This was my second favourite of the whole book. Graphic and brutal, I really enjoyed the concept of this one. 9/10

  15. 4 out of 5

    Amy Jane Alice

    I heard about New Fears, an anthology of horror stories edited by Mark Morris through Titan Books. While I don't usually read horror stories (I can be a bit of a scaredy cat), I thought that this sounded awesome and I very luckily received a copy from the publisher! Each short story is around thirty or so pages long, so I decided to try and read one a day. Keep reading for my spoiler free review of New Fears. Each story was so individual and thrilling; from haunted airport lounges, to grandparent I heard about New Fears, an anthology of horror stories edited by Mark Morris through Titan Books. While I don't usually read horror stories (I can be a bit of a scaredy cat), I thought that this sounded awesome and I very luckily received a copy from the publisher! Each short story is around thirty or so pages long, so I decided to try and read one a day. Keep reading for my spoiler free review of New Fears. Each story was so individual and thrilling; from haunted airport lounges, to grandparent imitating creatures to a doctor that stumbles upon a terrifying scenario on an isolated island, there's a horror story for everyone. Of course with so many different writing styles from the number of authors, there was always bound to be a couple of stories that weren't my cup of tea, but each instalment was short and snappy meaning that even if something wasn't to my taste it was still super easy to sail through each story. There was definitely a constant undercurrent of creepiness throughout, and I did find myself casting a few backwards glances down the stairs every time I walked ran up them in the dark, just in case, you know? The thing that scared me the most throughout the book was that New Fears isn't filled with typical and traditional monsters. While some do feature a demon like creature, a lot of the stories play on human fears and terrors which makes the stories much more realistic and therefore all the more terrifying. I won't review story by story because then we'd be here for a pretty long time, so I've cherry picked a couple of my favourite tales. I definitely feel that the stories got creepier and creepier, as the following are all from the last quarter or so of the book. The story that affected me most was definitely Dollies by Kathryn Ptacek. It left me feeling super uneasy and I'm pretty certain that a chill went down my spine, literally. Dollies is about Nonny, a young girl who is gifted dolls throughout her life which all die of smallpox. The story definitely took a turn that I was not expecting, and I guess that's a prevalent theme throughout the book: expect the unexpected. I finished Dollies with an audible release of breath and a "wow". To call it my favourite wouldn't be quite right considering what happens, but it definitely had an effect on me that the others failed to do. Another chilling tale is The Abduction Door, which is a story by Christian Golden about exactly what it sounds like: a door through which children are abducted. But the door moves. And through the door a child is abducted may not be in the same place through which they return, if they're lucky enough to escape. The stolen children can be saved, but at a cost. The House of the Head by Josh Malerman definitely freaked me out. Whilst nothing particularly scary happened, the whole premise of the story made me feel apprehensive; Evie owns a large doll house and loves to send time playing with her dolls, until they start to move. And they start to die. New Fears is a fresh take on the classic horror story, with stories that will definitely stick with you long after you finish reading them. I gave New Fears 3/5 stars, and it was definitely refreshing to read a genre which is worlds apart from my preferred, high fantasy, though I did find myself skipping a few of the stories that I didn't fancy. Thank you to Titan Books for sending me a copy to review!

