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Follow Lyra's story once again in a way you've never experienced it before, as the arrival of her fearsome uncle, Lord Asriel, draws her to the heart of a terrible struggle — a struggle born of Gobblers and stolen children, witch clans and armoured bears. Lyra hurtles toward danger in the cold far North, never suspecting the shocking truth, that she alone is destined to win Follow Lyra's story once again in a way you've never experienced it before, as the arrival of her fearsome uncle, Lord Asriel, draws her to the heart of a terrible struggle — a struggle born of Gobblers and stolen children, witch clans and armoured bears. Lyra hurtles toward danger in the cold far North, never suspecting the shocking truth, that she alone is destined to win, or to lose, this more-than-mortal battle.


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Follow Lyra's story once again in a way you've never experienced it before, as the arrival of her fearsome uncle, Lord Asriel, draws her to the heart of a terrible struggle — a struggle born of Gobblers and stolen children, witch clans and armoured bears. Lyra hurtles toward danger in the cold far North, never suspecting the shocking truth, that she alone is destined to win Follow Lyra's story once again in a way you've never experienced it before, as the arrival of her fearsome uncle, Lord Asriel, draws her to the heart of a terrible struggle — a struggle born of Gobblers and stolen children, witch clans and armoured bears. Lyra hurtles toward danger in the cold far North, never suspecting the shocking truth, that she alone is destined to win, or to lose, this more-than-mortal battle.

30 review for The Golden Compass Graphic Novel, Complete Edition

  1. 4 out of 5

    David Schaafsma

    We finished the first season of the BBC/HBO His Dark Materials series based on Phillip Pullman's trilogy, and I thought I would read the complete adaptation of the graphic novel focused on the first volume of Pullman's series, The Golden Compass (The Northern Lights was what Pullman wanted it to be called) by Stephane Melchior and illustrated by Clement Oubrerie. Here's some Finnish Northern Lights (you're welcome): https://www.cnn.com/videos/world/2020... I had read the first volume of the graphi We finished the first season of the BBC/HBO His Dark Materials series based on Phillip Pullman's trilogy, and I thought I would read the complete adaptation of the graphic novel focused on the first volume of Pullman's series, The Golden Compass (The Northern Lights was what Pullman wanted it to be called) by Stephane Melchior and illustrated by Clement Oubrerie. Here's some Finnish Northern Lights (you're welcome): https://www.cnn.com/videos/world/2020... I had read the first volume of the graphic novel adaptation and liked it, so I finally took the time to read it all through. It's great that there are so many terrific versions of this fantasy series. The original by Pullman is great, of course. I liked the movie with Daniel Craig and Nicole Kidman. I like the BBC/HBO series. I like this graphic novel adaptation, efficiently done and beautifully illustrated. I say let a thousand versions bloom of a great story. The first volume is my favorite as it has the best adventure line and Lyra is clearly featured. I like Iorek Byrnison, that big bear. I the like northern lights as the best and clearest instance of "dust," and the fact that a child with intuition is the best reader of the alethiometer, that truth telling magic machine. I like Pullman's aim to make it clear that the physical and spiritual worlds are richer and more complex than any of us ever learned in school or church. The tale also has some moments of real horror as we see that the hearts and minds and souls (and daemons) of children are at stake in all these issues.

  2. 4 out of 5

    Mikaela Garcia

    Good as the book is and I love the drawing

  3. 5 out of 5

    Lisa

    Loved this as a stunning graphic novel - I will be reading this repeatedly!

  4. 4 out of 5

    Alice Caryer

    I don't feel I need to review the actual storyline of this because everybody knows I love Northern Lights (and imo it's the best book of the trilogy, the other two don't quite live up to the initial brilliance). I'm not entirely sure this graphic novelisation would work on its own but as I've read the book three times, it works for me. I also loved the illustrations; some readers below didn't, but that's completely subjective and I'm glad I enjoyed them.

