free hit counter code Loose Change: Three Women of the Sixties - GoBooks - Download Free Book
Ads Banner
Hot Best Seller

Loose Change: Three Women of the Sixties

Availability: Ready to download

This is a compelling story of the experiences of three young women who attended the University of California at Berkeley and became caught up in the tumultuous changes of the Sixties. Sara Davidson follows the three—Susie, Tasha, and Sara herself—from their first meeting in 1962, through the events that "radicalized" them in unexpected ways in the decade after the years in This is a compelling story of the experiences of three young women who attended the University of California at Berkeley and became caught up in the tumultuous changes of the Sixties. Sara Davidson follows the three—Susie, Tasha, and Sara herself—from their first meeting in 1962, through the events that "radicalized" them in unexpected ways in the decade after the years in Berkeley. Susie navigates through the Free Speech Movement and the early women's movement in Berkeley, and Tasha enters the trendy New York art and society scene. Sara, a journalist, travels the country reporting on the stories of the sixties. The private lives that Davidson reconstructs are set against the public background of the time. Figures such as Timothy Leary, Mario Savio, Tom Hayden, and Joan Baez are here, as are the many young people who sought alternatives to "the establishment" through whatever means seemed worth exploring: radical politics, meditation, drugs, group sex, or dropping out. Davidson's honest and detailed chronicle reveals the hopes, confusion, and disillusionment of a generation whose rites of passage defined one of the most contentious decades of this century.


Compare
Ads Banner

This is a compelling story of the experiences of three young women who attended the University of California at Berkeley and became caught up in the tumultuous changes of the Sixties. Sara Davidson follows the three—Susie, Tasha, and Sara herself—from their first meeting in 1962, through the events that "radicalized" them in unexpected ways in the decade after the years in This is a compelling story of the experiences of three young women who attended the University of California at Berkeley and became caught up in the tumultuous changes of the Sixties. Sara Davidson follows the three—Susie, Tasha, and Sara herself—from their first meeting in 1962, through the events that "radicalized" them in unexpected ways in the decade after the years in Berkeley. Susie navigates through the Free Speech Movement and the early women's movement in Berkeley, and Tasha enters the trendy New York art and society scene. Sara, a journalist, travels the country reporting on the stories of the sixties. The private lives that Davidson reconstructs are set against the public background of the time. Figures such as Timothy Leary, Mario Savio, Tom Hayden, and Joan Baez are here, as are the many young people who sought alternatives to "the establishment" through whatever means seemed worth exploring: radical politics, meditation, drugs, group sex, or dropping out. Davidson's honest and detailed chronicle reveals the hopes, confusion, and disillusionment of a generation whose rites of passage defined one of the most contentious decades of this century.

