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Fiction. South Asia Studies. Mad scientists Hard-boiled detectives Vengeful goddesses Murderous robots Scandalous starlets Drug-fuelled love affairs This anthology features seventeen stories by ten best-selling authors of Tamil crime, romance, science fiction, and detective stories, none of them ever before translated into English, along with reproductions of wacky cover a Fiction. South Asia Studies. Mad scientists Hard-boiled detectives Vengeful goddesses Murderous robots Scandalous starlets Drug-fuelled love affairs This anthology features seventeen stories by ten best-selling authors of Tamil crime, romance, science fiction, and detective stories, none of them ever before translated into English, along with reproductions of wacky cover art and question-and-answer sessions with some of the authors. Grab a masala vadai, sit back and enjoy


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Fiction. South Asia Studies. Mad scientists Hard-boiled detectives Vengeful goddesses Murderous robots Scandalous starlets Drug-fuelled love affairs This anthology features seventeen stories by ten best-selling authors of Tamil crime, romance, science fiction, and detective stories, none of them ever before translated into English, along with reproductions of wacky cover a Fiction. South Asia Studies. Mad scientists Hard-boiled detectives Vengeful goddesses Murderous robots Scandalous starlets Drug-fuelled love affairs This anthology features seventeen stories by ten best-selling authors of Tamil crime, romance, science fiction, and detective stories, none of them ever before translated into English, along with reproductions of wacky cover art and question-and-answer sessions with some of the authors. Grab a masala vadai, sit back and enjoy

30 review for The Blaft Anthology of Tamil Pulp Fiction, Vol. I

  1. 5 out of 5

    Michael

    010214: this is not a three star 'good' book, this is a three star natural resource of local popular culture, interesting me primarily in an anthropological way. this is literature purely in an escape, adventure, way, that reveals much of the society it serves, that is, a world without luxury of a tv in every house. popular in adhering to tamil mores and views on political, social, sexual and emotional concerns. of the people, for the people, written simply, purely, quickly, in delivering its st 010214: this is not a three star 'good' book, this is a three star natural resource of local popular culture, interesting me primarily in an anthropological way. this is literature purely in an escape, adventure, way, that reveals much of the society it serves, that is, a world without luxury of a tv in every house. popular in adhering to tamil mores and views on political, social, sexual and emotional concerns. of the people, for the people, written simply, purely, quickly, in delivering its stories. why i can read this in other eras, other cultures, but not much here and now i do not know... on reflection, as i do not remember any story well, i rate this down a star. this is fun to read, is different and interesting, but probably it is the idea of cross-cultural reading more than the works. and this idea is mainly a case of inspiring a look at literary 'good' Tamil fiction, which is not easy to find...