  5. 4 out of 5

    Barbara

    Having simply adored and been enchanted by The Golden Compass, I enjoyed getting to see the story in a graphic novel format. Fans of abridged books may enjoy this one greatly since it manages to distill the wonderful story to its essential points. All the elements that made the original story's so compelling are here but without the detail that some like me might find essential. Still, the story is just as captivating here as it was the first time around. It might be interesting for some fans to Having simply adored and been enchanted by The Golden Compass, I enjoyed getting to see the story in a graphic novel format. Fans of abridged books may enjoy this one greatly since it manages to distill the wonderful story to its essential points. All the elements that made the original story's so compelling are here but without the detail that some like me might find essential. Still, the story is just as captivating here as it was the first time around. It might be interesting for some fans to compare the two versions and pull out strengths and favorites from both versions. As in the original, readers will find themselves thinking about the allure of power and the impact of passion and thrill at the loyal friends and allies who surround Lyra, the book's feisty protagonist.

  6. 4 out of 5

    Thomas Ray

    Graphic-novel doesn't do justice to the story. Too abridged, too little of the character development and motivations.

  7. 5 out of 5

    ⭐Aimee⭐

    I received a copy of the Northern Lights graphic novel from Penguin Random House New Zealand to review. This is the first book from the His Dark Materials trilogy. I have read the book, Northern Lights, but it was a few years ago now. I did really enjoy it but I never did get around to reading the other two books in the trilogy. And then I’d left it too late and forgot most of what happened. So when I saw that a graphic novel was going to be released I thought it would be a great way to refresh I received a copy of the Northern Lights graphic novel from Penguin Random House New Zealand to review. This is the first book from the His Dark Materials trilogy. I have read the book, Northern Lights, but it was a few years ago now. I did really enjoy it but I never did get around to reading the other two books in the trilogy. And then I’d left it too late and forgot most of what happened. So when I saw that a graphic novel was going to be released I thought it would be a great way to refresh my memory and also read a graphic novel. I haven’t read a lot of graphic novels. I will admit that I thought the story jumped ahead out of nowhere. I get that this is a graphic novel and not everything from the book can fit but it just changed scenes with no warning and I also felt like conversations were cut off and didn’t come to an end. I can’t say how much of the story is missing from the book but I did feel like the biggest parts were included. Maybe it’s just me and the fact I haven’t read a graphic novel in years… I did enjoy the illustrations. I thought they added to the story and made me think of the movie. I have only seen the movie once and all I remember from that is the actors and that insane orange monkey. I loved the detail in the illustrations. I do wish I’d taken some photos for my review but it just slipped my mind. Overall I did enjoy reading this edition of Northern Lights and it did bring enough of the story back for me to pick up the next book. Which is great! Now I just have to actually pick it up. I want to know what’s next for Lyra and Pan. If you’re a fan of the His Dark Materials trilogy and haven’t checked this out then I definitely recommend picking up a copy!

  8. 4 out of 5

    Anna Luce

    ★★★✰✰ (3.5 stars) On the one hand, I enjoyed Clément Oubrerie's style. On the other, I couldn't help in thinking that it did not mediate Pullman's world. It was at once too simple and too adult. It didn't emphasise the strong suits of the novel, giving the story a different tone. Nevertheless, I did like it and once I started it I became more adjusted to Oubrerie's 'vision'.

  9. 5 out of 5

    Jesse (Jaythebookbird)

    I’m such a fan of this series but the GN adaptation felt disjointed and rushed. It was all sharp edges and far too few moments that tied you to the characters. If I had lot read the series I think I would have been completely lost.

  10. 5 out of 5

    Marzie

    When I learned there was a graphic novel of Northern Lights (The Golden Compass) I had to order it. (Book Depository, US buyers! ). I was eager to see how the book had been adapted for a graphic novel. Unfortunately, I feel that it doesn't really live up to the wonder of Pullman's world. I felt like it compressed so much action into such a short space and the visuals didn't manage to convey a greater depth of information within that short space. I also had mixed feelings about the art, which som When I learned there was a graphic novel of Northern Lights (The Golden Compass) I had to order it. (Book Depository, US buyers! ). I was eager to see how the book had been adapted for a graphic novel. Unfortunately, I feel that it doesn't really live up to the wonder of Pullman's world. I felt like it compressed so much action into such a short space and the visuals didn't manage to convey a greater depth of information within that short space. I also had mixed feelings about the art, which somehow didn't capture the beauty of Lyra's world. Because of the vast compression factor of the storyline, I would only recommend the graphic novel to those who have read the source novel.

