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Dear Madam President: An Open Letter to the Women Who Will Run the World

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Redefine the expectations for women in leadership roles with this #1 New York Times bestselling volume of inspiring advice by the former communications director for Barack Obama and Hillary Clinton. Framed as an empowering letter from former Hillary Clinton Communications Director Jennifer Palmieri to the first woman president, and by extension, to all women working to succ Redefine the expectations for women in leadership roles with this #1 New York Times bestselling volume of inspiring advice by the former communications director for Barack Obama and Hillary Clinton. Framed as an empowering letter from former Hillary Clinton Communications Director Jennifer Palmieri to the first woman president, and by extension, to all women working to succeed in any field, Dear Madam President is filled with forward-thinking, practical advice for all women who are determined to seize control of their lives-from boardroom to living room. As a country, we haven't wrapped our heads around what it should look like for a woman to be in the job of President. Our only models are men. While wildly disappointed by the outcome of the 2016 election, Palmieri argues that our feelings-confusion, love, hate, acceptance-can now open the country up to reimagining women in leadership roles. And that is what Palmieri takes on in this book-redefining expectations for women looking to lead and creating a blueprint for women candidates and leaders to follow. Dear Madam President will turn the results of the 2016 election into something incredibly empowering for graduates, future female leaders, and independent thinkers everywhere.


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Redefine the expectations for women in leadership roles with this #1 New York Times bestselling volume of inspiring advice by the former communications director for Barack Obama and Hillary Clinton. Framed as an empowering letter from former Hillary Clinton Communications Director Jennifer Palmieri to the first woman president, and by extension, to all women working to succ Redefine the expectations for women in leadership roles with this #1 New York Times bestselling volume of inspiring advice by the former communications director for Barack Obama and Hillary Clinton. Framed as an empowering letter from former Hillary Clinton Communications Director Jennifer Palmieri to the first woman president, and by extension, to all women working to succeed in any field, Dear Madam President is filled with forward-thinking, practical advice for all women who are determined to seize control of their lives-from boardroom to living room. As a country, we haven't wrapped our heads around what it should look like for a woman to be in the job of President. Our only models are men. While wildly disappointed by the outcome of the 2016 election, Palmieri argues that our feelings-confusion, love, hate, acceptance-can now open the country up to reimagining women in leadership roles. And that is what Palmieri takes on in this book-redefining expectations for women looking to lead and creating a blueprint for women candidates and leaders to follow. Dear Madam President will turn the results of the 2016 election into something incredibly empowering for graduates, future female leaders, and independent thinkers everywhere.

30 review for Dear Madam President: An Open Letter to the Women Who Will Run the World

  1. 4 out of 5

    Mayra

    I've thought over and over about the best way to describe this little book and one image of my childhood comes to mind: I am sunburned and my mom gently rubs cold Noxema on my back. Yes, that is precisely how reading this little book felt. Yes, this is an open letter for the women who will run the world, but it is also a heart-balm for those of us who were robbed of our hopes in the 2016 election. This is a quick read packed with emotion.