  16. 5 out of 5

    Sal

    A good anthology and as with all anthologies some stories were better than others. Having never read anything by any of the authors it was good to find new authors to read. I have included a brief review of every story below, I haven’t gone into detail as I don’t want to spoil any of the stories for anyone else, I have just given each story a star rating and my own thoughts. The Boggle Hole - Alison Littlewood 3.5 stars Not horror as such but a good story full of folklore with a sad twist Shepherds A good anthology and as with all anthologies some stories were better than others. Having never read anything by any of the authors it was good to find new authors to read. I have included a brief review of every story below, I haven’t gone into detail as I don’t want to spoil any of the stories for anyone else, I have just given each story a star rating and my own thoughts. The Boggle Hole - Alison Littlewood 3.5 stars Not horror as such but a good story full of folklore with a sad twist Shepherds’ Business - Stephen Gallagher 4 stars This is a clever and well thought out story No Good Deed - Angela Slater 4.5 stars Creepy, clever brilliance that had me gripped from the very beginning The Family Car - Brady Golden 4 stars Would have liked this one to be longer as it ended with, for me, an awful lot of unanswered questions. Four Abstracts - Nina Allan 3 stars Abstract indeed. Really struggled to get into this one I’m afraid. Found the whole thing bitty and meandering making it hard to connect. Sheltered in Place - Brian Keene 5 stars Super short but oh so good. Clever twist at the end of a fab little story. The Fold in the Heart - Chaz Brenchley 4.5 stars A spooky and chilling story that kept me intrigued throughout. Departures - A.K. Benedict 4.5 stars This one is such a good story so much so that I wish it was longer as I would love to read what happens next to Sian and Marta The Salter Collection - Brian Lillie 4.5 stars A spooky and weird story that, like others before it, I would have liked more from as I really believe this one has the makings of a truly exceptional novel Speaking Still - Ramsey Campbell 5 stars This one is truly spectacular. Creepy, intriguing and heart breaking in its own way. A perfect short story The Eyes Are White and Quiet - Carole Johnstone 3.5 stars Intriguing but for me there was something missing from the story, not sure what though. Maybe it needs to be much longer and more detailed but I’m not 100% sure. The Embarrassment of Dead Grandmothers Sarah Lotz 5 stars This one amused me quite a bit. The story is brilliantly thought out and I’m pretty sure it wasn’t supposed to make me giggle but the imagery that flies from the page is so good that I could picture every moment perfectly. Brilliant read. Eumenides (The Benevolent Ladies) - Adam L.G. Nevill 4 stars Started off slowly with the trepidation building nicely and then boom it ended and in a seriously weird way as well. I wanted answers but I didn’t particularly get them at the end. Roundabout - Muriel Gray 4 stars A good intriguing short that kept my attention right to the end. Shorter than some of the others but still good The House of the Head 5 stars Absolutely brilliant! Clever, imaginative and well put together. Storytelling at its best! Succulents - Conrad Williams 5 stars I don’t think I will ever look at my collection of succulents the same way ever again. A clever story with a wicked ending. Dollies - Kathryn Ptacek 5 stars Oh my goodness this one was spectacularly sad. Well written, well thought out but so, so sad. Superb storytelling. The Abduction Door - Christopher Golden 5 stars This one was genuinely terrifying. I hate lifts/elevators anyhow and now, yeah well I may never get in one ever again. Stairs for me lol The Swan Dive - Stephen Laws 5 stars Ooh that was good. Dark, scary, horrific but oh so good! Brilliant ending to the anthology.

  17. 5 out of 5

    Pam Winkler

    This is a good book, with a lot of really high-quality stories. If you like horror, this is a good book for you. The Boggle Hole by Alison Littlewood was good and kind of heart-breaking. Shepherd's Business by Stephen Gallagher was good. I thought the premise was a little unbelievable, but the story was well-written enough that I didn't really care. No Good Deed by Angela Slatter was good. The Family Car by Brady Golden was good. I'm not quite sure what I expected, but this probably wasn't it. It This is a good book, with a lot of really high-quality stories. If you like horror, this is a good book for you. The Boggle Hole by Alison Littlewood was good and kind of heart-breaking. Shepherd's Business by Stephen Gallagher was good. I thought the premise was a little unbelievable, but the story was well-written enough that I didn't really care. No Good Deed by Angela Slatter was good. The Family Car by Brady Golden was good. I'm not quite sure what I expected, but this probably wasn't it. It was definitely good though. Four Abstracts by Nina Allen was good. I didn't like it as much as some of the others. Sheltered in Place by Brian Keene was good and I liked it a lot. My work has to do with Emergency Medical Services and the various shootings, in a sort of distant way. This was very reminiscent for me in a weird way. The Fold in the Heart by Chaz Brenchley - I absolutely loved this one. The relationships; unhealthy, slightly unhealthy and healthy, and his absolute love and affection were wonderful. Departures by A.K. Benedict was good. The Salter Collection by Brian Lillie was good. I didn't expect it, it's very different in tone than a lot of the other ones. Just as well written, though. Speaking Still by Ramsey Campbell was good and maybe a touch predictable, but lovely just the same. The Eyes Are White and Quiet by Carole Johnstone was interesting. And not at all what I expected; the difference between the first part of the story and the last was pretty extreme. The Embarrassment of Dead Grandmothers by Sarah Lotz was good, but I didn't like it very much. It felt like embarrassment humor; but I guess it's embarrassment horror. I don't like embarrassment much, it gets to me and upsets me. Eumenides (The Benevolent Ladies) by Adam L.G. Nevill was a bit uncomfortable. I didn't like it, but I suppose it was good. Roundabout by Muriel Gray was very good. It's a well-done horror trope, done by unusual people and it's just fantastic. The House of the Head by Josh Malerman was also fantastic and horrifying. I think I'd divorce her husband, just from the lack of respect for the horror she went through. It's incredibly vivid. Succulents by Conrad Williams was one I didn't like. I suppose it's good. Dollies by Kathryn Ptacek was nasty and good. The Abduction Door by Christopher Golden was also nasty and good. I know what my reaction is likely to be my reaction, or what I think my reaction is likely to be. I can get a bit stubborn and mean when I feel that I've been sinned again. The Swan Dive by Stephen Laws was good. It was kind of lovecraftian in a way.

