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"One of the funniest books I've read this year." --Boing Boing Absurd comics for our absurd times, from the artist behind the wildly popular webcomic Poorly Drawn Lines. In his follow up to the New York Times bestselling Poorly Drawn Lines, beloved webcomic artist Reza Farazmand returns with a new collection of comics that hilariously skewers our modern age. Comics for a St "One of the funniest books I've read this year." --Boing Boing Absurd comics for our absurd times, from the artist behind the wildly popular webcomic Poorly Drawn Lines. In his follow up to the New York Times bestselling Poorly Drawn Lines, beloved webcomic artist Reza Farazmand returns with a new collection of comics that hilariously skewers our modern age. Comics for a Strange World takes readers through time, space, and alternate realities, reuniting fans with favorite characters and presenting them with even more bizarre scenarios. A child is arrested for plagiarism. A squirrel adapts to human society by purchasing a cell phone--and a gun. And an old man shares memories of the Internet with his granddaughter ("A vast network of millions of idiots. Together, the idiots created endless shitty ideas. It was a true renaissance of shit."). In the world of Poorly Drawn Lines, nothing is too weird or too outlandish for parody. Featuring 50% brand new content alongside some of the most popular comics of the past year, Comics for a Strange World is the perfect antidote to life's absurdities.


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"One of the funniest books I've read this year." --Boing Boing Absurd comics for our absurd times, from the artist behind the wildly popular webcomic Poorly Drawn Lines. In his follow up to the New York Times bestselling Poorly Drawn Lines, beloved webcomic artist Reza Farazmand returns with a new collection of comics that hilariously skewers our modern age. Comics for a St "One of the funniest books I've read this year." --Boing Boing Absurd comics for our absurd times, from the artist behind the wildly popular webcomic Poorly Drawn Lines. In his follow up to the New York Times bestselling Poorly Drawn Lines, beloved webcomic artist Reza Farazmand returns with a new collection of comics that hilariously skewers our modern age. Comics for a Strange World takes readers through time, space, and alternate realities, reuniting fans with favorite characters and presenting them with even more bizarre scenarios. A child is arrested for plagiarism. A squirrel adapts to human society by purchasing a cell phone--and a gun. And an old man shares memories of the Internet with his granddaughter ("A vast network of millions of idiots. Together, the idiots created endless shitty ideas. It was a true renaissance of shit."). In the world of Poorly Drawn Lines, nothing is too weird or too outlandish for parody. Featuring 50% brand new content alongside some of the most popular comics of the past year, Comics for a Strange World is the perfect antidote to life's absurdities.

30 review for Comics for a Strange World: A Book of Poorly Drawn Lines

  1. 4 out of 5

    karen

    i liked this one a little bit less than Poorly Drawn Lines: Good Ideas and Amazing Stories. it’s the same kind of cutie-pie art and absurd/bleak humor, but it’s a more inconsistent collection - the jokes weren’t landing as well as in that first book. there’s a certain amount of obscurity to the humor, in both books - not quite in that smug new yorker cartoon way, where if you don’t “get it” you feel like an uncultured dunce, but you're forced to recalibrate what humor is in order to apprecia i liked this one a little bit less than Poorly Drawn Lines: Good Ideas and Amazing Stories. it’s the same kind of cutie-pie art and absurd/bleak humor, but it’s a more inconsistent collection - the jokes weren’t landing as well as in that first book. there’s a certain amount of obscurity to the humor, in both books - not quite in that smug new yorker cartoon way, where if you don’t “get it” you feel like an uncultured dunce, but you're forced to recalibrate what humor is in order to appreciate these quirky scenarios that are funny because weird/bewildering/absurd: and i’m cool with that for the most part, but there were too many pages like this one: which is cute, because every cat is cute, but doesn’t do much else. and some just hit a little too close to home to be funny right now the book is best when it’s just being goofy or...abrupt and even if the comedy payoff is sometimes lacking, at least the drawings are adorable: and i like its attacks on grammar-douches procrastinating ghosts thoughtless scientists humans in general but i am conflicted by this panel of a larger cartoon on the one hand - take that, bird! but also - mean to cats. i am torn. anyway - three stars worth of enjoyment. you’ll get some giggles, but don’t sell any family heirlooms to buy it or anything.