  2. 4 out of 5

    Vinitha

    I can read and write in Tamil. I studied Tamil in school from the age of 6 till I was 15. I have read poetry and classics, I have written essays and speeches. I should be proficient. But I never read in Tamil. Newspapers, fiction, jokes, gossip - I just avoid Tamil. I have no clue why I do it. It is my goal to overcome that in 2013. Given the back history, I was pleasantly surprised to hear about this book on NPR during my commute one morning couple of years back. This book has been on my to-rea I can read and write in Tamil. I studied Tamil in school from the age of 6 till I was 15. I have read poetry and classics, I have written essays and speeches. I should be proficient. But I never read in Tamil. Newspapers, fiction, jokes, gossip - I just avoid Tamil. I have no clue why I do it. It is my goal to overcome that in 2013. Given the back history, I was pleasantly surprised to hear about this book on NPR during my commute one morning couple of years back. This book has been on my to-read list ever since. It was in my pre-good reads life and all the books I wanted to read were saved as email drafts. I was never able to find a copy of this book in Houston and I really did not look for it in Singapore. It caught my eye when I was browsing the Singapore National Library and I had to pick it up. The cover (Front and back) scream Tamil pulp fiction. I thought it was because I have seen Tamil pulp fiction covers before. But my 3 year old has asked me more than once if I was reading a Tamil book on seeing the cover. What is in the cover that screams Tamil that even a 3 year old can pickup? So the review - the book is a collection of translated stories by famous Tamil authors and titbits of information about Tamil pulp and the authors. I actually enjoyed the titbits part quite a bit. Having never read Tamil pulp before this book was very fascinating. It was sort of like watching a Tamil movie - in the story Tokyo Rose (originally by Tamilvanan) I expected the lead pair (the detective called Shankarlal who has a big fan following in Japan - the Japanese police even consult him and his wife Indra , who goes around calling him Aathan) to break into a dance any minute among the locales of Japan. I have always been told Ramanichandiran books were the Tamil equivalents of Mills and Boon romances and I see the connection. Soft love stories with happy endings. I loved sci-fi touch Rajesh Kumar's stories brought in. Indraa Soundarrajan's story about rebirth and the divine reminded me watching a Tamil soap on TV. Murder, Crime and detectives (who are in relationships yet continue to drool behind other women) seem to be a common theme amongst the stories in this collection. Infact the book's back cover describes the book "Mad scientists! Hard-Boiled (Eggs??) Detectives! Vengeful Goddesses! Murderous Robots! Scandalous Starlets! Drug-Filled Love Affairs! The initial thrill of reading the translated Tamil works died down soon. It was simple translation - one that had me rolling with laughter often. I enjoyed the book and that is because I have not read Tamil pulp before and I find it a refreshing change from the other books I have been reading currently. I enjoyed the book because it offered a peak into the Tamil pulp publishing industry. I enjoyed the book because I could now understand why my grandmother and mother loved these books. If you are looking for literary works to read this is not the book for you. But if you want to pick a book to fill in few hours and move fast, go ahead pick this up. You will not regret it. A lazy weekend by the pool reading translated pulp - perfection! Review done and now it leaves me with one thing left to do - read at least one Tamil pulp fiction in Tamil.

  3. 5 out of 5

    Shruthi

    In my immediate family, my dad is the only one with the reading proficiency to read Tamil literature, with multiple shelves devoted to his novel collection and active subscription to the websites of Tamil lit magazines like Ananda Vikatan and Thuglaq. I'm at the reading level where I can only attempt reading the titles on the covers so it's not really a hobby/interest that we've been able to discuss and share as a family. But I just really personally liked that this book helped us bridge that la In my immediate family, my dad is the only one with the reading proficiency to read Tamil literature, with multiple shelves devoted to his novel collection and active subscription to the websites of Tamil lit magazines like Ananda Vikatan and Thuglaq. I'm at the reading level where I can only attempt reading the titles on the covers so it's not really a hobby/interest that we've been able to discuss and share as a family. But I just really personally liked that this book helped us bridge that language divide. I was able to talk to my father about Tamil lit for the first time ever and, although it's been a while since he's read some of these authors, it was just really nice to be able to share this moment with him! So, yes, a lot of these plots were wild, reminiscent of like B-movie Tamil movie plots, but this was the first time I actually even read anything translated to English from Tamil and I had this warm feeling of familiarity while reading. Many of the stories were crime stories full of hard-boiled detectives and those are not super interesting to me but I hope the other volumes in this collection have other genre fiction as I'd love to read more of the romance and science fiction/fantasy stories. The one story I really really enjoyed was "Dim Lights, Blazing Hearts" by Ramanichandran, which was a contemporary-ish (dated 1997) romance that felt very Austenian, with misunderstandings, class differences, and a delicate yet lovely development of Feelings after the female protag rejects her love interest.