30 review for Loose Change: Three Women of the Sixties

  1. 5 out of 5

    Jessaka

    Berkley Days? There have been a few towns that I still love. of course, there is my hometown of Paso Robles. CA, then after my divorce from my husband and the Jehovah’s Witnesses, I fell in love with Berkeley. Moving there right after my divorces, Berkeley meant a new life, freedom, and college, but not at U.C. Berkeley. Then my moving back to my hometown but living 20 miles away in Creston, was where I met my new husband. I have a great fondness for those days. And now, Tahlequah, OK. I have liv Berkley Days? There have been a few towns that I still love. of course, there is my hometown of Paso Robles. CA, then after my divorce from my husband and the Jehovah’s Witnesses, I fell in love with Berkeley. Moving there right after my divorces, Berkeley meant a new life, freedom, and college, but not at U.C. Berkeley. Then my moving back to my hometown but living 20 miles away in Creston, was where I met my new husband. I have a great fondness for those days. And now, Tahlequah, OK. I have lived in a lot of places, but these are the ones that I still love, so, these are the ones I write about in my reviews. The second reading of this book was a disappointment. The women in it were sorority girls, and they were somewhat superficial, or at least two of them were. They loved money and fame. Whatever happened to “tune in and drop out? Well, they were not hippies and were not in Berkeley for long, and it was just before the hippie movement had arrived. The only woman in this book that was into the Berkeley scene was Susie, who had a boyfriend who was an anti-war activist and gave speeches. What bothered me most about this book was their dysfunctional relationships with men. Well, it was also the sex, which in this case I would call, pornography, or as one reviewer had said, “It was trashy.” And two of the women were off to NY and Boston. My mind began wandering when reading of their sordid life’s and their posh lifestyles. It is just that this was supposed to be a book about Berkeley, or so I thought. Like a bad marriage, I just wanted it to be over with. The Berkeley in this book was not the Berkeley I knew. They never got into playing it poor or wearing tiedyed shirts and patched jeans. They wore expensive clothes and had their hair done at the best salons. At least, I wore my ex’s blue work shirt that I had embroidered with the women’s power symbol on the front of it, but that didn’t last long as the shirt wore out. The only anti-war protest that If was in was when my husband was driving me to see a doctor whose office was on Telegraph Avenue, and we ended up in the middle of it. This was in 1969, and I hardly knew what a hippie was, but I knew about the war protests from watching some TV. I had been sheltered by the Jehovah’s Witnesses. When I saw the hippies walking down a different street other than Telegraph Avenue, I was in wonder, and I wanted out of the car to be with them, see what was going on. So, I began taking a bus to Berkeley often. I never saw another anti- war protest. I didn’t find Susie’s Berkeley life interesting since it was all about her love affair with the anti-war protester. A few places were mentioned, like Larry Blake’s, which I believe is the restaurant where I had roast beef sandwiches with the meat sauce in it in place of other condiments. Towards the end of the book, one of the women lived on Channing Way, the same street where I had lived, and there was a mention of North Berkeley, a nicer part of town, where I lived near the end of my Berkeley days. I left in 1987 and headed back to my hometown. My own Berkeley began with my streaking to the campus with a group of college guys. I was the only woman in the group. It also began with Patty Hearst’s kidnapping. I still have the fliers that were tacked to telephone poles that said, “We love you, Tanya.” I have no idea what to do with them now. It was also about taking TM in the 80s but I never used the mantra. Getting into the New Age was also in the 80s, but now I can’t stand listening to it. And It was about dating, of course, and going to the beach with friends, going to college, sitting in cafes like The Med, Café Expresso, which we called Café Depresso, and then the Renaissance Café. La Boheme in the evenings. Then it was walking down Telegraph Avenue just to see what was going on and sitting on the steps of Sproul Plaza to listen to the students argue with the preacher, things I did when I used to take a bus to Berkeley. And then it was the African Congo and other drums that some blacks played near Sproul Plaza and at Lake Anza. Soothing. I wasn’t much into drugs. I tried pot a few times, cocaine once, and a magic mushroom once. Now, the mushroom was great, but after trying it again and having nothing happen, well, I never bothered with it again. I had even been to a commune after meeting a man that lived in one, but after learning that he was with another woman, I thought better of it. Nothing like showing up at the wrong time for him, the right time for me. I glamorized communes. I learned from this book that they had them in Berkeley. If I had only known. I knew that they didn’t work out because people fought, some didn’t want to chip in and help with the chores, and then there were the jealousies of free love. Nothing is free. Men and women both burned out from all the multiple sex partners and both men and women became jealous of the other’s partners, even though it was suggested that each could sleep around. I left Berkeley, moving back to my hometown, then to Creston where I met my new husband. I will always miss Berkeley, just as I miss Creston and the fun we had together in that small Cowtown. After Creston we moved around a lot, and now here we are in our old age, settled in Tahlequah, OK, another town I would miss if we moved away. What did I want from this book? More about the hippies. I liked the idea of the hippies, back to nature, growing your own food, eating healthy, and caring for others. I believe, instead, that it became plagued with drugs.

  2. 5 out of 5

    Billie Johnson

    This is one of my all-time favorite books...I've read all of Sara Davidson's books and enjoyed them but this is tops, in my opinion. It really captures the the times, the confusion, the determination of our generation to make a change on the world and leave our mark. This is one of my all-time favorite books...I've read all of Sara Davidson's books and enjoyed them but this is tops, in my opinion. It really captures the the times, the confusion, the determination of our generation to make a change on the world and leave our mark.