  2. 4 out of 5

    Kelly (and the Book Boar)

    Find all of my reviews at: http://52bookminimum.blogspot.com/ When I heard rumors over the weekend of the library potentially shutting down due to COVID-19 I did what any crazy normal bibliophile would do – instantly drove from the ‘burbs to downtown in order to check out allllllllllllllllllllllllllllllll the physical books I could hold – and I brought a kid with so we could double-down if necessary. (Speaking of double-down, I’m doing a twofer of Reza Farazmand comics here rather than separate r Find all of my reviews at: http://52bookminimum.blogspot.com/ When I heard rumors over the weekend of the library potentially shutting down due to COVID-19 I did what any crazy normal bibliophile would do – instantly drove from the ‘burbs to downtown in order to check out allllllllllllllllllllllllllllllll the physical books I could hold – and I brought a kid with so we could double-down if necessary. (Speaking of double-down, I’m doing a twofer of Reza Farazmand comics here rather than separate reviews because even if the world is ending I will remain lazy.) I actually was seeking Nathan Pyle’s Strange Planet when I went to the “OneNorth Collections” location of the Central Branch. Alas, that popular little new release was not to be found – but both of these were. And how could I resist “Comics For A Strange World?” I mean hell, no better time than the present for that title, right? Then yesterday I found myself in a situation I never would have imagined possible . . . . Work from home? With my Funko girl squad? What?!?!?!?! Now don’t get it twisted that I don’t believe WFH to be a thing that should be encouraged/required at this moment in time. I just so happen to work in an industry that has historically been led by old white men who are allergic to technological development. The idea of staff not being in the office or that projects could be completed efficiently not in a cube-farm is something that was simply unfathomable. However, times have changed and project requests have evolved and whether the powers-that-be are on board or not, they were forced to comply so there I was clacking away in a “pants optional” environment. But what to do about a lunch hour? I mean, I was already at home so there was no need to escape. Instead I pulled these two little selections from the leaning tower o’library stack and had a chuckle or twelve. Ernesto and Kev have, at minimum, a new fan and there’s about an 82% chance Kev and I were separated at birth (just waiting on that 23 and Me confirmation) . . . . There’s nothing I enjoy more than a darkly humorous take on the world and these deliver in spades. As one of the blurbs states in the form of a grandfather explaining the internet to his grandchild . . . . . “A vast network of millions of idiots. Together, the idiots created endless shitty ideas. It was a true renaissance of shit.” If you find yourself tired of wading through the shit, I highly recommend picking up something funny as a tiny break from reality. Now is a time where it is more important than ever to take care of yourself . . . . Keep your heads up. We’ll get through this.

  3. 4 out of 5

    Sarah Andersen

    Reza Farazmand has such a unique sense of humor and a wide array of characters. This book made me laugh out loud so many times. The “a little bird told me it’s your birthday” comic is probably one of the most genius comics ever written.

  4. 5 out of 5

    [Shai] Bibliophage

    Indeed strange, that's how I was able to perceived the comic strips are in this graphic novel. There are at least two that I found at least a little hilarious; but as for the rest, they just made me question on what the heck those comic strips really mean. I even question myself that maybe I didn't sense the meaning, but I'm quite certain that I'm not the only one who just didn't get it.

  5. 4 out of 5

    Schizanthus Nerd

    I read some of the comics twice to try and figure out what I was missing. I find most things funny including things that aren't supposed to be, yet I didn't even feel the beginning of a smile while reading this book. I tried really hard. Sorry, this one wasn't for me. I received a copy of this graphic novel from NetGalley (thank you very much to NetGalley and Plume Books, Penguin Group for the opportunity) in exchange for honest feedback.

  6. 5 out of 5

    Chad

    Absurd comics that are more boring than absurd. I liked Farazmand's first collection but these comics fell completely flat.