  4. 5 out of 5

    Shweta Ganesh Kumar

    Of crime fighting damsels, revengeful Goddesses and much more, published by Blaft Publications A sari clad south Indian beauty brandishing a pistol looks seductively out at the reader from the cover of The Blaft Anthology of Tamil Pulp fiction. And while the cover is not what you would typically expect from a collection of English short stories, the buxom gun toting woman sure sets the tone for what lies ahead. Compiled by Pritham. K. Chakravarthy, the anthology comprises of seventeen stories, inc Of crime fighting damsels, revengeful Goddesses and much more, published by Blaft Publications A sari clad south Indian beauty brandishing a pistol looks seductively out at the reader from the cover of The Blaft Anthology of Tamil Pulp fiction. And while the cover is not what you would typically expect from a collection of English short stories, the buxom gun toting woman sure sets the tone for what lies ahead. Compiled by Pritham. K. Chakravarthy, the anthology comprises of seventeen stories, including one excerpt from a serialized novel, all translated from Tamil. What sets this anthology apart from others in its genre is that the stories in this volume come exclusively from publications categorized as ‘Pulp fiction’. ‘The book is an attempt to claim the status of literature’ for such writing, as the translator’s note makes clear right at the beginning. With pieces selected from popular writers like Ramanichandran to crazily prolific writers like Indra Soundar Rajan and Rajesh Kumar to old favourites like Tamilvannan amongst others, the collection has a selection that is not only diverse but also intriguing. Suspense in the detective stories, grittiness in the narrative about the brothels of North India, rebirth and romance are just some of the flavours that the reader can look forward to in this collection. Rajesh Kumar’s Idhaya 2020 and Silicon Hearts have distinct shades of Asimov’s science fiction tales. Me by Vidya Subramaniam is a strongly feminist piece of short fiction penned in 1987. Dim Lights, Blazing Hearts by Ramanichandran is a roller coaster tale of romance reminiscent of the Mills and Boons of the eighties and nineties. However the highlights of the collection are by far the detective stories with their twists and turns, the voluptuous women detectives and their charming male partners, the exotic locations, the action and general spiciness of it all. From Hurricane Vaij, to Sweetheart Please Die, and Tokyo Rose, the detective and crime stories outshine almost all of the other stories in the book. The only stories that seem a little too regressive despite being written in 2005 and 2007 are A Murder and A Few Mysteries and Revenge by Prajanand V.K. Though the stories were originally penned in the Tamil spoken by the masses, Chakravarthy’s translation seems to have done them justice. There are rarely instances where the reader is at a loss to understand the context and characters that in some stories are Tamilian to the core. However the detailed endnotes will help any reader from a non-Tamilian background to get over any stumbling blocks they might face in enjoying the stories. Priced at Rs. 395 and brought out by the independent publishing house Blaft publications, The Blaft Anthology of Tamil Pulp Fiction (Volume I) is available in all leading bookstores as well as from online bookstores. For the intriguing stories and the reproduction of the often wacky cover art of the original publications, this book is a must-read for anyone who loves short fiction of a different kind. This review was first published here - http://www.theindependentreviewer.com...

  5. 5 out of 5

    Chelsea Mcgill

    Posted from my blog http://thegloballycurious.blogspot.in/ The collection covers a wide range of genres, so there is something for everyone who likes pulp! My favorites were "Matchstick Number One" by Rajesh Kumar (a tale about family and political corruption), "The Rebirth of Jeeva" by Indra Soundar Rajan (a college student on a field trip discovers the truth about her past life!), "Dim Lights, Blazing Hearts" by Ramanichandran (a sort of Pride and Prejudice love story where the woman makes assu Posted from my blog http://thegloballycurious.blogspot.in/ The collection covers a wide range of genres, so there is something for everyone who likes pulp! My favorites were "Matchstick Number One" by Rajesh Kumar (a tale about family and political corruption), "The Rebirth of Jeeva" by Indra Soundar Rajan (a college student on a field trip discovers the truth about her past life!), "Dim Lights, Blazing Hearts" by Ramanichandran (a sort of Pride and Prejudice love story where the woman makes assumptions and acts on stereotypes), and "Sweetheart, Please Die!" by Pattukkottai Prabakar (a mystery about a college student's disappearance). This anthology is a brilliant piece of translation and selection, and there really is something for everyone. I have a few complaints about the featured stories themselves. First, the selection seems to primarily focus on crime and detective fiction, which make up a majority of the book. This is probably because of the overwhelming abundance of crime fiction published, but I appreciated the other genres presented more. I am excited to read the second volume, in which it seems more non-crime stories are included. The second is that these stories, like pulp novels everywhere, are written for a mass audience and therefore leave something to be desired in their treatment of women and depiction of South Indian culture. I was frequently annoyed by the non sequitur sexual references, the passivity of some of the female characters, and the way that conservative stereotypes were considered to be the norm. The worst example of this was in the first story, Subha's "Hurricane Vaij," in which the male lead is more concerned with somehow getting his hand onto his girlfriend's breast than with paying attention to what the villain is saying. The worst part about this scene is that the female lead is pretending to be unconscious, so she cannot react to what her partner is doing. Besides this incident, there are many other examples where the stories made me uncomfortable because of the treatment of women, or for other social and cultural reasons. Despite this, I would encourage you to read the book - these are extremely popular stories and it's more important to experience the phenomenon that has been rendered in English for the first time. And, after all, it is an anthology - you can always skip to another story if you don't like the one you're reading.