  2. 4 out of 5

    Matt

    The 2016 US Presidential Election is that indelible mark that will likely be commented upon far past the next such event. Historians are happy to watch the ‘players’ bandy their own theories about for the time being. Jennifer Palmieri, a senior member of the Clinton Campaign, pens this short piece in the guise of writing a letter to the future first female President of the United States. In fact, it is her own mini-memoir and soapbox statement about the campaign, the issues, and her involvement The 2016 US Presidential Election is that indelible mark that will likely be commented upon far past the next such event. Historians are happy to watch the ‘players’ bandy their own theories about for the time being. Jennifer Palmieri, a senior member of the Clinton Campaign, pens this short piece in the guise of writing a letter to the future first female President of the United States. In fact, it is her own mini-memoir and soapbox statement about the campaign, the issues, and her involvement in the political process. She explores how this fictitious first female POTUS will have to embrace her difference from all past holders of the office, rather than try to downplay it. She speaks of how said POTUS will have to rise above the fray and face verbal bullets along the way, as well as some of the poisonous attacks that Clinton took from the Trump fans. This elusive POTUS will also have to strive to be better and look back on what came before her, seeking to better the institution and the country, while staying true to herself and her family. Overall, Palmieri needed a place to vent her frustrations about being so close and so far from being able to pen this letter to her own boss after 2016. A decent account of personal stories and sentiments, though by now the entire process has been so over-examined that without something new to offer, the narrative blends in to all the other pieces that fill bookstore shelves. I will be the first to admit that I was not pleased with the end result of the 2016 US presidential election, for more reasons than one. However, I have read many of the books on the subject, from both academics and laypeople, campaign staffers and candidates, which has given me some detailed—and exhausted—insight into the process and the end result that November night. In the end, there are reasons that things turned out a certain way, some of which are being investigated at present. However, there seems to be only so much that can be said and so many ways to blame a fool. We must look forward to heal and while Palmieri wants to, she’s still wrapped up in some regurgitation that does little to move the discussion forward. Developing a book about an open letter to a future presidential election winner is good, though the true content of this piece is less about the uplifting newness of the process and a way to bitch about why Clinton could not hold that role. It’s ok, bitterness is likely still concentrated in the veins of the campaign workers, but they will need to shake some of it off and look to 2020, when there is a new chance to slay an old dragon. Palmieri has some interesting perspectives, having worked with some strong-willed characters in the realm of US politics. But, these are used as anecdotes to create a mini-memoir about her own life, rather than constructive ideas for a yet to be identified winner of a presidential election who will go where Clinton could not in 2016. May that woman be great and intelligent, as well as keen to govern, but may she also not sit around and kick the can about lost opportunities forever. Kudos, Madam Palmieri, for a decent insight into your life and experiences. A brief read, so the experience is not overly time consuming or troublesome. You communicated well with the time given to examine the subject matter. Love/hate the review? An ever-growing collection of others appears at: http://pecheyponderings.wordpress.com/ A Book for All Seasons, a different sort of Book Challenge: https://www.goodreads.com/group/show/...

  3. 5 out of 5

    Monica Kim: Reader in Emerald City

    Could it be that women are meant to go only so far in the world? No, that can’t be it. Women haven’t plateaued; it is the rules we were playing by that are outdated. — Jennifer Palmieri, Dear Madam President: An Open Letter to the Women Who Will Run the World . . Jennifer Palmieri’s “Dear Madam President: An Open Letter to the Women Who Will Run the World” is a must-read for all women and men, it’s inspiring, empowering, and optimistic. . "My book explained what happened and where we need to go from Could it be that women are meant to go only so far in the world? No, that can’t be it. Women haven’t plateaued; it is the rules we were playing by that are outdated. — Jennifer Palmieri, Dear Madam President: An Open Letter to the Women Who Will Run the World . . Jennifer Palmieri’s “Dear Madam President: An Open Letter to the Women Who Will Run the World” is a must-read for all women and men, it’s inspiring, empowering, and optimistic. . "My book explained what happened and where we need to go from here. Jennifer Palmieri picks up the ball and runs with it in this book. It's about being a woman, working for a woman, and telling the stories of the personal and professional ups and downs that all women need to hear as we chart our individual and collective futures."― Hillary Rodham Clinton . As the former Director of Communications for Hillary Clinton's 2016 presidential campaign, the White House Communications Director for President Barack Obama, and various other politicians, Palmieri has been in the frontline of politics of many years, not to mention, campaigning for what was probably the most gruesome & consequential presidential campaign in the history. This book is essentially an open letter to the women who will be our first women president, thank you letter to Hillary Clinton, and empowering letter to all women looking to leave their mark in the world. . Short, but powerful and well-written, Palmieri reflects back on campaigning for Hillary Clinton and her time & experience in politics, with some personal stories interwoven. I find her deep-reflection & analyses of double standard during Hillary Clinton presidential campaign very insightful & painfully honest. She believed until recently that women’s equality fight has be won & done, but after the election loss, she started to see almost everything about the public’s perception of Clinton through the gender factor. I just had goosebumps writing that, lol. Palmieri opens up about how it felt for her during the campaign, the unprecedented personal attacks against the candidate, and the loss on election night. Let’s be real, things were not easy for Hillary, whether you like her or not. I’ll never forgive James Comey, although that wasn’t the only deciding factor. But to be the most qualified presidential candidate in the history, and to lose to the least qualified reality show celebrity 🍊🤡, it’s one ridiculously painful loss. I hope that we learned our lesson, and we certainly cannot afford another disastrous outcome in 2020. . This isn’t a gossipy, “what-ifs” tell-all kind of a book, rather a book of forward-thinking framework inspirational & practical advice for all women. Palmieri advises a future generation of women to embrace their femininity as a political advantage in the face of a male-dominated field, but also in other life settings as well. As painful the loss was, Palmieri wraps it in a empowering & positive note and as a learning experience. I really like the different styles of books & writing coming from Obama & Clinton staffers. Everyone writes in their own voice, style, and personality, and it’s interesting to read how they each experienced their time in politics differently. She could’ve easily write a memoir-type of a book, but I thought this format was really creative & right way to deliver her story & core message. I am looking forward to reading many more books by the staffers on my TBR list. You know what I’d love to read, a memoir by Hillary’s aid, Huma Abedin! Oh boy, that would be a good one. 🤣 This book, at times painful, but overall, a wonderful, inspiring read. I’ve actually never heard Palmieri speak before, but her intelligence, experience, and personality were deeply felt. Highly recommend it!