  7. 5 out of 5

    Rod Brown

    Not quite as strong as the first volume, but still hilarious as hell.

  8. 5 out of 5

    Jessica Rodrigues

    Alas, I just don't get it. A few pages made me chuckle, but overall, not my sense of humor. There's still something here for those who are into more dry, dry humor. I thought my humor was dry, but my humor is the center of a Boston cream donut compared to this. There's kind of a... hipster irony humor to it? It's the kind of humor that might make you exhale a little louder than normal through your nose, or raise your eyebrow for a sec, but not enough to elicit any genuine laughter. received via Net Alas, I just don't get it. A few pages made me chuckle, but overall, not my sense of humor. There's still something here for those who are into more dry, dry humor. I thought my humor was dry, but my humor is the center of a Boston cream donut compared to this. There's kind of a... hipster irony humor to it? It's the kind of humor that might make you exhale a little louder than normal through your nose, or raise your eyebrow for a sec, but not enough to elicit any genuine laughter. received via Netgalley

  9. 5 out of 5

    Cale

    There are some deeply cynical strips here, and a number that are very absurd. I don't think anything made me laugh out loud, but I did find a lot of humor, much of it very dark, in this collection. It's loosely divided into topical sections, but picking any out of the book will probably serve you well. Some of it manages to be topical and timely while also being timeless, which is a neat trick. The art isn't fancy, but it is perfectly functional. It's a quick read that most will enjoy. And a num There are some deeply cynical strips here, and a number that are very absurd. I don't think anything made me laugh out loud, but I did find a lot of humor, much of it very dark, in this collection. It's loosely divided into topical sections, but picking any out of the book will probably serve you well. Some of it manages to be topical and timely while also being timeless, which is a neat trick. The art isn't fancy, but it is perfectly functional. It's a quick read that most will enjoy. And a number of the strips may look familiar as they've floated around online.

  10. 4 out of 5

    Jessi ♥️ H. Vojsk

    I follow the artist on Instagram, so I knew some of the comics, but I still really liked it. They were so strange and some were really funny, so it's good as a present for friends with a weird (but cool) imagination. ✔️

  11. 4 out of 5

    Katie Lipovetsky

    A witty, heartfelt read that, at times, had abrasively jaw-dropping humor. Made for a great sit down read with my best friend :)

  12. 5 out of 5

    Jillyn

    It's hard not to know about Poorly Drawn Lines. These comics show up everywhere: Facebook, Twitter, Tumblr. You name it. And most of the time, I get a little chuckle at them. So I was happy to get a copy of this collection of comics. It's an okay book. The comics were hit and miss for me. Some were really relatable and made me snicker. Some I didn't find funny at all. It was kind of a mixed bag all around. I will say that in order to fully appreciate these comics, you have to have sort of a dry, It's hard not to know about Poorly Drawn Lines. These comics show up everywhere: Facebook, Twitter, Tumblr. You name it. And most of the time, I get a little chuckle at them. So I was happy to get a copy of this collection of comics. It's an okay book. The comics were hit and miss for me. Some were really relatable and made me snicker. Some I didn't find funny at all. It was kind of a mixed bag all around. I will say that in order to fully appreciate these comics, you have to have sort of a dry, cynical sense of humor. And be a little bit weird. The comics are divided into themes: The Human Experience, Social Creatures, Changes, A Strange World, and Thoughts on Things. If you're already familiar with the comics, you'd probably appreciate this book. If you're new, it might be a weird thing to read and get used to. In my opinion, if you have it it's worth reading, but it's not something I'd rush out and grab right away. I received a copy in exchange for my honest review.