  6. 5 out of 5

    Nethra Ram

    I'm surprised by how much I enjoyed this collection. The translation is super local and nothing literary which I'm sure is a deliberate move. I loved the lingo and the flavor of these stories that I've read in their original tongue. If you can suspend your literary snobbishness for a bit you can definitely enjoy a chuckle or two in this ride.

  7. 5 out of 5

    Tim Poston

    Heady stuff! Fascinating at every level, from crisp narrative to the social attitudes and economic realities assumed in the stories. Read it last year, and was delighted today to find both this and a < a href="https://www.goodreads.com/book/show/8... volume in 'Coffee on Canvas'. I very virtuously did not walk off with volume 2: I will buy it, to help encourage the publishers to create a third. Heady stuff! Fascinating at every level, from crisp narrative to the social attitudes and economic realities assumed in the stories. Read it last year, and was delighted today to find both this and a < a href="https://www.goodreads.com/book/show/8... volume in 'Coffee on Canvas'. I very virtuously did not walk off with volume 2: I will buy it, to help encourage the publishers to create a third.

  8. 5 out of 5

    Pierre

    This collection of detective stories, romances, supernatural tales and other pulp fiction, translated for the first time ever from the South Indian language of Tamil into English, is excellent.

  9. 4 out of 5

    Shabari Karumbaya

    Classic!!! A thoroughly enjoying read and one of the best English Tamil translations I have read in a long time.

  10. 5 out of 5

    Loo ool

    Read it!

  11. 4 out of 5

    Sagar Birkar

    What a great effort this is ! This is my first ever read of Tamil pulp fiction. Detectives , scientist , rebirths etc makes an excellent recipe. In an era when languages divide people, this work cuts barriers. I loved "The Rebirth of Jeeva" and "My name is Kamala". More power to such work. Some of the stories were not upto the mark of the others but then I guess its just fun to read.

  12. 5 out of 5

    Kasthuri bai

    Definitely very interesting book translate more books Interesting try to translate more novels. Great job. After many years i started reading again upload tamil pulp fiction volume two

  13. 4 out of 5

    Sujatha Varadharajan

    rated 3 just for the nostalgic trip down to my teenage years when I learnt tamil by means of reading cheap thrillers.

  14. 5 out of 5

    Neha

    Super fun read. The introduction is beautifully written.

  15. 4 out of 5

    Sbijapure

    Nice variety of thrilling stories. Old fashioned.

  16. 4 out of 5

    Rakesh

    Entertaining Stories. Enjoy them for what they are.

  17. 4 out of 5

    Srikanth

    I had always the like the cover artwork of local novels and magazines, they had an indianized touch with a touch of sensuality. But even though i can read Tamil i never managed to pick and complete one whole novel of tamil fiction. Browsing a bookstore is like trying to find your Kohinoor among lot of others, and i just happened to lay my eyes on the book and grabbed it just for the heck of it. And by god did i like the "HECK" part of it. The books are an anthology of Tamil fiction, which have b I had always the like the cover artwork of local novels and magazines, they had an indianized touch with a touch of sensuality. But even though i can read Tamil i never managed to pick and complete one whole novel of tamil fiction. Browsing a bookstore is like trying to find your Kohinoor among lot of others, and i just happened to lay my eyes on the book and grabbed it just for the heck of it. And by god did i like the "HECK" part of it. The books are an anthology of Tamil fiction, which have been chosen and made with lot of care and passion. The reasons are A. The cover art. B. The few pages inside that show the cover art of some books that have been published. C. The variety of authors covered and the choice of stories chosen. D. And the old ads from times gone by mentioned in the books. I mean after few years probably the only thing left of the books would be blogs or some anthologies. Now instead of going on and on how it is a part of our and some parts of the world's culture i will get down right to it. The short stories or short novel's start with these A. The authors introduction. B. The quantity of fiction written by him.(Tamil writers churn out works like pulp, literally. There is our Rajesh kumar who has written 1500 novels and being considered for Guinness book of world records) C. The best story of that author. I really really liked the stories because of reading a lot of english novels, it always feels good to read about indian characters in a manner that we all can relate. The sexual manner in which they play around, the situations, the addresses(especially the address, aah i love Madras and its locals) and the villains and their names. I mean come on who would understand a joke about :Harris being from Brooklyn". It would rather be "Ponnusamy from Parangimalai" right. The stories are varied starting from crime, supernatural to the normal romance variety. They are simple and go inside like scotch on the rocks or Nimbu paani for the teetotallers. People please read and i am pretty sure that you would say "Dil mangay more" and this has made me even more proud and happy to be an Indian on such variety of literature in circulation. And we have not even scratched the surface of other languages.