  18. 5 out of 5

    Steven Belanger

    Overall very good collection of stories with only a few I didn't care for, not an uncommon thing for a short story anthology. Though most were good stories and well-written, I continuously didn't care for how most of them ended, like the writers had a good idea, and wrote them well, but then had no place to take them. That isn't exactly true, either; they definitively end. Inexplicable, really, but the bottom line is that I just didn't like how most of the stories concluded. Why? I guess because Overall very good collection of stories with only a few I didn't care for, not an uncommon thing for a short story anthology. Though most were good stories and well-written, I continuously didn't care for how most of them ended, like the writers had a good idea, and wrote them well, but then had no place to take them. That isn't exactly true, either; they definitively end. Inexplicable, really, but the bottom line is that I just didn't like how most of the stories concluded. Why? I guess because they were too much like a nightmare the characters couldn't wake up from, and I'm living one of those right now in real life, and don't need to be reminded of it. Too many stories were about things that characters saw, or things that happened to them, but they weren't able to take their own action. The last story is a perfect example of this. I think this is what I mean when I said many of the stories had no place to go. I don't know. You may disagree. They're all good, most written by maybe the best authors from the United Kingdom. Most of the stories take place in England, Scotland, Ireland, etc. and that was all good. I got descriptions and spellings I don't normally come across. There are a great many pubs with fireplaces and cozy confines, for example. The writing is all good. I don't remember any stories that I just glazed over and immediately dismissed. Well, maybe there was one or two. The stories are effective. I think my favorite is "Shepherds' Business," a very well-written tale with a shocking ending that is nevertheless logical and conclusive in the reality of the tale. I also like it best because the narrator is someone of action. Unlike the narrator of the last story, for example, who is just a witness to terrible things and then he's back where he started (literally), the narrator here, a local doctor of a small, rather isolated island. Yes, this one was my favorite, by far. But they're all good, and if you're a fan of the old Twilight Zone episodes that were like nightmares the characters couldn't wake from, you'll have no problem here. Again, the stories are all good and the writing for the most part is very good, so this one is well worth your time. If you read this, and you feel the same way I did about many of the endings, please comment to let me know, so I won't think it's just me and that I'm losing my mind.