  13. 5 out of 5

    Nancy

    This collected book of comic strips from the Poorly Drawn Lines website was the December pick for the I Read Comics Books bookclub. It was amusing, with minimalist drawings with typically four to five panels. However, the simple drawings don't necessarily mean simple ideas, as many of the strips were very clever with sly humor. Two animals showed up over and over again, a large green bear and a bluebird that looked suspiciously like the Pigeon from Mo Willem's children's books, that were funnier This collected book of comic strips from the Poorly Drawn Lines website was the December pick for the I Read Comics Books bookclub. It was amusing, with minimalist drawings with typically four to five panels. However, the simple drawings don't necessarily mean simple ideas, as many of the strips were very clever with sly humor. Two animals showed up over and over again, a large green bear and a bluebird that looked suspiciously like the Pigeon from Mo Willem's children's books, that were funnier than if a human character said the same thing. My favorite strips were the baby that plagiarized, the shapes club, asteroid plans, planets talking about life ("it's when a bunch of tiny organisms do sex on you") and the longer astronauts in a cave story. The author Reza Farazmand now joins Sarah Andersen's Sarah's Scribbles and Nick Seluk's Heart and Brain comics that I follow on Twitter for their insightful jokes.

  14. 5 out of 5

    Mortisha Cassavetes

    Oh what a cute book! I loved the graphics and it had me laughing out loud for real. This is my first book from this author and all of it was fresh and new. Very witty and a bit strange which I love. I would recommend this book to everyone who loves a chuckle.

  15. 5 out of 5

    Sadhika

    Reza Farazmand is a funny man, only if you can understand his dark humor. This book made me laugh out so loud so many times, however did not seem to click with a few of my friends whom I showed certain comic pages. It isn't a bookfor everyone, but I liked it personally.

  16. 5 out of 5

    Lenny

    Reza Farazmand's Comics for a Strange World is a collection of his webcomics that pokes fun at our society with gentle and amusing punchlines. The joke's on us, even if the protagonists include animals, aliens, the grim reaper on a journey of self discovery, and ghosts. Farazmand's humor is easy for everyone to understand and jump onto, especially since he focuses on topics like our dependence on technology, and (mostly) stays away from politics, gender, and other areas that could be considered Reza Farazmand's Comics for a Strange World is a collection of his webcomics that pokes fun at our society with gentle and amusing punchlines. The joke's on us, even if the protagonists include animals, aliens, the grim reaper on a journey of self discovery, and ghosts. Farazmand's humor is easy for everyone to understand and jump onto, especially since he focuses on topics like our dependence on technology, and (mostly) stays away from politics, gender, and other areas that could be considered divisive. Farazmand's art style is highly minimalist, which is a great style for web comics. Don't mistake minimalism for sloppy or easy to replicate - it's certainly better than anything I could have ever drawn, and it would probably have made a good newspaper strip comic back in the day too. He also uses a simple, pleasing, washed out color palette that doesn't once get in the way of his humor. The jokes were amusing, especially the animals pretending to be humans, and having recurring characters made a nice pattern even if there wasn't an overarching narrative. Overall, I chuckled a few times, but I didn't laugh out loud like Aminder Dhaliwal's Woman World, or Kate Beaton's Hark! A Vagrant. I got the jokes, it just wasn't a style of humor that resonated as much with me. But also, I think humor in comics is a really, really hard thing to accomplish, regardless of what *kind* of humor is right for you. You're essentially creating comedic timing in the space between panels, and the joke has to have both visual and written strength for it to land. I've seen it a lot, and seen it done well a lot, and I really respect those folks who are able to somehow make it work, because I have no idea how they do it. So I appreciate that this book *does* land for people even if it wasn't my cup of tea. This collection is a true three star rating for me. Not bad, but not great either.

  17. 4 out of 5

    Ariana

    This was a fun, silly collection of comic strips that really put a smile on my face. The simple and cute illustrations matched the humor very nicely. Some of the jokes didn’t quite work for me while others did—there was some level of obscurity with many of the comics, which maybe was not the best way to go about writing things. This may not be as accessible to everyone when the point of the collection weighs so heavily on your readers getting all the jokes. I thought that Farazmand went a little This was a fun, silly collection of comic strips that really put a smile on my face. The simple and cute illustrations matched the humor very nicely. Some of the jokes didn’t quite work for me while others did—there was some level of obscurity with many of the comics, which maybe was not the best way to go about writing things. This may not be as accessible to everyone when the point of the collection weighs so heavily on your readers getting all the jokes. I thought that Farazmand went a little overboard in that department. Overall though, this is a pretty humorous, quick read that will brighten your day. It’s not the best comic collection I’ve ever come across, but it was definitely enjoyable. I would recommend giving this a try if you are into dry but quirky humor!