  18. 5 out of 5

    Anupama Ma

    The Women: ( Except for the ones in the two sensible Vidya Subramaniam stories) a) Good ‘family’ women never cut their hair, not even split ends. They get terribly disturbed when they see PDA and the degradation of Indian/ Tamil culture. ‘Modern’ women go to beauty parlours, cut their hair, wear chudithars , gossip about film stars and some even try to seduce their bosses. b) When the clue to a murder is a cigarette butt, Tamil women can be eliminated as suspects because they will never even be in The Women: ( Except for the ones in the two sensible Vidya Subramaniam stories) a) Good ‘family’ women never cut their hair, not even split ends. They get terribly disturbed when they see PDA and the degradation of Indian/ Tamil culture. ‘Modern’ women go to beauty parlours, cut their hair, wear chudithars , gossip about film stars and some even try to seduce their bosses. b) When the clue to a murder is a cigarette butt, Tamil women can be eliminated as suspects because they will never even be in a room where there is a cigarette let alone smoke. c) They silently bear their husbands’ insults and make cashew pakodas for them d) There are also ‘free type’ women, the detective’s sidekicks, who wear shorts and T-shirts with words like ‘Swelling yours’ (ewwwww) written on them. They talk about Debonair and take sleazy innuendos in their stride. Science Fiction : Idhaya 2020 made me wonder which came first Endhiran or Rajesh Kumar’s robot. And there were Fate Life Readers. But by the time I read the story with NASA astronauts planning conception in outer space, my mind was blown. The Detective stories : Take a bow Sherlock Holmes. Murders solved from carefully written diary entries, torn magazine covers, beedi butts under the bed and jasmine scented hankerchieves, again, conveniently dropped under the bed. But I must cut them some slack since one of these stories was written in 1967. Words : Most of the words and expressions were explained for non-Tamil readers in the glossary at the end except one. This is one word that I would love to use in a real life conversation someday : Jagadalapradhapan. I’ve been rolling it around on my tongue ever since I read it. While I would not buy the next volume of this anthology, I recommend this one. Pulp Fiction deserves its rightful place in Tamil Literature and this book gives you the right sized bite of it. Review here http://thebookstoryblog.wordpress.com...

  19. 4 out of 5

    Z

    It's been a while since I laughed out loud while reading a book, and this anthology gave me many opportunities to do so. I think these stories need to be understood in the context of the Tamil ethos and the kind of entertainment that is held dear by the average reader of Tamil pulp fiction. Don't take them too seriously. Some of the stories are written in a hilariously moralistic tone - Ramanichandran's "Dim Lights, Blazing Hearts" even has a girl who refuses the advances of a man she loves mere It's been a while since I laughed out loud while reading a book, and this anthology gave me many opportunities to do so. I think these stories need to be understood in the context of the Tamil ethos and the kind of entertainment that is held dear by the average reader of Tamil pulp fiction. Don't take them too seriously. Some of the stories are written in a hilariously moralistic tone - Ramanichandran's "Dim Lights, Blazing Hearts" even has a girl who refuses the advances of a man she loves merely because she suspects him of having had another girlfriend, and the author's very serious rationale is, "She was not prepared to feast on a used plate." (One of my big LOL moments.) Some others try to be modern but retain their disapproving undertones, such as Pattukottai Prabakar's "Sweetheart, please die!", a "modern-day" mystery where a girl who smokes pot and has sex is deemed to be "no innocent chick." Indra Soundar Rajan's "The Rebirth of Jeeva," a serious tale of reincarnation and revenge, includes such gems as "...when a voluptuous breast brushes against a man's broad chest, what need is there for special reactors to produce nuclear energy?" On a more serious note, it's clear that these stories have been carefully selected to represent various facets of Tamil pulp fiction and several of them provide real food for thought. Props to Vidya Subramaniam for "Me" and "Ripples," the only stories in here whose protagonists are independent, empowered working women seeking to forge their own paths through life. Pushpa Thangadorai's "My Name is Kamala" provides a haunting insight into the desperation of a prostitute. I would recommend this book highly to anyone somewhat familiar with Tamil culture.