  19. 4 out of 5

    Angela Stockton

    This review has been hidden because it contains spoilers. To view it, click here. As is usually the case with an anthology, I found that I like some stories and not others. SO, here are my individual ratings: 'The Boggle Hole' - 2/5. Didn't really do much for me if I'm honest but it was okay. 'Shepherds' Business' - 4/5. That was unexpected and quite creepy. 'No Good Deed' - 3/5. A bit disturbing. 'The Family Car' - 5/5. I think this one is definitely one of my favorites. I love stories like this, that bring something innocent and make it menacing. 'Four Abstracts' - 4/5. Spider As is usually the case with an anthology, I found that I like some stories and not others. SO, here are my individual ratings: 'The Boggle Hole' - 2/5. Didn't really do much for me if I'm honest but it was okay. 'Shepherds' Business' - 4/5. That was unexpected and quite creepy. 'No Good Deed' - 3/5. A bit disturbing. 'The Family Car' - 5/5. I think this one is definitely one of my favorites. I love stories like this, that bring something innocent and make it menacing. 'Four Abstracts' - 4/5. Spiders are nothing to mess with.. 'Sheltered in Place' - 5/5. Definitely unexpected, never saw that one coming. 'The Fold in the Heart' - 1/5. Honestly didn't do anything for me. 'Departures' - 3/5. Creepy enough but I feel like it went on too long. 'The Salter Collection' - 5/5. Another one of my favorites. I love bizarre stories. 'Speaking Still' - 5/5. Another brilliant story, original and disturbing. 'The Eyes Are White and Quiet' - 1/5. Not my sort of story. 'The Embarrassment of Dead Grandmothers' - 1/5. This is more of a comedic story than anything else, I fail to see how it is horror, unless it is considered horror to abandon your dead grandmother. 'Eumenides' - I can't rate this one because I didn't boher reading it. Why did I decide against it? I flipped through it and nothing caught my attention so I decided to move on. 'Roundabout' - 2/5. Strange premise, could have worked if written better. 'The House of the Head' - 3/5. A bit silly maybe but also disturbing. 'Succulents' - 4/5. I have a feeling this would be good as a short horror film. 'Dollies' - 5/5. I dislike dolls, I dislike their vacant appearances and I can't understand how I ever played with them as a child. This has a twist as it's not so much focused on the dolls themselves but the main character. Another surprise ending. 'The Abduction Door' - 5/5. Again, I love stories where it leaves you with the unexpected. I'll never look at elevators the same way again. 'The Swan Dive' - I didn't read this one either, I started it but I literally fell asleep and just can't be bothered to...oops.

  20. 4 out of 5

    Horror DNA

    Since the recent announcement of the closure of Great Jones Street, I’ve seen it bandied about on social mayhem sites that the short story as a viable form for speculative fiction is in its death throes. Well, I’m here to tell you that it just isn’t true. 2017 saw some of the best collections and anthologies of this generation produced by some of the greatest authors and editors in the business; some young, some grizzled veterans, all hugely talented and working at the top of their game, particu Since the recent announcement of the closure of Great Jones Street, I’ve seen it bandied about on social mayhem sites that the short story as a viable form for speculative fiction is in its death throes. Well, I’m here to tell you that it just isn’t true. 2017 saw some of the best collections and anthologies of this generation produced by some of the greatest authors and editors in the business; some young, some grizzled veterans, all hugely talented and working at the top of their game, particularly in horror fiction. One such editor is Mark Morris, curator of the stories in this book I’m talking about today. New Fears is an anthology that hearkens back to the old days, taking something that was the norm back in the ‘70s and ‘80s and making it seem almost new by comparison to the typical themed volumes that are being produced en masse today. This book, in the vein of such greats as Douglas E. Winter’s Prime Evil: New Stories by the Masters of Modern HorrorPrime Evil and Dennis Etchison’s Cutting Edge—not to mention everything Kirby McCauley ever touched—is un-themed because Morris wanted to create something that would demonstrate the varied and seemingly limitless possibilities of our chosen genre. So, he limited his contributors to just one simple and very important requirement: write a damn good story. And I can tell you that the authors within responded in fucking spades. You can read Shane's full review at Horror DNA by clicking here.

  21. 4 out of 5

    Brennan LaFaro

    I picked this collection up at the beginning of this summer, looking to read a few stories from modern horror voices I knew and hoping to discover some new authors. Like a lot of collections this size and this diverse, there are stories that stand out and stay with you, stories that are fine but you likely won’t revisit, and stories that don’t quite hold your attention. The good ones, and the big names, are spread out enough to carry a reader through the entire book. I’d like to start by highlig I picked this collection up at the beginning of this summer, looking to read a few stories from modern horror voices I knew and hoping to discover some new authors. Like a lot of collections this size and this diverse, there are stories that stand out and stay with you, stories that are fine but you likely won’t revisit, and stories that don’t quite hold your attention. The good ones, and the big names, are spread out enough to carry a reader through the entire book. I’d like to start by highlighting a few authors I wasn’t familiar with before. The opening story, The Boggle Hole by Alison Littlewood was one of my favorites in the book. It’s a spin-on a creature story that features significantly more characterization than creature and put Littlewood on my radar. Departures by A.K. Benedict was another terrific read, and mixes horror with something like fantasy. It’s much easier to recommend than to describe. The Embarrassment of Dead Grandmothers by Sarah Lotz offers us something different, an excellent black humor story. The Abduction Door by Christopher Golden is one of those stories that gives us some new every day object to fear, elevators here, and a surprisingly poignant ending. The big names also have some excellent stories sprinkled throughout. Josh Malerman’s House of the Head, which is now getting rave reviews on the return of creepshow, was originally written for this anthology and is every bit as good as you hope. It’s a great spin on haunted house fiction. Brian Keene delivers Sheltered in Place, a pretty engaging story with a fantastic ending. Adam Nevill’s Eumenides (The Benevolent Ladies) goes to the kind of deep, dark place we might expect from this author, but we’re here for the ride as per usual. Being relatively new to the not-featured-at-Barnes & Noble horror community, this collection served as a nice introduction to some of these authors. If it peaks your interest, Mark Morris has also edited and released a second volume. It currently resides on my bookshelf and is waiting to introduce me to some new voices.

