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The Many Deaths of Scott Koblish: (Dark Humor Comics, Adult Comics, Deadpool Illustrator Book)

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Marvel Comics artist Scott Koblish (Deadpool, Spider-Man) has been illustrating his own demise for many years in morbidly funny, 4-panel black-and-white comics. He's the one person struck by a comet, suddenly overrun by a pack of baboons, resting under the precarious rock tipped by a single bird, or the target of his daughter's (of course homicidal) teddy bear come to life Marvel Comics artist Scott Koblish (Deadpool, Spider-Man) has been illustrating his own demise for many years in morbidly funny, 4-panel black-and-white comics. He's the one person struck by a comet, suddenly overrun by a pack of baboons, resting under the precarious rock tipped by a single bird, or the target of his daughter's (of course homicidal) teddy bear come to life. Though it's always Scott on the receiving end, the comics perfectly capture that irrational feeling we all have that everything can go very wrong in one irrevocable instant. Slapstick, surreal, and eerily plausible, with extended scenarios and pops of color throughout, this collection of cosmic reckonings shows that, if the end is nigh, at least you'll die laughing.


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Marvel Comics artist Scott Koblish (Deadpool, Spider-Man) has been illustrating his own demise for many years in morbidly funny, 4-panel black-and-white comics. He's the one person struck by a comet, suddenly overrun by a pack of baboons, resting under the precarious rock tipped by a single bird, or the target of his daughter's (of course homicidal) teddy bear come to life Marvel Comics artist Scott Koblish (Deadpool, Spider-Man) has been illustrating his own demise for many years in morbidly funny, 4-panel black-and-white comics. He's the one person struck by a comet, suddenly overrun by a pack of baboons, resting under the precarious rock tipped by a single bird, or the target of his daughter's (of course homicidal) teddy bear come to life. Though it's always Scott on the receiving end, the comics perfectly capture that irrational feeling we all have that everything can go very wrong in one irrevocable instant. Slapstick, surreal, and eerily plausible, with extended scenarios and pops of color throughout, this collection of cosmic reckonings shows that, if the end is nigh, at least you'll die laughing.

30 review for The Many Deaths of Scott Koblish: (Dark Humor Comics, Adult Comics, Deadpool Illustrator Book)

  1. 5 out of 5

    Chad

    This is exactly what the title says. Koblish has dreamed up many inventive to off himself. The author is a gifted visual storyteller as he wordlessly sets up his little premises for his demise. A quick, darkly funny read. Received an advance copy from Chronicle Books and NetGalley. All thoughts are my own and in now way influenced by the aforementioned.

  2. 5 out of 5

    Jim

    This was genius! The best artists can tell stories without words. And this artist is excellent at telling such a diverse range of stories without a single dialogue bubble. Well, as diverse as you can be when every comic has the same result. But take a look at these - they are hilarious. I don’t know if reading them in one sitting makes them more or less funny, but I read it, then I read it with my girlfriend and they were just as funny the second time through. Thanks to NetGalley and Chronicle B This was genius! The best artists can tell stories without words. And this artist is excellent at telling such a diverse range of stories without a single dialogue bubble. Well, as diverse as you can be when every comic has the same result. But take a look at these - they are hilarious. I don’t know if reading them in one sitting makes them more or less funny, but I read it, then I read it with my girlfriend and they were just as funny the second time through. Thanks to NetGalley and Chronicle Books for a copy in return for an honest review.

  3. 5 out of 5

    Devin Warner

    This was an incredibly dark and funny book as creator Scott Koblish imagines his own death in different over the top ways. Koblish's illustrations are terrific as always and a truly unsung hero of the comics world (everyone should look at the hundreds of characters he squeezed on to the cover of the Deadpool wedding issue). While I know this type of humor may not be for everyone this will delight anyone who has a taste for dark humor.