  3. 4 out of 5

    Harriet Wrye

    This revival of the original Sixties chronicle reads, to me, even better this time around. While Sara and I were both at Berkeley at nearly the same time, she was really THERE in the middle of things--she is a fine journalist and her visitations back with the roommates she shared and the lives they led that epitomized the feminist awakening, the political activism, the sexual revolution--all with such a sense of immediacy of real lives known and lived.

  4. 5 out of 5

    (Lonestarlibrarian) Keddy Ann Outlaw

    Published in 1977, this book has surely become a classic Sixties tell-all, featuring three women's journeys through their Berkley college years and beyond, taking the reader from about 1963 - 1973. Davidson is an ace journalist who was turned down by the New York Times after working as the New York correspondent for the Boston Globe, but she made the leap to inspired freelance writing and was paid well by Harpers and other magazines for her coverage of the counterculture. Davidson lets it all ha Published in 1977, this book has surely become a classic Sixties tell-all, featuring three women's journeys through their Berkley college years and beyond, taking the reader from about 1963 - 1973. Davidson is an ace journalist who was turned down by the New York Times after working as the New York correspondent for the Boston Globe, but she made the leap to inspired freelance writing and was paid well by Harpers and other magazines for her coverage of the counterculture. Davidson lets it all hang out. No stone is left unturned as we gaze deeply into the the issues which so affected Sara, Tasha and Susie: sexual mores, divorce, women's lib, revolutionary politics, relationships, careers, social mores, drugs, music and the arts. I have a great deal of respect for the raw honesty behind this book. All three struggled through conflicted relationships with the men they loved, seeking to find their own identities beyond coupledom, the prime issue I recall being front and center for so many women as the Sixties turned into the Seventies. This was the second time I read Loose Change after first encountering it some thirty years ago. Although my college years started five years later than Davidson, I felt familiar with much of the territory she covers here, although I was not as politically active as these Berkley gals. Even though I lived through these times, some of the content has the power to shock me. Memories were stirred.... Those were wild and crazy times, colorfully brought to life in Loose Change, giving women's voices a real airing. I would like to read more of Sara Davidson (what's taken me so long?). And I thank her for having the bravado to write this book.

  5. 4 out of 5

    Terri

    This book changed my life when I was 14. It was about three women and the way their lives were led during the 60's. What the lesson was for me was that women can be whoever they wanted to be. That sometimes things happen and we learn from those events. I think Sara is a good writer who has a unique voice. This book changed my life when I was 14. It was about three women and the way their lives were led during the 60's. What the lesson was for me was that women can be whoever they wanted to be. That sometimes things happen and we learn from those events. I think Sara is a good writer who has a unique voice.

  6. 4 out of 5

    Torie

    This book is awful. If the main characters, three friends who meet at Berkeley in the sixties and follow divergent paths through that era, are actually interesting people, this book makes them seem like total idiots. It reads like a trashy romance novel, so that eventually every time a male character enters the story, I could be assured that the event would be followed with "we made love.." Not that there's anything wrong with plentiful sex, but the womens' lives are ultimately supremely directe This book is awful. If the main characters, three friends who meet at Berkeley in the sixties and follow divergent paths through that era, are actually interesting people, this book makes them seem like total idiots. It reads like a trashy romance novel, so that eventually every time a male character enters the story, I could be assured that the event would be followed with "we made love.." Not that there's anything wrong with plentiful sex, but the womens' lives are ultimately supremely directed by the men they supposedly fall "in love" with. I approached the book as a documentation of womens' intimate lives within the counterculture, and so kept telling myself that this was the generation who learned to break with all the bullshit of the traditional gender roles so that my generation would know better. Whenever I got to feeling too disgusted and superior, I would remind myself, a sort of "There but for the grace of whoever.." But the book really just seemed to be about tiresome, bourgeois, privileged white women who don't seem to have anything very meaningful to say.