  4. 5 out of 5

    Liz

    I liked this book, but I didn't love it. The author provided valuable information for future female leaders, and I will continue to support intelligent, progressive women who run for public office. However, the book's path was distracting when it went off topic by elaborating on the author's personal and family struggles as a paid consultant to Hillary. I would have preferred a clearer road map for young women seeking a career in politics.

  5. 5 out of 5

    Barbara

    Jennifer Palmieri was the director of communication for Hilary Clinton's 2016 presidential campaign. This book is a letter to any future woman president. It is also about the perils Clinton faced during the campaign as a woman persuing an office that tradition has reserved for men. Palmieri shares many insights that can help any woman seeking a leadership position. She is honest about the prejudices and biases a woman seeking power will face. She believes it is an "upsetting of the natural balan Jennifer Palmieri was the director of communication for Hilary Clinton's 2016 presidential campaign. This book is a letter to any future woman president. It is also about the perils Clinton faced during the campaign as a woman persuing an office that tradition has reserved for men. Palmieri shares many insights that can help any woman seeking a leadership position. She is honest about the prejudices and biases a woman seeking power will face. She believes it is an "upsetting of the natural balance to upend the patriarchy" that is at the root of the problem. Much of her advice is similar to that of Mary Beard in her book, Women and Power. "When it comes to pleasing the masses in a patriarchal society, women seeking power can't win playing by the old man-centric rules. This is why we should stop expecting to find ourselves reflected in our country's history and models of power, and write our own story." Palmieri believes we are hurting ourselves if, in the future we continue "to play a niche role in a workplace built for men". Jennifer Palmieri's message is powerful and hopeful. I am heartened by her words, but the 2016 election shattered my optimism. Perhaps a U.S. president will be a woman in the distant future, but in 2020? Only in my dreams.

  6. 4 out of 5

    Natali

    You'll understood pretty early on in this book that she needed to write this for her own sanity and mindset as much as for the rest of us. The author was one of the main employees of the 2016 Clinton campaign. This isn't really a postmortem of that campaign, although there is some of that. More, this is a mantra of how that campaign was just a page in what could be a much better novel for all of us, not just women. I think she is saying that she has wisdom to share and we all do and it is time f You'll understood pretty early on in this book that she needed to write this for her own sanity and mindset as much as for the rest of us. The author was one of the main employees of the 2016 Clinton campaign. This isn't really a postmortem of that campaign, although there is some of that. More, this is a mantra of how that campaign was just a page in what could be a much better novel for all of us, not just women. I think she is saying that she has wisdom to share and we all do and it is time for us to share for the collective good. I appreciate that she did this. I wish we would all have the gumption to share and inspire in the spirt of this book. And for those who will accuse her of whining about a Trump win, read the book. That isn't at all what this is. And if you are inclined to think so without reading the book, we probably shouldn't be GoodReads friends or any other social network for that matter.