  4. 5 out of 5

    Molly

    Scott Koblish dies a lot. Sometimes it takes him one page to die, sometimes two, but he always ends. This is a delightful wordless graphic novel collecting exactly what its title implies: the many deaths of Scott Koblish. My favorites are the meta-panels, in which his own drawings become the bringers of his doom - oh, and the snowglobe he recklessly shakes, not realizing that it will cause the parallel universe where he lives to collapse under a violent earthquake. Pretty fun. I received access t Scott Koblish dies a lot. Sometimes it takes him one page to die, sometimes two, but he always ends. This is a delightful wordless graphic novel collecting exactly what its title implies: the many deaths of Scott Koblish. My favorites are the meta-panels, in which his own drawings become the bringers of his doom - oh, and the snowglobe he recklessly shakes, not realizing that it will cause the parallel universe where he lives to collapse under a violent earthquake. Pretty fun. I received access to this book via NetGalley in exchange for an honest review

  5. 5 out of 5

    Philip Obaza

    As dark as it is amusing. While I laughed out loud at a few of these strips, others were simply fine. A quick, easy, entertaining read.

  6. 4 out of 5

    Christian

    Really quick, fun and morbidly funny read. Reminds me of a jauntier Edward Gorey.

  7. 4 out of 5

    Dean Simons

    Incredibly funny, often unexpected and occasionally profound. Only let down by the predictable ones in the bunch. Recommended.

  8. 4 out of 5

    Jenny Houle

    The book is exactly as the title sounds...it's a comic book that depicts THE MANY DEATHS OF SCOTT KOBLISH, from an avalanche happening where he's looking out at a scenic overlook and dumping him down the hill, to the Grim Reaper handing him a fork to get burning toast stuck in a toaster to Scott Koblish dying of waiting for someone to stop at his booth at a comic convention to running from a T-Rex, only to get hit by a bus. The illustrations are well done. I'm not sure what I was expecting that I The book is exactly as the title sounds...it's a comic book that depicts THE MANY DEATHS OF SCOTT KOBLISH, from an avalanche happening where he's looking out at a scenic overlook and dumping him down the hill, to the Grim Reaper handing him a fork to get burning toast stuck in a toaster to Scott Koblish dying of waiting for someone to stop at his booth at a comic convention to running from a T-Rex, only to get hit by a bus. The illustrations are well done. I'm not sure what I was expecting that I didn't get it, but overall, it was not...super exciting.

  9. 4 out of 5

    Greagh

    This comic was beautiful drawn and a true laugh, each death straddled the line between possibility and irrational fear. Scott Koblish encompasses all the unexpected possibilities of death that will have you questioning your cat and how close you want to sit next to the window.

  10. 4 out of 5

    Susie Wang

    In this fairly enjoyable comic about ways to die, Scott Koblish imagines a ton of different ways to go. There are some moments in this book that made me think, Hey, I've thought about that too! It's pretty obvious Scott suffers from acute imagination of his cat running him over and forces him to descend to his death. It's like how everyone thinks about what would happen if their phones fall off the bridge. It's hilarious as it is relate-able. It was also a very quick read. I read it in between wor In this fairly enjoyable comic about ways to die, Scott Koblish imagines a ton of different ways to go. There are some moments in this book that made me think, Hey, I've thought about that too! It's pretty obvious Scott suffers from acute imagination of his cat running him over and forces him to descend to his death. It's like how everyone thinks about what would happen if their phones fall off the bridge. It's hilarious as it is relate-able. It was also a very quick read. I read it in between works in two sittings. And the only reason I didn't finish it in one sitting was because I had to get back to work. A good way to spend your coffee break.

  11. 4 out of 5

    David Lipely

    Amazing! An all art masterpiece! Even without words, it speaks volumes! Hilarious!

  12. 5 out of 5

    Cale

    I've got another death for you - death by tedium. I'm sorry, but few of the deaths in this collection are in any way creative. A shot causing an avalanche, being carried away by a fishing line or by balloons. These are cliches, not creative. And literally four of the strips all feature a cat pushing a person out of the window. The fourth I'll give him because of the circumstances it takes place in, but otherwise, it's the same gag, and it wasn't funny the first time. The art is fine; the use of I've got another death for you - death by tedium. I'm sorry, but few of the deaths in this collection are in any way creative. A shot causing an avalanche, being carried away by a fishing line or by balloons. These are cliches, not creative. And literally four of the strips all feature a cat pushing a person out of the window. The fourth I'll give him because of the circumstances it takes place in, but otherwise, it's the same gag, and it wasn't funny the first time. The art is fine; the use of spot color a little strange but understandable. But good art doesn't overcome a lot of boring situations. There are a few that are innovative (the stolen sign, although it too is pretty well used), but for me there were a lot more misses than there were hits. If you're going to try to make death funny, you really need to be more outlandish or absurd.