  11. 4 out of 5

    RhiannaH

    A fantastic 'refresher' of Northern Lights. After reading the novel several years ago and before commencing on reintroducing myself with the His Dark Materials, I felt that I needed a refresher as such to remind myself of the story plot. The graphic novel provided as much detail as the novel and recaptured my love and interest into this amazing story trilogy. Would highly recommend to anyone who may seem intimidated by the series or novel - this is a perfect introduction to the masterful collect A fantastic 'refresher' of Northern Lights. After reading the novel several years ago and before commencing on reintroducing myself with the His Dark Materials, I felt that I needed a refresher as such to remind myself of the story plot. The graphic novel provided as much detail as the novel and recaptured my love and interest into this amazing story trilogy. Would highly recommend to anyone who may seem intimidated by the series or novel - this is a perfect introduction to the masterful collection.

  12. 4 out of 5

    Ella Dincă

    After trying this story in all sorts of forms, including the serials, I feel it has something broken, it's somehow incomplete. This graphic novel is just another try to fix it.

  13. 4 out of 5

    Ron Turner

    Doesn't quite capture the magic of the original book. I'm curious to see how the new HBO television series does.

  14. 5 out of 5

    Christine

    A great way to re-read the Golden Compass!

  15. 5 out of 5

    George (BuriedInBooks)

    Really nice illustrations. Would recommend

  16. 5 out of 5

    Stephanie

    I have not read THE GOLDEN COMPASS novel, nor have I seen the movie, but for someone who has always wanted to understand the hype around the series, but hasn't had time to read it, this graphic novel was PERFECTION! The illustrations are gorgeous and make keeping track of characters much easier than having to remember all of the names. I had no trouble at all understanding and following Lyra's story. It begins at Jordan College where she is under the care of the "Master" and overhears Lord Asrie I have not read THE GOLDEN COMPASS novel, nor have I seen the movie, but for someone who has always wanted to understand the hype around the series, but hasn't had time to read it, this graphic novel was PERFECTION! The illustrations are gorgeous and make keeping track of characters much easier than having to remember all of the names. I had no trouble at all understanding and following Lyra's story. It begins at Jordan College where she is under the care of the "Master" and overhears Lord Asriel speaking about "dust" to the other scholars. Roger, her best friend, gets taken by the "Gobblers," who are the General Oblation Unit, who we later learn are trying to find a way to separate children from the daemons (outward extension of their soul) to use the energy and dust created from the separation to find a way to get in to the "other world." This was where I got confused and had to do some digging, but thankfully, as the book goes on, we learn more about dust and this other world that is referenced. When Roger is taken by the Gobblers, Lyra sets out to bring him home but meets Mrs. Coulter (who is actually her mother) who is charming and buys Lyra nice dresses, but Lyra thinks that she is hiding something and wants to take the alethiometer from her, so she runs away. Lyra meets a band of "Gyptians" who tell her about her origins and who her true parents are and why she is being hunted by the General Oblation Board, she also meets their astronaut, Lee Scoresby, and an armoured bear named Iorek Byrnison. With these people, she sets off to the North (the Arctic) to find all of the children who have been taken by the Gobblers as well as setting Lord Asriel (who she learns is her father) free from the armoured bears. While the story was a bit hard to follow at times and required A LOT of re-reading, I thought the graphic novel was amazing. The pages displaying the aurora borealis were absolutely stunning. When Lord Asriel explains what Dust is to Lyra (and the reader) it is easy to understand with a visual explanation that the graphic novel offers. Overall, I give it four stars for amazing illustrations and a great story.