  20. 4 out of 5

    Sam

    "Mad scientists! Hard-boiled detectives! Vengeful goddesses! Murderous robots! Scandalous starlets! Drug-fueled love affairs!"...so promises the back cover of this collection of 17 stories dating as far back as the 1960s. How could anyone resist? This is the first time these Tamil-language stories have been translated into English. The Tamil equivalent of the dime novels and potboilers we're familiar with, these have been the popular stories consumed by the masses through the years. So amidst the "Mad scientists! Hard-boiled detectives! Vengeful goddesses! Murderous robots! Scandalous starlets! Drug-fueled love affairs!"...so promises the back cover of this collection of 17 stories dating as far back as the 1960s. How could anyone resist? This is the first time these Tamil-language stories have been translated into English. The Tamil equivalent of the dime novels and potboilers we're familiar with, these have been the popular stories consumed by the masses through the years. So amidst the fun and kitsch, unbelievable coincidences, overwrought emotions, and doses of moral preaching, it was interesting to get glimpses of the concerns of society during the time periods when these were written--everything from government corruption, protecting the vulnerable, ensuring those who abuse power get their just desserts, family, marriage, women's roles... I liked that the anthology also includes a sampling of the lurid, weird, hilarious, and overall fantastic covers for these types novels and stories. In addition to the colorful, pulpy-goodness of the covers of gods and scantily-clad women carrying guns, there's one cover that has Christina Aguilera's picture on it, only the singer has been monster-fied with grayish skin, fangs, and blood dripping down her chin. What? Heh. Love. Not all of the stories were equally entertaining, however. I found the longer ones more absorbing than the 'blah' ones that took up only a pinchful of pages. All in all, though, it was a breezy way to while away a few hours.

  21. 4 out of 5

    Vismay

    So this book is the fount (or representative!) of all the Tamil movies which are dubbed into Hindi films and finally remade into Hindi films! Of course, time and again they are inspired by Hollywood (!!), and they make campy Hulk, Evil Robots, god-knows-what movies, also make an utter mess of Christopher Nolan's 'Memento (which was made into an even bigger mess by Aamir Khan), with extreme violence and rampant sexism. Though of course, these writers are so prodigious that originality has to shin So this book is the fount (or representative!) of all the Tamil movies which are dubbed into Hindi films and finally remade into Hindi films! Of course, time and again they are inspired by Hollywood (!!), and they make campy Hulk, Evil Robots, god-knows-what movies, also make an utter mess of Christopher Nolan's 'Memento (which was made into an even bigger mess by Aamir Khan), with extreme violence and rampant sexism. Though of course, these writers are so prodigious that originality has to shine through some of their works - which Bollywood then shamelessly copies. Originality in movies comes through original screenplay. When you have paucity of 'Pulp Fiction' writers, then you are eternally looking for ideas elsewhere. When we say that India doesn't have a large readership base, we are so wrong. 'Great Novel', 'Best Novel', 'Everest Novel', 'Ullaasa Oonjal' etc. are widely read by common people across Tamil Nadu. They are constantly churning out stories - detective, romance, poor man's sci-fi, which forms a staple for Tamil Movies and TV series. The collection in the 'Tamil Pulp Fiction' gives a flavor or a glimpse of a prodigious body of work that has been churning out and being consumed for so long. Isaac Asimov was a 'Pulp Fiction' writer (because sci-fi!), Michael Crichton started as a 'Pulp Fiction' writer - and all the 'Pulp Fiction' writers know how to keep their readers hooked. Maybe I should also start my journey through this route!