  13. 5 out of 5

    Paul

    LOOK OUT SCOTT! You might choke yourself on “The Most Important Meal of the Day” or those pigeons may literally bite the hand that feeds them… Thank you to NetGalley, Chronicle Books, and Mr. Koblish for the advanced copy for review. Full review can be found here: https://paulspicks.blog/2018/04/12/th... Please check out all my reviews: https://paulspicks.blog LOOK OUT SCOTT! You might choke yourself on “The Most Important Meal of the Day” or those pigeons may literally bite the hand that feeds them… Thank you to NetGalley, Chronicle Books, and Mr. Koblish for the advanced copy for review. Full review can be found here: https://paulspicks.blog/2018/04/12/th... Please check out all my reviews: https://paulspicks.blog

  14. 5 out of 5

    Eamonn Murphy

    ‘The Many Deaths Of Scott Koblish’ is a small hardback coffee table book by comic artist Scott Koblish (Spider-Man, Deadpool) in which he contemplates ways he might meet the Grim Reaper. There are fantasy and SF elements to several of these extinctions which, along with his status as a super-hero artist, qualify it for inclusion on this website. Largely in black and white but with odd splashes of colour, these are mostly one page, four-panel cartoons in which Scott Koblish meets his doom. Some st ‘The Many Deaths Of Scott Koblish’ is a small hardback coffee table book by comic artist Scott Koblish (Spider-Man, Deadpool) in which he contemplates ways he might meet the Grim Reaper. There are fantasy and SF elements to several of these extinctions which, along with his status as a super-hero artist, qualify it for inclusion on this website. Largely in black and white but with odd splashes of colour, these are mostly one page, four-panel cartoons in which Scott Koblish meets his doom. Some stretch to three pages so I assume he did them for his own amusement in idle moments and eventually had enough to make a book. These are all ‘silent’ strips with no dialogue or captions at all and the material is suitable for children. That’s gotta be a potentially big market and the lack of dialogue makes it good for international distribution. So, what’s in it? The first page shows Scott leaning against a rock atop which a huge boulder is precariously balanced. A bird lands on one end of the boulder and it falls on our hero. No gore, he’s just obscured from view underneath it. On page two, he falls off a mountain while skiing. On page three, he’s sat on the ledge of an open window when a cat jumps in his lap and he falls out. Then he’s killed by an earthquake, strangled by his own malevolent hair, wafted into space by helium balloons (a 2 pager) and so on and so on. These bare descriptions don’t convey the humour of the pictorial representation. Many are far out with Scott being eaten by trees, kidnapped by aliens and starving to death at a comic convention waiting for someone to buy his sketches. Sea monsters also feature quite a lot. My favourite has Scott walking along looking at his phone, run over by a driver who’s looking at her phone and photographed by all the bystanders using their phones. What else can I say? The hardcover version is a tidy little book printed on quality paper. It’s quite amusing and won’t take up much of your time. The kids will like it. It’s ideal for putting on the coffee table for guests to pick up and peruse while you’re making tea. It’s an odd thing to publish but certainly no worse than the celebrity joke books and memoirs that come out at Christmas time. In fact, the Christmas season would have been the right time to release it as it makes a decent little stocking filler for almost anyone, even if they can’t read. It’s nice. Eamonn Murphy