  17. 4 out of 5

    I'mogén

    I've been wanting to re-read this series for what feels like for ever, and the start of the new tv series definitely sparked me to dive back into this world. I haven't yet watched the show but I wanted a new yet familiar experience and the graphic novel certainly gave me that. You definitely need to be familiar with the story because it is heavily abridged, what with being a graphic adaptation, so some scenes felt rather choppy. For example, it's sometimes not clear how Lyra has already learned s I've been wanting to re-read this series for what feels like for ever, and the start of the new tv series definitely sparked me to dive back into this world. I haven't yet watched the show but I wanted a new yet familiar experience and the graphic novel certainly gave me that. You definitely need to be familiar with the story because it is heavily abridged, what with being a graphic adaptation, so some scenes felt rather choppy. For example, it's sometimes not clear how Lyra has already learned some dark truths so early on, and then I have to remember that where we have more discussion from the novel, the adaptation has a more subtler hint, not dwelled on, to keep up the pace and cut down on time lost. I still find it odd how easy it is for a child, Lyra, to be taken into someone else's care in this book, with no relation or approval from a relative what so ever. This just emphasises how corrupt humanity is in this world (a reflection of real life?) And how anyone would do anything to benefit themselves. (view spoiler)[ the panels depicting Lyra coming through crowds atop of Iorek Byrnison made my cheeks all tingly with excitement! It was drawn very well (hide spoiler)] I found it so frustrating for Lyra to only be listened to when they needed specific information and then not listen to her other thoughts, especially when she actually had valid points to make! I do think she went about it in what you'd expect to be a childish manner, and I think this lead to her not being taken seriously a lot of the time... But then again, she's only 11! That's perhaps the only way she knows how to express her self, and I can only imagine how much more frustrating it must be when you're not listened too and feel you have something important to add! I think I thought this when I originally read the trilogy years ago (which for some reason I didn't catalogue, I'll have to update my shelves) but I like that the gender of the demon is the opposite of the person. As demons represents souls, I feel like it's a nice reflection of both the feminine and masculine attributes people have (sorry to talk soley on the generic female and male genders, but it's got context I wanted to discuss). Pan seems to be the reason why she's always caught and that grated on me at times. But again, as her soul, he's a facet of her very being and was clearly the personified fearful, wary part of her. He actually added an intelligent bount of second guessing in dangerous situations, to steer away from the rash choices that Lyra seemed to be prone to. I did find myself missing pieces of dialogue when they're right at the bottom of a panel. I kept overlooking them or thinking they were part of the bottom panels. Its was simple and fast to just go back over what I'd read, once I realised this though. The art style was simple but effective. The scenery was equistite but I found the drawing of humans a tad on the lack luster side, in comparison. It does show some gory scenes. In the books you can imagine the injust child cruelty and fantasy violence. That may be somewhat okay for a younger audience, it's their imagination, but seeing some of the scenes drawn are a little intense, when you think of the young readers it's intended for. I'm looking forward to the show. From the trailers alone it looks incredibly promising. I know the golden compass movie was apparently a bit of a flop, but I only recall seeing part of it, so perhaps I'll make a theme of it and check the movie out again, before watching the show, continue on with the graphic novel adaptations, if there are more out, and then finally begin the new Book of Dust novels... This will definitely take me some time! Pick it up, give it a go and enjoy! >(^_^)< Gén

  18. 5 out of 5

    Samuel

    This comic adaption of Philip Pullman’s NORTHERN LIGHTS, first of the HIS DARK MATERIALS trilogy, mostly does a good job adapting things into the comic format. The story is abridged, of course, and there are a decent amount of thought-out changes to try and channel the flow of information and sequence of plot in a way more suited to panel after panel, rather than flow-on of prose. Sometimes what seem to be bigger changes are teased, before zippily returning back to the novel’s way of doing thing This comic adaption of Philip Pullman’s NORTHERN LIGHTS, first of the HIS DARK MATERIALS trilogy, mostly does a good job adapting things into the comic format. The story is abridged, of course, and there are a decent amount of thought-out changes to try and channel the flow of information and sequence of plot in a way more suited to panel after panel, rather than flow-on of prose. Sometimes what seem to be bigger changes are teased, before zippily returning back to the novel’s way of doing things, and so generally changes only end up being for ways to convey information with less words. Sometimes this falters, and there’s a terrifying onslaught of words on a page that makes the adaption seem rather ill-conceived for the form. The first two dozen or so pages seem to suggest a more changed adaption than the comic as a whole is, by starting off somewhat from Lord Asriel’s point-of-view instead of Lyra’s, making a joke at how Lyra talking to her daemon companion (as is usually realised in adaptions) would be audible to all present, and using speedy dream sequences to move around the introduction of worldbuilding elements. But things quickly settle into mostly just doing things the way the novel did them, for better or worse. It’s nice to see a lot of scenes that other adaptions forgo get adapted here. As for the actual art, it’s a simple sort of visual depiction very much geared to children, and the expressiveness of the characters certainly is of a singular style. There’s a disjointed sense to a lot of the story, even for all the scenes it preserves - the novel is just too wordy to adapt easily as a children’s comic. And while I love to see comic adaptions of novels in general, there is a question of who exactly this was for, as the novel itself is already aimed at children. It’s a decent adaption, adding nothing but doing a serviceable job realising the story of course best told in the original novel. Two and a half photograms, and a very expressive daemon.