  22. 4 out of 5

    Dhiraj Sharma

    Tamil Pulp Fiction is an English compilation of stories originally published in Tamil by local authors. These are the stories you would either hate or love. Those looking for serious fiction, character development, in depth analysis and logical conclusions would be disappointed. Instead in these stories you will find detectives brilliant than Sherlock Holmes, unrealistic circumstances, out of the blue situations and abrupt endings. All stories get classified as "pulp fiction" genre which is gene Tamil Pulp Fiction is an English compilation of stories originally published in Tamil by local authors. These are the stories you would either hate or love. Those looking for serious fiction, character development, in depth analysis and logical conclusions would be disappointed. Instead in these stories you will find detectives brilliant than Sherlock Holmes, unrealistic circumstances, out of the blue situations and abrupt endings. All stories get classified as "pulp fiction" genre which is generally sold on the roadside and shabby bookstalls one usually finds next to bus and railway stations. Some stories are real good while others are crap stuff. But inspite of above I suggest you still give TPF and its Vol-II a try. You need to give kudos to the author's imagination and the publishers who compiled these anthologies in english translation. The book also has a small section in the middle which depicts the covers of all major novels. These covers speak a lot about the contents inside the book which is expected to excite or induce the potential buyer. After all this is primarily pulp fiction which has to appeal to the lowest denominator. Read these stories as if you are watching a B grade pot boiler and you won't be disappointed. Fans of Grisham, Crichton, Koontz, Clancy, Ludlum and Archer may please give TPF a wide berth.

  23. 5 out of 5

    M M

    The Blaft book is an uneven collection. There are two or three absolute sparklers, but the rest are somewhat pedestrian and obvious. I loved the brilliant wit and repartee of Pattukotai Prabakaran’s ‘Sweetheart, Please Die’ and the innuendo and bonhomie of Subha’s ‘Hurricane Vaij’, which were possibly the best stories in the book. Some of the stories are overtly preachy – offering a defence of a woman’s sexual rights, say, or urging honesty in a politician – and some involve mad scientists and t The Blaft book is an uneven collection. There are two or three absolute sparklers, but the rest are somewhat pedestrian and obvious. I loved the brilliant wit and repartee of Pattukotai Prabakaran’s ‘Sweetheart, Please Die’ and the innuendo and bonhomie of Subha’s ‘Hurricane Vaij’, which were possibly the best stories in the book. Some of the stories are overtly preachy – offering a defence of a woman’s sexual rights, say, or urging honesty in a politician – and some involve mad scientists and that old favourite of Indian films, reincarnation and revenge. I guess this is not surprising: they must appeal to the lowest denominator, and so become obvious and forced. Still, it’s heartening to see that the remarkably prodigious authors of the stories (some of whom have written thousands of tales and novellas) are often capable of superb and sophisticated imagination, refusing to pander to the base, and, fortunately for us, Pritham Chakravarthy has located several gems of the genre, and published them here.

  24. 5 out of 5

    Arun Divakar

    Southern India as much as I know is a fertile ground for pulp fiction. An entire generation of educated-but-unemployed women staved off boredom during the morose daytime hours in the company of fiction of the abovementioned genre. I have had my brush with this literary genre way before I even saw this book. The plot lines are simple but outrageously funny, the characters are nothing if not dramatic and its a fun ride. This anthology gets four stars owing only to the fun factor. Where else can you Southern India as much as I know is a fertile ground for pulp fiction. An entire generation of educated-but-unemployed women staved off boredom during the morose daytime hours in the company of fiction of the abovementioned genre. I have had my brush with this literary genre way before I even saw this book. The plot lines are simple but outrageously funny, the characters are nothing if not dramatic and its a fun ride. This anthology gets four stars owing only to the fun factor. Where else can you expect to meet a dashing detective who manages to get a hard-on while listening to the villain's plan for world domination ? or a protagonist who gets a sniper rifle from his friend "Abroad" and shoots a minster outright in broad daylight ?? If you get my drift then go get the book, shut down your brain and enjoy the ride. Such brainless fun is good for you once in a while too...