  7. 4 out of 5

    Sarah

    This is a heartfelt book of advice from Jennifer Palmieri, Hillary Clinton's 2016 Director of Communications, as well a former Obama and Clinton White House staffer, to the woman out there who will eventually be our first female president--and really for any woman in the workplace or in the world. It's also a memoir of sorts, as Palmieri relates stories of her time as a woman in politics and the ways that gender impacted the Clinton campaign. Overall, a really lovely and hopeful piece about the This is a heartfelt book of advice from Jennifer Palmieri, Hillary Clinton's 2016 Director of Communications, as well a former Obama and Clinton White House staffer, to the woman out there who will eventually be our first female president--and really for any woman in the workplace or in the world. It's also a memoir of sorts, as Palmieri relates stories of her time as a woman in politics and the ways that gender impacted the Clinton campaign. Overall, a really lovely and hopeful piece about the heights women can and will reach. *Used for PopSugar 2018 Reading Challenge prompt "A book about feminism."

  8. 5 out of 5

    Charlotte Jones

    *Disclaimer: I received this book for free from NetGalley in exchange for an honest review. Despite this being a best selling non-fiction title, I had never heard of it before seeing it on NetGalley. Being someone who has only been learning about American politics since 2016, Jennifer Palmieri wasn't a name that was familiar to me. I have to say I was disappointed with this book unfortunately. I don't feel that the title, and especially the subtitle 'An Open Letter to the Women Who Will Run the Wo *Disclaimer: I received this book for free from NetGalley in exchange for an honest review. Despite this being a best selling non-fiction title, I had never heard of it before seeing it on NetGalley. Being someone who has only been learning about American politics since 2016, Jennifer Palmieri wasn't a name that was familiar to me. I have to say I was disappointed with this book unfortunately. I don't feel that the title, and especially the subtitle 'An Open Letter to the Women Who Will Run the World', is indicative of what the book actually is. Jennifer Palmieri runs through her own experiences as part of the Hillary Clinton campaign and expresses what she thinks happened during the presidential election. Only the very end of each chapter is really addressed to 'Madam President', a future female president. I felt that the book is sold as an uplifting letter to women who aim for greatness, but sadly this felt like Palmieri airing her shock and sadness at the outcome of the election. She even mentions Hillary's What Happened in this book and as harsh as it sounds, I think the author is covering much of the same ground as Hillary Clinton did in her previously published account. Unfortunately, I wouldn't really recommend this. Though I feel that the intentions were good, the execution was lacking and I feel that there are other books out there that would do the intended job better, uplifting women and inspiring them to enter politics.

  9. 4 out of 5

    Sarah Elizabeth

    This book is empowering and encouraging. It is thoughtful and interesting. It speaks to the ways we as a country, but especially as women, can learn from Hillary Clinton's presidential campaign, and uses those experiences to encourage and guide our future female president. one of my favorite lines says, "a woman can be both strong and emotional." To which I say AMEN! I highly recommend everyone read this short book. it will encourage and uplift you. I received a digital ARC of this book from the p This book is empowering and encouraging. It is thoughtful and interesting. It speaks to the ways we as a country, but especially as women, can learn from Hillary Clinton's presidential campaign, and uses those experiences to encourage and guide our future female president. one of my favorite lines says, "a woman can be both strong and emotional." To which I say AMEN! I highly recommend everyone read this short book. it will encourage and uplift you. I received a digital ARC of this book from the publisher and NetGalley in exchange for my review.

  10. 4 out of 5

    Gail

    It's been a hard week. Politics has me down in the dumps. But in wanting to share my review of Jennifer Palmieri's "Dear Madam President," I felt hopeful again re-reading this quote below from the book. It reminded me of how I optimistic I felt with almost every page of this slim little read—a book that's equal parts memoir about Palmieri's experiences working for Obama and HRC and a story of inspiring positive change. If this excerpt fires you up, then I recommend you give this one a read! "Wome It's been a hard week. Politics has me down in the dumps. But in wanting to share my review of Jennifer Palmieri's "Dear Madam President," I felt hopeful again re-reading this quote below from the book. It reminded me of how I optimistic I felt with almost every page of this slim little read—a book that's equal parts memoir about Palmieri's experiences working for Obama and HRC and a story of inspiring positive change. If this excerpt fires you up, then I recommend you give this one a read! "Women haven't plateaued; it is the rules we were playing that are outdated. We are learning to appreciate that with this [political] uncertainty comes an empowering new sense of possibility. I look around at all that women are doing in America today and I'm inspired. Women aren't just running for office in record numbers, they are winning in record numbers, too ... So you see, Madam President, having survived the unprecedented scene in the movie where the world exploded after all, we can now write our own happy ending. From now on, we will decide what is possible for us. This movie ends with women running the world."