  7. 5 out of 5

    Alessandra Santamaria

    I always felt very curious about the 60's. It always seemed so majestic and magical to me. I wanted to live it myself. Now that i've read this book and I understand a lot better what it was actually like, i dont like it so much. Were the 60's powerful and revolutionary and probably a one of a kind decade? Hell yeah. But people were not only passionate and driven, they also felt confused and lonely. And don't even get me started on all the damn drugs and sleeping with hundreds of people. I don't I always felt very curious about the 60's. It always seemed so majestic and magical to me. I wanted to live it myself. Now that i've read this book and I understand a lot better what it was actually like, i dont like it so much. Were the 60's powerful and revolutionary and probably a one of a kind decade? Hell yeah. But people were not only passionate and driven, they also felt confused and lonely. And don't even get me started on all the damn drugs and sleeping with hundreds of people. I don't judge others based on that kind of stuff, but the girls in this novel crearly did it because they just wanted to love and be loved respected. I think that's what all of us really want at the end. All though I see myself in Sara, specially because I'm a journalism major and her professional journey really interested me, Susie was in my opinion, by far the most fascinating women out of the three. Tasha was cool at the beggining but halfway through the book I was sort of done with her.

  8. 5 out of 5

    Jester

    So many opportunities to discuss important events of the 60s, but the author focused on sexual relationships and judgments on them. The author and her other two subjects led such varied lives that touched on the time period, but trivial matters are conveyed. Tasha created several sculptures? Great. Tell us about those. Davidson chose not to. Sara was in the performer's tent at Woodstock? Sounds like she would have many stories. Not one of them is in the book. Sara was able to choose her stories So many opportunities to discuss important events of the 60s, but the author focused on sexual relationships and judgments on them. The author and her other two subjects led such varied lives that touched on the time period, but trivial matters are conveyed. Tasha created several sculptures? Great. Tell us about those. Davidson chose not to. Sara was in the performer's tent at Woodstock? Sounds like she would have many stories. Not one of them is in the book. Sara was able to choose her stories and location working for the Boston Globe after one article? How did that happen? We will never know. We are informed of sexual partners and how their sex was. Perhaps that shows her interests. Disappointing.

  9. 4 out of 5

    Paula

    Still one of my all time favorites --

  10. 5 out of 5

    Terri Hermes

    Down memory lane The times have certainly changed, seems like yesterday! A very good book and true to the hippie era and the feminist awakening!

  11. 4 out of 5

    Trish

    If you came of age in the Sixties, the book gives you a compelling look back into that amazing era. Berkeley, which seemed a Mecca to me, protests first for Civil Rights and next for peace in VietNam, riots and demonstrations, teargas and water hoses, love, drugs, bell-bottom pants--all the memories rushed back when I read Davidson's book. We wanted to change the world, and look what has happened to it. Thank goodness I had my two little children to look after; otherwise, I would have joined a c If you came of age in the Sixties, the book gives you a compelling look back into that amazing era. Berkeley, which seemed a Mecca to me, protests first for Civil Rights and next for peace in VietNam, riots and demonstrations, teargas and water hoses, love, drugs, bell-bottom pants--all the memories rushed back when I read Davidson's book. We wanted to change the world, and look what has happened to it. Thank goodness I had my two little children to look after; otherwise, I would have joined a commune in California, and who knows where I would be today.

  12. 4 out of 5

    Rhode

    Read it repeatedly as a young woman, although it was about the generation just ahead of mine. It was one of the few places I could see women, who were not in the entertainment industry, making their way through life without immediately coupling up.

  13. 5 out of 5

    Santina

    By far one of my favorite books. It’s captivating throughout. I feel like I am going back in time reliving all the highs and lows of the 60’s. Highly recommend, especially for anyone who enjoys this era.

  14. 5 out of 5

    Mary Ann

    I really enjoyed this book, and have reread it as well. Interesting look at the sixties from a young woman who came of age during that time.