  22. 5 out of 5

    Nikki (Spine Tinglers)

    New Fears Edited By Mark Morris Published by Titan Books, 2017 Rating: 4.5 out of 5 Reading anthologies is a lot like eating a bag of Starbursts. You know your favorite flavors, and you resist eating those first. There’re some less savory flavors, but you eat them anyway because the experience is short, and, ultimately, it’s serving to satisfy your sweet tooth. And, if it this bag of candy is anything like New Fears, edited by Mark Morris with some of the best names in modern horror, you’re going to New Fears Edited By Mark Morris Published by Titan Books, 2017 Rating: 4.5 out of 5 Reading anthologies is a lot like eating a bag of Starbursts. You know your favorite flavors, and you resist eating those first. There’re some less savory flavors, but you eat them anyway because the experience is short, and, ultimately, it’s serving to satisfy your sweet tooth. And, if it this bag of candy is anything like New Fears, edited by Mark Morris with some of the best names in modern horror, you’re going to feel a little sick to your stomach after consuming it all. New Fears is a unique anthology in that its purpose is not to be centered around a specific theme, per se, but rather to collect a set of stories to give you new things to be frightened about. And, for all intents and purposes, this anthology accomplishes its goals. The stories range from folkloric tales of mischievous creatures, to child abductions by way of obscured hell dimensions, to the realistic horror of mass shootings. Each author has a unique voice that brings these new terrors to the table, some with comedic tinges, some with full blown horror straight in your face. The diverse themes, perspectives, and tone of this anthology make it a true delight to read. I enjoyed a majority of the stories in this book. “The Boggle Hole” by Alison Littlewood opens this anthology and brought me back to my days of binging Are You Afraid of the Dark as a child (and, let’s face it, an adult as well). The whimsical tone of this story made the unnerving nature of the story even more exciting to read. A few other standouts include Stephen Gallagher's “Shepherd’s Business”, a truly disturbing story that sticks with you long after you finish the final sentences. “Dollies” by Kathryn Ptacek was chilling in its innocence; Christopher Golden’s “The Abduction Door” has a horrifying cinematic quality to it. And still, though many of these stories creep into your mind, grabbing hold tight and notching up your paranoia, others imbued humor to provide levity between haunts. I’m looking at you “The Embarrassment of Dead Grandmothers” by Sarah Lotz, the funniest (yet still dark) story in this book. There were a few stories that I did not enjoy as much as others, but that’s to be expected in an anthology, especially one like this with such a wide variety of authors, themes, and tones. The stories that were less memorable tended to end ambiguously, without identifying the “fear” as concretely as in other stories. Still though, even these stories were successful in creating an atmosphere as dread, and none halted the procession of the book. This anthology is one of the best I’ve read so far. Mark Morris has compiled a hard-hitting, fun, and terrifying anthology with New Fears. The authors included in this collection are some of the greatest voices of horror we have. This was a great way to learn about new wonderful authors, including many female horror writers I’m excited to follow. I highly recommend this book to genre fans, and I cannot wait to read the second installment coming later this year.

  23. 5 out of 5

    William M.