  19. 4 out of 5

    Commodore

    Don’t get me wrong, I was hugely on board with a graphic novel adaptation when I saw it in the library. I liked that it didn’t try to adapt every dialogue and action into a 1:1 representation. I like an adaptation that truly adapts the source material into its new medium, which is unfortunately where this graphic novel falls flat. I wanted to see details in illustrations that a text-only novel couldn’t address, background details of Oxford and London, or the Royal Arctic Institute, but the art s Don’t get me wrong, I was hugely on board with a graphic novel adaptation when I saw it in the library. I liked that it didn’t try to adapt every dialogue and action into a 1:1 representation. I like an adaptation that truly adapts the source material into its new medium, which is unfortunately where this graphic novel falls flat. I wanted to see details in illustrations that a text-only novel couldn’t address, background details of Oxford and London, or the Royal Arctic Institute, but the art style is... almost lazy. The backgrounds are usually little more than colored scribbles. There’s no continuity in face shapes. Lyra’s hair changes color halfway through, and neither time is it her actual color (she’s a dark blonde, which Mrs. Coulter later has slightly lightened). John Faa looks like an idiotic Skwisgar Skwigelf knockoff, and Farder Coram’s Dæmon, described in the original novel as the most beautiful cat Lyra has ever seen, looks like fucking Garfield. The spy-fly is sealed into a tube, instead of a small round tin meant to mimic the shape of the alethiometer, so Ozymandias and Mrs. Coulter being nearly desperate to open it doesn’t make any sense in the comic. Little attention is paid to the rules of the universe. Dæmon converse with humans regularly and easily (it’s stated that they talk to humans who aren’t “theirs” very rarely under normal circumstances) and people touch other people’s Dæmons almost as casually, so the hideous reveal of the scientists at Bolvangar grabbing Pan loses almost all impact. It doesn’t even work as a stand alone comic; if I hadn’t read HDM first I’d have no clue of the scope of anything. A big disappointment overall. I know we all hated the movie adaptation, but I’d watch it a dozen times before reading this again. I actually feel a little kinder to the movie now, which I never thought would happen.

  20. 4 out of 5

    Ije the Devourer of Books

    This graphic novel brings The Golden Compass, The Subtle Knife, and The Amber Spyglass together in one volume. It is a great way to read the three stories especially if you like graphic novels. The story itself was three stars for me because it was the graphics that were really the icing on the cake, making it four stars. I haven't read the written novels but I am a big fan of graphic novels and so I immediately grabbed this volume when it came out. I was very curious about this series because w This graphic novel brings The Golden Compass, The Subtle Knife, and The Amber Spyglass together in one volume. It is a great way to read the three stories especially if you like graphic novels. The story itself was three stars for me because it was the graphics that were really the icing on the cake, making it four stars. I haven't read the written novels but I am a big fan of graphic novels and so I immediately grabbed this volume when it came out. I was very curious about this series because when the books came out there were quite a few opinions about how anti-Church the books are. Certainly the Roman Catholic church and religion are not portrayed in a postive light in this story but that is the way the author has chosen to tell it and those are his personal views about church. One of the clergy portrayed at the beginning of the story has a vague resemblance to Bishop Rowan Williams (former Archbishop of Canterbury) but I am sure he wont take it too personally. I dont think the anti-religious stance of the book should be used to deter people from reading it. It is a series of books which are anti-authority in many ways. Parenting, educational establishments and the place of children within them are all critiqued in this book. Other than those undelying messages it is actually a really good adventure story with children wanting to take a part in their own rescue and adults either assisting or hindering that. It is also very sad in parts. This is a graphic novel version so the entire story is told through art and it does this really well because although this is a children's story it is actually complex in a way but rich in fantasy and imagination. I dont think I would want to read the written version but the graphic novel is a good way to experience the full story.