  25. 4 out of 5

    विकास नैनवाल

    The Blaft Anthology of Tamil Pulp Fictions incorporates the stories by some of the pioneer writers of the pulp fiction industry who write in Tamil. Here is the list of the stories with their ratings. I'll give 3.5/5 stars to the book as a whole. I loved it . Hurricane Vaij 3.5/5 Idhaya 2020 2.5/5 Matchstick Number One 4.5/5 Silicon Hearts 2.5/5 The Rainbow 2/5 The FLR 4.5/5 Me 2/5 Ripples 3.5/5 The Rebirth of Jeeva 3.5/5 The Rich Woman 1.5/5 Dim Lights, Blazing Hearts 2/5 Sweetheart, Please Die 3.5/5 My Name The Blaft Anthology of Tamil Pulp Fictions incorporates the stories by some of the pioneer writers of the pulp fiction industry who write in Tamil. Here is the list of the stories with their ratings. I'll give 3.5/5 stars to the book as a whole. I loved it . Hurricane Vaij 3.5/5 Idhaya 2020 2.5/5 Matchstick Number One 4.5/5 Silicon Hearts 2.5/5 The Rainbow 2/5 The FLR 4.5/5 Me 2/5 Ripples 3.5/5 The Rebirth of Jeeva 3.5/5 The Rich Woman 1.5/5 Dim Lights, Blazing Hearts 2/5 Sweetheart, Please Die 3.5/5 My Name is Kamla 3/5 Tokyo Rose 3/5 A murder and a Few Mysteries 2/5 Revenge 2.5/5 Glory to the love that kills! 3/5 After reading this collection i have purchased The Blaft Anthology of Tamil Pulp Fiction-Volume 2. I hope its as good as this one.

  26. 5 out of 5

    Peter

    From an interview with Rajesh Kumar: "I am sometimes accused of plagiarizing English novels. Let me tell you something: I never even read English novels. In the time I would have to take to read a thick English novel, I can write two novels myself. I do read books in English, but they are reference books relevant to my stories. Most are general knowledge and science books. If any of my readers still doubt me, they are welcome to come and search for English novels in my house." Wonderfully pleasura From an interview with Rajesh Kumar: "I am sometimes accused of plagiarizing English novels. Let me tell you something: I never even read English novels. In the time I would have to take to read a thick English novel, I can write two novels myself. I do read books in English, but they are reference books relevant to my stories. Most are general knowledge and science books. If any of my readers still doubt me, they are welcome to come and search for English novels in my house." Wonderfully pleasurable. Perhaps I'm hoping the reading some of the world's most prolific writers will have an impact on my own writing productivity?

  27. 4 out of 5

    Marcy

    This is not the usual sort of thing I would read, but I remember reading a review of this anthology in "The Guardian" a couple of years ago and so when I saw it in a shop, I decided I'd check it out. The volume is a mix of genre fiction: romance, science fiction, mystery. And as with most narratives of this sort they are quite entertaining, especially reading these types of stories all set in Tamil Nadu. Some are a bit overly religious, but it is interesting to see how that context shapes even a This is not the usual sort of thing I would read, but I remember reading a review of this anthology in "The Guardian" a couple of years ago and so when I saw it in a shop, I decided I'd check it out. The volume is a mix of genre fiction: romance, science fiction, mystery. And as with most narratives of this sort they are quite entertaining, especially reading these types of stories all set in Tamil Nadu. Some are a bit overly religious, but it is interesting to see how that context shapes even a murder mystery.

  28. 4 out of 5

    Michael

    Kind of interesting collection of Indian pulp fiction. Detective, sci-fi, romance and docudramas. The detective fiction reads like american pulp fiction from the 20's-30's, simple, sophmoric humor, pretty obvious stuff. Women are treated poorly in much of this writing although there are a couple of female authors represented for a more nuanced view. Overall, an entertaining, light read with not much subtlety.

  29. 5 out of 5

    Derek Davis

    OK, it ain't "lit" by any means, but the quality's all over the place. Some of the pieces could have been written by an eight-year-old, while others have a semi-sophisticated hand. I guess you could say the same of any pulp collection, anywhere. The main difference between this and American pulp seems to be that the audience for Tamil pulp was, and is, primarily women, homemakers looking for something to read in their down time, while the crime fiction in America was aimed at men.

  30. 5 out of 5

    Pooja T

    I picked this book up pretty much on a whim. I didn't really know what to expect and honestly bought this book because of its cover. The book though pleasantly surprised me, I really, really enjoyed it. From spunky detective duos to stories of sci-fi, reincarnation and even gentle love stories, this collection has it all. I loved these simply written stories and look forward to reading the second instalment of stories.

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