  15. 5 out of 5

    L

    One of my all-time favorites, and it had a large influence on me, growing up. I romanticized the sixties and the hippie era that I just missed by a decade or two, so this book let me live through that time vicariously, and I could easily identify with the author and her friends. I didn't have any of the same experiences really (or not yet, at least), but in terms of their feelings and experiences of self-discovery in a chaotic time, I really felt a kinship with these women. And to me, reading abo One of my all-time favorites, and it had a large influence on me, growing up. I romanticized the sixties and the hippie era that I just missed by a decade or two, so this book let me live through that time vicariously, and I could easily identify with the author and her friends. I didn't have any of the same experiences really (or not yet, at least), but in terms of their feelings and experiences of self-discovery in a chaotic time, I really felt a kinship with these women. And to me, reading about other times (or other cultures, for that matter) through the lens of people living their day-to-day lives is best way to understand an era. So if you want to experience the sixties as three different women did, this book can give you just that. Note however that they are not really diverse in terms of class, culture or ethnicity, so it is very limited in that regard. There's also very little about lgbtia history and experiences, so you'll have to find all those other voices elsewhere. But for the viewpoints written about, at least, it paints a vivid picture of the time. Note: I can't recall how many times I have read this, probably at least ten. But I first read it around 1978 or 79, and last read it a few years ago. And am soon to read it again!

  16. 4 out of 5

    Timmy Cham

    Once upon a time in 1960, there were three young women who went to Berkeley. Tasha was an artist; Susie was a radical-in- training; and Sara was a journalist. In this chronicle of their lives (spanning 1959 to 1973), the reader is given an up-close- and-personal view of the upheavals of the 1960s and early 1970s. The book touches upon many events, both pivotal and sundry: from the advent of diet sodas and 7-digit phone numbers, to the Pill and the sexual revolution, to the Berkeley Free Speech Movem Once upon a time in 1960, there were three young women who went to Berkeley. Tasha was an artist; Susie was a radical-in- training; and Sara was a journalist. In this chronicle of their lives (spanning 1959 to 1973), the reader is given an up-close- and-personal view of the upheavals of the 1960s and early 1970s. The book touches upon many events, both pivotal and sundry: from the advent of diet sodas and 7-digit phone numbers, to the Pill and the sexual revolution, to the Berkeley Free Speech Movement, feminism, and Vietnam, to mysticism, hallucinogens, Timothy Leary, Ram Dass, and Gurdjieff. In addition to the sociopolitical changes of the era, Davidson's memoir astutely and sensitively chronicles the impact of the 1960s on the 3 women's lives, relationships, and self-understandings.

  17. 5 out of 5

    Edward

    I first read Davidson's book around 30 years ago. I enjoyed it then and enjoyed reading it again. It was interesting to again read about the energetic idealism of the 60s youth but their myopic view of the world, like the one that was between San Francisco and New York City. However, many of the things they were working so hard for have worked their way into today's society, the abolishment of the draft, women's liberation, and voting rights for eighteen year olds to name a few. It is good histo I first read Davidson's book around 30 years ago. I enjoyed it then and enjoyed reading it again. It was interesting to again read about the energetic idealism of the 60s youth but their myopic view of the world, like the one that was between San Francisco and New York City. However, many of the things they were working so hard for have worked their way into today's society, the abolishment of the draft, women's liberation, and voting rights for eighteen year olds to name a few. It is good history for particularly today's generation to read and gain an understanding of wheresome of their freedoms came from.

  18. 5 out of 5

    Bamboozlepig

    I found this on the freebie cart at the library and picked it up because the sixties have always fascinated me. I was a little worried that this would be a dry sociological dig into the mores of the world in that era, but it turned out to be a fascinating look into the lives of three very different women who came of age in a turbulent time. Davidson's writing is very engaging and honest, and she writes no-holds barred about what they did for love back then. It'd be interesting if she'd write a f I found this on the freebie cart at the library and picked it up because the sixties have always fascinated me. I was a little worried that this would be a dry sociological dig into the mores of the world in that era, but it turned out to be a fascinating look into the lives of three very different women who came of age in a turbulent time. Davidson's writing is very engaging and honest, and she writes no-holds barred about what they did for love back then. It'd be interesting if she'd write a follow-up to share what the three of them are now doing with their lives.