  18. 4 out of 5

    Zedsdead

    A collection of minimalist, absurdist, ultra-dry comic strips. Non-serial. I typically love straight-faced or non-sequitur humor. So I was surprised when PDL didn't really land for me. But Comics for a Strange World did produce some winners: Man: "Some insects are so strong. Look at this beetle. His kids are going away to college. But he does not cry." KLOOB. The one device for everything. Talking box: "Tell KLOOB what you want!" Man: "A simple life and a swift death." Box: "Okay, damn. Well...KLOOB can A collection of minimalist, absurdist, ultra-dry comic strips. Non-serial. I typically love straight-faced or non-sequitur humor. So I was surprised when PDL didn't really land for me. But Comics for a Strange World did produce some winners: Man: "Some insects are so strong. Look at this beetle. His kids are going away to college. But he does not cry." KLOOB. The one device for everything. Talking box: "Tell KLOOB what you want!" Man: "A simple life and a swift death." Box: "Okay, damn. Well...KLOOB can reorder paper towels." Woman: "I only see the best in people." Death Incarnate: "What about me?" Woman: "Iconic style and a great work ethic." Blushing Death Incarnate: "Aww."

  19. 4 out of 5

    Adam M

    There are a lot of genuine laughs in this book. I've been a fan of these comics for a while and was more than happy to order this book for our library. It didn't disappoint. Reza Farazmand has a great, dead-pan style of comedy that really works for me. It's also feels contemporary, not because there are pop-culture reference everywhere, but because it's fresh and speaks to problems we're having now. Highly recommended for stress relief. There are a lot of genuine laughs in this book. I've been a fan of these comics for a while and was more than happy to order this book for our library. It didn't disappoint. Reza Farazmand has a great, dead-pan style of comedy that really works for me. It's also feels contemporary, not because there are pop-culture reference everywhere, but because it's fresh and speaks to problems we're having now. Highly recommended for stress relief.

  20. 5 out of 5

    mad mags

    Welcome to sideways world. (Full disclosure: I received a free electronic ARC for review through NetGalley and Edelweiss.) If you've ever read Reza Farazmand's web comic Poorly Drawn Lines , then you know more or less what you're in for here: irreverent humor, a dash of commonsense observations, and just the right about of black comedy. Comics for a Strange World is a bit hit-or-miss; a equal number of the pieces had me guffawing in happy shock as did those that stumbled and fell flat. A fair n Welcome to sideways world. (Full disclosure: I received a free electronic ARC for review through NetGalley and Edelweiss.) If you've ever read Reza Farazmand's web comic Poorly Drawn Lines , then you know more or less what you're in for here: irreverent humor, a dash of commonsense observations, and just the right about of black comedy. Comics for a Strange World is a bit hit-or-miss; a equal number of the pieces had me guffawing in happy shock as did those that stumbled and fell flat. A fair number seem a direct response to this crazy, heart-wrenching Drumpf era we now find ourselves in; see, e.g., the opening panel, which is the first of five favorites I included below. But don't worry: Ernesto the talking bear and his duck sidekick Kevin make several appearances, and this strange world is also populated with a fair number of talking animals, self-aware ghosts - and even a dinosaur packing heat. ("It's his right.") Try it! You won't be sorry, and you just might help Ernesto out of that slump. http://www.easyvegan.info/2017/10/24/...

  21. 5 out of 5

    Ellice

    In the introduction to this volume, Farazmand alludes to the rise of human beings, and some of the questionable ways they choose to live. Not surprisingly then, these comics are dark, perhaps even darker than the ones in his first book, Poorly Drawn Lines: Good Ideas and Amazing Stories—but they are equally hilarious. In an era when web comics proliferate, Farazmand’s are among the best. In the introduction to this volume, Farazmand alludes to the rise of human beings, and some of the questionable ways they choose to live. Not surprisingly then, these comics are dark, perhaps even darker than the ones in his first book, Poorly Drawn Lines: Good Ideas and Amazing Stories—but they are equally hilarious. In an era when web comics proliferate, Farazmand’s are among the best.