  11. 4 out of 5

    Reese

    Great expectations, high hopes -- not good. I know that; but even in a pessimist like me, hope happens. I thought that Dear Madam President would be a little book with plenty of big revelations. It is a little book, but one that is not nearly as illuminating as I had imagined. Nevertheless, since Jennifer Palmieri does allow us to see Hillary Clinton during the 2016 campaign from the vantage point of an insider, I found her observations and assessments rather interesting. More satisfying, for me Great expectations, high hopes -- not good. I know that; but even in a pessimist like me, hope happens. I thought that Dear Madam President would be a little book with plenty of big revelations. It is a little book, but one that is not nearly as illuminating as I had imagined. Nevertheless, since Jennifer Palmieri does allow us to see Hillary Clinton during the 2016 campaign from the vantage point of an insider, I found her observations and assessments rather interesting. More satisfying, for me, was the unexpected attention paid to the late Elizabeth Edwards, with whom Palmieri became close friends when she worked as John Edwards' press secretary. That piece of the book might have allowed me to feel comfortable with a four-star rating for Dear Madam President, but somehow the book was published without having been carefully examined by someone who could easily have spotted and corrected the occasional grammatical errors. I was distracted by them. I'm guessing that Elizabeth Edwards, a perfectionist who left a doctoral program in English in order to go to law school, would have been bothered by them too. So, four stars? Nah.

  12. 4 out of 5

    LuCee

    I very rarely review anything. I'm content to read and give a star rating for my own use. It jogs my memory and allows me to go back and read again the books I truly enjoyed, and for whatever reason, connected with. This book, Dear Madam President, is different. And this 'review' is just me reminding myself why it got me to write a 'review' at all. Disclaimer - I'm not American, so this political climate in the United States is not personal for me. Don't get me wrong, I'm completely fascinated wi I very rarely review anything. I'm content to read and give a star rating for my own use. It jogs my memory and allows me to go back and read again the books I truly enjoyed, and for whatever reason, connected with. This book, Dear Madam President, is different. And this 'review' is just me reminding myself why it got me to write a 'review' at all. Disclaimer - I'm not American, so this political climate in the United States is not personal for me. Don't get me wrong, I'm completely fascinated with it. I keep thinking this is HISTORY happening right before my eyes. I assumed most people in this day and age were just too cynical, had access to vast troves of information and would never blindly follow anyone who promised they alone could fix it all. Well color me stupid, I thought we were all smarter than that. This book gives me hope - hope that maybe, just maybe, we are smarter than that. Dear Madam President is beautifully written, inspiringly so. Written as an open letter to some unkown person in the not to distant future (god willing), it's a reminder to every child, woman and man, that there is hope. That we are the hope.

  13. 5 out of 5

    Leena Dbouk

    Good book. I feel like the title is a little misleading. This is more of a semi-memoir of Palmieri's experience losing the 2016 election. Personally, I would have liked something a little more academic such as "We Should All be Feminists" which I found to be more thoughtful. This will appeal to many readers/voters/feminists though. Just know that it is more a look at the Clinton campaign's loss than a letter to future woman president.

  14. 5 out of 5

    Anna

    While this book has some really great quotes here and there that I think get her point across, it was a little all over the place and not exactly what I was expecting. I spent a lot more time listening to how she felt about the 2016 election and her personal ties to political leaders than I did feeling empowered as a woman, which is what I assumed was the purpose of this book.

  15. 5 out of 5

    Raven

    Absolutely Delusional. She lost. Get over it.

  16. 5 out of 5

    Shantel

    Not at all what I expected from the title. I thought it was suppose to be about empowering women. It was more about the ladies story about working with the Clinton campaign. I would only recommend if that's what you are looking for.

  17. 4 out of 5

    Begüm Saçak

    This book is one of its kind and that's why I liked it for the most part. Written for "female" presidents or leaders of the future, the book inspires women to pursue their dreams and explain potential hurdles along the way by drawing from the 2016 election campaign.

