free hit counter code White Rat: Stories (Harlem Moon Classics) - GoBooks - Download Free Book
Ads Banner
Hot Best Seller

White Rat: Stories (Harlem Moon Classics)

Availability: Ready to download

Originally published in 1977, White Rat contains twelve provocative tales that explore the emotional and mental terrain of a diverse cast of characters, from the innocent to the insane. In each, Jones displays her unflinching ability to dive into the most treacherous of psyches and circumstances: the title story examines the identity and relationship conundrums of a black m Originally published in 1977, White Rat contains twelve provocative tales that explore the emotional and mental terrain of a diverse cast of characters, from the innocent to the insane. In each, Jones displays her unflinching ability to dive into the most treacherous of psyches and circumstances: the title story examines the identity and relationship conundrums of a black man who can pass for white, earning him the name �White Rat� as an infant; �The Women� follows a girl whose mother brings a line of female lovers to live in their home; �Jevata� details eighteen-year-old Freddy�s relationship with the fifty-year-old title character; �The Coke Factory� tracks the thoughts of a mentally handicapped adolescent abandoned by his mother; and �Asylum� focuses on a woman having a nervous breakdown, trying to protect her dignity and her private parts as she enters an institution. In uncompromising prose, and dialect that veers from northern, educated tongues to down-home southern colloquialisms, Jones illuminates lives that society ignores, moving them to center stage.


Compare
Ads Banner

Originally published in 1977, White Rat contains twelve provocative tales that explore the emotional and mental terrain of a diverse cast of characters, from the innocent to the insane. In each, Jones displays her unflinching ability to dive into the most treacherous of psyches and circumstances: the title story examines the identity and relationship conundrums of a black m Originally published in 1977, White Rat contains twelve provocative tales that explore the emotional and mental terrain of a diverse cast of characters, from the innocent to the insane. In each, Jones displays her unflinching ability to dive into the most treacherous of psyches and circumstances: the title story examines the identity and relationship conundrums of a black man who can pass for white, earning him the name �White Rat� as an infant; �The Women� follows a girl whose mother brings a line of female lovers to live in their home; �Jevata� details eighteen-year-old Freddy�s relationship with the fifty-year-old title character; �The Coke Factory� tracks the thoughts of a mentally handicapped adolescent abandoned by his mother; and �Asylum� focuses on a woman having a nervous breakdown, trying to protect her dignity and her private parts as she enters an institution. In uncompromising prose, and dialect that veers from northern, educated tongues to down-home southern colloquialisms, Jones illuminates lives that society ignores, moving them to center stage.

30 review for White Rat: Stories (Harlem Moon Classics)

  1. 4 out of 5

    Jonathan

    As with any collection of short stories, not everything hit the mark for me, but when she does she is spectacular. Her use of voice in particular continues to be deeply impressive.

  2. 4 out of 5

    J-L

    I'm not sure that all of those pieces work as short stories but in lesser hands, I suspect they might have been disastrous. Gayl Jones' faith in the culture and history of Black Americans is moving and of course, ripe with stories that are aching to be recorded because in real life, for a number of characters such as the ones in these stories, there is perhaps no language to voice their pains. Jones gives as much consideration, lucidity and dignity to those who wrestle mental illness and traum I'm not sure that all of those pieces work as short stories but in lesser hands, I suspect they might have been disastrous. Gayl Jones' faith in the culture and history of Black Americans is moving and of course, ripe with stories that are aching to be recorded because in real life, for a number of characters such as the ones in these stories, there is perhaps no language to voice their pains. Jones gives as much consideration, lucidity and dignity to those who wrestle mental illness and trauma as those who--on the surface anyway--do not. Aside from exploring racial and historical legacies, a number of these stories also tackle sexual identity and its impact of bystanders--most notably the girl narrator in 'The Women,' whose sexuality blossoms as her mother's affairs with different women increase over time. This is perhaps why the language, and especially the narrative structure, of those stories defy convention in order to mirror internal chaos and the narrators' attempts to make sense of it all--including the tension between the uneducated, and the professors and doctors who want to define them. Although bleak and stark, these stories are not devoid of light; as Jones herself has stated: "the answer sometimes comes in the telling."

  3. 5 out of 5

    Aileen M

    I enjoy short stories because instead of having a beginning, middle, and end, it's just the middle. But there's still a finality to each story that makes it feel complete when you finish reading it. This book of stories is very well written, and uses so many different voices and personalities it's amazing that it's so easily bundled up into one book.

  4. 5 out of 5

    Black Bibliophile

    I never wanted each one to end...

  5. 5 out of 5

    Gregory Duke

    3.5 Gayl Jones' amazing sense of voice permeates all the of the stories included here, and there were some generally wonderful highlights (White Rat, The Women, Asylum, The Coke Factory, The Roundhouse, A Quiet Place for the Summer) that handle race, neurodivergence, sexuality both heteronormative and queer, and, of course, even more of her complexity difficult relationships. There were some duds that weren't disastrous and even had some fascinating choices, but they just didn't work at all emoti 3.5 Gayl Jones' amazing sense of voice permeates all the of the stories included here, and there were some generally wonderful highlights (White Rat, The Women, Asylum, The Coke Factory, The Roundhouse, A Quiet Place for the Summer) that handle race, neurodivergence, sexuality both heteronormative and queer, and, of course, even more of her complexity difficult relationships. There were some duds that weren't disastrous and even had some fascinating choices, but they just didn't work at all emotionally or thematically enough for me, which I think is more of an issue, because I expect so much from Jones after having loved the three novels of hers I've read so intensely. This feels like more of an early formative bridge between Eva's Man to The Healing in its application of dialect, so there's an interestingly visible trajectory she is going on as an author as you read through this slim collection. Alas, even the least successful Gayl Jones is more successful than most authorial careers.

  6. 4 out of 5

    Madeline

    White Rat is a collection of very human short stories. They are sometimes brutal, and sometimes intensely compassionate.

  7. 4 out of 5

    Inda

    Gonna write an entire review on the blog later but let's just say this book got me shook.

  8. 4 out of 5

    Stephanie

  9. 4 out of 5

    Jennifer M.

  10. 4 out of 5

    Shemaine

  11. 4 out of 5

    LaShonda Katrice Barnett

  12. 5 out of 5

    Angela Zagumennyy

  13. 5 out of 5

    Robert Lashley

  14. 5 out of 5

    Zentejano

  15. 5 out of 5

    Kim Anderson

  16. 5 out of 5

    Jeni

  17. 5 out of 5

    Brandon Prince

  18. 4 out of 5

    Bria Feliciano

  19. 5 out of 5

    Sheree

  20. 5 out of 5

    Catcami00

  21. 5 out of 5

    Kagwiria

  22. 4 out of 5

    Maurice Pogue

  23. 5 out of 5

    Melissa

  24. 4 out of 5

    M.b. Turner

  25. 5 out of 5

    Brainchild

  26. 4 out of 5

    SydnieRogers

  27. 5 out of 5

    Andrea Ta-wil

  28. 4 out of 5

    Jess

  29. 5 out of 5

    Lauren

  30. 4 out of 5

    Mocha Girl

Add a review

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Loading...
We use cookies to give you the best online experience. By using our website you agree to our use of cookies in accordance with our cookie policy.