  15. 4 out of 5

    mad mags

    Not for the chronically anxious. (Full disclosure: I received a free book for review through Library Thing's Early Reviewers program.) -- 2.5 stars -- The Many Deaths of Scott Koblish is exactly what it sounds like: the author's weird and varied imaginings of how he might meet his end. The scenarios range from the mundane-yet-tragic (being buried in an avalanche; dying in a festive house fire) to the more bizarre and outlandish (being kidnapped by aliens only to die in a fiery wreck when the US gov Not for the chronically anxious. (Full disclosure: I received a free book for review through Library Thing's Early Reviewers program.) -- 2.5 stars -- The Many Deaths of Scott Koblish is exactly what it sounds like: the author's weird and varied imaginings of how he might meet his end. The scenarios range from the mundane-yet-tragic (being buried in an avalanche; dying in a festive house fire) to the more bizarre and outlandish (being kidnapped by aliens only to die in a fiery wreck when the US government shoots your flying saucer down; being murdered in the night by your daughter's adorable stuffed teddy bear). My personal favorites are those that involve nonhuman animals getting revenge (such as the kangaroo boxer who stomps his human opponent to death. down with animal fighting!). There are no fewer than five instances of cats sending an unsuspecting Scott Koblish plummeting out a window to his death. It's a cute enough idea, if not terribly memorable. Well, unless you're scared of clowns, alligators, or dying in unclean undies. Then some of these panels just might keep you awake at night. No death by sheer embarrassment, though, so I'm safe! :) http://www.easyvegan.info/2018/12/04/...

  16. 4 out of 5

    Wayne McCoy

    Scott Koblish is an artist with Marvel comics who has worked on titles like Deadpool, Spider-Man, and Thor. In 'The Many Deaths of Scott Koblish' he draws a collection of ways he might die. From the realistic (falling down a mountain) to the fantastic (being abducted by aliens), there are pages of ways that the author could meet his demise. They are all told in pictures only with no dialogue. There is one recurring gag that I found especially funny. They are morbidly dark, but they appealed to my Scott Koblish is an artist with Marvel comics who has worked on titles like Deadpool, Spider-Man, and Thor. In 'The Many Deaths of Scott Koblish' he draws a collection of ways he might die. From the realistic (falling down a mountain) to the fantastic (being abducted by aliens), there are pages of ways that the author could meet his demise. They are all told in pictures only with no dialogue. There is one recurring gag that I found especially funny. They are morbidly dark, but they appealed to my sense of humor. The art is pretty good, and the situations are pretty imaginative. This book reminded me a bit of the parts of Groundhog Day where a character attempts many times to kill themselves. More recently this was done in the movie Doctor Strange. These sequences, and the comics in this book can remind us that we are all mortal, but that's no reason not to get a laugh in about it. I received a review copy of this ebook from Chronicle Books and NetGalley in exchange for an honest review. Thank you for allowing me to review this graphic novel.

  17. 5 out of 5

    Kim

    This wordless collection of comics is so funny and fantastic. Each mini story (usually 4 panels or so) depicts the author/illustrator dying in a random and weird way. It sounds kind of morbid, but it is actually really funny. There are alien abductions, weird supernatural events, space accidents, cases of bad luck, etc. There are no words or dialogue, but sometimes the title of the "story" provides an added punch line. Even without words, the way the characters are drawn shows so much personalit This wordless collection of comics is so funny and fantastic. Each mini story (usually 4 panels or so) depicts the author/illustrator dying in a random and weird way. It sounds kind of morbid, but it is actually really funny. There are alien abductions, weird supernatural events, space accidents, cases of bad luck, etc. There are no words or dialogue, but sometimes the title of the "story" provides an added punch line. Even without words, the way the characters are drawn shows so much personality and emotion. I read this book in the car as I was waiting to pick up the kids at school and I am sure other parents were wondering why the crazy mom was laughing out loud by herself. All four of my kids read it too and it was fun to hear their laughter from various corners of the house as they passed it around.

  18. 5 out of 5

    Rod Brown

    Scott Koblish kills himself off over and over in these one- or two-page gags, and despite the inherent repetition, he keeps it stupid fun throughout. My favorite is "Cooties." Fans of such variations-on-a-theme humor should also check out Et Tu, Brute?: The Deaths of the Roman Emperors, Spy vs. Spy or My Neighbor Seki, Vol. 1. Scott Koblish kills himself off over and over in these one- or two-page gags, and despite the inherent repetition, he keeps it stupid fun throughout. My favorite is "Cooties." Fans of such variations-on-a-theme humor should also check out Et Tu, Brute?: The Deaths of the Roman Emperors, Spy vs. Spy or My Neighbor Seki, Vol. 1.