  22. 5 out of 5

    Josh

    A simple collection of comics, this books offers a cynical, twisted, funny, and delightfully relateable view on the human experience.

  23. 4 out of 5

    Dramapuppy

    I love these comics. They're so weird and existential.

  24. 4 out of 5

    Andrey

    Humor is not meant to be obvious, so obviously I have no choice, but to give this one 5 out of 5. Without doubt the funniest comic I've ever read.

  25. 4 out of 5

    Jenah Carter

    This was a birthday gift from an amazing friend and he went through and tagged all his favourite pages and then marked the ones that related most to the both of us. So, it made a hilarious book sentimental as well.

  26. 5 out of 5

    Alec Rigdon

    An excellent collection of comics by Poorly Drawn Lines. A laugh per page and a surprising amount of contemplative moments.

  27. 4 out of 5

    Audrey Adamson Stars in Her Eye

    Created to poke fun of the absurdity of our world, Comics for a Strange World aims to poke fun at modern life and humanity. Unfortunately, instead of being funny, it gets rather depressing. I like the comic style but the comic's tone is beak. There are a few that are smart and humorous. While I never laughed out loud, I was highly amused by a handful. I also liked the length. So many books of comics ends before you really even get started. Over all, I was underwhelmed by this selection of comics Created to poke fun of the absurdity of our world, Comics for a Strange World aims to poke fun at modern life and humanity. Unfortunately, instead of being funny, it gets rather depressing. I like the comic style but the comic's tone is beak. There are a few that are smart and humorous. While I never laughed out loud, I was highly amused by a handful. I also liked the length. So many books of comics ends before you really even get started. Over all, I was underwhelmed by this selection of comics. I received an ARC from NetGalley for an honest review.

  28. 5 out of 5

    StephanieNicole

    4.75 stars instead of 5 because of "weird hyphenations"* If you like the previous book or the web comics, you'll like this book. This book only has comics, no flash stories. *My only gripe is that some of the comics have weird hyphenations. For example, on page 19, the word "compare" is hyphenated "com-pare" with "-pare" on a second line, which seems unnecessary. This is done frequently, so frequently that I'm not certain if it is for comedic effect or not, but I found it distracting.

  29. 4 out of 5

    Wayne McCoy

    'Comics for a Strange World: A Book of Poorly Drawn Lines' by Reza Farazmand is the second collection in the Poorly Drawn Lines series I've read. Either the series has gotten funnier, or my sense of humor has changed. I reviewed the first volume of comics by this author/artist and didn't find much to laugh at. This time around, I was pleasantly surprised. The punch lines seem to hit better and are funnier. Maybe my favorite is about the guy whose beard grows longer as he imbibes stronger caffeine 'Comics for a Strange World: A Book of Poorly Drawn Lines' by Reza Farazmand is the second collection in the Poorly Drawn Lines series I've read. Either the series has gotten funnier, or my sense of humor has changed. I reviewed the first volume of comics by this author/artist and didn't find much to laugh at. This time around, I was pleasantly surprised. The punch lines seem to hit better and are funnier. Maybe my favorite is about the guy whose beard grows longer as he imbibes stronger caffeine, until finally: tea! The comic art is the same. Mostly droll faced humans and animals staring at the fourth wall. They are simply drawn figures, but that makes for clarity to the reader, and doesn't make them poorly drawn. I received a review copy of this ebook from Penguin Group Blue Rider Press and Plume, and NetGalley in exchange for an honest review. Thank you for allowing me to review this ebook.

  30. 4 out of 5

    Ryan

    While this is not my type of humor, and there seems to be no real ebb and flow to the comics within, it was an okay read. The strips were divided into major groupings which helped, but it is a very dry sense of humor. Fans of Dilbert will enjoy these strips.

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