  21. 4 out of 5

    Adelle

    I really enjoyed this. While it doesn't quite capture the atmospheric magic of Northern Lights the novel, it's still a great way to spend a few hours. It's definitely not a graphic novel that you can pick up without some background knowledge of Pullman's masterpiece His Dark Materials. There's a lot that's left behind in the change of mediums, but the core plot points remain. As someone who read and enjoyed the series, my understanding of why events happened as they did, why characters reacted i I really enjoyed this. While it doesn't quite capture the atmospheric magic of Northern Lights the novel, it's still a great way to spend a few hours. It's definitely not a graphic novel that you can pick up without some background knowledge of Pullman's masterpiece His Dark Materials. There's a lot that's left behind in the change of mediums, but the core plot points remain. As someone who read and enjoyed the series, my understanding of why events happened as they did, why characters reacted in certain ways, and the fundamentals of the world building, meant I enjoyed this. It certainly wasn't as good as the novel, but I think it's unfair to judge the two side by side when they're such vastly different mediums. There's no way you could do a graphic novel of any of the books in the series as well as the novels themselves without there being excessive text and hundreds of pages long. The graphic novel, however, is certainly more true to the novel then the movie, The Golden Compass. Regarding the art style, it took a bit to get used to it, but it's almost reflective of the story in how dark and gritty it is. This isn't a light hearted story being told, theres' murder, child abduction and abuse, as well as blatant child abandonment. I don't think a light and happy art style would have worked well with the underlying concerns of the novel. Overall, I enjoyed the graphic novel.

  22. 5 out of 5

    Tânia Cabral

    The His Dark Materials series are my all time favourite books to read, and although the movie was lacking in all sorts of ways I think i have lost count of how many times i ve seen it. It's always nice to revisit Lyra´s story, so I jumped at the opportunity to read the Northern Lights graphic novel, yes The Northern Lights, not The Golden Compass has it was named in the movie and in this adaptation, sometimes causes confusion, some thought that they were getting the whole trilogy due to the compl The His Dark Materials series are my all time favourite books to read, and although the movie was lacking in all sorts of ways I think i have lost count of how many times i ve seen it. It's always nice to revisit Lyra´s story, so I jumped at the opportunity to read the Northern Lights graphic novel, yes The Northern Lights, not The Golden Compass has it was named in the movie and in this adaptation, sometimes causes confusion, some thought that they were getting the whole trilogy due to the complete edition on the title, and only got the first book, so better read very well any product descriptions before buying anything folks. In regard to the adaptation it was all right they caught the essence of it but sometimes added stuff that wasn't in the book like Lyra having ballet lessons(LOL) or Farder Coram`s daemon being a fat ginger cat ...... The artwork was alright, dark and smudged(it sets a bit of a melancholic mood to the story) sometimes it made me almost glue my face to the book to see some details but not bad artwork at all only something we don't see every day. All in all, I think fans of the trilogy will be happy to read another material with relation to the series (like me) and new readers to this universe might enjoy this abridged edition as an incentive (or not) to start reading this series.