  18. 4 out of 5

    John Brinsley-pirie

    I love the insights from people who worked on campaigns that became pivotal political moments. The Clinton campaign has come under enormous scrutiny and, in at least some part, from influences that have incentives that are unhelpful to understand how things actually operated. Media portrayals of the campaign always appear to be tailored for some editorial view and political commentary is understandably loaded. This book, while clearly and obviously from a point of view that is not neutral, is glor I love the insights from people who worked on campaigns that became pivotal political moments. The Clinton campaign has come under enormous scrutiny and, in at least some part, from influences that have incentives that are unhelpful to understand how things actually operated. Media portrayals of the campaign always appear to be tailored for some editorial view and political commentary is understandably loaded. This book, while clearly and obviously from a point of view that is not neutral, is glorious in its openness to that. The author isn’t trying to make a case, rather she is articulating an appeal to the political instincts of the public and showing the reader the experience of being at the end of a divisive and mediatiaed campaign. The emotional burden of the event is clear and the presentation of it is moving and compelling.

  19. 4 out of 5

    Corinne

    I didn't read What Happened By HRC because I didn't want to get depressed and angry for that many pages. This book was the perfect size for me. I enjoyed reading about how Hillary was so concerned throughout the election but l also liked when the author talked about how inclusive President Obama was to women. I also loved her reminiscing about Elizabeth Edwards. I had forgotten how much I admired this woman. She was such a strong force and inspiration to me. So thank you, Jennifer Palmieri, for I didn't read What Happened By HRC because I didn't want to get depressed and angry for that many pages. This book was the perfect size for me. I enjoyed reading about how Hillary was so concerned throughout the election but l also liked when the author talked about how inclusive President Obama was to women. I also loved her reminiscing about Elizabeth Edwards. I had forgotten how much I admired this woman. She was such a strong force and inspiration to me. So thank you, Jennifer Palmieri, for allowing me to become hopeful and excited for the first woman president.

  20. 4 out of 5

    Valerie

    The reason I rate it for three stars is the title. The title suggest that there will be motivating words to hear to any woman wanting to be inspired and create change, but there’s only about 10-20 pages worth of that. The rest are stories from political events that have happened in Palmieri’s life. I enjoyed hearing her perspective, but the title didn’t prepare me for such.

  21. 5 out of 5

    Emily

    I was trying to get more into political nonfiction and this was a good gateway read!

  22. 5 out of 5

    Adrienne

    Empowering book for women in general not just in politics!

  23. 4 out of 5

    Meagan McDougall

    This was just what I needed today. A quick love letter full it hope, experience and excitement for the women who will and are leading our world.

  24. 4 out of 5

    Juliana Philippa

    When it comes to pleasing the masses in a patriarchal society, women seeking power can’t win playing by the old man-centric rules. This is why we should stop expecting to find ourselves reflected in our country’s history and models of power, and write our own story. How to describe this little book? It is, as the title states, an open letter to the first female president of the United States of America, whomever she should be. It is also a kind of processing of the 2016 election for those of When it comes to pleasing the masses in a patriarchal society, women seeking power can’t win playing by the old man-centric rules. This is why we should stop expecting to find ourselves reflected in our country’s history and models of power, and write our own story. How to describe this little book? It is, as the title states, an open letter to the first female president of the United States of America, whomever she should be. It is also a kind of processing of the 2016 election for those of us on the Clinton side who were dumbfounded and confused by the win (I'll leave alone whether the other side was as well). And it is a look at women as leaders, and women and power, in today's world; at the innumerable differences that exist between how a man is treated in certain situations, and how a woman is treated in those exact same situations. It's a reminder that the reckoning isn't over, and the dynamics and issues that we saw come alive in the 2016 election are still very much with us today, and just as unsettled. The book is organized into chapters based on different "advice" or "messages" Palmieri wants to give to the first female president of the U.S., and interspersed throughout are her own personal memories, accounts of how this tied into the race and the election, how it tied to Hillary Clinton specifically, and how it relates to all women. It is well pulled together and reads very smoothly; one might think it could seem schizophrenic, jumping all over the place, but you're following a woven thread throughout and it all makes sense as you go. There were several quotable passages, as my numerous status updates will attest to. I will paste some of my favorite below. Bottom line: a lovely read that I would recommend. This election is still so raw and everyday I am still confounded by how that man was elected president, how he continues to garner support, and how spineless people can be ... but before I go on a rant, all this to say that there were several moments when reading this that I started to tear up. This was an emotional election and I remember feeling so betrayed by my country when the election was over; I felt like I lived in a place that I no longer recognized and that had shown the worst of itself, instead of the best. Palmieri has a very interesting passage towards the end where she says that that feeling must be similar to the feeling of those who, in places of sorrow and discontent, voted for Trump (she's not belittling them; if it comes off that way, that's my error in phrasing, not Palmieri's). I felt that at the end of Election Day, and still feel it often as every new day passes and the spectacle (such an inadequate word) continues. This helped remind me that there will be another election though—and another one after that, and another one after that, etc. This is not the end of the story of women running for the highest office in the land (/world), it is only the beginning, and I have no doubt that during my lifetime, I will see the first female president of the United States of America elected.The future is female. The past was, too. It’s just that no one thought it was important enough to bother writing it all down. ——— But whatever a woman’s story might be, it’s hard for her to tell it when her voice isn’t heard. It is also hard for her story to be told when people are too busy disliking the sound of her voice to listen to what she is saying. ——— Predictably, there were a lot of people who lamented that “if only we could have seen this Hillary during the campaign , things would have turned out different.” That’s all bullshit. She was always the same person. We are the ones who perceive her differently in different situations.*This review is of an ARC provided by NetGalley and the publisher in exchange for an honest review. Some changes and/or edits may be made to the final published version.