    3 AND 1/2 STARS I had heard this collection was coming out months ago and was looking forward to reading it because it seemed to have a nice mix of veteran writers and some new names I had not heard of before. It was surprising to see Alison Littlewood and Sarah Lotz on the cover over larger horror names such as Brian Keene, Adam Nevill and Stephen Laws, but perhaps the first two writers I mentioned have a larger following in England. It didn't seem like a wise marketing choice, but I'll let that 3 AND 1/2 STARS I had heard this collection was coming out months ago and was looking forward to reading it because it seemed to have a nice mix of veteran writers and some new names I had not heard of before. It was surprising to see Alison Littlewood and Sarah Lotz on the cover over larger horror names such as Brian Keene, Adam Nevill and Stephen Laws, but perhaps the first two writers I mentioned have a larger following in England. It didn't seem like a wise marketing choice, but I'll let that up to the publisher. As for the content, all of the stories were entertaining to some degree, but the two real standouts were Josh Malerman and Ramsey Campbell, whose entries had a real sense of dread and buildup and clearly better than any of the other tales. However, I discovered four others that were quite strong by Stephen Gallagher, Angela Slatter, Brady Golden, and Brian Lillie. The rest were readable, but nothing amazing. However, the authors I named elevated the collection into the realm of recommendation to any horror fan. Most of the stories were subtle and not in your face, so fans of gore or extreme violence should be aware that this is not that type of book.

  24. 5 out of 5

    Rob

    I was concerned after reading a number of stories at the start that this collection would be of the ho-hum variety but it was back-loaded with some very strong entries. All in all, quite enjoyable. My faves were 4 of the last 5: “The House of the Head”, “Dollies”, “The Abduction Door” and “The Swan Dive”. Rating for all entries: 1-The Boggle Hole: 2.5/5 2-Shepherds’ Business: 2.5/5 3-No Good Deed: 3/5 4-The Family Car: 2.5/5 5-Four Abstracts: 3/5 6-Sheltered in Place: 3/5 7-The Fold in the Heart: 1/5 8- I was concerned after reading a number of stories at the start that this collection would be of the ho-hum variety but it was back-loaded with some very strong entries. All in all, quite enjoyable. My faves were 4 of the last 5: “The House of the Head”, “Dollies”, “The Abduction Door” and “The Swan Dive”. Rating for all entries: 1-The Boggle Hole: 2.5/5 2-Shepherds’ Business: 2.5/5 3-No Good Deed: 3/5 4-The Family Car: 2.5/5 5-Four Abstracts: 3/5 6-Sheltered in Place: 3/5 7-The Fold in the Heart: 1/5 8-Departures: 2/5 9-The Salter Collection: 3/5 10-Speaking Still: 3/5 11-The Eyes Are White and Quiet: 2/5 12-The Embarassment of Dead Grandmothers: 3/5 13-Eumenides: 3/5 14-Roundabout: 1/5 15-The House of the Head: 5/5 (Great story of a girl and a haunted dollhouse) 16-Succulents: 3/5 17-Dollies: 4/5 (The consequences of untold secrets) 18-The Abduction Door: 4/5 (Take the stairs instead!) 19-The Swan Dive: 4/5 (Maybe life is worth living)

  25. 5 out of 5

    Pamela Scott

    (copy provided by the publisher and voluntarily reviewed) New Fears is a cracking collection of horror stories. I’m a huge fan of horror fiction and it takes a lot to impress me. The authors in this fantastic collection really pulled it off. I loved every story but there are a few that spoke to me just a little louder than the others: Shepherd’s Business by Stephen Gallagher, the really chills don’t come until the very end and my flesh crawled off my bones and scuttled away. Four Abstracts by Nina (copy provided by the publisher and voluntarily reviewed) New Fears is a cracking collection of horror stories. I’m a huge fan of horror fiction and it takes a lot to impress me. The authors in this fantastic collection really pulled it off. I loved every story but there are a few that spoke to me just a little louder than the others: Shepherd’s Business by Stephen Gallagher, the really chills don’t come until the very end and my flesh crawled off my bones and scuttled away. Four Abstracts by Nina Allan is an astounding story, my absolute favourite in the collection, there is something so sad and haunting about it. The Salter Collection by Brian Little is terrifying and sinister and utterly enthralling. Every story in this collection is great but the above ones are a little bit more special.