  23. 4 out of 5

    Jimmy Green

    *uggh* I really don't want to sound like a bully or a pretentious dick when I say this.... I was not impressed. Don't get me wrong! I absolutely love His Dark Materials and I am happy it got a comic adaptation seeing as how visual it is but at the moment this really REALLY isn't how I would have gone about it. While the story is obviously good (and not eviserated by studio execs and bible thumpers unlike someone else) but the art honestly comes across as, in the nicest way possible, downright UG *uggh* I really don't want to sound like a bully or a pretentious dick when I say this.... I was not impressed. Don't get me wrong! I absolutely love His Dark Materials and I am happy it got a comic adaptation seeing as how visual it is but at the moment this really REALLY isn't how I would have gone about it. While the story is obviously good (and not eviserated by studio execs and bible thumpers unlike someone else) but the art honestly comes across as, in the nicest way possible, downright UGLY. The characters are either boring-looking or downright creepy to look at, especially Lyra who looks like a goblin half the time. It Dosen't help that the backgrounds are very often crude too. Now there are some splashes of brilliance. The Arctic backdrop looked awesome and the Bears and witches are very well done but that's just it; flashes.... and it's a shame because I've seen a lot of fan art from younger artists that were so much more beautiful and would have been more suited to this epic tale. (I would've killed to see Jeff smith or kazu kibuishi's interpretation!)

  24. 5 out of 5

    Sue

    My review is of the graphic novelisation, not of the story. I am currently reading The Northern Lights for the first time, in book form, and picked up the graphic novel version out of interest to see how it compared. I only got about halfway through it. I didn't like the illustrations. The characters were harsh-looking and the overall feeling was dark, heavy and dreary. I also felt that the picture-based format left a lot out. The main plot points were there, accurately, but the atmosphere and t My review is of the graphic novelisation, not of the story. I am currently reading The Northern Lights for the first time, in book form, and picked up the graphic novel version out of interest to see how it compared. I only got about halfway through it. I didn't like the illustrations. The characters were harsh-looking and the overall feeling was dark, heavy and dreary. I also felt that the picture-based format left a lot out. The main plot points were there, accurately, but the atmosphere and the poetry of the book were missing. I didn't find myself imagining anything as I read, in the way that I'm doing with the ordinary book format. This was my first graphic novel, and I shan't finish it, but I'll try more of them. Perhaps I'll be luckier next time, especially if the artwork appeals more to me. Oh, and The Northern Lights story itself - absolutely wonderful! But I'll review that separately.

  25. 5 out of 5

    Lucy Hayes

    I liked the art style, although at times, it was difficult to tell which character was which. I don't care so much for the abridged story. It's very possible to have the graphic novel format and include enough detail that it isn't necessary to have read the original novel first. Overall, this book was cool. (I'm a nit-picker though! Why change insignificant details? SPOILER WARNING: At one point, Lyra has the alethiometer and the spy bug each hidden in metal tins. In the original novel, the tins I liked the art style, although at times, it was difficult to tell which character was which. I don't care so much for the abridged story. It's very possible to have the graphic novel format and include enough detail that it isn't necessary to have read the original novel first. Overall, this book was cool. (I'm a nit-picker though! Why change insignificant details? SPOILER WARNING: At one point, Lyra has the alethiometer and the spy bug each hidden in metal tins. In the original novel, the tins match. In the graphic novel, the alethiometer is in a round tin, and the spy bug is in a test tube-shaped thing. I get that the author probably wanted the reader to know which object was which at a glance, but it ruins the moment when Mrs. Coulter is trying to take the alethiometer from Lyra at Bolvanger. Mrs. Coulter would have no reason to suspect that the alethiometer is in the tin that actually hides the spy bug, because it's impossible for it to fit in a test tube!)

  26. 4 out of 5

    Arkham Reviews

    While I am disappointed that I needed to buy this complete collection to read the final part of this adaptation (having already bought the first two volumes separately), I will admit that it's nice to have the complete story in one volume. The plot is condensed, but does keep all of the most important elements from the novel. Like the book, it is very slow to start but builds to an utterly thrilling final act. I also felt that the artist captured the feel of the story well. While her style was ve While I am disappointed that I needed to buy this complete collection to read the final part of this adaptation (having already bought the first two volumes separately), I will admit that it's nice to have the complete story in one volume. The plot is condensed, but does keep all of the most important elements from the novel. Like the book, it is very slow to start but builds to an utterly thrilling final act. I also felt that the artist captured the feel of the story well. While her style was very sketchy, it did noticeably improve by the final part and could be very beautiful. If I had to critique anything, it would be the smaller details. Characters often appeared to have no daemons, and Pan rarely shifted from his ermine form. All in all though, this is a lovely comic to own and I would definitely recommend it to fans of Pullman's work.