  25. 4 out of 5

    Pearl

    Recovering from the devastating loss of the Hillary Clinton Presidential Campaign, of which she was Communications Director, Jennifer Palmieri has written a short book in the form of a letter that looks forward to the day when a woman will win the Presidency, and more women will be elected to political office. To the day when they will run the world. And she has some advice for them. It’s not a profound book, full of political theory or political issues and platforms; nor is it a bitter book, bla Recovering from the devastating loss of the Hillary Clinton Presidential Campaign, of which she was Communications Director, Jennifer Palmieri has written a short book in the form of a letter that looks forward to the day when a woman will win the Presidency, and more women will be elected to political office. To the day when they will run the world. And she has some advice for them. It’s not a profound book, full of political theory or political issues and platforms; nor is it a bitter book, blaming everyone but the campaign itself for their loss. Not that she doesn’t cast blame. Just that it’s more sorrowful and regretful than bitter. It’s a fairly personal story of loss, weaving her experiences and the lessons learned from the campaign with the loss of her sister who was in the final stages of Alzheimer’s and succumbed to it soon after the election. She writes that the biggest lesson she learned from the campaign was about gender bias. When she joined Hillary’s campaign, she didn’t think that gender would be a big barrier to getting her elected President of the United States. After all Obama, as an African American, had broken through the race barrier and gotten elected. Surely a woman could too. Her take-away: As far as seeing someone attain power in America, gender is a bigger barrier than race.* But her book, as the title suggests, is premised on the belief that women will break through this barrier, the glass ceiling, if you will. So she writes a letter to these future female leaders to give them the benefit of what she’s learned. A lot of the advice, I have to say, is pretty generic; but I can see how it could be helpful to first time candidates and even serve as a useful reminder to seasoned candidates facing tough elections. Most of her advice can be summed up under the dictum of be yourself as a woman; don’t think you have to run as a man would run. She writes telling of Clinton’s concession speech. So many people responded by saying “where was this Hillary during the campaign.” Palmieri’s response is that she was always there. This was the same Hillary. The difference is that this was a concession speech. That’s how people are conditioned to see women – gracious and conceding. Not ambitious. They can accept that image. In the same vein she writes, “We think a woman shines brightest when she is selflessly putting others' interests above her own. It’s more flattering than seeking her own spotlight.” So to overcome these biased baked into our culture, Palmieri says women must learn to exert their power in their own way. She says that she had always thought she could do a job just as well as any man could. But only recently she has realized that she doesn’t want to. “I want to do the job the best way I can do it, not the way he would.” And she advises women to project their own power. “People will take their cue from you. That’s it. If you act like you belong in the room, people will believe you do. If you act like your opinion matters, others will too.” Her advice to women who think they have to hide their emotions: “Let’s nod less and cry more.” Palmieri weaves her advice with many examples from the Clinton campaign and tells some interesting anecdotes from the campaign. About Hillary herself, of course, (she’s a fan), and about Huma Abedin, and about Elizabeth Edward, a close friend. (She also worked on a John Edwards campaign.) Personally, I would have liked more of these stories. The book is short and is a very quick read. I’m not suggesting it needed filling out. Just that more stories about the very intelligent women she has worked for and with would have been interesting and would not have made the book overly long. I didn’t think this was a great book, but for what it sets out to be, it was good enough. It’s witty and well written and pretty honest. *Perhaps she should have remembered that the 15th Amendment passed fifty years before the 19th Amendment.