  19. 5 out of 5

    Travis

    I feel like I've read something before with a very similar theme; maybe The Book of Bunny Suicides, though the deaths here are more accidental than intentional. Anyway, it is an enjoyably humorous collection with a good mix of types of death: straightforward but funny ones, running gags (like a cat knocking him out windows/off railings), and some unexpected twist deaths. Also, most scenarios fit on one page, but there are the occasional ones that take two or more pages to tell, and the author do I feel like I've read something before with a very similar theme; maybe The Book of Bunny Suicides, though the deaths here are more accidental than intentional. Anyway, it is an enjoyably humorous collection with a good mix of types of death: straightforward but funny ones, running gags (like a cat knocking him out windows/off railings), and some unexpected twist deaths. Also, most scenarios fit on one page, but there are the occasional ones that take two or more pages to tell, and the author does a good job with the build up on those.

  20. 4 out of 5

    April

    This book is a bit disturbing and strange. However, I found it morbidly funny. I've never seen a character as unlucky as Scott. If it's something bad, it will most likely happen to this character. I'm hoping that the author of this isn't as unlucky as the character he is using to portray himself as. If he is, that is one unlucky man.

  21. 5 out of 5

    Rebecca

    I received a free copy of this book from the publisher (via LibraryThing) in exchange for an honest review. I really enjoyed this little collection. It can be read through in a few minutes, and I've laughed each time I've read through it. Each strip features a death that range from plausible, and some that are spectacularly sci-fi. I really liked the mix of common and absurd. I love the one featuring the grill. That has almost happened to my husband so many times. . . If you take one thing away I received a free copy of this book from the publisher (via LibraryThing) in exchange for an honest review. I really enjoyed this little collection. It can be read through in a few minutes, and I've laughed each time I've read through it. Each strip features a death that range from plausible, and some that are spectacularly sci-fi. I really liked the mix of common and absurd. I love the one featuring the grill. That has almost happened to my husband so many times. . . If you take one thing away from this book, let it be this: A cat is probably going to kill you someday.

  22. 5 out of 5

    Lori

    Thanks to Netgalley for the ARC. This clever book is about a quarter too long. The cartoons start to repeat in a way that irritates rather than entertains. My favorite running gag involves my favorite feline pet. If your sense of humor runs dark you will likely get a kick out of this.

  23. 5 out of 5

    Algernon Swift

    A genuinely funny book running the range from safely silly to impressively dark at times. Art is effortless and stories are short and sweet, mostly running just four panels. A good Father’s Day gift, or for people whose tastes run along the lines of Charles Addams or Edward Gorey.

  24. 5 out of 5

    Jess

    Such a fun and cute book. I wish that they would have put the part in the end about how Scott would draw these when he was bored just for himself earlier, like I was wondering the whole time why Scott kept dying the whole time. Overall a great cute storybook with creative ideas.

  25. 5 out of 5

    Mary

    Well, it's not the Gashlycrumb Tinies. (Fantastic) About the author says: For many year, he has also been drawing his own death for his own amusement. Yep. His own amusement. Should have kept them to himself.

  26. 4 out of 5

    Jessica

    Never have so many hilarious deaths been depicted in a book before. To choose a favorite would be unfair to the others. I very nearly laughed myself to death. (That’s a free idea for the next volume!)

  27. 5 out of 5

    Paul Veldhouse

    20 minutes of fun laughs with my grade and middle school boys. A super quick “read” as it’s all illustrations. He thinks like my kids do and it’s been a fun reference point for some household jokes now. Beware the cat!

  28. 5 out of 5

    Kelly

    I sorta liked this, but have a feeling I probably shouldn't have. :)

  29. 4 out of 5

    Patty

    Adorable and inventive.

  30. 4 out of 5

    Caitlin Searcy

    Fun, quick read

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