  27. 4 out of 5

    Mark

    That was an OK adaptation that at least allows for a quick flight through the story without sacrificing much plot or details. Ironically the illustrated edition suggest a younger audience, but none of the gore or intensity is cut-out. In fact, it might be even more gruesome than black-and-white words on a page. I didn't care too much for the art: some of the backgrounds are magnificent, but the character drawings are oddly childish and vaguely simple. The BBC miniseries actually does a better jo That was an OK adaptation that at least allows for a quick flight through the story without sacrificing much plot or details. Ironically the illustrated edition suggest a younger audience, but none of the gore or intensity is cut-out. In fact, it might be even more gruesome than black-and-white words on a page. I didn't care too much for the art: some of the backgrounds are magnificent, but the character drawings are oddly childish and vaguely simple. The BBC miniseries actually does a better job adopting the source material, but it is such a great story that it is always fun to revisit. The ending of the first book could be disappointing if one weren't able to continue. Luckily the trilogy continues, along with a newer trilogy and two side stories. Alas, not in the graphic novel edition, for now.

  28. 5 out of 5

    Erica

    I really enjoyed the visual representation of the story! I read this in parallel with the novel itself, and it was great to have the visuals. The illustrations of the Lights and the Arctic landscapes are stunning, and I love the way the daemons were depicted (especially the kids' daemons and their abilities to shift form). I'm not sure I would recommend it as a stand-alone. Because it's a graphic novel, scenes are often reformatted to emphasize action and simplify dialogue. Makes sense for the fo I really enjoyed the visual representation of the story! I read this in parallel with the novel itself, and it was great to have the visuals. The illustrations of the Lights and the Arctic landscapes are stunning, and I love the way the daemons were depicted (especially the kids' daemons and their abilities to shift form). I'm not sure I would recommend it as a stand-alone. Because it's a graphic novel, scenes are often reformatted to emphasize action and simplify dialogue. Makes sense for the format, but you definitely lose out on subtlety of interactions, and it has the effect of changing some of the characters' dynamics with each other. But as a "companion" to the novel, or for fans of the series itching for new ways to explore it, I highly recommend!

  29. 5 out of 5

    Matthew Archibald

    I enjoyed this graphic novel adaptation of The Golden Compass, but it really crammed a lot into one volume. Though it was abridged, by necessity, I actually liked not having every little thing explained to me. On the other hand, if I had not read the original book (and seen the movie? I can't remember if I ever watched it...) I'm not sure I would have understood what was going on. As it is, I remember little enough that now I feel I need to re-read the original (and then, of course, the rest of I enjoyed this graphic novel adaptation of The Golden Compass, but it really crammed a lot into one volume. Though it was abridged, by necessity, I actually liked not having every little thing explained to me. On the other hand, if I had not read the original book (and seen the movie? I can't remember if I ever watched it...) I'm not sure I would have understood what was going on. As it is, I remember little enough that now I feel I need to re-read the original (and then, of course, the rest of the trilogy).

  30. 4 out of 5

    Stephanie Tournas

    This French import, originally published by Gallimard, is a masterful interpretation of Pullman's beloved His Dark Materials series. The tone, world building, and characterizations seem to directly channel the author's intentions in. I love Lyra's wide eyed, yet wise, appearance, and the personalities of the animals - daemons and Iorek Burnisson especially - are just so well done. I hope there will be more from this team. I have high standards for this novel, as it is one of my favorites, and th This French import, originally published by Gallimard, is a masterful interpretation of Pullman's beloved His Dark Materials series. The tone, world building, and characterizations seem to directly channel the author's intentions in. I love Lyra's wide eyed, yet wise, appearance, and the personalities of the animals - daemons and Iorek Burnisson especially - are just so well done. I hope there will be more from this team. I have high standards for this novel, as it is one of my favorites, and this version is completely satisfying.

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