  19. 4 out of 5

    Jetamio

    I first read Loose Change when it was published in the 70s when I was in college. I’ve reread it many times and it remains one of my favorite books. Sara is a great writer and I have always been able to identify with her characters. They all have such interesting lives and often fill me with joy, curiosity and laughter. I’ve read most of Sara’s books and can’t seem to put them down. She draws me right into her story.

  20. 5 out of 5

    Nadine

    Read it back in the day when it was first published and read it again this summer. Interesting to read it in the midst of the present milieu. Will be obtaining a hard copy soon so I can research all the authors, artists, etc. to see how they all came through.

  21. 5 out of 5

    Debbie Smith

    One of my all time very favorite books I've ever read. One of my all time very favorite books I've ever read.

  22. 4 out of 5

    Karen Bayer

    Good re-read while waiting for the library to reopen!

  23. 5 out of 5

    Mary

    This book follows the lives and friendships of three young women from their first meeting with each other in 1962 at the University of California at Berkley through the events that "radicalized" them all after college. They all were living during the tumultuous decade known as the "Swinging Sixties" in the "birthplace" of many radical movements - Berkley. Susie is a young woman just becoming involved with the Free Speech Movement in Berkley and finds herself navigating through the early struggle This book follows the lives and friendships of three young women from their first meeting with each other in 1962 at the University of California at Berkley through the events that "radicalized" them all after college. They all were living during the tumultuous decade known as the "Swinging Sixties" in the "birthplace" of many radical movements - Berkley. Susie is a young woman just becoming involved with the Free Speech Movement in Berkley and finds herself navigating through the early struggle for women's rights. Tasha enters the trendy art and society scene in New York. Sara, an idealistic journalist, travels the country reporting on the stories of the time. I did enjoy this book very much and thought that it was very well-written. I grew up in the sixties in England; and although there was quite a radical culture that developed in parts of England during the sixties; I never really moved in those circles during college life myself, so never became "radicalized" the way others may have been during the sixties. I give this book an A!

  24. 5 out of 5

    A.B. Turner

    I read this book when I was in my late teens and it changed my perception of so many issues, from being politically aware through the changing place of women in society, right down to listening to the music of the time and gaining a real appreciation of those artists. The book is just a masterclass on how to tell the story of a generation through the eyes of the three main protagonists. Each woman, Sara, Susie and Tasha are all deftly described, as they grow you grow with them, Ms Davidson makes I read this book when I was in my late teens and it changed my perception of so many issues, from being politically aware through the changing place of women in society, right down to listening to the music of the time and gaining a real appreciation of those artists. The book is just a masterclass on how to tell the story of a generation through the eyes of the three main protagonists. Each woman, Sara, Susie and Tasha are all deftly described, as they grow you grow with them, Ms Davidson makes you experience everything , but without falling into many of the tired cliches associated with books about the Sixties. I have read and re-read this book so many times through my life, it never fails to entertain, to inform and to genuinely make you feel...I think more than anything else, this book makes you examine not only the emotions of the characters, but also your own. A wonderful book which I cannot recommend highly enough.

  25. 5 out of 5

    LadyCalico

    Shallow, rambling book about the empty, wasted lives of four spoiled, superficial, self-absorbed skanks who are taking way too long to grow up and grow a brain. There may be an off-chance one of them may have taken her nose out of her own navel long enough to learn the importance of relationship, but I'm not sure. If ever I thought that being the center of the universe might be fun, this book disabused me of that notion and shows that narcissism is merely boring. I hope they all got a little mor Shallow, rambling book about the empty, wasted lives of four spoiled, superficial, self-absorbed skanks who are taking way too long to grow up and grow a brain. There may be an off-chance one of them may have taken her nose out of her own navel long enough to learn the importance of relationship, but I'm not sure. If ever I thought that being the center of the universe might be fun, this book disabused me of that notion and shows that narcissism is merely boring. I hope they all got a little more discerning before the age of AIDS arrived. I don't know if any of them ever matured enough to grow a moral compass or value system, but within the amoral void between their ears, they have nothing that makes them the least bit deep, noteworthy, or interesting. The really sad part is that they reproduced.