  26. 5 out of 5

    Sara

    No matter your politics, the advice given to any woman who seeks to be in a leadership position is well thought out and truly inspiring.

  27. 5 out of 5

    Evie

    Dear Madam President by Jennifer Palmieri isn't the kind of book many think it is. Like it says in its title, it is an open letter to the women who will run the world. It calls out the rules women have to play by and things women have accepted (but no more) because we live and work in a man's world. It talks about how society doesn't blink at certain things a man does, but how women are frowned upon shall they dare do something society thinks it's not fit or proper for a woman. Read the full rev Dear Madam President by Jennifer Palmieri isn't the kind of book many think it is. Like it says in its title, it is an open letter to the women who will run the world. It calls out the rules women have to play by and things women have accepted (but no more) because we live and work in a man's world. It talks about how society doesn't blink at certain things a man does, but how women are frowned upon shall they dare do something society thinks it's not fit or proper for a woman. Read the full review at A Quaintrelle In The City

  28. 5 out of 5

    LemonLinda

    Written as a letter of advice and encouragement to our future first female president, this is also a letter of consolement and hope both for herself as communication director for the HRC 2016 campaign and for those of us who still are somewhat stunned that "that man" won the election whether we were Democrats, Republicans, former BUT now reformed Republicans, or now confirmed Independents or Unaffiliated because we refuse to be in the same party with those of this administration. In writing this Written as a letter of advice and encouragement to our future first female president, this is also a letter of consolement and hope both for herself as communication director for the HRC 2016 campaign and for those of us who still are somewhat stunned that "that man" won the election whether we were Democrats, Republicans, former BUT now reformed Republicans, or now confirmed Independents or Unaffiliated because we refuse to be in the same party with those of this administration. In writing this, it also becomes advice and encouragement for any female who wants to look beyond the traditional and the ordinary be it in politics or anywhere else because she believe more women in the mix can only improve things at any level. To paraphase - she believes emotion should be seen as a positive, that women should tell their own story rather than trying to find their niche in "his story", and that they should look to their male colleagues as partners rather than masters. These are only a few of the many sound bits and pieces of advice. She ends by saying "women before us ... made countless ... sacrifices in the struggle for real change. It is up to us - the women in America today - to finish the job. .... Go show us what a woman leading us in this new world looks like."

  29. 5 out of 5

    Karina Paramitha

    I stopped reading on page 50-ish. It shows too much admiration towards Hillary, that it feels almost like love letters from someone blinded by mere love. Not to oppose Hillary nor the author, this is not my favorite book.

  30. 4 out of 5

    Ellyn Lem

    Somewhat inspiring book by the person who was Hillary Clinton's Communication Director for the campaign. . . .I think I liked the title the best--just being reminded that one day women will run the world. Perhaps I would have liked the book even better if I could figure out the intent. It was written as a letter to the future "Madam President," but only the ends of chapters seem to reference that angle. The rest is a collection of anecdotes about the campaign and the Hillary Clinton she got to k Somewhat inspiring book by the person who was Hillary Clinton's Communication Director for the campaign. . . .I think I liked the title the best--just being reminded that one day women will run the world. Perhaps I would have liked the book even better if I could figure out the intent. It was written as a letter to the future "Madam President," but only the ends of chapters seem to reference that angle. The rest is a collection of anecdotes about the campaign and the Hillary Clinton she got to know (among other famous political women like Elizabeth Edwards) with a few Obama anecdotes thrown in there since she worked in his administration as well. Besides that component of the book, there is a side story about her sister's experience with early Alzheimer's and a good deal of advice sharing (e.g., it is ok to cry), which did not seem too strikingly original. I took more from "Lean In" and books by Joan Williams on women's leadership. Still, I go back to that title, which made me happy just looking at the book sitting in my car. One day. . . I hope in the not so distant future.

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