  26. 5 out of 5

    Cameron Trost

    "New Fears" is a big anthology, clocking in at exactly four hundred pages, and it claims to feature "new horror stories by masters of the genre". These two points considered, I expected at least one or two stories to be real corkers, but none of the tales in the anthology impressed me greatly. Let's focus on the positives though. There were enough decent stories to warrant a three-star rating...but only just. My favourites were "The Boogle Hole" for the sentimentality of it, "Eumenides" for the "New Fears" is a big anthology, clocking in at exactly four hundred pages, and it claims to feature "new horror stories by masters of the genre". These two points considered, I expected at least one or two stories to be real corkers, but none of the tales in the anthology impressed me greatly. Let's focus on the positives though. There were enough decent stories to warrant a three-star rating...but only just. My favourites were "The Boogle Hole" for the sentimentality of it, "Eumenides" for the dystopian atmosphere and creepiness, "The Embarrassment of Dead Grandmothers" because it's realistic horror, "Shepherds' Business" and "Dollies" for the ending, perhaps the only truly shocking endings of the anthology. "Four Abstracts" is also worth a quick mention, because it's original, well-written, and a bit weird.

  27. 4 out of 5

    Ryan Pidhayny

    Anthologies can be pretty hit-and-miss, so I was pleasantly surprised by the quality of New Fears. There was only a single story I didn't like; the rest ranged from decent to great. While not a themed anthology, there is a sense of atmospheric dread that permeates each of the stories within. Not all of them are supernatural horror, but it's a great blend of diversity in how disturbing each tale is. The best of the best are 'The Abduction Door' by Christopher Golden, 'Succulents' by Conrad Willia Anthologies can be pretty hit-and-miss, so I was pleasantly surprised by the quality of New Fears. There was only a single story I didn't like; the rest ranged from decent to great. While not a themed anthology, there is a sense of atmospheric dread that permeates each of the stories within. Not all of them are supernatural horror, but it's a great blend of diversity in how disturbing each tale is. The best of the best are 'The Abduction Door' by Christopher Golden, 'Succulents' by Conrad Williams, 'Speaking Still' by Ramsey Campbell, 'Four Abstracts' by Nina Allan, and 'Shepherd's Business' by Stephen Gallagher.

  28. 4 out of 5

    Andy Kristensen

    2.5 out of 5 stars. This one was a little disappointing to say the least. While some of the stories were excellent (Golden's "The Abduction Door" has a fascinating original idea behind the horror of it and "Dollies" by Ptacek is one of the most dark and disturbing but intriguing short stories that I've read in a while), more often than not the stories were boring (Williams's "Succulents"), long-winded (Allan's "Four Abstracts"), or just outright confusing, meandering, and tedious to get through ( 2.5 out of 5 stars. This one was a little disappointing to say the least. While some of the stories were excellent (Golden's "The Abduction Door" has a fascinating original idea behind the horror of it and "Dollies" by Ptacek is one of the most dark and disturbing but intriguing short stories that I've read in a while), more often than not the stories were boring (Williams's "Succulents"), long-winded (Allan's "Four Abstracts"), or just outright confusing, meandering, and tedious to get through (Brenchley's "The Fold in the Heart" and Nevill's "Eumenides [The Benevolent Ladies]"). If not for the few good stories being THAT good and propping up the rest of the collection, it would've received two stars from me, as the boring and bad stories were exactly that--very boring and very bad.

  29. 5 out of 5

    Brittany

    I saw The House Of The Head on creepshow and saw it was written by Josh Malerman and found it was in this book. I received as a Christmas present. I was excited but became quickly disappointed. These are supposed to be horror stories but alot of them dont even seem horrorish and the ones that do have such terrible and confusing endings you cant even enjoy the story. Now there are still some very good stories in here. My favorite is The Abduction door which was the only story that really had a sc I saw The House Of The Head on creepshow and saw it was written by Josh Malerman and found it was in this book. I received as a Christmas present. I was excited but became quickly disappointed. These are supposed to be horror stories but alot of them dont even seem horrorish and the ones that do have such terrible and confusing endings you cant even enjoy the story. Now there are still some very good stories in here. My favorite is The Abduction door which was the only story that really had a scary horror feeling to it. There were others that werent really horror but still good, like Shepherds Business. If you're looking for something scary , most of these stories wont do

  30. 5 out of 5

    R Z

    3.2 average for the 19 offerings. A few— No Good Deed, Shepards' Business, and The Salter Collection standing as my personal favorites—were phenomenal, a few made me wish that the universe could be expanded into full length offerings, and some were just,,, fine. All in all, a collection that has its pits and its peaks, and one that I will definitely keep on my shelf. I won this as part of a goodreads giveaway.

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