  26. 4 out of 5

    Sam Romilly

    On the one hand I really liked the way that special 60s period was described. It gives an insight into exactly what went on and what people felt and talked about. Also very revealing to have the view completely from a women's perspective and to recognise how arrogant, childish and selfish men were at that time, yet this was accepted as the norm. What was less good about the book was the reference to practically every cultural and political event at the time in passing rather than making any atte On the one hand I really liked the way that special 60s period was described. It gives an insight into exactly what went on and what people felt and talked about. Also very revealing to have the view completely from a women's perspective and to recognise how arrogant, childish and selfish men were at that time, yet this was accepted as the norm. What was less good about the book was the reference to practically every cultural and political event at the time in passing rather than making any attempt to link into the stories. It was almost a namecheck exercise while excessive time was spent on describing in intimate detail the quality of their various sexual experiences. So overall leaving a feeling that the book was written to capture a greater buying public rather than being an exercise in integrity as it claimed.

  27. 4 out of 5

    Nancy

    Another reread. I first read this book when it first came out around 1977. Now, I am reading it as a prelude to Davidson’s latest book, Leap!: What Will We Do With The Rest of Our Lives? Loose Change chronicles the lives of three women, including Sara herself, for the 10 years beginning with college in the 1960’s. I could identify with some of the book, though I was younger and less radical than these women. The part that bothered me, though, was the women’s dependency on men. This was apparentl Another reread. I first read this book when it first came out around 1977. Now, I am reading it as a prelude to Davidson’s latest book, Leap!: What Will We Do With The Rest of Our Lives? Loose Change chronicles the lives of three women, including Sara herself, for the 10 years beginning with college in the 1960’s. I could identify with some of the book, though I was younger and less radical than these women. The part that bothered me, though, was the women’s dependency on men. This was apparently a mini-series in the late 70’s, but I have no recollection of that.

  28. 4 out of 5

    Julian

    I've been borrowing this from my mother for like a year at this point, thinking I would finish it but never actually doing so. Still, that doesn't mean the book sucks. It's a fascinating glimpse into lives in the decades before mine, which always interests me, but I feel like I got what I was going to get out of it and I don't really need to finish. If someone else has read this and thinks otherwise, let me know and I'll finish it. I've been borrowing this from my mother for like a year at this point, thinking I would finish it but never actually doing so. Still, that doesn't mean the book sucks. It's a fascinating glimpse into lives in the decades before mine, which always interests me, but I feel like I got what I was going to get out of it and I don't really need to finish. If someone else has read this and thinks otherwise, let me know and I'll finish it.

  29. 4 out of 5

    Elizabeth

    I thought the writing was kind of awkward, considering it was written by an established journalist. Susie's voice would go from being cryptic and slangy to sounding straight like Sara's. The women's stories were really engrossing, though, and I'm not at the end yet, but I keep wondering when Sara and Tasha are going to finally dump these awful guys. If they do, I'll give this 4 stars. If Sara sodomizes Ram Dass, I'll give it 5. I thought the writing was kind of awkward, considering it was written by an established journalist. Susie's voice would go from being cryptic and slangy to sounding straight like Sara's. The women's stories were really engrossing, though, and I'm not at the end yet, but I keep wondering when Sara and Tasha are going to finally dump these awful guys. If they do, I'll give this 4 stars. If Sara sodomizes Ram Dass, I'll give it 5.

  30. 5 out of 5

    Eliza

    A favourite subject and time period and Davidson writes well. The main thing I take away from this is how little the human condition changes....and yet we seem to be less adventurous and more conformist than these women, elitist as they are (which may seem a strange choice of adjective but whether they like the description or no the worlds they represent were not, and are not, typical). Absorbing and interesting.

Add a review

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Loading...
We use cookies to give you the best online experience. By using our website you agree to our use of cookies in accordance with our cookie policy.